Banque nationale de la République d'Haïti. Département fiscal; Annual report of the Fiscal Department (continues the Ame...

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Banque nationale de la République d'Haïti. Département fiscal; Annual report of the Fiscal Department (continues the Americn fiscal report series, see U.S. relations section below, (4-trUS-1933-40)
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Publisher:
Port-au-Prince, Imprimerie de l’Etat, 1941-.

Notes

General Note:
2b-L/E- 1941-50
General Note:
Hollis 005396553

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
ILLMC
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
LLMC31884
System ID:
AA00000769:00010

Full Text
















This volume was donated to LLMC
to enrich its on-line offerings and
for purposes of long-term preservation by

Harvard Law School Library









BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI





ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE


FISCAL DEPARTMENT


FOR THE FISCAL YEAR


OCTOBER 1949 SEPTEMBER 1950








SUBMITTED TO
THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR FINANCE
BY THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE BANQUE NATIONAL
DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI














Imprimerle de 1'Etat
PORT-AU-PRINCE. HAITI


I/













j










CONTENTS


NARRATIVE SECTION:
Pages
INTRODU CTION ...................................................................... 1
FOREIGN TRADE AND COMMERCIAL BALANCE....................................... 2
Im ports.................................................................................. ......... ....... 3
CIF Price of the main imported articles............................... ............ 5
S Index of prices of the main imported articles..:................................. 5
Origin of im ports........................................... ............... ............... 7
Imports from the United States of America............................... ........ 8
S Ports of entry of imports.......................... .................... 9
S Exports................ ..................... ................................... ................. 9
Volume of our exports................ ... ....... .... ......................... 10
Index of prices of the main exported products...................................... 11
D destination of our exports.......................... .. ....................................... 11
Destination of our exports by country............................... ................ 12
o- Exports towards the United States............................. ...................... 12
Ports of shipment of exports...................................................... 13
Main exported products............................ .............................. 14
Coffee................................ .......................................... 14
NS> Sisal................................... ........ ..................... 16
Raw sugar.................................. .............. .......................... 18
Bananas........................................................................ 19
Articles of the handicraft industry............................................... 21
S Cacao..................... .. ............... ...... ...................... 22
Cotton....................................................... .... 23
Essential oils................................................................ ................... 24
Prices, World export and production of some products which are grown
in H aiti........ ................................................................................... 25
M aritim a Traffic......... ............. ....... ....................................... 31
A ir traffic................................................................ 32
Tariff m odifications......... ............ ............... .......................... 32
PUBLIC FINANCES............................................................. .................... 34
Receipts of the Government............................. .................................. 34
Custom s