• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Cover
 Introduction
 Concepts, definitions and structure...
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 Part I: Foreign trade of Haiti,...
 Part II: Statistical data relating...
 Bibliography






Foreign Trade of Haiti, 1945-50, Douglas H. Parks, xv+153p,
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Title: Foreign Trade of Haiti, 1945-50, Douglas H. Parks, xv+153p,
Physical Description: Archival
Publisher: Wash., Pan Am. Union, Div. of Stats., 1954
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Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Introduction
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Concepts, definitions and structure of study
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
    Table of Contents
        Page xi
        Page xii
    List of Tables
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
    Part I: Foreign trade of Haiti, 1945-1950
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
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    Part II: Statistical data relating to the foreign trade of Haiti, 1945-1950
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    Bibliography
        Page 152
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Full Text






















This copy of a rare volume in its collections,
digitized on-site under the
LLMC Extern-Scanner Program,
is made available courtesy of the

Saint Louis University Law Library






INTERNATIONAL TRA I


OF THE AMERICAN STAT



Bulletin No. 1


* September 1954


- -...-...~F-i *.---.------ -~n~


PA N.A M E R I C A NU N I O N *


W A S H I N GTO N, D. C.


FOREIGN TRADE OF HAITI 1945-1950


1944- 1945- 1946- 1947- 1948- 1949-
1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


40



30





20








10


- r











//


EXPORTS
IMPORTS


40



30




20








10







FAM AMERrCAM4 U3loM-. OFFICE OF ST 7T-TIc5


ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES


Inter-American Economic and Social Council




INTERNATIONAL TRADE OF THE AMERICAN STATES


Bulletin No. 1 August 1954


Foreign Trade of Haiti, 1945-1950


Department of Economic and Social Affairs
Division of Statistics
Pan American Union
Washington, D.C. c0 is95


e312
ccf3~







INTRODUCTION


Throughout the history of the Pan American Union, as well as that of its
predecessor, the Commercial Bureau of the American Republics, making available
to its member states factual information on their international trade has al-
ways been a major point in the service of the organization to the American
community, For more than three decades this service was accomplished through
the medium of statistical reports published under the title of the Foreign
Trade Series. In 1952 the Inter-American Economic and Social Council., sensing
the need for a more systematic approach to the treatment of international trade
statistics, instructed the Pan American Union, as its Secretariat, to under-
take the task of statistical reclassification of tle trade of the American
states into the framework of the Standard International Trade Classification,
commonly referred to as the SITC for the period 1945 to 1950.

This report on the foreign trade of Haiti initiates the publication of a
series of studies developed in conformity with this new approach. Using the
SITC as the pattern into which the trade statistics of these states are to be
recast is in keeping with the traditional interests of the Pan American Union
in international trade and marks another step in its desire to promote inter-
national understanding, good-will and peace through commercial intercourse.

That the present work of the Pan American Union in international trade
statistics is almost purely historical in nature does not fully describe its
intent which is to fill what may soon develop into a serious.statistical void
in the Data on the international trade of the American States, as well as to
provide officials of national governments and international organizations,
and other interested persons with a group of studies based on systematically
developed, internally consistent facts relating to the trade of these coun-
tries in the immediate post-war years. It is also intended that this work
will provide the basis for continuing research on significant aspects of the
commodity composition of international trade.

A brief observation on the manner in which the technical staff of the
Pan American Union has performed its task may serve to indicate the nature of
the preliminary work which had to be accomplished before any statistical group-
ings as such could be undertaken,

The primary problem to be resolved was that of establishing the precise
relationship between items in national classifications and those of the SITC
through the development of "conversion keys", As only a few countries in
the Western Hemisphere were engaged at the time in the task of determining
these relationships, more than thirty conversion keys, averaging better than
1,000 items each, were constructed by the technical staff of the Pan American
Union, using as the classification guide the Manual de Codificaci6n para la
aplicaci6n de la Clasificaci6n Uniforme para el Comercio Internacional'devel-
oped by the Inter American Statistical Institute, It was in this highly
technical area of commodity classification that the Inter American Statistical
Institute made its contribution to the international trade program of the
Pan American Union,









A crucial problem faced at this stage was that of fitting national items
into the SITC at the lowest level of significant detail, namely, at the SITC
item level. In some instances this could be accomplished with more than a
fair degree of precision, but in other instances, due to the insufficient
commodity description encountered in many of the national listings, it was
impossible to effectively allocate a national item to a single SITC item. It
was found, however, that, aside from a few isolated instances, a more workable
relationship could be established in terms of SITC groups, and that sufficient
detail would thus be provided for most analytical purposes. In those few
instances in which the relationship between national items and SITC groups
could not be conclusively ascertained, decisions of a somewhat arbitrary na-
ture were rendered. Their effects, however, on the statistical accuracy of
the work are negligible.

The precise classification of imports of soups, for example, by Panama
in 1945 and 1946 is impossible in terms of SITC groups, as they must be clas-
sified with either "meat canned and meat preparations, canned and not canned"
(group 013) or with "vegetables preserved and vegetable preparations" (group
055). The insufficiency of the blanket designation "soups" for allocation
to the SITC is obvious. The decision to place soups thus broadly described
in the 055 group was made on the assumption that the value of the meat inclu=
ded in meat soups was, in all probability, the lesser of the values involved
and that purely meat soups, without vegetables, rice or other elements, were
on the whole relatively slight. That such a decision has a bearing on the
internal comparability of the data is undeniable, but any other decision was
unworkable from the point of view of the application of the SITCo Fortunately,
however, such instances were rare

The solutions achieved in the area of commodity classification were but
one aspect of the general problem faced in work of this magnitude. As each
country employs a commodity classification system designed to meet its own
needs, so each country compiles its statistics according to concepts which it
feels most adequately present the facts. It was therefore necessary to exam-
ine the trade returns of each country to determine the concepts employed in
their preparation in order to minimize as much as possible statistical dis-
crepancies resulting from conceptual differences. Specifically, these prob-
lems were concerned with matters such ass whether the statistics reflected the
concepts of special or general trade and what adjustments, if any, could be
applied to make the data among countries comparable whether imports were
valued on fob. or coiof, basis; or whether the imports by countries were
stated in terms of country of origin or country of purchase, and whether the
exports by countries indicated the country of ultimate consignment or simply
country of destination without reference to consignment.

For example, the import trade statistics of Guatemala are generally
compiled on fo.b. basis at the commodity level but are c.i.f. in terms of
country distribution. In neither case is there available to the international
trade statistician a technique by which, say, the compiled commodity statis-
tics can be converted to c.iof, at each level of commodity detail. Although
an estimated average insurance and freight adjustment factor is applied to the


IV -









foob. value of the commodity statistics in the aggregate, iu cannot be applied
u,o the details. By the same token, the country of origin statistics cannot be
coc.xerted to ai .o.b. basis.

On the export cide, the question of the treatmenr of -reexports assumes a
prominent pla.e. One of the cardinal merits in the study of international
trade is the ability to state in more or less precise terms what are the
domestically-produced exportable goods of a country and to be able to relate
that information to the economic structure of thd country. The inclusion of
reexpors obviously introduces discrepancies and, under certE.in conditions,
may lead to erroneous conclusions, not only with regard to.the nature of the
export trade of a given country but also with respect to the nature of its
economic activity.

The classical example in the Western Hamisphere is Panama. At times the
val]u( of her reexports have exceeded the value of nationally-produced exports,
and, if included in the export statistics, would result in a totally different
picture than is warranted by the facts as disclosed by a study of the trade in
more restricted terms. This situation on the export side has its counterpart
in the impor. statistics in that accurate an statistical description of Panama's
imports for .:unsumption is not obtainable froi the trade returns. Under the
present methods by which Panama's import statistics sre compiled, it is impos-
sible to determine with practical exactitude thcse imports which are destined
for internal consumption and those destined for reexport. At certain levels
of :ommod'ty detail the overstatement of imports m.y be cubscantial, and may
thus seriously impair Lhe comparability of the data in a comparison of her
trade with that .f her neighbors.

That these are technical points of interest and challenge bo international
trade statisticians is obvious. Aside from specialists in national govern-
mental agencies and in international organizations, their existence may mean
little to other users of international trade statistics. While such statis-
tics are compiled primarily for the convenience of governmental agencies,
thair use is not restricted exclusively to the specialists in governmental
agencies and international organizations. They are closely scrutinized by
businessmen, private professional investigators and students, all of whom will
form conclusions on the basis of the data as presented. Regardless, however,
of who uses the trade statistics, it is mandatory that the statistician make
crystal clear the precise nature of the data with which he is dealing and that
if adjustments have been made or can be made in the data, the applicable tech-
niques should be clearly stated and illustrated.

This study on the foreign trade of Haiti was prepared by Douglas H. Parks,
Program Specialist in International Trade Statistics, Division of Statistics,
Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Pan American Union.









CONCEPTS, DEFINITIONS AND STRUCTURE OF STUDY


1. National Classification System

The classification form used by the Fiscal Department of the Banque
National de la Republique d'Haiti for the statistical presentation of the
foreign trade of Haiti may best be described as an alphabetical listing of
commodities in which the principles of commodity classification have been
applied on a limited scale. The application of classification principles
is not complete, as indicated by an examination of the export and import
schedules in Appendixes D-1 and D-3.

2o Commodity Composition of the Trade

During the course of the six-year period covered by this report the
number of national items appearing in the export schedule ranged between 94
and 112 annually, with 150 representing the maximum number of items in which
transactions took place, On the import side the range in the number of items
was somewhat more limited, running between 135 and 141 annually, with the
latter being the maximum number of items involving an import transaction,

On the basis of this evidence there emerge two conclusions: The first
is that the commodity structure of the import trade possesses a greater
degree of stability than does the export trade, and the second is that the
commodity composition of Haiti's foreign trade rests on a very narrow base,
thus making it relatively vulnerable to external economic conditions, partic-
ularly in the case of exports.

3o Trade System

The trade system employed in compiling the trade returns of Haiti is the
general system. There is no indication regarding the handling of reexports
other than the statistical fact that they are not included in the total value
of exports or in exports by country as reported by the Fiscal Department, but
in the export commodity schedule they are collectively gathered together
under the heading "reexports" in 1945-46 and subsequent years. These reex-
ports have been excluded from the statistical tables contained in this study
The value of reexports during these years amounted to $271,000 in 1945-46,
$638,000 in 1946-47, $286,000 in 1947-48, $425,000 in 1948-49 and $1,487,000
in 1949-50.

As there is no indication of how imports are handled statistically and
as there is nothing in the import schedule which might be construed to be an
import other than for consumption it is possible that imports may be over-
stated by an unspecified amount, It has been tacitly assumed that the import
statistics relate to consumption,


- vi -









4. Valuation

Exports are f.o.b. Haitian ports or frontier and include export duties;
imports are declared values, c.i.f. port of importation. l/

5. Exchange Rates

As determined by law, the gourde is equal to $0.20.

6. Destination and Origin of Trade

The statistics relating to exports by country are on country of destination
basis which however, does not, necessarily mean country of ultimate consignment
in every case. The import statistics by country are on country of origin basis,
although there is sufficient evidence in various categories of imports to
support the supposition that the basis of the statistics may be country of
purchase rather than of origin.

7. Other Definitions

The term significant, usedthroughout this study with reference to commod-
ities and countries, is somewhat broad in its meaning. On the one hand, it
possesses the connotation associated with "principal" or "primary", and, on
the other, its usage denotes a relative rather than an absolute state or con-
dition. In this latter sense, the position of the commodity or country is
determined by its relationship to other commodities or countries, or by the
direction or trend of the commodity or country in the trade of Haiti, or by
the bearing a particular commodity or group of commodities may have econom-
ically on the country.

The meanings associated with the term "significant" may be amplified by
the following examples:

a) Argentina does not rank among the principal countries of origin
in the import trade, her position is largely determined as a
supplier of two commodities. Until 1946-47 she ranked second
after the United States as a source of dairy products, but in
subsequent years her position has declined both in the absolute
and relative sense as imports from other countries, principally
Denmark, increased. A similar situation prevailed in imports of
perfumery, cosmetics and related products originating in Argentina.

b) The growth in imports of fish and fish preparations are signif-
icant not only because of the rate of growth but also because of
the broader implications indicating an improvement in dietary
standards.



_/ United States Tariff Commission. The Foreign Trade of Latin America,
Pt. II, vol. 2. p. 303.


- vii -









c) The exports of handicraft articles such as mahogany ware,
handbags and footwear, undoubtedly afford a livelihood for
a substantial segment of the population. Their declining
position in the export trade should therefore be regarded
with some concern, unless however that condition is being
offset by tourist purchases,

The term selected, like that of significant, possesses a breadth of
meaning, as the criteria for inclusion or exclusion of a commodity or
country in a statistical table or listing vary greatly. A country may be
included in a list of selected countries by virtue of the absolute magni-
tude of its trade; it may also be included on the grounds that it is the
only country in the area with whom trade relations exist, regardless of the
magnitudes involved. The selection may have been based on the trend in the
trade between Haiti and another country, or may have stemmed from a proba-
bility based upon conditions within the trading partner. The selection of
commodities may follow a similar pattern.

In practice, the selection of commodities and countries was based on
the following considerations

a) Magnitude of the trade involved;

b) Trend in the trade; and

c) Probable effects of internal economic conditions either within
the trading partner of Haiti.

8. Structure of Study

This study consists of three parts, of which the second is the most
significant as it provides a complete statistical description of the charac-
ter of the export and import trade to the divisional level of commodity
detail, as well as forming the foundation on which the commentary rests, At
the group level the statistics reflect only the trade in those commodities
deemed significant in Haiti's trade pattern.

The first part of this study is a brief commentary touching on salient
aspects of the foreign trade of Haiti, first, on the broad plane of general
characteristics of her foreign trade in which the emphasis is on those ele-
ments which do not readily lend themselves to quantitative presentation. Such
elements appear to emerge only after a mass of factual data is processed into
such pattern or patterns as will enhance the utility of such data, Secondly,
the commodity structure and geographical orientation of the export trade is
developed first in broad terms and then in detail by specific commodity groups
and, in some instances, items. Some consideration has been given at these
lower levels of commodity details to price movements, to the country of desti-
nation pattern, and to the presence of persistent problems which may at times
exert a pronounced influence on the trade in a particular item or group of
items.


v iii -









While the Institut Haitien de Statistique has developed an index of export
prices, it was not used in this study and a separate index was constructed for
inclusion in the discussion relating to export prices. The primary reason was
to have an export price index compatible with the SITC, which could not be
accomplished with the index developed by the Institut Haitien de Statistique.

Whereas the discussions relating to the structure of the export trade were
developed primarily along the lines of commodity groups, those pertaining to
imports were pursued at the level of commodity divisions with appropriate refer-
ences to group composition. The commodity diversification was the basic reason
for following this line of procedure in the comments on the import trade. The
multiplicity of commodities covered by some of the national descriptions, for
example, "Agricultural Machinery Tools and Implements" and "Machinery and Appa-
ratus", maked it mandatory that the highest possible level of commodity detail
consonant with acceptable analytical requirements be utilized and that the next
lower level of detail be used as amplification.

The structure of the foreign trade of Haiti is comprehensively treated in
15 tables comprising Appendixes A and B of the second part of this study. The
purely commodity characteristics of exports and imports arranged according to
sections, divisions and groups of the SITC are shown in Tables I, II, and III
of Appendix A and in Tables VIII, IX, X and XI of Appendix B. The data relat-
ing to exports have been amplified by indicating in Table IV the destination
on a selected country basis of significant commodity groups, and in Table V
the direction of these groups in terms of broad geographical areas. The treat-
ment of the country distribution of imports, shown in Tables XII and XIII, was
restricted to the divisional level of SITC detail. Completing the statistical
description are 4 tables showing the country-wise distribution of exports, and
imports.

It is contemplated that the statistical material contained in Part II of
this study will be brought up-to-date by a supplementary bulletin wholly sta-
tistical in nature.

The central point of significance in these tables lies in the develop-
ment of a body of statistical facts relating to foreign trade on a uniform,
internally consistent basis. In other words, through the intensive examina-
tion in to the structure of the trade of each country of the Western Hemi-
sphere and the statistical reclassification of the trade of each country along
the lines indicated in this study of Haiti, it is felt that an important step
in the direction of improving the comparability of international trade sta-
tistics is being taken. This step, however, is being made possible only
through the previous accomplishments in the area of statistical methodology.

The achievement of a greater degree of international comparability in
the field of international trade statistics will ultimately provide the
technical specialists and other persons interested in this field with sta-
tistical tools of greatly enhanced usefulness.


- ix -








A derived series indicating the movement of export prices is shown in
Table XVI of Appendix C.

The country schedule employed in this study to describe the geographical
distribution of exports and imports is the United States Schedule C, "Classi-
fication of Country Designation used in Compiling the United States Foreign
Trade Statistics", appropriately modified to fit the international character
of this study.

Part III is devoted entirely to commodity schedules indicating, on the
one hand, the manner of presentation used by the national compiling office,
and, on the other, the national contents of SITC groups. The schedules as
contained in Appendix D are the "conversion" keys mentioned in the Introduc-
tion, and represent the basic point of reference for the statistical reclassi-
fication comprising the second part of the study. Technically speaking, these
keys are valid only for the six-year period 1945-1950. However, they may be
applied for a number of years prior to 1944-45 and subsequent to 1949-50 with
reasonable assurance of obtaining statistical descriptions comparable to those
contain in Part II. As a word of caution, careful scrutiny of national commod-
ity descriptions should be made in each case in order to avoid internal incon-
sistencies in the statistical data. The United Nations "Commodity Indexes for
the Standard International Trade Classification. (Preliminary Issues) (Sta-
tistical Papers. Series M, No. 10, Index Edition, April 1953) should be
consulted for classification guidance on doubtful points.









TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION ............................................... ...... ... iii

CONCEPTS, DEFINITIONS AND STRUCTURE OF STUDY ............................ vi

PART I

FOREIGN TRADE OF HAITI, 1945-1950

1. General Characteristics of the Foreign Trade of Haiti ................ 3

2. Export Trade ......................... ....................... .. ...... 5

A. General Nature of the Export Trade ............................ 5
B. Exports by SITC Commodity Sections ............................ 9
C, Exports by Significant Commodities ............................ 10

(1) Coffee ..................................... o ........ 10
(2) Sisal ....................................... ...... 16
(3) Sugar ......................................... ........... 17
(4) Bananas ....... ................... .. ................ ... 20
(5) Cotton .................................................. 20
(6) Cocoa ........................................ .. a21
(7) Essential Oils ......... ............................. 22

D. Exports by Other SITC Commodity Section ........................ 23
E. Export Prices ............................................... 25

3. Import Trade ............................ .......... ............... 29

A. General Nature of the Import Trade ........................... 29
B. Imports by Significant Commodities ........................... 35

(1) Textile Yarn, Fabrics, Made-up Articles and Related
Products ......................... ........... ...... .. 35
(2) Cereals and Cereal Preparations ............................ 37
(3) Machinery and Transport Equipment ..................... 37
(4) Base Metals ...................................... 39
(5) Chemicals .............................. o .. ........... 39
(6) Mineral Fuels, Lubricants and Related Products .......... 40

PART II

STATISTICAL DATA RELATING TO THE FOREIGN TRADE OF HAITI, 1945-1950

Appendix A

Statistical Data Relating to the Export Trade of Haiti


- xi -








Table I Exports of Merchandise by Sections of the SITC, 1945-1950.....
Table II Exports of Merchandise by Sections and Divisions of the
SITC, 1945-1950 ... ..... ...... ..... .. .. .......... .........
Table III Exports of Significant Commodity Groups, 1945-1950 ...........
Table IV Exports of Significant Commodity Groups by Selected
Countries, 1945-1950 ................. ....................
Table V Geographical Distribution of Exports by Significant
Commodity Grouns, 1945-1950 ...............................
Table VI Geographical Destination, of Exports, 1945-1950 ..............
Table VII Distribution of exports by Country, 1945-1950 ................

Appendix B

Statistical Data Relating to the Import Trade of Haiti


Table VIII
Table IX

Table X

Table XI
Table XII

Table XIII

Table XIV
Table XV


Imports of Merchandise by Sections of the SITC, 1945-1950 ....
Imports of Merchandise by Sections and Divisions of the
SITC, 1945-1950 ........,................ .................
Imports by Significant Divisions and Selected Groups of
Commodities, 1945-1950 ....................................
Imports of Significant Groups of Commodities, 1945-1950 .....
Imports of Significant Commodity Divisions by Geographical
Origin, 1945-1950 .......................... ...........
Imports by Selected Countries of Origin by Significant
Commodity Division,. 1945-1950 ..........................
Geographical Origins of Imports, 1945-1950 ................
Distribution of Imports by Country, 1945-1950 ................


103
114
116


Appendix C

Export Prices


Index of Export Prices, 1945-1950 ............................


123


PART III


Export and Import Schedules

Appendix D


D-1 Export Schedule of Haiti in Order of National Items Coded to SITC
Groups, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ........................................
D-2 Export Schedule of Haiti: SITC Groups by National Items
1944-45 to-1949-50 ..... ............................................
D-3 Import Schedule of Haiti in Order of National Items Coded to SITC
Groups, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ................. ...............
D-4 Import Schedule of Haiti: SITC Groups by National Items
1944-45 to 1949-50 ...................... ..........................

BIBLIOGRAPHY ... ...... .................., .. .......... .......... .... ....


127

130

137

143

152


- xii -


Table XVI







LIST OF ri;.LS


Table 1 Relative Value of Coffee, Vegetable Fibers other than Cotton
and Jute, Sugar and Fresh Fruits and Nuts in the Export
Trade of Haiti, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ......... 5

Table 2 Value of Exports by Principal Countries, in Selected Years,
1920-21 to 1949-50 ............... .. o. ........... ..........oo 7

Table 3 Relative Value of Exports by Important Geographical Areas, in
Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 .... .................. 8

Table 4 Destination of Selected Exports, 1949-50 ...................... 8

Table 5 Relative Value of Exports by Sections of the SITC, in Selected
Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 .. ........ ...................... 9

Table 6 Value of Exports by Significant Commodity Divisions as Percent
of SITC Sections and Total Exports, in Selected Years,
1944-45 to 1949-50 ............................................ 11

Table 7 Quantity, Value and Price of Coffee Exports, 1944-45 to 1949-50 o 13

Table 8 Average Yearly New York Spot Price for Haitian Good Washed Coffee
showing the High, Low and Range of Prices, 1946-1950 .......... 15

Table 9 Quantity of Coffee Exported by Haiti to the United States and
Europe, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ............... 15

Table 10 Quantity and Value of Exports of Sisal by Principal Countries
of Destination, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ....... 17

Table 11 Composition of Sugar Exports, in Selected Years,
1944-45 to 1949-50 ..... o...... .... .... .......... ............ 18

Table 12 Destination of Raw Sugar Exports, in Selected Years, 1944-45
to 1949-50 O................................................... 19

Table 13 Average F.O.B. Contract Price Paid by United Kingdom Ministry
of Food for Raw Sugar, 1945 to 1950 .......................... 20

Table 14 Destination of Cotton Exports, in Selected Years,
1944-45 to 1949-50 ..................................... .....o 21

Table 15 Quantity and Value of Cocoa Exported, the FoO.B. Unit Value,
and the Value of Exports to the United States, 1944-45 to
1949-50 ............. ............. ........ ..................... 21

Table 16 Exports of Essential Oils by FO.B. Unit Value Categories,
1944-45 to 1949-50 ............ ......................... .. .. 22


- xiii -








Table 17 Value of Exports of Selected Other Commodity Groups, in
Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ....O.......o............... 23

Table 18 Value of Exports of Selected Handicraft Articles, 1944-45
and 1949-50 ..................... .... ....................... 24

Table 19 Index of Export Prices by Sections of the SITC, 1944-45 to
1949-50 ........... ........... ......... ................... 26

Table 20 Comparison of Price Indexes for all Exports, Coffee, and Sisal
and 15 Other Commodities, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ............... .. 27

Table 21 Index of Export Prices according to Categories of Importance
1944-45 to 1949-50 ,,....... .. .... ... ... ... ........... 28

Table 22 Comparison of the Index for Principal and Secondary Exports
with Total Index, 1944-45 to 1949-50 .....o........ ......... 28

Table 23 Relative Value of Imports by Sections of the SITC, in Selected
Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 0000......... ...o..... .............. 29

Table 24 Value of Imports by Significant Commodity Divisions as Percent
of SITC Sections and Total Imports, in Selected Years
1944-45 to 1949-50 .......... 0 ... .............. .............. 31

Table 25 Relative Value of Imports from Selected Countries, in
Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ooo......................... 34

Table 26 Imports of Textile Yarn, Fabrics, Made-up Articles and Related
Products by Commodity Groups, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to
1949-50 .. o... o.... o .... o..... .. ..... ........................ 35

Table 27 Value of Imports of Textile Goods by Significant Commodity Groups
by Selected Countries of Origin, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to
1949-50 ............. ... .... -- ..O ..................... 36

Table 28 Relative Value of Imports of Agricultural Machinery and
Implements, and Mining, Construction and other Industrial
Machinery, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ..o....oo.O ..oo ................o. 37

Table 29 Value of Imports of Machinery other than Electric by Commodity
Groups by Country of Origin, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to
1949-50 ...... oo....o.... ...................... .. ....................o 38

Table 30 Relative Value of Imports of Chemicals by Commodity Groups, in
Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 .......................0.... 39

Table 31 Relative Value of Imports of Selected Chemicals by Selected
Countries, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 .............. 40


- xiv -









Table 32 Imports of Mineral Fuels, Lubricants and Related Products by
Country, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50 ................ 40


CHARTS


Chart I Average Monthly Spot Price for Good Washed Haitian Coffee,
1945-1950 ...................................................... 'l


- xv -

















This Pae is No Yet

Av ailable


Jr t i: Si


1-s


- Ii

















This Pae is No Yet

Av ailable


Jr t i: Si


1-s


- Ii







1. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FOREIGN
TRADE OF HAITI


In a very real sense Haiti is highly dependent upon the maintenance of
steady trade relations. As a producer of coffee, sisal, sugar and bananas, as
well as numerous other commodities, Haiti's level of income appears to correlate
rather closely to prices obtained for her exports, particularly those regarded
as principal commodities. This rather close, even intimate, relationship between
per capital income and the export trade bears not only on domestic economic activ-
ity, but also on her capacity to import, I/

Eliminating those imports which may be stimulated by inter-governmental
loans e.g., the Export-Import Bank loans of 1948 and April 1951 2/ and
development loans contracted through the International Bank for Reconstruction
and Development, the bulk of Haiti's imports are non-durable and semi-durable
consumer goods which must be financed in the main from the proceeds of the export
trade. In essence, Haiti's ability to import essential consumer goods rests upon
her ability to export goods on favorable terms,

On the other hand, the importance of international trade to Haiti goes
beyond the level of per capital income. Historically, the Treasury has depend-
ed upon export and import duties for the major portion of its revenues, as
high as 96% of governmental receipts have been obtained from international
trade activities. Although the trend in the ratio of duties to total revenues
has been decreasing in recent years as new sources of income have been explored
and developed, the relationship is still impressive,

In composition, Haiti's foreign trade is dominated on the export side by
commodities of a food nature, principally coffee, and, to a lesser but still
impressive extent, by inedible crude materials other than fuels, of which sisal
is the principal component, and on the import side by manufactured goods in
general, the most significant of which are (1) textile yarn, fabrics, made-up
articles and related products, (2) machinery other than electric, (3) trans-
port equipment, (4) manufactures of base metals, (5) perfumery, cosmetics,
soaps, and cleansing and polishing preparations, (6) and petroleum products.
While food commodities are second in importance as a section of import commod-
ities, their ranking is due primarily to the inflow of wheat flour.

The structural difference between the two components of Haiti's trade are
obvious, as are also the points of strength and weakness. From one point of
view it would appear that Haiti, because of relatively few commodities of
significance in her export trade, occupies a position possessing certain advan-
tages, namely, that, by maintenance of certain minimum standards of quality,



I/ UN. Mission to Haiti, July 1949, p. 209

2 Export-Import Bank of iashington, Twelfth Semi-Annual Report to Congress
for the Period January-June 1951, p, 13


-3-









her competitive position in international markets can be improved so as to
command premium prices. The evidence available on price behavior suggests that
the magnitude of fluctuations of premium quality commodities is significantly
less than those of base grade. The emphasis on quality might well serve as an
offset to price fluctuations which appear to be an inherent characteristic of
the country's principal exports.

The relative stability in the position occupied by many of the import
commodities is suggestive of a persistent, sustained demand for such goods, and
that, regardless of the course of economic events, they must be imported on a
somewhat regular basis. That there may be some strong differences in the dura-
bility of demand for certain exports, on the one hand, and certain classes of
imports, on the other, points to a highly probable source of difficulty for the
country in its natural efforts to maintain and improve the living conditions of
its people, particularly if an acute divergence of these demands should develop.

Country-wise, Haiti's export trade shows a strong European orientation, but
a similar position is not maintained on the import side where the United States,
with few exceptions, overwhelmingly serves as the source of supply. While the
number of countries with which import transactions were conducted during the
period 1944-45 to 1949-50 was half again as great as those involving export
transactions, the persistence of trade with the former was, in general, sporadic
and involved transactions of a generally low range of value, many less than $500
annually.








2o EXPORT TRADE


A, GENERAL NATURE OF THE EXPORT TRADE


The international demand for a limited number of commodities of a food and
inedible crude materials nature is reflected in the export statistics of Haiti.
Coffee, vegetable fibers other than cotton and jute, sugar, and fresh fruits are
the principal commodity groups, and in the aggregate accounted for slightly more
than nine-tenths of the total value of exports in 1949-50. Coffee alone repre-
sented slightly over one-half of the total; of the vegetable fibers group, sisal
is the most important, not only in terms of value but because of the implica-
tions for broadening the economic structure of the country. The sugar group is
predominately raw sugar; and the fresh fruits and nuts group, while extensive in
number of items, is dominated by the trade in bananas. The relative significance
of these four groups in the export trade structure is clearly evident in Table 1.


Table 1

Relative Value of Coffee, Vegetable Fibers other than Cotton and Jute,
Sugar and Fresh Fruits and Nuts in the Export Trade of Haiti, in
Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total value of exports)

1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

All Exports (1,000 dollars) 17,112 30,885 38,480

Exports of 4 groups (percent of
all exports) 81.8 79.7 88.8

Coffee 42.6 35.2 53.2
Vegetable fibers 9.9 26.3 24.1
Sugar 13.8 9.0 8.0
Fresh fruits and nuts 15.5 9.2 3.5


The four principal commodities comprising the above groups -- coffee, sisal,
raw sugar and bananas -- not only determine to a large extent the level of ex-
ports, but also exert a definite influence on the level of governmental revenues.
Nearly one-fifth of all revenues are derived from duties levied on these commod-
ities.

At the present time the trade in cotton, cocoa and essential oils occupies
a secondary position in the composition of Haiti's exports. While the poten-
tialities for development appear to be present, they have not been effectively
promoted as yet.


-5-








Although the composition of the export trade of Haiti may be more or less
adequately discussed in terms of above-mentioned seven commodities, such a
limitation does not take into account items of substantially lesser standing,
some of which reflect one of the country's principal forms of economic activity
other than that of agricultural pursuits for export and subsistence.

The composition of Haiti's export trade may be summarized as follows

1. Principal commodities -- coffee, sisal, sugar, bananas;
2o Secondary commodities -- cotton, cocoa, essential oils;
3o All others, significantly, travel goods and footwear made
of sisal, cane and straw, and leather; mahogany ware, hides
and skins; oil-seeds, oil-nuts and oil kernels

From the statistical evidence relating to the geographical distribution of
the export trade it appears that Haiti is moving steadily in the direction of a
more balanced trade, a characteristic of pre-war conditions which was interrupted
by the isolating effects of the waro Since 1945-46 the lessening of the depen-
dence upon the United States has been due to the resurgence of the European
markets, particularly those in northwestern and southwestern Europe. Whether the
export market situation will ultimately return to its pre-1936-37 position when
approximately one-half of Haiti's exports went to France is, to say the least,
problematic and may depend to a large extent upon the attitudes prevailing in
the formulation of commercial policy not only by Haiti but by other countries
and upon the currency situation in a number of European countries, particularly
in northwestern Europeo However, the rapidity with which Haitian goods have
re-entered the European markets between the end of the war and 1949-50 should
lend support to encouraging trade in that direction0

As a point of possible divergence but also one of historical interest
having a bearing on present developments, a brief review of the distribution of
Haiti's export trade by countries over a period of three decades might effec-
tively illustrate the significance of the present trade pattern, During the
sixteen-year period ending in 1935-36 between two-fifths and two-thirds of the
export trade was with France, with the United States ranking a low second, and
the United Kingdom and Belgium-Luxemburg fluctuating between the third and
fourth place positions until 1930-31 after which date the United Kingdom defina-
tely moved into third place The French position of pre-eminence in the export
trade of Haiti underwent a radical change as the result of the termination of
the Franco-Haitian commercial agreement of April 12, 1930, and although a new
convention was entered into in June 1938 and exports to France showed a sharp
upward tendency, restrictions of various kinds hampered the development of trade
relations and the French position was never regained. Until the outbreak of the
war the ranking of the countries was as follows United States, United Kingdom,
Belgium-Luxemburg and France, The reorientation of the trade between 1939-40
and 1944-45 was of course obvious, but in subsequent years the relative position
of the United States has declined as Belgium-Luxemburg moved into a strong second
place and Italy.into third By 1949-50 the Netherlands ranked fourth and the
position of the United Kingdom had declined to fifth place In summary, the
trade by countries during the course of three decades is shown in Table 2.








Table 2


Value of Exports by Principal Countries, in selected
Years, 1920-21 to 1949-50


Exports
to 6
Year Countries

1920-21 86.7
1924-25 87.0
1929-30 81.5
1935-36 87.9
1936-37 83.0
1938-39 86.5
1939-40 92.6
1944-45 89.4
1945-46 76.1
1946-47 86.9
1947-48 93.1
1948-49 92.2
1949-50 95.8


Belgium-
U. S. Luxemburg


32.4
12.0
9.2
14.2
27.9
34.4
51.6
77.7
61.9
59.6
59.9
59.1
55.8


3.6
7.5
10,0
12o5
10,3
9.4

5.1
11.3
12.2
11.5
15.8


Italy Netherlands


a/
1.9
9.3
0.7
8.1
0.4
0.1


4.1
6.2
9.2
11.5


/
3.1
1.1
0.7
2.1
1.5
0.5

0.2
1.7
3.3
3.8
8.9


U. K. France


3.6
2.9
4.7
15.1
16.1
18.9
27.0
11.6
7.3
9.3
10.4
8.2
3.3


50.7
63.5
49.7
47.2
16.3
21.0
4.0


0.9
1.1
0.4
0.5


/ Not separately shown.
_/ Less than 1/10 of 1%.

Source: Data for 1920-21 through 1939-40 from Institut Haitien de
Statistique. 1804-1954: Cent Cinquante ans de Commerce
Exterieur d'Haiti, p. 9, and Pan American Union. Foreign
Trade Series (various issues), 1920-1941.




The pattern of trade with areas other than the United States and north-
western and southwestern Europe -- the Caribbean, northern South America and
Central Europe -- possesses such a degree of instability as to make it extr-m-
ely difficult to discern anything approaching a trend in the flow of goods,
Although the trade with Canada exhibits a similar tendency toward extreme
fluctuations, the general economic development of that country during the past
decade and a half might well support the supposition of an increasing export
trade. The general geographical structure of the export trade, as indicated
by the relative value of exports, is shown in summary form in Table 3.


- 7-








Table 3


Relative Value of Exports by Important Geographical Areas,
in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total exports)

Area 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

All Exports (1,000 dollars) 17,112 30,885 38,480

Exports of 6 Areas (percent of all
exports) 99.5 99.9 99.9

Northern North America 80.0 60.0 56.8
Caribbean 1.8 0.8 0.8
Northern South America 2.2 a/ 0.7
Europe 15.5 39.1 41.6

Northwestern 11.6 31.4 29.1
Central 3.9 1.5 1.0
Southwestern a 6.2 11.5

a/ Less than 1/10 of 1%


The broadening of the country distribution of exports has not been matched
by a similar movement in the commodity composition of the trade by countries.
Structurally, the trade with countries other than the United States is limited
in general to one major commodity and, at most, four others. This character-
istic is clearly indicated in the Table 4 in which the country distribution of
selected exports is presented as a percent of the value of the exports to each
country listed in the table.



Table 4

Destination of Selected Exports, 1949-50
(as percent of value of exports to each country)

Country Total Coffee Raw Sugar Sisal Cotton Cocoa

Canada 99.4 90.6 -- 8.8 --
United States. 82.2 37.3 0.5 40.4 -- 4.0
Colombia 100.0 -- -- -- 100.0 --
United Kingdom 99.9 -- 54.8 -- 45.1 --
Netherlands 99.7 41.2 58.1 -- 0.2 0.2
Belgium-Luxemburg 99.8 94.4 a/ 5.0 0.4
France 81.6 5.8 -- 75.8








Table 4 (Continued)


Destination of Selected Exports, 1949-50
(as percent of value of exports to each country)

Country Total Coffee Raw Sugar Sisal Cotton Cocoa

Germany 72.3 -- 72.3 a/ --
Switzerland 99.8 97.7 -- 2.1
Italy 99.9 99.9 b/ -

a/ Less than 1/10 of 1%
b/ Value of export not indicated in source.



B. EXPORTS BY SITC COMMODITY SECTIONS


The most obvious aspect of the composition of the export trade of Haiti is
the extent to which exports are concentrated primarily in the food section and,
to a lesser but still substantial degree, in the section pertaining to inedible
crude materials other than fuels. The balance of the trade is unevenly divided
among six other sections. The magnitude of the concentration, expressed in
terms of relative value, is clearly indicated by the summary of the export trade
given in Table 5.

Table 5

Relative Value of Exports by Sections of the SITC,
in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total exports)

Sections 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0
Food 74.7 58.3 67.5
Beverages and tobacco 0.1 0.1 a/
Crude materials, inedible, except fuels 14.3 34.8 28.4
Animal and vegetable oils and fats 0.3 0.2 0.1
Chemicals 2.1 0.7 1.6
Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material 3.1 0.8 0.7
Miscellaneous manufactured articles 5.4 5.1 1.7
Miscellaneous transactions and commodities, n.e.s -- -- a/


a/ Less than 1/10 of 1%


-9-









By expanding the above table to the divisional level of the SITC and
shifting the point of emphasis, the relative importance of the major divisions
can be clearly stated for those sections having the most significance in the
structure of the export trade of Haiti, as is indicated in Table 6 in which the
relative value of the significant commodity divisions is expressed as a percent
of the value of the appropriate section and also of total exports.

The narrowness of the commodity basis of the export trade is emphasized by
the fact that, although the trade is grouped under the headings of 31 SITC divi-
sions, all but an insignificant portion of the total is accounted for by the 10
divisions listed in Table 6. This structural characteristic is further empha-
sized when the trade is scrutinized at the group level of detail. Of the 53
commodity groups utilized, only 15 can be considered as important. Included in
this number are such groups as natural honey, inedible crude materials, n.e.s,,
and processed oils and fats and waxes of animal or vegetable origin which are
not of particular significance in Haiti's trade pattern but are included because
of their position in the export trade of Latin America as a whole.


C. EXPORTS BY SIGNIFICANT COMMODITIES


(1) Coffee: This commodity is the principal export of Haiti in a double sense:
As an item of trade it accounts for between one-third an one-half of the total
value of exports, and as a producer of Government revenue it makes a substantial
contribution to the financial position of the Treasury.

While the increase in the total value of exports during the period 1944-45
to 1949-50 was due in part to the expansion of sisal production and export, a
significant portion of this increase must be attributed to the rise in Coffee
prices, particularly in 1946-47 and 1949-50 and not to any increase in the quan-
tity of coffee exports, as is apparent from Table 7 showing the quantity and
value of coffee exported by Haiti and the average New York spot price for Haitian
coffee graded as "good washed" type.


- 10 -







Table 6


Value of Exports by Significant Commodity Divisions as Percent of
SITC Sections and Total Exports, in Selected Years,
1944-45 to 1949-50


Sections and Divisions


Section
19h4-45 1947-48 1949-50


Total Exports
1944-45 1947-48 1949-50


Total Exports


Food


Fruits and vegetables
Sugar and sugar preparations
Coffee, tea, cocoa, spices, and
manufactures thereof

Crude materials, inedible, except fuels

Hides, skins and fur skins, undressed
Oil-seeds, oil nuts and oil kernels
Textile fibres (not manufactured into
yarn, thread or fabrics and waste)


Chemicals


98.5

21.3
18,5


9302

5.5
5.2

82.5


98,3

16,0
15.4

66.9

9908

3.1
4.1

92.6


99.3

5.4
11.8

82.1

99.5


3.0
3.6


92.9


100.0 100.0 100.0


Essential oils and perfume materials,
toilet, polishing and cleansing
preparations

Manufactured goods classified chiefly
by material

Wood and cork manufactures (excluding
furniture)


100.0 100.0 100.0


86.4


62.2


0.7


1.6


83.3


86.4 62.2 83.3


95.2


15.9
13.8

43.9


98.0


9.3
9.0

39.0


1.1
1.4


99.0


3.7
8,0

55.4


0.9
1.0

26,4


0.8
0.7


32.3


I


ii-iL-


2.6 0.5 0.6











Table 6 (Continued)


Sections and Divisions

Miscellaneous 'manufactured articles

Travel goods, handbags and similar
articles
Footwear


Secio


Section
1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

66.9 93.2 77.7


42.0
24.9


18.5
74.7


Total Exports
1944-45 1947-48 1949-50


10.6
67.1


0.9
3.8


0.2
1.2


--







Table 7


Quantity, Value and Price of Coffee Exports
1944-45 to 1949-50

Quantity Value Av. N.-Y. Spot Price*
Year (metric tons) (1,000 dollars) (cents per pound)

1944-45 29,968 7,290 13.75
1945-46 24,283 7,630 18.87
1946-47 24,659 12,131 26.70
1947-48 22,733 10,775 28.25
1948-49 27,824 13,449 J2.42
1949-50 26,242 20,455 50.13


*Data refers to calendar year and obtained from Pan American Coffee
Bureau, Coffee Statistics, and Oficina Panamericana del Cafe,
Estadisticas Cafeteras.


During these six years the movement of prices for Haitian coffee of the
"good washed" type which ranks with the premium grades and thus "enjoys a
preferred status" 1/ appears to have progressed through three phases, the
first being the rapid rise from the OPA ceiling price of 13.75 cents per pound
to 27.70 cents for November 1946, followed by a period in which the price
fluctuated somewhat erratically between 24.90 cents for May 1947 and 35.94
cents for October 1949. As a reaction to the partial loss of the Brazilian
crop in 1949, the virtual elimination of reserve stocks by Brazil, and the
acknowledged fact that consumption was ciceedilg current production by
Scubv:tL:nbial margin, there occurred a pronounced increase in prices which had
been moving moderately upward since May 1949. The price for Haitian coffee
jumped from 3594 cents for October to 51.00 cents for November, and, for the
next fourteen months, fluctuated between 45.30 cents and 56.60 cents. The
monthly variations in the price of Haitian coffee for the six years in question
are graphically presented in Chart 1, and summarized on an annual basis in Table
8 showing the average yearly price, the high, low and range of prices for the
calendar year 1946 to 1950. The movement of the export price index for coffee
(i.e., f.o.b. unit value Haitian port) is discussed in the section on export
prices and is shown in Table XVI, Appendix C.





l/ United States Tariff Commission. Economic Controls and Commercial
Policy in Haiti. p. 11.


- 13 -











Chart I
Average Monthly New York Spot Price for Good Haitian Washed Coffee
1945-1950
(in cents per pound)
70



60




50



Per Cent
of Change
40 +100
+ 90
+ 80
+ 70

+ 60

30 +50
0 + 40

*+ 30


S+ 20

+ 10

20 -- 0
-5
10

15
20

25

S 30
35

40

45

in _________ 50








Table 8


Average Yearly New York Spot Price for Haitian Good Washed Coffee
showing the High, Low and Range of Prices, 1946-50
(in cents per pound)


Average


Year

1946
1947
1948
1949
1950


18.87
26.70
28.25
32,42
50.13


High

27.70
27.95
30,05
51.00
56.60


Low


13.75
24.90
27.63
26.70
45.30


13.95
3.05
2.42
24.30
11.30


Source: Based on data in Pan American Coffee Bureau, Coffee
Statistical Picture and Coffee Statistics, and George
Gordon Paton & Co., Coffee Annual, 1950.


The post-war development in the coffee trade have been quite favorable for
Haiti in terms of gross prices received. The question not explored at this time
is the cost of production-price ratio, from which the actual net benefit accruing
to Haiti might be determined with some degree of precision. While such an inves-
tigation is outside the scope of this study, it should be indicated at this junc-
ture that there has been a general upward movement in labor costs and, as a conse-
quence, costs of production have moved upward.

With the re-opening of the European markets after the war there was a pro-
nounced change in the geographical orientation of Haiti's coffee exports.
Whereas the United States accounted for all but a small portion of the total
coffee exported between 1940-41 and 1944-45, the amount shipped to Europe since
1947-48 has exceeded that moving to the United States by a substantial margin,
as is shown in Table 9.

Table 9

Quantity of Coffee Exported by Haiti to the United States
and Europe, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(in thousands of metric tons)


Destination


Total Coffee

United States
Europe
Northwestern
Central
Southwestern


1944-45 1947-48 1949-50


30.0


26
2

2


22.7


.3 6.8
.6 15.8
11.0
.6 1.0
-- 3.8


- 15 -


26.2

10.4
15.4
9.0
0.5
5.9








The Netherlands and Belgium-Luxemburg, constituting the principal markets
in northwestern Europe, together accounted 8,400 metric tons in 1947-48 and
8,900 tons in 1949-50 of coffee. Norway provided a market for a total of 6,400
metric tons in 1945-46 and 1946-47, and for 2,300 tons in 1947-48, but since
then has declined to a position of relative unimportance. The markets of central
and southwestern Europe are limited almost exclusively to Switzerland and Italy.

(2) Sisal: The exports of sisal have increased rapidly in both quantity and
value during the period 1944-45 to 1949-50, and now rank as the second most impor-
tant export commodity While the importance attained by this commodity has been
due principally to an expansion of output, its present position has been aided
to some extent by the continued decline in the banana trade which began to mani-
fest itself in 1947-48.

Although Haiti does not compare with British East Africa as a producer and
exporter of sisal, her relative position in the trade has increased from an av-
erage of 2.5 percent of the world exports for the years 1934-1938 to an estima-
ted 12 percent in 1949. The growth of the industry in Haiti, as reflected in
world exports, has progressed at a more..rapid rate than in any other producing
country, Not reflected in the sisal export statistics, however, is the trade in
articles such as shoes, slippers and hand bags made of this fiber. The use of
sisal by domestic industry in the production of such goods, a portion of the
output of which is exported directly, may account in part for the gap between
production statistics and those for export.

The export of sisal from Haiti increased from 9,167 metric tons valued at
$1,676,000 in 1944-45 to 33,426 tons valued at $9,270,000 in 1949-50, an in=
crease of 265 percent in quantity and 453 percent in value. During this period
the price of sisal advanced substantially. Aside from exports to the United
States which account for between 93,5 and 9908 percent of the total quantity,
the only markets of importance are Belgium-Luxemburg, France and the Dominican
Republic However, as compared with the United States, these markets exhib-
ited a substantial degree of instability. The fluctuations in the Belgium-
Luxemburg and French markets may be due in part to currency restrictions and
to competition from British East African sources

Besides these four countries, there were sporadic shipments to Canada,
Puerto Rico, Argentina and the United Kingdom, Germany and Switzerlando Exports
to Canada may increase as the industrial demand for bindry twine grows, In
1948-49 shipments amounted to 15 metric tons, increasing the following year to
88 tons. A similar condition may exist in Puerto Rico where a rapid industrial
growth is taking place.

While the sisal price quotations-in the international markets, particu-
larly the London market, for British East African No0 1, coiofo, London, have
moved upward, it has not been at the pace of coffee and other commodities whose
price behavior subsequent to the war may be termed spectacular The price of
Haitian sisal (ioeo, unit value fooobo Haiti) showed a trend similar to that
for British East African sisal, taking into account the nature of the two
prices








Price increase generally act as a stimulant to production, but in the case
of sisal the net effect of increased output does not manifest itself until some
years after additional plantings are made. The consequent result is that the
increased output may come during a period of depressed prices and may thus act
as a deterrent to increased output as long as the basic problem of relating
supply to demand remains unsolved. Under present conditions in which consump-
tion in many countries is still below pre-war levels, the period of relatively
high prices may continue for some time. Whether steps are taken to effectively
increase the output will depend upon the willingness of producers to gamble on
a sustained industrial demand for this fiuer by the cordage industry which has
made extensive use of sisal in the manufacture of bindry twine.

While exports of sisal fiber command considerable attention for their
importance as raw material thus tending to overshadow the trade in sisal
products, this trade affords a livelihood for those engaged in the production
of handicraft articles. The principal items in this category are hand bags,
shoes and slippers, hats, carpets and baskets, the export of which in 1949-50
amounted to $529,000. All but a negligible portion of these articles was
shipped to the United States,

SThe trade in sisal by the principal countries of destination is shown
in Table 10.


Table 10

Quantity and Value of Exports of Sisal by Principal Countries
of Destination, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(quantity in metric tons; value in thousands of dollars)

19.44-45 1947-48 1949-50
Country Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Value

Total 9,167 1,676 26,077 8,113 33,426 9,270

United States 9,155 1,672 25,063 7,854 31,237 8,678
Dominican Republic -- 171 59 304 101
Belgium-Luxemburg 151 36 1,271 303
France -- 548 131 486 144
All others 12 4 144 33 128 44


(3) Sugar: The international trade in sugar ranks third after coffee and sisal
in the structure of Haiti's exports, and is marketed mainly in the United Kingdom.
While Haiti does not rank among the leading sugar-producing nations, the commod-
ity is deemed of sufficient importance for the Haitian representative at the
International Sugar discussions to request an export quota of 150,000 tons for
1955. While some doubt was expressed that such an export level could be attained
by that date, it was generally felt that, predicated on the interest of the


- 17 -








Government, Haitian capital and sugar groups in expanding the output of cane
and in rationalizing the structure of the industry, some increase undoubted
would take place. L/ The focal point of interest in this commodity is to
improve the competitive position of sugar in the world markets.

Raw sugar represents the principal component of the group, followed by
molasses and, until 1949-50, cane sugar, at which time the exports of refined
sugar increased to the point of attracting attention. The composition of the
group is indicated in Table 11.


Table 11

Composition of Sugar Exports, in Selected Years
1944-45 to 1949-50
(in metric tons)

Commodity 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Total 41,911 34,270 44,762

Raw Sugar 29,276 20,092 30,794
bMlasses 12,554 14,101 13,458
Refined Sugar 23 1 478
Cane Sugar 49 76 22
Cane Syrup 8 -- 1
Brown Sugar -- a/


a/ Less than 500 kilos.



Due to the composition of the group, there is a sharp divergence in the
geographical orientation of sugar exports The trade with Europe consists
almost exclusively of raw sugar in contrast with that of the United States
which is predominately molasses in composition. At the same time there is some
indication of a growing trade in refined sugar with the United States. The
European orientation of the Haitian sugar trade is indicated in Table 12
showing the geographical distribution of raw sugar exports.


l/ F.A.OO, Commodity Report: Suar, November 22, 1950, po 9








Table 12


Destination of Raw Sugar Exports, in Selected Years
1944-45 to 1949-50
(in metric tons)

Destination 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Total 29,276 20,092 30,794

United States 961 1,036
Europe 29,197 19,131 29,757

United Kingdom 29,197 19,131 7,517
Netherlands a/ 21,333
Germany -- 907

All others 79 a/


a/ Less than 500 kilos.


For the group as a whole, shipments to Europe in 1949-50 accounted for approxi-
mately two-thirds of the quantity and nine-tenths of the value, the sharp differ-
ence in the proportions of quantity and value being due to a drastic decline in
the price of molasses exports to the United States.

As the price of almost 40 percent of the sugar moving in international
trade is determined by special negotiations and considerations of a trade and
financial nature, it is manifestly impossible to speak of a "world price" for
this commodity. That the four principal categories of sugar prices -- i.e.,
the free market price; the price prevailing in the British Commonwealth and
Empire, the French Union, and the Portuguese colonies; contract and special
prices; and, lastly, the United States consumption price -- reflect the major
trends of the New York Coffee and Sugar Exchange appears to be a substantiated
fact, but it cannot be maintained that they are determined by the New York
quotations. 1/

Following the outbreak of the war in 1939 the quota provisions of the
Sugar Act of 1937 were suspended and negotiations for the sale of raw sugar were
conducted with the United Kingdom Ministry of Food on a contract basis. The
trend in the average f.o0b. contract prices paid by the Ministry moved upward
from 1941 through 1945, levelling off during 1946 to 1948, and declining some-
what the following year; a slight recovery was evidenced in 1950. The prices
for the six-year period 1945 through 1950 are indicated in Table 13.



1/ F.A.O., Commodity Reports Sugar, November 22, 1950, p. 18. For a description
of the four categories of prices, see pp. 18-21.


- 19 -









Table 13


Average FoOB. Contract Price Paid by United Kingdom
Ministry of Food for Raw Sugar, 1945-1950
(in U.S. cents per pound)

Year Average F.O.B. Contract Price

1945 3l10
1946 4.925 a/
1947 4,9625a/
1948 5.0
1949 4.0
1950 4.24

a/ Renegotiated price

Source: Farr & Co,, Manual of Sugar Compaes, 1951-52, p 92


As the New York raw sugar prices during the period 1945 to 1947 were based on
the price paid by the United States Government for Cuban sugar (excluding duty)
and as account was taken by the Ministry of Food of these prices in the contract
negotiations for Haitian sugar in substance the latter price reflected what
might be regarded as the New York sugar prices After that date the New York
price was coiofi and the degree of relationship between the fooob. Haitian
price and the New York price for Cuban sugar became less apparent.

(4) Bananas: From 1944-45 through 1946-47 exports of bananas ranked second after
coffee, averaging approximately 17 percent of the total value of exports, but in
subsequent years there has been a precipitious decline in the quantity and value
as well as the foobo unit value. During this same period, Haiti, according to
one source, accounted for slightly over 5 percent of the quantity of bananas
entering world trade and ranked seventh among the leading producers in 1945 and
1947. 1/

Aside from sporadic shipments to the Netherlands Antilles and the British
West Indies, the entire trade is oriented toward the United States,

(5) Cotton: The present cotton production is derived from a perennial plant
producing fibers of good quality, but, due to lack of care in planting, poor
cultivation and little or no attempts at insect and disease control, it appar-
ently does not measure up to standards capable of commanding better prices.
While the exports of cotton have fluctuated widely in quantity and value, the
foob. unit value has, with the exception of 1947-48, moved steadily upward.




1/ IBRD, The Banana Industry of the Caribbean Area, September 1948, Table lo


- 20 -










Colombia, for the three-year period 1944-45 to 1946-47, purchased the major
portion of the cotton exports, but gave way to the United Kingdom in 1947-48.
During the same year substantial shipments were made to the Netherlands, Belgium-
Luxemburg and France, which however, were not sustained in subsequent years.
These sales may have had their origin in temporary market conditions. The coun-
try distribution of cotton exports is indicated in Table 14.


Table 14

Destination of Cotton Exports, in Selected Years 1944-45'to 1949-50
(quantity in metric tons; value in thousands of dollars)

1944-45 1947-48 1949-50
Country Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Value

Total 1,037 329 3,290 1,861 1,289 862

Cuba .34 10 -- -- -- --
Colombia 1,004 320 -- -- 350 262
United Kingdom -- -- 2,070 1,106 882 568
Netherlands -- 243 146 11 8
Belgium-Luxemburg 677 417 47 24
France -- 300 191 -- --


(6) Cocoa: Under the stimulus of advancing prices the position of cocoa in the
structure of Haiti's exports strengthened from 1.3 percent of the total value in
1944-45 to 4.1 percent in 1947-48, the peak year for this commodity, Despite the
effects of neglect, Haiti exported between 1,300 and 1,900 metric tons annually
during the period 1944-45 to 1949-50, most of which went to the United States.
The trade in cocoa is summarized in Table 15.


Table 15

Quantity and Value of Cocoa Exported, the F.O.B. Unit Value, and the
Value of Exports to the United States, 1944-45 to 1949-50

Quantity Value FoO.B. Unit Value Exports to U.S.
Year (metric tons) (1,000 dollars) (cents per pound) (% of Value)

1944-45 1,264 216 7.71 46.8
1945-46 1,255 248 8.98 84.7
1946-47 1,914 778 18.42 94.7
1947-48 1,795 1,272 32.11 84.7
1948-49 1,560 994 25.95 99.6
1949-50 1,873 863 20.87 99.6


- 21 -










(7) Essential Oils: Certain groups of commodities, because of their heteroge-
neous nature, raise special problems in the analysis of commodity statistics.
Although such groups may appear to contain items of a similar nature, careful
probing may often disclose substantial difference, particularly in price struc-
ture and behavior as well as in demand characteristics. The cereals group is a
case in point, as is also sugar, undressed hides, skins and fur skins, and metal-
liferous ores and metal scrap. In other instances the heterogeneity is even more
pronounced due to differences in materials, degree of processing and other factors.
For example, textile fabrics of standard type consist of cotton, silk, woollen
and worsted, and synthetic fabrics.

The essential oils seem to fall into the category of basically heterogen-
eous commodity group, and for that reason deserve special attention.

The essential oils consist of nine distinct items and one of an "all others"
category, and exhibit a wide range of prices, from $112o72 per kilo for neroli
oil to $0.15 for orange flower water, with $6.30 per kilo being the computed
average. In reality these average "prices" represent the f.o0b. unit values
computed from the quantity and value data contained in the trade returns cover-
ing the six-year period 1944-45 to 1949-50, and serve as a criterion for ar-
ranging the component parts of the group into a more rational pattern designed
to facilitate the determination of any trend in the exports of the group. The
nine identifiable items have been arranged into categories described by such
general terms as (1) low-priced, (2) medium-priced and (3) high-priced. A
summary of the exports of the nine identifiable essential oils by foo.bo unit
value categories is presented in Table 16 showing the quantity and value of
exports as a percent of the group total and the average foobo value over the
six-year period 1944-45 to 1949-50,

Table 16

Exports of Essential Oils by F.O.oB Unit Value Categories
1944-45 to 1949-50
(quantity and value as percent of group total;
foobo unit value in dollars per kilo)

Quantity, Value and F.O.B. Unit Value Categories
F.O.B. Unit Value Low* Medium** High**

Quantity 87,12 12.39 o025
Value 48.41 47.52 4o06
F.O.B. Unit Value
Average. 3.49 24.17 100.00
Range 2,48-5.26 13.37-42.15 21.18-117.50

*Consists of orange flower water, amyris, citronelia, lemon grass, petit-
grain, lime oil,
M*Consists of vetiver,
**-Consists of neroli and sweet-basil.


- 22 -










The export trade in these oils is limited in the main to the United States
although France did account for a relatively sizeable portion of the total in
1949-50.

Between 1944-45 and 1949-50 the quantity of all essential oils exported by
Haiti increased at a faster rate than did the value, with the result that the
f.o.b. unit value in 1949-50 was approximately one-fifth less than in 1944-45.
However, in these relationships a preponderant weight was given to the high-
priced oils in 1944-45 which was not applicable in the latter year. The extent
of the deterioration of the export position of these oils may be inferred from
the magnitude of the variations in the range of their f.o.b. unit values about
their average, and, more specifically, from a comparison of their f.o.b, unit
values which declined from approximately $138.00 in 1944-45 to $21.00 in 1949-
50, Further evidence of the shift in weight exerted by these oils is apparent
from the fact that in 1949-50 they accounted for only 0.26 percent of the total
quantity of the group and for 0.75 percent of its value as compared with 1.61
percent and 23.84 percent, respectively, in 1944-45. Concurrent with this decli-
ne, the improvement in the relative quantity and value position of the medium-
priced. category was at a more rapid rate than the improvement in the low-priced
oils. In both these categories there was exhibited a tendency toward a deterio-
ration in the f.o.b. unit value. However, by excluding the high-priced oil
from consideration and combining the other two categories there appears to have
been no change of any real significance in the unit value position of the low-
and medium-priced categories.


D. EXPORTS BY OTIHR SITC COMMODITY SECTIONS


Up to this point the discussion of the commodity character of the export
trade of Haiti has been limited to those commodities which can be characterized
as being either of a principal or secondary importance in the country's trade.
There are, in addition, 6 other groups whose position in the export pattern
should be indicated. In Table 17 is presented in summary form the value of
exports of these six groups.

Table 17

Value of Exports of Selected Other Commodity Groups,
in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(in thousands of dollars)

Commodity Groups 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Total 1,595 2,489 1,594

Hides and skins (undressed) except
fur skins 135 343 329
Oil-seeds, oil-nuts and oil kernels 126 439 394


- 23 -









Table 17 (continued)


Value of Exports of Selected Other Commodity Groups,
in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(in thousands of dollars)

Corodity Groups 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Wood manufactures, n.e.s. 453 161 229
Travel goods and handbags and
similar articles 387 291 70
Footwear 230 1,177 445
Manufactured articles, n.e.So 264 78 127

6 groups as percent of total
value of exports 9.3 8l1 4.1


Other than the first two groups listed in the above table the rest repre-
sent for the most part exports of handicraft articles, the principal items of
which are indicated in Table 18 together with their export values in 1944-45
and 1949-50o

Table 18

Value of Exports of Selected Handicraft Articles
1944-45 and 1949-50
(in thousands of dollars)

Item 1944-45 1949-50

Total 1,096 759

Mahogany ware 453 228
Handbags of
Sisal 337 66
Cane and straw 51 3
Hats of cane, straw or sisal 25 17
Shoes and slippers of
Sisal 136 444
Cane and straw 82 a/
..th.. r 12 1

a/ Less than $500.

Not included in the above list are such handicraft articles as silver jewelry,
articles made of shells and seeds, and toys, the trade in which is extremely
slight. There has been a general decline in the exports of handicraft articles,
the reasons for which are not clearly discernible. The growth of the tourist
trade may, however, be a possible clue attributible to this decrease.


- 24 -










E. EXPORT PRICES


A matter of persistent concern not only to Haiti but to all the countries
of Latin America is that relating to the movement of export prices, particu-
larly the prices of those products of vital significance to their economy,
Argentina and Uruguay, for example, have a natural and abiding interest in
wool prices; Chile and Mexico have a similar interest in copper quotations in
the major commodity markets. For some fourteen countries, including Haiti, the
fluctuations in the price of coffee might spell the difference between prosper-
ity and depression.

More specifically, the interest in price movements centers in the price
actually received by the country for the commodity in question. This price forms
one element in the terms of trade, the other being the price actually paid for
imports in which should be included insurance, freight and other charges incurred
in the movement of goods from the exporting country to the importing country.

While there exist price quotations on the international commodity markets
for most if not all the major commodities exported by Latin America, such prices
per se are generally not usable in the ideal sense as there are often included
elements over which the exporting country has little or no control and from
which it receives no benefits. The New York price for Cuban raw sugar, for
example, affords an illustration of such inclussions. Raw sugar prices as
quoted on the New York Sugar Exchange include insurance, freight and duty, the
last item being wholly non-economic in its application. The problem to be
resolved in using such a price is to delete or neutralize the elements from
which the exporting country receives no benefits.

The average price of Cuban raw sugar in New York in 1932 was 2.93 cents per
pound, the United States import duty on which amounted to 2.00 cents per pound.
At the same time the price in public warehouses in Cuba was 0.70 cents. The
difference of 0.23 cents between the New York c. & f. price of 0.93 cents (New
York price less duty) and the Cuban public warehouse price may conditionally be
ascribed to charges incurred in transit. The apparent price received by Cuba
in 1932 was only 24 percent of the quoted New York price. It is obvious that
totally different results may be obtained by using these various prices, and
that the statistical measures obtained may be greatly influenced by the
arbitrary, non-economic nature by which import duties are levied.

If there are strong qualifications attached to the use of prices quoted on
the international commodity exchanges, there are also some applicable to the use
of f.o.b, unit values, particularly where there exists the suspicion that the
valuation methods employed by the exporting country are somewhat arbitrary. It
appears, however, that, in spite of such objections, the foo.b. unit value does
tend to reflect more faithfully what a country receives for a particular export
or group of exports, and, perhaps, for that reason mitigates to some extent the
disadvantages encountered in the use of such values,


- 25 -










The export price index for Haiti, shown in summary form in Table 19 and in
detail in Table XVI Appenu-x G, was constructed on the basis of the foo.bo unit
values of 17 individual commodities or, as in some instances, groups of com-
modities -.right by their relative value in the export trade in 1949-50, with
the base of the index being the fiscal years 1946-47 and 1947-48. The relative
values of the commodities included in the index ranged from 0.058 percent for
beeswax to 53.549 percent for coffee, with sisal fibers occupying the somewhat
middle ground of 24.318 percent. In the aggregate these commodities accounted
for all but 0.7 percent of the total value of exports.

The decision to employ weights based on the relative value in 1949-50 was
made after examination of indexes weighted by relatives values in 1944-45 and
1945-46 combined and in 1947-48. In the first instance, there appeared to be
serious understatement of the importance of certain items and overstatement of
others without noticeable offsets, and in the second instances, although there
appeared to be a better balancing of the importance of coffee and sisal fibers,
the projection of such relationships in the future did not appear to be soundly
conceived. As it is almost axiomatic that coffee plays a highly significant
part in the economic structure of many countries and that the commodity is at
the present time enjoying a highly favorable situation price-wise, it was felt
that due weight should be allocated to the role played by coffee in the export
trade and at the same time retaining the general influence of sisal as well as
other significant commodities on the overall index.


In Table 19
according to the
data relating to


the index of export prices is presented in summary form
sections of the SITC and is in substance comparable with the
exports of merchandise contained in Table I Appendix A.


Table 19

Index of Export Prices by Sections of the SITC
1944-45 to 1949-50;1946-47 to 1947-48 = 100


Sections of the SITC


Total


0 Food
2 Crude materials, inedible,
except fuels
4 Animal and vegetable oils and
fats
5 Chemicals
6 Manufactured goods classified
chiefly by materials
8 Miscellaneous manufactured
articles


Fiscal Year ending September 30th.
1945 1946 2 1948 1949 1950

78.6 90.3 105.3 94.7 95.7 132.1

52.4 65.7 100.7 99.3 99.0 149.4

61,0 61.2 94.6 105.4 108.0 99.3


81.9 89.7
178,2 201.9

82,6 91.2


95.7 104.9
131.6 61,4

104.5 94.7


90,0 67.0
67.7 139.6

105.5 11.3


106.8 109.6 102.3 97.7 90.2 82.5


- 26 -









The general course of the index appears to have been sharply upward during
the first three years, with the next two years indicating a softening of prices
for exports. Under the stimulus of advancing coffee prices there was a strong
upsurge in 1949-50. The most significant advances were made in the food category
where an increase of 185 percent was registered in 1949-50 over 1944-45, again
indicating the influence of coffee price movements. Inedible crude materials,
while advancing by 63 percent over the same period, showed in a tendency toward
decline in 1949-50. The movements in the other categories was somewhat mixed.

The principal influence in the movement of the total index was of course
the price of coffee, and for three of the six years covered.by this index there
appeared to exist a very close relationship between the index for coffee and
that for all commodities comprising the index. Another strong but not as
definitive an influence was that of sisal fibers. These influences are apparent
in Table 20 in which are shown the index for all commodities, that for coffee
and sisal, and for the remaining 15 commodities included in the index under the
heading "others".

Table 20

Comparison of Price Indexes for All Exports, Coffee and
Sisal and 15 Other Commodities, 1944-45 to 1949-50
1946-47 and 1947-4 -= 100

Year Total Coffee Sisal Others

1944-45 79 50 63 120
1945-46 90 65 60 133
1946-47 105 102 92 114
1947-48 95 98 107 86
1948-49 96 100 107 86
1949-50 132 161 95 107


By re-computing the index in terms of three categories -- principal exports,
secondary exports, and all others -- it becomes apparent that, price-wise, the
principal exports have on the whole enjoyed a favorable situation, while those
of a secondary importance have, in general, not been so fortunate. The situa-
tion appeared to have improved somewhat in 1949-50, but was still substantially
below the peak year 1945-46. In the category of "all others", however, the
general trend has been downward, although there was a moderate increase in
1946-47 and 1947-48. This situation is summarized in Table 21.


- 27 -









Table 21


Index of Export Prices according to Categories of
1944-45 to 1949-50
1946-47 and 1947-48 = 100


Year

1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50


Total Principal


79
90
105
95
96
132


55
66
100
100
101
142


Secondary

151
170
125
75
79
134


Importance


All Others

92
98
103
97
95
73


When the principal and secondary exports are combined, the resulting
index follows very closely the over-all index, as is indicated in Table 22.


Table 22

Comparison of the Index for Principal and Secondary
Exports with Total Index 1944-45 to 1949-50
1946-47 and 1947-48 = 100


Year

1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50


Total


Principal & Secondary Exports


79
90
105
95
96
132


89
106
94
96
140


- 28 -









3. IMPORT TRADE


A. GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPORT TRADE


The structure of Haiti's imports reflects the persistent demand for manu-
factured goods, chiefly of a textile nature, and to a less extent, for food-
stuffs, the most important of which are the cereals groups, particularly wheat
flour. Although imports of machinery and transport equipment rank third, it
is difficult to characterize the demand as persistent, for while the growth of
such imports have boardered on the spectacular, there have been pronounced year-
to-year variations in the groups comprising this section. It the area of chem-
icals, the imports are primarily commodities of a medicinal and pharmaceutical
nature, and perfumery, cosmetics, soaps, and cleansing and polishing prepara-
rations. Petroleum products constitute the bulk of the imports coming under the
heading "mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials". The balance of the
import trade is made up of miscellaneous manufactured articles, of which clothing
and footwear account for sizeable portions; tobacco, principally in manufactured
form; wood in the form of shaped or simply worked pieces; and vegetable oils.

In broad outline, the structure of the import trade of Haiti is indicated
in Table 23 showing the relative value of imports by sections of the SITC.


Table 23

Relative Value of Imports by Sections of the SITC,
in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total imports)

Sections 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0

Food 23.3 18.7 18.4
Beverages and tobacco 2.2 2.5 2.3
Crude materials, inedible, except
fuels a/ 0.3 1,2
Mineral fuels, lubricants and
related materials 4.1 4.3 4.0
Animal and vegetable oils and fats 1.1 0.8 0.9
Chemicals 11.0 9.8 8.3
Manufactured goods classified chiefly
by materials 41.3 41.1 45,1
Machinery and transport equipment 10.2 13.2 13.3
Miscellaneous manufactured goods 6.8 9.4 6,5


a/ Less than 1/10 of 1%


- 29 -










From the above table it is readily apparent that manufactured goods,
excluding from this category those processed goods falling under the heading
of "food" and "beverages and tobacco", constitute between three-fourths and
four-fifths of the total imports by value,

It is, however, at the divisional and group level of detail that the
significant nature of Haiti's import trade appears. The nine principal com-
modity divisions of imports represented 70 percent of the total value in 1949-
50; four of the divisions were under the heading "manufactured goods classified
chiefly by material"; two were under "machinery and transport equipment", and
one each under "food", "mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials", and
"chemicals". The value of imports recorded under these nine division,: :-.;
from $1,100,000 for manufactures of metals to $10,800,000 for textile yarn,
fabrics, made-up articles and related products. The imports of secondary impor-
tance, covering eighteen commodity divisions, accounted for 22 percent of the
total value in 1949-50, and ranged from $110,000 for coffee, tea, cocoa, spices
and manufactures thereof to $959,000 .for imports of fish and fish preparations.
The relative importance of the twenty-seven commodity divisions regarded as
significant in Haiti's import trade are indicated in Table 24 in which is shown
the value of each division as a percent of the appropriate section and also of
total imports.

The pattern of imports is, in broad terms, relatively stable, as is indi-
cated by an examination of the table. In general, changes were limited to
variations of less than one percentage point, and those of any significance
were not more than 2.5 percentage points, excluding the case of cereals and
cereal preparations which appear to be in relative decline,

The principal imports were textile yarn, fabrics, made-up articles and
related products; cereals and cereal preparations; machinery other than electric;
transport equipment; base metals, particularly those of iron and steel; perfum-
ery, cosmetics, soaps, and cleansing and polishing preparations; and mineral
fuels, lubricants and related materials. Those of a secondary importance con-
sisted of non-metallic mineral manufactures, n,eso. manufactures of metals,
fish and fish preparations; medicinal and pharmaceutical products; and elec-
tric machinery. The national content of these categories of imports are
contained in Appendix D-4.

The United States is the major source for Haiti's imports, with Canada and
the United Kingdom ranking second and third, respectively, and the Netherlands
Antilles occupying the fourth position, Belgium-Luxemburg, France, Italy Germany,
India and the Netherlands constitute sources of secondary importance in over-all
picture. The country distribution of imports in terms of relative value is
indicated in Table 25 (Page 34).


- 30 -







Table 24


Value of Imports by Significant Commodity Divisions as Percent of
SITC Sections and Total Imports, in Selected Years,
1944-45 to 1949-50


Sections and Divisions


Section
1944-45 1947-48 1949-50


Total Imports
1944-45 1947-48 1949-50


Total Imports


Meat and meat preI.lrations
Dairy products, e. and honey
Fish and fish preparations
Cereal and cereal preparations
Fruits and vegetables
Coffee, tea, cocoa, spices and
manufactures thereof


Beverages and tobacco


Beverages
Tobacco and tobacco manufactures

Crude materials, inedible, except fuels


Wood, lumber and cork


100.0 100.0 100.0


21.7
78.3

50.0

50.0


26.2
73.8

95.7

95.7


32.5
67.5

98.2

98.2


Mineral fuels, lubricants and related
materials

Mineral fuels, lubricants and
related materials


100.0 100.0 100.0


100.0 100.0 100.0


4.1 4.3 4.0


Food


92.0


89.6

1.5
6.3
2.7
76.6
2.0

0.5


88.0

1.4
7.8
10.9
65.1
2.3

0.5


82.5

1.9
8.9
14.4
52.8
2.8

1.7


0.4
1.5
0.6
17.8
0.5


91.0


0,3
1.5
2.1
12.7
0.4

0.1


92.9


0.4
1.6
2.6
9.7
0.5

0.3


0.5
1.8


0.6
1.8


0.8
1.6


a/ 0.3


---


1944-45 1947-48 1949-50









Table 24 (Continued)


Section
1 1, 19. 7 l 109,9--


Total Imports
g-I 1- h 1 L7-h8 19L9-50


Animal and vegetable oils and fats

Animal and vec-table oils (not essential
oils), fats, greases and derivatives


Chemicals


Dyeing, tanning and cX i- .;
materials
Medicinal and pharmaceutical products
Essential oils and perfume materials,
toilet, polishing and cleansing
preparations

Manufactured goods classified chiefly by
material

Leather, leather manufactures, n.e.s.,
and dressed furs
Rubber manufactures, ::.e.s.
Paper, paperboard and manufactures
thereof
Textile yarn, fabrics, made-up articles
and related products
Non-metallic mineral manufactures, n.e.s.
Silver, platinum, gems and jewellery
Base metals
Manufactures of metals


100,0 100.0 100,0


100.0 100.0 100.0


11o7
20.7


66.5


99.4


0.8
3.1


68.1
7.7
0.6
10.0
4.7


98.4


99.1


10.9 13.6
25.7 28.0


61.6


99.7


1.2
3.2


65.9
6.7
1.0
9.1
8.8


57.5


99.7


1.5
3.1


66.3
7.1
1.1
10.8
6.7


0.8


0.9


1.1
2.5


6.0


0.4
1.3


28.1
3.2
0.2
4.1
1.9


0.5
1.3

1.6

27.1
2.8
u.4
3.7
3.6


0.7
1.4

1.4

29.9
3.2
0.5
4,9
3.0


---------


Sectbions- andu Divisions


r,






Table 24 (Continued)


Sections and Divisions

Machinery and transport equipment

Machinery other than electric
Electric machinery, apparatus and
appliances
Transport equipment

Miscellaneous manufactured articles

Clothing
Footwear


S e ct io n


S
1944-45

100,0

58.0

10.5
31.5

22.8

14.6
8.2


ectio
1947-48

100.0

44.9

13.6
41.5

23.9

15.8
8.1


n
1949-50

100o0

47.3

15.2
37.5

43.5

23.7
19.8


Total Imports
1944-45 1947-48 1949-50


5.9

1.1
3.2



1.0
0.5


5.9

1,8
5.5



1.5
0.8


6.3

2.0
5.0



1.5
1.3


a/ Less than 1/10 of 1%


c'








Table 25


Relative Value of Imports from Selected Countries,
in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total value)

Country 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

All Countries (1,000 dollars) 13,154 32,209 36,201

Imports from 9 countries
(percent of all countries) 86.8 95.3 95.6

United States 81.6 81.7 76.2
Canada 1.6 3.2 4.5
United Kingdom 1,1 2.4 4.1
Belgium-Luxemburg -- 1.1 2.0
France a/ 1.0 1.4
Italy -- 0.2 1.4
Germany a/ 1.3
India 1.3 1.4 1.0
Netherlands -- 1.2 0.2


a/ Less than 1/10 of 1%


The predominance of the United States in the import trade is in keeping
with the historical tendencies in the United States-Haitian trade relations,
but the positions of the United Kingdom, Belgium-Luxemburg, France and Germany
represent a marked departure from the historical pattern and to a large extent
are a reflection of the disruptive forces of the war on international trade
relations. The rapid growth of the import trade with Canada may be indicative
of the development of a new source of imports.

On the basis of the data shown in Table 24, there appears to be a reaso-
nably good dispersion of commodities throughout the SITC. Although it is by no
means a perfectly balanced dispersion, it is not highly concentrated in a single
commodity group or division and, further, it possesses a substantial degree of
stability in composition, This same general characteristic is apparent when
the import trade is considered on a country-by-commodity basis. Aside from cer-
tain exceptions -- textile goods imported from Mexico and India, and petroleum
products from the Netherlands Antilles -- there appears to be little tendency
for the trade of a country to be dominated by a single commodity to the extent
that such occurs in the export trade where coffee for example, accounted for
better than nine-tenths of the exports to four out of seven countries in 1949-
50 (see Table 4, above). The breadth of the commodity basis of the trade by
countries is apparent from Table XIII Appendix B, in which are shown imports by
selected countries of origin by selected commodity divisions for the period


- 34 -











1944-45 to 1949-50, indicating for each country the number of selected divisions
and the percent of total imports from that country represented by the divisions.


B, IMPORTS BY SIGNIFICANT .;- AiODITIES


(1) Textile Yarns, Fabrics, Made-up Articles and Related Products: The most im-
portant single import commodity division'is that of textile yarn, fabrics, made-
up articles and related products consisting of six commodity.groups of which
cotton is the principal group. The principal commodity groups comprising this
division are indicated in Table 26 showing the value of imports by.groups.


Table 26

Imports of Textile Yarn, Fabrics, Made-up Articles and Related Products
by Commodity Groups, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(Value in thousands of dollars)


Commodity Group


Total


Textile yarn and thread
Cotton fabrics of standard type
Textile fabrics of standard type other
than cotton fabrics
Tule, lace, embroidery, ribbons, trimmings
and other small wares
Made-up articles


1944-45 1947-48 1949-50


3,701

187
2,977


8,722 10,824

567 484
6,444 8,276


240 1,103


There were, in addition to the above-listed groups, some imports of special
textile fabrics and related products, the aggregate value of which was insigni-
ficant.

Although the United States is the source for between four-fifths and seven-
eights of the imports of textile goods, substantial amounts were received from
Mexico and the United Kingdom, with India and Czechoslovakia showing up strongly
in 1949-50 as sources of made-up articles other than clothing and footwear,
principally in the form of jute bags used in the export of coffee and cocoa, A
summary of the imports by significant groups by selected countries of origin is
presented in Table 27.


- 35 -


1,424

33
605








Table 27


Value of Imports of Textile Goods by Significant Commodity Groups
by Selected Countries of Origin, in Selected Years,
1944-45 to 1949-50
(in thousands of dollars)

Commodity Group by Country 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Textile yarn and thread 187 567 484

Canada a/ 1 6
United States 92 441 195
Mexico 4 3 1
United Kingdom 85 54 141

4 countries as % total 96.8 88.0 70.9

Cotton fabrics of standard type (not
including narrow and special fabrics) 2,977 6,444 8,276

Canada a/ 15 28
United States 2,496 5,493 7,782
Mexico 461 440 363
United Kingdom 16 29 38

4 countries as % total 99.9 92.8 99.2

Textile fabrics of standard type (not
including narrow and special fabrics),
other than cotton 240 1,103 1,424

Canada 1 1 1
United States 222 1,038 1,300
United Kingdom 12 23 23

3 countries as % total 97.9 96.3 93.0

Made-up articles wholly or chiefly of
textile materials n.e.s. (other than
clothing and footwear) 295 603 605

United States 135 172 179
Czechoslovakia -- 115
India -160 430 297

3 countries as % total 100.0 99.8 97.7


a/ Less than $500.


- 36 -









(2) Cereals and Cereal Preparations: The second most important division of
imports is that of cereals and cereal preparations of which wheat flour is the
most significant item in the division. Imports of wheat flour during the six-
year period 1944-45 to 1949-50 ranged in quantity from 14,800 to 23,500 metric
tons and in value from $1,000,000 to $3,700,000, with Canada and the United
States supplying the bulk of the wheat flour and cereals and cereal prepara-
tions in general. Rice, unmilled cereals other than wheat and rice, and cereal
preparations including preparations from flour and fecula of fruits and vegeta-
bles constitute the balance of the division, ranging in quantity between 296 and
1,131 metric tons and in value between $530,000 and 4il,900,000.

(3) Machinery and Transport Equipment: Machinery other than electric rank fourth
at the divisional level, with transport equipment fourth. Imports of machinery
are destined primarily for mining, construction and other industrial uses,
although the inward movement of agricultural machinery and implements is not
without significance. The relative proportions of these two groups are indica-
ted in Table 28.


Table 28

Relative Value of Imports of Agricultural Machinery and Implements,
and Mining, Construction and other Industrial Machinery
1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total value of Machinery other than Electric)


Mining, Construction
Total Machinery Agricultural and other Industrial
Year (1,000 dollars) Machinery & Implemnents Machinery

1944-45 781 29.3 70.7
1945-46 1,269 9.9 91.1
1946-47 885 29.6 70.4
1947-48 1,914 35.6 64.4
1948-49 3,674 29.7 70,3
1949-50 2,275 44.7 55.3



Until 1947-48 all but a negligible portion of the imports of machinery
other than electric originated in the United States. With the recovery of
Europe the position of the United States was challenged and, as a result of
the increased imports from the United Kingdom and other countries of Europe,
suffered a noticeable decline, particularly in agricultural machinery and
implements. (See Table 29).


- 37 -








Table 29


Value of Imports of Machinery other than Electric by Commodity
Groups by Country of Origin, in Selected Years,
1944-45 to 1949-50
(in thousands of dollars)

1944-45 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50

Total. 781 1,914 3,674 2,275

United States 763 1,801 2,261 1,716
Cuba 4 11 29 127
Venezuela / 1,086 a/
United Kingdom 8 33 107 166
Belgium 1 16 37
France 16 16 29
Germany 2 73 57
Italy .. 2 70

Agricultured machinery and
implements 229 681 1,091 1,016

United States 222 631 832 708
Cuba 4 12 -
United Kingdom 8 32 92 137
Netherlands 12 59 38
Belgium a 13 21
France a/ 1 1
Germany 69 39
Italy 1 65

Mining, construction and other
industrial machinery 551 1,233 2,583 1,259

United States 541 1,170 1,427 1,008
Cuba 4 7 17 127
Venezuela a/ 1,086 a/
United Kingdom 1 15 29
Belgium 1 3 16
France 16 15 28
Germany 2 4 18
Italy 1 5


In the field of transport equipment the position of the United States
completely dominates the picture, and despite the substantial gains made by
the United Kingdom in 1948-49 and 1949-50 the relative position of that country


- 38 -









did not exceed 3 percent of the total value of imports of this division,
Automobiles and trucks are the principal imports, with the former leading by
a slight margin.

(4) Base Icotals: The imports of commodities fabricated from base metals are
primarily of iron and steel in the form of bars, beams, rods, plates, sheets,
pipes and fittings, railroad tracks, and wire, as well as some articles of
copper and copper alloys. Until 1948-49 the United States was the source for
more than nine-tenths of the total value of such imports, but her position
declined as imports from Belgium-Luxemburg rose to 16 percent of the total in
1949-50 as compared with only 5 percent the previous year.

(5) Chemicals: Perfumery, cosmetics, soaps, and cleansing and polishing prepa-
ration is the principal group, with medicinal and pharmaceutical products ran-
king second, and pigments, paints, varnishes and related materials ranking
third. Imports of inorganic chemicals arc no li-ible, as are also those of
fertilizers and explosives. The group composition of this division in terms
of relative value is shown in Table 30.


Table 30

Relative Value of Imports of Chemicals by Commodity Groups,
in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total chemicals)

Group 1944-45 1947-48 1949-50

Value of all chemicals (1,000 dollars) 1,446 3,142 3,819

Inorganic chemicals 0,8 0.8 o.6
Pigments, paints, varnishes 11.7 10.9 13.6
Medicinal and pharmaceuticals 20.7 25.7 28,0
Perfumery, cosmetics, etc. 66.5 61.6 57.5
Fertilizers 0.2 0,3 a/
Explosives 0.1 0.5 0.2


The bulk of the imports of the principal chemicals comes from the United
States, with the United Kingdom occupying second place as a source. Although
Canada, France, the Netherlands and Switzerland constitute relatively important
sources they are not of the same magnitude as the United States and the United
Kingdom. The relative value of imports of the principal chemicals from the
United States and the United Kingdom is indicated in Table 31, together with
the aggregate value of imports from secondary sources of supply.


- 39 -








Table 31


Relative value of Imports of Selected Chemicals* by Selected
Countries, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total)

1924-t2 1947-48 1949-50

Total Value (1,000 dollars)* 1,431 3,089 2,994

United States 59.5 65.7 59.8
United Kingdom 0.4 18.5 28.7
Others--* 8.4 13.6 8.0

Total 68,3 97.8 96.5

*Consists of dyeing, tanning and coloring materials; medicinal and
pharmaceutical products; and essential oils and perfume materials;
toilet, polishing and cleansing preparations,
**Consists of Canada, France, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.


(6) Minerals Fuels, Lubricants and related products: The imports of mineral
fuels, lubricants and related products consist primarily of petroleum products
in the form of gasoline, lubricating oils and kerosene. The trade in coal,
coke and other forms of solid fuels is negligible. Beginning in 1945-46 the
Netherlands Antilles became the principal source for petroleum products, out-
stripping the United States by a-margin as high as 4.5 to 1. Imports from
Puerto Rico declined rapidly after 1944-45. The country distribution of im-
ports of this division are shown in Table 32.


Table 32

Imports of Mineral Fuels, Lubricants and Related Products
by Country, in Selected Years, 1944-45 to 1949-50
(as percent of total)

1944-45 1947-4 199-0

Total (1,000 dollars) 534 1,373 1,431

United States 25.1 25.9 22,7
Netherlands Antilles 28.8 70.7 76.8
Others 46,1 3.4 0.5


- 40 -






























PART II

Statistical Data Relating to the Foreign Trade of Haiti

1945-1950



































Appendix A

Statistical Data Relating to the Export Trade of Haiti









Table I

EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE BY SECTIONS OF THE SITC, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S, dollars)


Section Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Sectional Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


TOTAL


17,112

12,790

8


2,446

54

367


Food

Beverages and tobacco

Crude materials, inedible,
except fuels

Animal and vegetable oils and fats

Chemicals

Manufactured goods classified
chiefly by material

Miscellaneous manufactured articles

Miscellaneous transactions and
commodities, n.e.So


22,823

14,863

41


5,301

76

502


524 528

922 1,515


Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding.


a/ Less than $500.


HAITI


31,498

22,861

60


6,856

56

542


292

831


30,885

17,999

16


10,773

55

207


259

1,575


31,020

17,936

12


11,385

40

315


305

1,027


38,480

25,962

12


10,926

23

616


275

663






Table II
EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE BY SECTIONS AND DIVISIONS OF THE SITC, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Sec. & Div. Sectional and Divisional Fiscal year ending September 30tho
Code Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 149 _1950


TOTAL


FOOD


17,112 22,823 31,498 30,885 31,020 38,480

12,790 14,863 22,861 17,999 17,936 25,962


00 Live animals, chiefly for food
02 Dairy products, eggs and honey
04 Cereal and cereal preparations
05 Fruits and vegetables
06 Sugar and sugar preparations
07 Coffee, tea, cocoa, spices, and
manufactures thereof
08 Feeding stuff for animals (not including
unmilled cereals)
09 Miscellaneous food preparations


a/ 2
59 101
48 220
2,723 4,440
2,363 2,050

7,506 7,878


1
68
173
6,403
3,174


31
22
2,878
2,779


9
a/
1,825
1,660


a/
52
13
1,406
3,075


12,910 12,047 14,342 21,318


243
a/


BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO

Beverages
Tobacco and tobacco manufactures


CRUDE MATERIALS, INEDIBLE, EXCEPT FUELS

21 Hides, skins and fur skins,
undressed
22 Oil-seeds, oil nuts and oil kernels
23 Crude rubber, including synthetic
and reclaimed
24 Wood, lumber and cork
26 Textile fibers (not manufactured into
yarn, thread or fabrics and waste)


2,446 5,301 6,856 10,773 11,385 10,926


135
126

10
99


155
212

3
70


295
615

1
40


343
439


7


390
290


329
394


8 12


2,017 4,697 5,828 9,975 10,647 10,152


HAITI





Table II (Continued)


Sec. & Div.


Sectional and Divisional


190. C


Fiscal year ending
QI A IQ4,7


September
1Q/, 8


30th.
1I qq


Code uitle Descriptions ~d.!
I 1Q]. 8


28 Metalliferous ores and metal scrap
29 Animal and vegetable crude materials,
inedible, n.e.s.

ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS

41 Animal and vegetable oils (not essential
oils), fats, greases and derivatives

CHEMICALS

55 Essential oils and perfume materials,
toilet, polishing and cleansing
preparations

MANUFACTURED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY
BY MATERIAL

63 Wood and cork manufactures (excluding
furniture)
65 Textile yarn, fabrics, made-up articles
and related products
66 Non-metallic mineral manufactures, noe.oS
67 Silver, platinum, gems and jewellery
68 Base metals
69 Manufactures of metals


- 1

61 162


524


453

65
4
3


76


76

502



502


528


333

187
7
1


MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES


922 1,515


831 1,575 1,027


Furniture and fixtures 10 1
Travel goods, handbags and similar
articles 387 492


166 291


56


56

542



542


292


210

62
17
2


55


55

207



207


259


161

98
a
a

2a/


616



616


275


229


'


HAITI






Table 11 (Cor!tinued)


Sec. & Div, Sectional and Divisional Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


Clothing
Footwear
Miscellaneous manufactured articles,
ne.s,


30
230

264


71
689

260


80
452

120


25
1,177


90 127


9 MISCELLANEOUS TRANSACTIONS AND COMMODITIES,
N.E.S.

92 Live animals, not for food




Mo Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding


a/ Less than $500.


HAITI








Table III


EXPORTS OF SIGNIFICANT COMMODITY GROUPS, 1945-1950
(Quantity in metric tons except as indicated;
value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Group Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Group Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


026 Natural honey
Quantity
Value


042 Rice


Quantity
Value


268 1,069
40 178


044 Maize (corr:), unfilled
Quanti ty
Value


051 Fruits and nuts, fresh (not including oil
nuts) c/
Value

(051-03) Bananas, not including plaintains
Quantity (1,000 stems)
Value

Fruits and nuts, fresh, other than bananas
Quantity
Value


2,645 4,377 6,306 2,853 1,771 1,339


4,015
2,507


936
138


5,859
4,023


1,207
354


7,302
6,130


1,049
177


3,547 2,156
2,840 1,691


753
79


254
59


464
101


141
30


376
52


165
68


700
152


294
17


768
41


216
12


1,842
1,307


392
32


HAITI








Table III (Continued)


Group Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Group Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


053 Fruits preserved and fruit preparations
Quantity
Value

054 Vegetables, fresh and dry, roots and tubers,
not including artificially dehydrated
Quantity
Value


538
59


401
30



172
33


477
56



172
40


142
20



11
5


360
41


310
32


061 Sugar
Quantity
Value

071 Coffee
Quantity
Value

072 Cocoa
Quantity
Value


41,911 35,953 39,500 34,270
2,363 2,051 3,174 2,779


29,968
7,290


1,264
216


24,283
7,630


24,659
12,131


31,013
1,660


44,762
3,075


22,733 27,824 26,242
10,775 13,449 20,455


1,255 1,914 1,795 1,560
248 779 1,272 894


081 Feeding stuff for animals (not including
unmilled cereals)
Quantity
Value


2,871 3,243
90 172


1,971 3,421 2,163
125 243 99


112 Alcoholic beverages
Quantity (1,000 liters)
Value


1,873
863


1,947
98


167
60


HAITI








Table III (Continued)


190, '5


Fiscal year ending September 30th,
6o0, A 19Q,7 1Q9t 19A49


Code Group Title Descriptin


211 Hides and skins (except fur skins), undressed
Quantity
Value

221 Oil-seeds, oil nuts and oil kernels
Quantity
Value


263 Cotton
Quantity
Value


i 265 Vegetable fiburs, except cotton and jute
Quantity
Value


(265-04) Sisal
Quantity
Value


211
135


1,752
126


267
295


306
343


2,051 3,239 2,483
212 615 439


1,037 4,868
329 1,747


9,186
1,687


9,167
1,676


16,822
2,949


16,821
2,948


268 3,290
155 1,861


21,157
5,671


26,077
8,113


21,157 26,077
5,671 8,113


328
390


271
329


2,355 3,319
290 394


2,055 1,289
1,336 862


29,710 33,490
9,311 9,289


29,710
9,311


33,426
9,270


291 Crude animal materials, inedible, n.e.s,
Quantity
Value

292 Crude vegetable materials, inedible, n.e.oS
Quantity
Value

413 Oil and fats processed, and waxes of animal or
vegetable origin
Quantity
Value


4,297 3,390
2 1


7,420
59


2,599
1


844
- b/


1,116
39


c/ 5,097
161 77


Group


1950


HAITI


/-1-- -__ m*.!^ 7"\_ ^riLk-i K-L *! rt,rt







Table III (Continued)


Group Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Group Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


551 Essential oils, perfume and flavor materials
Quantity (kilos)
Value

632 Wood manufactures, n.e.s,
Quantity
Value

655 Special textile fabrics and related products,
i Quantity,
j Value

S 657 Floor coverings and tapestries
Quantity
Value

821 Furniture and fixtures
Quantity
Value

831 Travel goods and handbags and similar articles
Quantity
Value

841 Clothing except fur clothing
Quantity
Value


39,561 47,964 79,096 64,723
367 502 542 207


289
453


50
41


32
24


34
10


181
387


5
30


199
333


76
59


380
128


3
1


297
492


7
71


109
210


4
8


109
54


22
12


118
166


11
80


93
161


5
6


144
90


6
4


157
291


4
25


89,200 84,676
315 616


110
212


11
9


67
81


111
229


9
8


52
36


HAITI








Table III (Continued)


Group Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Group Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


851 Footwear
Quantity
Value

899 Manufactured articles n.e.s.
Quantity
Value


193
264


220
689


186
260


162 452
452 1,177


110
120


Less than 500 kilos
Less than $500
Quantity not in comparable units


HAITI


320
731






HAITI


Table IV
EXPORTS OF SIGNIFICANT CODMODITY GROUPS BY SELECTED COUNTRIES 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Group Commodity Groups by Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Selected Countries 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


051 Fruits and nuts, fresh (not including
oil nuts)


United States
Bahama Islands


2,645 4,377 6,306 2,853 1,771 1,339


2,634 4,364
11 12


061 Sugar

United States
Bahama Islands
United Kingdom
Netherlands
Belgium-Luxemburg
Germany


071 Coffee


2,363

412
6
1,943
-


2,051 3,174 2,779 1,660 3,075


374
9
1,667

-


327
.1
2,835
a/11
-


669
1
2,109
a/


180
1
1,479


280
a/
691
1,984
120
120


7,290 7,630 12,131 10,775 13,449 20,455


239
6,354
6
a/
27
-
-


Canada
United States
Bahama Islands
Cuba
Netherlands Antilles
Puerto Rico
Sweden
Norway
United Kingdom
Netherlands
Belgium


6,283
17


2,845
8


1,757
13


1,333
6


452
3,130

1,472
23
18
68
372
8
30
1,072


3,483
5
a/
2

185
2,601
21
537
3,338


38
3,191
2



109
1,073
a/
705
3,306


154
4,119
1
1,165



330
a/
1,112
3,461


329
8,018


a/


64

1,409
5,744







Table IV (Continued)


Group Commodity Groups by Fiscal year ending September 30tho
Code Selected Countries 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


071 Coffee (Continued)

France
Switzerland
Italy
Syria

072 Cocoa

United States
Mexico
Cuba
Netherlands
Italy
China

211 Hides and skins (except fur skins),
undressed

United States

221 Oil-seeds, oil nuts and oil kernels

United States
Bahama Islands
Cuba


664


101
81
33
-



135

135

126

118
4
4


624
359


210
14
24





155

155

212

205
6
3


33
566
1,275
85


737


5
32
5


295

295

615

587
4
24


2
462
1,878
9


1,077


172
23



343

343

439


5
156
2,838
107


890


3




390

390

290


434
4
3/


10
375
4,436
68


857


6




329

329

394

391
3
-


263 Cotton 329 1,747

Colombia 320 1,746
United Kingdom a/


155 1,861 1,336


148
1,106 1,018


HAITI






Table IV (Continued)


Group Commodity Groups by Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Selected Countries 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


263 Cotton (Continued)

Netherlands
Belgium
France

265 Vegetable fibers, except cotton and
jute


Canada
United States
Dominican Republic
United Kingdom
Belgium
France


292 Crude vegetable materials, inedible,
n.e.s.


146 74 8
417 94 24
id 191 b/ -


1,687 2,949 5,671 8,113 9,311 9,289


1,682
-
-
-


2,859
12

69


5,264


161
235


7,854
59
1
36
131


6
9,045
107
34
22
91


32
8,676
101

303
144


59 161


United States
Cuba
Netherlands Antilles
Puerto Rico


413 Oils and fats processed, and waxes of
animal or vegetable origin

United States
Belgium


160
-



76

76


HAITI







HAITI Table IV (Continued)


Group Commodity Groups by Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Selected Countries 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950

551 Essential oils, perfume and flavor
materials 367 502 542 207 315 616

United States 366 499 536 205 315 593
Netherlands 1 2 -
France 1 2 22

632 Wocd manufactures, n.e.s. 453 333 210 161 212 229

Canada 58 32 13 a/ a/ a/
United States 381 283 142 102 130 162
Canal Zone a/ a/ 9 18 4 4
Bahama Islands a/ 1 2 1 a/ 1
Cuba 11 31 21 38 39
Trinidad 1 a/ 2 -
Netherlands Antilles 2 1 1 1 1 1
Virgin Islands a/ 1 2 5 4 4
Puerto Rico 11 2 5 8 29 14

831 Travel goods and handbags, and
similar articles 387 492 166 291 181 70

Canada 36 25 a/ a/ a/ a/
United States 345 458 150 267 166 61
Canal Zone 2 a/ a/ 3 / -
Bahama Islands a/ 1 4 3 a/ a/
Cuba / 2 2 1 2 1
Lh the-lands Antilles 4 2 5 7 4 1
Virgin Islands a/ 2 2 5 5 3
Puerto Rico a a/ 2 4 2 3






Table IV (Continued)


Group Commodity Groups by Fiscal year ending September 30th
Code Selected Countries 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


851 Footwear


230


Canada
United States
Canal Zone
Bahama Islands
Cuba
Netherlands Antilles
Virgin Islands
Puerto Rico
British Guiana
Surinam'
Switzerland


1
215
a/]
a
a/
3
1
a/
5
1


689

24
638
1
2
3
8
3
1

6


452 1,177


a/
393
1
6
7
15
5
6
2
2


- 13


1,153
1,153


Less than $500.
Data not indicated in source


731

a/
718
a/
2
3
2
3
2


445

a/
438

2
3

1
1


HAITI





HAITI Table V

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF EXPORTS BY SIGNIFICANT
COMTCODITY GROUPS, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Geographical Area by Significant Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Commodity Groups 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950

Northern North America 13,188 13,949 18,345 18,239 18,239 21,547

051 Fruits and nuts, fresh (not including
oil nuts) 2,634 4,364 6,290 2,845 1,757 1,333
061 Sugar 412 374 327 669 180 280
071 Coffee 6,593 3,582 3,483 3,229 4,273 8,347
072 Cocoa 101 210 737 1,077 890 857
S 211 Hides and skins (except fur skins),
VI undressed 134 152 291 343 390 329
o0 221 Oil-seeds, oil nuts and oil kernels 118 205 587 434 288 391
1 265 Vegetable fibers, except cotton and jute 1,682 2,859 5,264 7,854 9,050 8,708
292 Crude vegetable materials, inedible, n.e.s, 58 161 76 6 45 25
413 Oils and fats processed, and waxes of
animal or vegetable origin 54 76 56 55 37 22
551 Essential oils, perfume and flavor materials 366 506 536 205 315 593
632 Wood manufactures, n.e.So 439 314 155 102 130 162
831 Travel goods, handbags, and similar articles 381 483 150 267 166 62
851 Footwear 216 663 393 1,153 718 438

13 groups as % total exports to northern
North America 96.3 95.0 97.5 98.4 98.7 98.7

Caribbean 122 1,624 160 148 1,396 210

051 Fruits and nuts, fresh (not including
oil nuts) 11 13 17 9 13 6
061 Sugar 8 9 1 1 1 a/
071 Coffee 33 1,514 7 2 1,166
072 Cocoa 33 24 1 -





HAITI Table V (Continue



Geographical Area by Significant
cwnimodity Groups 1945


d)


Fiscal year ending September 30th.
1946 1947 1948 1949


221 Oil-seeds, oil nuts and oil kernels
265 Vegetable Tibers, except cotton and jute
632 Wood manufactures, n.e.s.
831 Travel goods, handbags, and similar
articles
851 Footwear

9 groups as % total exports to Caribbean

Northern South America

263 Cotton

As % total exports to northern South America

Northwestern Europe

061 Sugar
071 Coffee
072 *oc--
263 Cot-toi
265 Vegetable fibers, except cotton and jute
551 Essential oils, perfume and flavor materials

6 groups as % total exports to northwestern
Europe

Central Europe

071 Coffee


8
5
13

5
6

40.1

320

320

85.3

1,943

1,943






98.1

664

664


10
12
16

9
17

82.6

1,746

1,746

97.2

3,287

1,667
1,550
a/

69
1


98.6

624

624


28
8
43

15
41

33.9

84

84

84.8

10,036

2,846
6,716
5
70
396
3


99.3

566

566


62


9,5:

2,1C
5,19
17
1,86
2C


4 2
59 112
36 76

21 14
L6 11

.7 95.9

- 148

- 148

- 98.0

39 7,725

)9 1,479
75 4,908
'2 3
1~ 1,187
)0 148
2


98.3

462

462


98.9

156

156


As % exports to Central Europe


1950


3
126
60

8
7

70.5

262

262

98.9

11,098

2,795
7,228
6
600
447
22


99.3

375

375


99.7 96.0


97.6 100.0 100.0 97.7


--I


-"1---'-- 1--s~--


-- ,, DUU_,~- ~L~MUCI-y~C-~ -I ~ i------UI--9LQ --







Table V (Continued)


Geographical Area by Significant
Commodity Groups


1945


Southwestern Europe

071 Coffee
072 Cocoa

2 groups as % total exports to southwestern
Europe

Western Asia

071 Coffee

As % total exports to Western Asia


Fiscal year ending Sept ent er 30th.


Less than $500.

Data not indicated in source


Fiscal year ending
S 1946 1947

359 1,307

359 1,275
32


100.0 100.0

S- 85

85

100.0


HAITI


- -- ---


September
1948

1,901

1,878
23


100.0

9

9

100.0


30th.
1949

2,838

2,838



99.9

107

107

100.0


1950

4,436

4,436



99.9

68

68

100.0


m







Table VI

GEOGRAPHICAL DESTINATION OF EXPORTS, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Continents and Areas 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


Total Exports

North America

Northern
Southern

Mexico
Central America
Caribbean

South America

Northern
Western
Eastern

Europe

Northwestern
Central
Southwestern

Africa


17,112

14,087

13,698
,389

82
3
304

377

375
a/
2

2,648

1,981
666
a/


22,823

16,665

14,677
1,988

20
1
1,967

1,814

1,797
a/
17

4,342

3,333
650
359


31,498 30,885

19,305 18,796

18,822 18,532
483 265

a/ a/
11 29
472 236

110 9

99 7
a/ a/
10 2

11,995 12,071

10,108 9,708
580 462
1,307 1,901

a/


Northern
Southern


HAITI


38,480

22,144

21,841
303

a/
5
298

266

265
a/
1

16,002

11,181
384
4,437


31,020

19,953

18,488
1,465

1
8
1,456

151

151
a


10,805

7,809
156
2,840

4

4
a/








Table VI (Continued)


Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Continents and Areas 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


9 107

9 107


Asia


Western
Southern
Southeastern
Eastern


i Note: Details may not add to totals due to rcunding


I a/ Less than $500.


HAITI







Table VII


DISTRIBUTION OF EXPORTS BY COUNTRY, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of UoS. dollars)


Fiscal year ending September 30th,
Country 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950

Total Exports 17,112 22,823 31,498 30,885 31,020 38,480

North America 14,087 16,665 19,305 18,796 19,953 22,144

Northern 13,698 14,677 18,822 18,532 18,488 21,841
Canada 395 538 36 40 163 363
United States 13,303 14,139 18,786 18,492 18,325 21,479
o Southern 389 1,988 483 265 1,465 303
Mexico 82 20 / a/ 1 /

Central America 3 1 11 29 8 5
Guatemala / a/ / a/ -
El Salvador -/ -
Honduras / 3 a
Costa Rica a/ a/ a/ a a/
Canal Zone 3 1 11 29 5 4
Caribbean 304 1,967 472 236 1,456 298
Bermuda a/ a/ 1 1 a/
Bahama Islands 69 67 110 43 31 31
Cuba 74 1,704 84 23 1,234 47
Jamaica 6 1 8 7 4 5
Dominican Republic 2 23 3 60 108 119
Leeward and Windward Islands 2 1 a/ a/ a/ -
Barbadas 40 18 17 a/ a/
Trinidad a/ 1 4 10 3 1


HAITI







HAITI Table VII (Continued)


Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Country 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950
Caribbean (Continued)
Netherlands Antilles 48 83 164 38 19 15
French West Indies a/ 7 24 3 1 a/
Virgin Islands 1 6 10 17 16 12
Puerto Rico 102 35 47 17 41 68

South America 377 1,814 110 9 151 266
Northern 375 1,797 99 7 151 265
Colombia 320 1,746 84 a/ 148 262
SVenezuela 49 45 13 2 2 3
oS British Guiana 5 a/ a/ 3 -
Surinam 2 6 2 2 -
Western a/ a a/ a/ a
Ecuador a a
Peru a/ a/ a
Bolivia / -
Chile a/ a/ a/ a/ a/ a/

Eastern 2 17 10 2 a 1
Brazil a/ a/ a/ a/ a/ 1
Paraguay / -
Uruguay 1 1 a/ a -
Argentina 1 16 10 2 a-

Europe 2,648 4,342 11,995 12,071 10,805 16,002
Northwestern 1,981 3,333 10,108 9,708 7,809 11,181
Sweden 69 188 123 -
Norway 372 2,601 1,073 330 64








Table VII (Continued)


Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Country 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


Northwestern (Continued)
Denmark
United Kingdom
Netherlands
Belgium-Luxemburg
France
Germany


Central
Austria'
Czechoslovakia
Switzerland


1,981


1,676
40
1,168
9
a/


a/
2,928
546
3,564
280


666


133
3,216
1,027
3,764
339
33


8O 462
a/

30 462


55
2,535
1,190
3,578
117
3


1
1,260
3,414
6,086
190
166


156

156
156


Southwestern
Spain
Portugal
Italy


359


1,307
-


-9 a/
359 1,307


1,901 2,840 4,437


1,901 2,840 4,437


Africa


Northern
French Morocco

Southern
British Africa


9 107


Western
Syria
Israel and Palestine


Asia


HAITI







HAITI


Country

Southern
India

Southeastern
Philippines

Eastern
China
Hawaii


Table VII (Continued)


Fiscal year ending September 30th.
1945 1946 1947 1948 1949







1- 5/ /
5- -


I


Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding


a/ Less than $500.


1950




































Appendix B

Statistical Data Relating to the Import Trade of Haiti










Table VIII

IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE BY SECTIONS OF THE SITC, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Section Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Sectional Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


13,154

3,061

295


TOTAL


O Food

1 Beverages and Tobacco

2 Crude materials, inedible except
fuels

3 Mineral fuels, lubricants and related
materials

4 Animal and Vegetable oils and fats

5 Chemicals

6 Manufactured goods classified chiefly
by material

7 Machinery and transport equipment

8 Miscellaneous manufactured articles


15,922

2,652

511


26


534 543

141 132

1,446 1,400


5,434

1,347


6,898

2,206


27,230

4,070

669


11


827

289

2,285


13,366

2,520


32,209

6,025

790


31,427

6,301

782


93 336


1,373

249

3,142


13,235

4,267


1,723

509

2,506


11,462

5,930


36,201

6,644

842


447


1,431

321

3,019


16,333

4,814


890 1,554 3,194 3,034 1,878 2,350


Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding.


HAITI







Table IX

IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE BY SECTIONS AND DIVISIONS OF THE SITC, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U. S. dollars)


Sec & Div Sectional and Divisional Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


TOTAL


FOOD


13,154 15,922 27,230 32,209 31,427 36,201

3,061 2,652 4,070 6,025 6,301 6,644


00 Live animals, chiefly for food
01 Meat and meat preparations
02 Dairy products, eggs and honey
03 Fish and fish preparations
04 Cereals and cereal preparations
05 Fruits and vegetables
06 Sugar and sugar preparations
07 Coffee, tea, cocoa, spices and
manufactures thereof
09 Miscellaneous food preparations

BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO

11 Beverages
12 Tobacco and tobacco manufactures

CRUDE MATERIALS, INEDIBLE, EXCEPT FUELS

24 Wood, lumber and cork
26 Textile fibers (not manufactured into yarn,
thread or fabrics) and waste

MINERAL FUELS, LUBRICANTS AND RELATED MATERIALS

31 Mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials


1
47
192
82
2,344
60
21


3
46
213
68
1,932
49
29

59
253


511

100
411

26

23

2

543


534 543


2
58
387
393
2,581
103
50

134
362


669

153
515


2
87
495
685
4,103
143
58

34
418


790

208
583


7
78
419
673
3,951
160
69


8
128
569
959
3,511
187
96


45 110
899 1,075


782

203
579


93 336

89 331


447

439


827 1,373 1,723 1,431

827 1,373 1,723 1,431


HAITI






Table IX (Continued)


Sec & Div
Code


Sectional and Divisional
Title Descriptions


Fiscal year ending


19L5


1946


1947


September 30th.
1948 1949


ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE JILS AND FATS

41 Animal and vegetable oils (not essential
oils), fats, greases and derivatives


CHEMICALS


1,446 1,400 2,285 3,142 2,506 3,019


51 Chemical elements and compounds
53 Dyeing, tanning and coloring materials
54 Medicinal and pharmaceutical products
55 Essential oils and perfume materials,
toilet, polishing and cleansing
preparations
56 Fertilizers, manufactured
59 Explosives and miscellaneous chemical
materials and products

MANUFACTURED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY
MATERIAL

61 Leather, leather manufactures, n.e.s.,
and dressed furs

62 Rubber manufactures, n.e.s.
63 Wood and cork manufactures excludingg
furniture)
64 Paper, paperboard and manufactures, thereof
65 Textile yarn, fabrics, madeup articles and
related products
66 Non-metalic minerals manufactures, n.e.s.
67 Silver, platinum, gems and jewellery
68 Base metals


12
169
300


962
3


9
182
395


812
1


26
344
809


1,299 1,936
6 10


5,434 6,898 13,366 13,235 11,462 16,333


75 153


168

35
237

3,701
416
32
545


35
400

4,246
557
33
744


45
339

9,005
1,141
100
859


35
507

8,722
893
127
1,201


132


132


141


1950


509


509


20
289
633


1,476
10


18
412
846


1,736
a/


185

398

40
475

6,361
1,038
118
1,905


240

513

85
492

10,821
1,152
174
1,768


------


II


-' "


HAITI







Table IX (Continued)


Sec & Div Sectional and Divisional Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


69 Fanufactures of metals


253


332 1,236 1,165


943 1,088


MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT

71 Fachinery other than electric
72 Electric machinery, apparatus and
appliances
73 Transport equipment

MiSCELLANEOUS LA1UFACTURED ARTICLES


1,347 2,206 2,520 4,267 5,930 4,814


781 1,269


885 1,914 3,674 2,275


256 388 582
681 1,248 1,772


890 1,554 3,194 3,034 1,878 2,350


81 Prefabricated


buildings; sanitary, plumbing,


heating and lighting fixtures and fittings
82 Furniture and fixtures
84 Clothing
85 Footwear
86 Professional, scientific and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods, watches and clocks
89 Miscellaneous manufacturing articles, n.e.s.


19
1
130
73


18
4
186
32


6a 1 25
667 1,289


24
10
399
109


54
2,597


39
25
478
245


86
2,161


87
60
422
345


46
23
556
465


55 71
909 1,189


Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding,


a/ Less than $500.


1 8


658
1,598


734
1,805


HAITI






Table X


IMPORTS BY SIGNIFICANT DIVISIONS AND SELECTED GROUPS OF COME1DITIES 1945-1950
(Quantity in metric tons except as indicated*;
value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Div Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Division Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


Meat and meat preparations
Quantity
Value


Dairy products, eggs and honey
Quantity
Value

022 Milk and cream: evaporated, condensed
or dried
Quantity
Value


366
192


67
46


384
213



271
107


75
58


585
387



435
202


117
87


733
495



603
307


93
78


635
419



504
241


145
128


966
569



771
329


Fish and fish preparations
Quantity
Value


459
82


428 1,814
68 393


3,619 3,963 5,865
685 673 959


031 Fish: fresh or simply preserved
Quantity
Value

Cereals and cereal preparations
Quantity
Value


451
77


22,267
2,344


419 1,786 3,596 3,903 5,823
62 371 668 636 932


16,927
1,932


15,277 20,386
2,581 4,103


23,336
3,951


24,344
3,511


* See notes at end of table.


I


HAITI







Table X (Continued)


Div Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Division Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


046 Meal and flour of wheat and spelt
(including meslin)
Quantity
Value


21,974 16,530
2,238 1,806


14,821 19,292 22,205
2,401 3,730 3,576


Fruits and vegetables
Quantity
Value


Miscellaneous food preparations (value)'

091 Margarine and shortenings
Quantity
Value

Beverages
Quantity (1,000 liters)
Value

Tobacco and tobacco manufactures (value)

122 Tobacco manufactures (value)

Mineral fuels, lubricants and related
materials (value)

313 Petroleum products (value)

Animal and vegetable oils (not essential
oils) fats, greases and derivatives (value)


299


616
228


176
64

231

137


253


389
184


253
100

411

259


141 132


393
103

362


401
298


308
153

515

391


576
143


418 899


527 1,932
352 797


411
208

583

496


963
187


1,075


2,790
977


441
203

579

450


900
274

568

496


827 1,373 1,723 1,431

827 1,372 1,722 1,430


289 249 509 321


23,529
3,214


-~--p~c~~~~~~-~~'~ll~-~~- ~---


HAITI





Table X (Continued)


Div Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Division Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 .195Q


412 Vegetable oils
.Quantity
Value

Dyeing, tanning and coloring materials b
Quantity
Value

Medicinal and pharmaceutical products (value)

Essential oils and perfume materials,
toilet, polishing and cleansing
preparations c/ (value)

Leather, leather manufactures, n.e.s.,
and dressed furs (value)

612 Manufactures of leather and artificial or
reconstituted leather, n.e.So (value)

Rubber manufactures, ne.So (value)

Paper, paperboard and manufactures
thereof d/ (value)

Textile yarn, fabrics, made up articles and
related products (value)

652 Cotton fabrics of standard types (not
including narrow and special fabrics)
(value)


261
105


369
169

300



962


48


38

168


144
64


424.
182

295


62
48


a/
344

809


671
381


a/
289

633


582
240


a/
412

846


812 1,299 1,936 1,476 1,736


75 153


43

475


115

488


237 400 339


3,701 4,246 9,005


185


157

398


475


240


200

.513


492


8,722 6,361 10,821


2,977 3,292 7,524 6,444 4,576 8,276


.61




62

64


65'


~ _____


HAITI





Table X (Continued)


Div Fiscal year ending September 30th.


Code


1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


Division Title Descriptions

653 Textile fabrics of standard type (not
including narrow and special fabrics)
other than cotton fabric (value)

656 Made-up articles wholly or chiefly of
textile materials, n.e.s. (other
than clothing and footwear)
Quantity
Value

Non-metallic mineral manufactures, n.e.s.
(value)

661 Lime, cement and fabricated building
materials, except glass and clay
materials
Quantity
Value

665 Glassware (value)

Base metals (value)

681 Iron and steel (value)

Manufactures of metals (value)

699 Manufactures of metals, n.e.s. (value)

Machinery other than electric (value)


416




8,739
207

139

545

500

253

253

781


365




1,307
383


947 1,103 1,170 1,424


469 1,351
210 603


557 1,141


9,840
228

257

744

653

332

332

1,269


9,568
300

707

859

742

1,236

1,234

885


412
246


1,297
605


893 1,038 1,152


15,141
536

288

1,201

1,041

1,165

1,159

1,914


19,312
579

336

1,905

1,743

943

937

3,674


23,305
620

433

1,768

1,592

1,088

1,080

2,275


240




845
295


- -----I-~~-I~


HAITI






Table X (Continued)


Div Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Division Title Descriptions 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


712 Agricultural machinery and implements
(value)

716 Mining, construction and other industrial
machinery (value)

Electric machinery, apparatus and
appliances (value)

Transport equipment e/ (value)

Clothing f/ (value)

Footwear (value)

Miscellaneous manufactured articles,
n.e.s. (value)

891 Musical instruments, phonographs and
phonograph records (value)

892 Printed matter (value)

899 Manufactured articles n.e.s. (value)


125


551 1,144


141

425

130

73


262


681 1,090 1,016


622 1,233 2,583 1,259


388


582


658


734


681 1,248 1,772 1,598 1,805


399


32 109


478

245


667 1,289 2,597 2,161


621 1,241 2,522 2,062


422


465


909 1,189


749 1,077


*Where value only is shown, units of quantity were
units,
/ Not in comparable units.
Consists wholly of group 533, pigments, paints,
/ Consists wholly of group 552, perfumery, cosmet:
e/ Consists wholly of group 642, articles made of
SConsists wholly of group 732, road motor vehicle
SConsists wholly of group 841, clothing except f


either not indicated in source or were not in comparable

varnishes, and related materials.
ics, soaps, and cleansing an polishing preparations.
pulp, of paper and paperboard.
es.
ur clothing.


,- 84

S 85


HAITI







Table XI

IMPORTS OF SIGNIFICANT GROUPS OF COMMODITIES, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Group Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code 'Group Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


011 Meat: fresh, chilled or frozen
012 Meat: dried, salted smoked or cooked not canned
013 Meat: canned and meat preparations, canned
and not canned
022 Milk and cream: evaporated, condensed or
dried
023 Butter
024 Cheese and curd
031 Fish: fresh or simply preserved
032 Fish and fish preparations canned or not
042 Rice
045 Cereals, unmilled, other than wheat, rice, barley
and maize
046 Meal and flour of wheat and spelt (including
meslin)
048 Cereal preparations including preparations from
flour and fecula of fruits and vegetables
053 Fruits preserved and fruit preparations
054 Vegetable fresh and dry roots and tubers, not
including artificially dehydrated
055 Vegetables preserved and vegetable preparations
062 Sugar confectionery and other sugar
preparations
075 Spices
091 Margarine and shortenings
099 Food preparations, n.e.s.
111 Non-alcoholic beverages


35 37 51 55 54 90


107
92
14
62
6
a/


202
108
77
371
22
a/


63 88 110


2,238 1,806

44 38
11 17

30 17
19 15

21 29
15 59
228 184
72 70
10 7


307
94
94
668
17
95

158


329,
128
112
932
26
15

151


2,401 3,730 3,576 3,214


70
19

57
27

50
134
298
65
14


120
29

80
33

57
34
352
66
12


119
27

84
49

68
45
797
102
23


131
30

101
57

95
110
977
98
44


HAITI


- --`- ~--`------







Table XI (Continued)


Group Fiscal year ending September 30th,
Code Group Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


112 Alcoholic beverages
121 Tobacco unmanufactured
122 Tobacco manufactures
243 Wood shaped or simply worked
263 Cotton
311 Coal, coke, and briquettes
313 Petroleum products
412 Vegetable oils
413 Oils and fats processed, and waxes of animal
and vegetable origin
511 Inorganic chemicals
533 Pigments paints, varnishes and related
materials
541 Medicinal and pharmaceutical products
552 Perfumery, cosmetics, soaps and cleansing ar.
polishing preparations
561 Fertilizers manufactured
591 Explosives
611 Leather
612 Manufactures of leather and artificial reconstituted
leather, n.e.So
629 Rubber manufactured articles, n.eoSo
632 Wood manufactures, n.e.s.
642 Articles made of pulp, of paper and of a
paperboard
651 Textile yarn and thread
652 Cotton fabrics of standard type (not including
narrow and special fabrics)
653 Textile fabrics of standard type (not including
narrow and special fabrics), other than
cotton fabrics


54
95
137
2
3
4
530
105

36
12

169
300

962
3
1
9

38
168
32

237
187


92
152
259
23
3
a/
543
64

68
9


139
124
391
6
5

827
44

245
50


182 303
395 623


812
1
2
33

43
475
28

400
204


1,299
6
5
39

115
488
32

339
315


196
87
496
89
4
1
1,372
48

201
26

344
809

1,936
10
16
29


179
129
450
331
5
1
1,722
381


128
20


289
633

1,476
10
78
29


135 157
421 398
34 37


475
358


230
72
496
439
8
1
1,430
240


412
846

1,736
a/
7
40

200
513
81

492
484


2,977 3,292 7,524 6,444 4,576 8,276


947 1,103 1,170 1,424


__


HAITI


240 365






Table XI (Continued)


Group Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Group Title Description 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


654 Tulle, lace, embroidery, ribbons trimmings and
other srall wares
656 iade-up articles wholly or chiefly of textile
materials ne.s. (other than clothing and
footwear)
661 Lime, cement and fabricated building materials,
except glass and clay materials
663 Mineral manufactures, ne.s, not including clay
and glass
665 Glassware
666 Pottery
673 Jewellery. and goldsmiths' and silversmiths' wares
681 Iron and s eel
682 Copper
699 Manufactures of metals, neSo.
712 Agricultural machinery and implements
716 Mining, construction and other industrial machinery
721 Electric machinery, apparatus and appliances
732 Road motor vehicles
812 Sanitary, plumbing, heating and lighting fixtures
and fittings
821 Furniture and fixtures
841 Clothing except fur clothing
851 Footwear
864 Watches and clocks
891 Musical instruments, phonographs and phonograph
records
892 Printed matter
899 Manufactured articles n.e.s.


2


295

207

24
139
46
32
500
46
253
229
551
141
425

19
17
130
73
a/


2 10


383

228

33
257
38
33
653
91
332
125
1,144
256
681

18
39
186
32
25


4 7
43 41
621 1,241


210

300

19
707
115
100
742
117
1,234
262
622
388
1,248

24
10
399
109
54

18
57
2,522


5 10 33


603

536

30
288
40
127
1,041
161
1,159
681
1,233
582
1,172

39
25
478
245
86

25
74
2,062


246

579

72
336
51
118
1,743
161
937
1,090
2,583
658
1,598

87
60
422
345
55

68
92
749


605

620

44
433
56
174
1,592
176
1,080
1,016
1,259
734
1,805

46
23
556
465
71

45
67
1,077


a/ Less than $500.


-- II~-I


HAITI









IIICRTS OF SINIFICMT Cl.I; ITY DIVISIONS BY G' ,.2.FHICAL HIGIN, 1945-1950
(Value in thousands of U.S. dollars)


Div Comr.odity Division by Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Geo.rrarhical origin 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


02 Dairy products, eggs and honey

By Area

Northern North America
Southern North America
South America
Northwestern Europe
Central Europe
Southwestern Europe


387


105
3
85


119
a/
88
5


404
6
12
73
a/


By Significant Countries


Canada
United States
Argentina
Denmark
Netherlands
Belgium
France
Switzerland

03 Fish and fish preparations

By Area

Northern North America
Southern North America


a/ a/ a/
105 119 278
85 88 39
5 23
31


1 1

82 68 393


375
9


1
403
12
50
22
1
. a/
a/6

685


667
8


1
344
3
44
18
2
a/
7

673


647
8


46
415
16
47
26
1
1
15

959


862
7


Table XII


HAITI





Table XII (Continued)


Div Commodity Division by Fiscal year ending September 30th.
Code Geographical origin 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


03 Fish and fish preparations (Continued)


,South America
Northwestern Europe
Southwestern Europe
Northern Africa
Western Africa
Eastern Asia

By Significant Countries

Canada
Ujrited jta-,tcr
Bahama Islands
Netherlands Antilles
Venezuela
Netherlands
Belgium
France
Portugal
Japan


04 Cereals and cereal preparations

By Area

Northern North America
Southern North America
South America
Northwestern Europe
Central Europe


- 2
6 7 13


178
196
9
a/

J
a/
3
6


566
101
7
1

-a
2
2
7


2,344 1,932 2,581 4,103 3,951 3,511


2,340
a/
4
a/


1,930
1
a/

a]/


2,575

a/
5
a/


4,000
1
94
5
3


589
58
8



1
1
2
13


830
32
7
a/

74
2
1
1
10


3,919
6
18
7
1


3,495
a/

13
2


---


HAITI




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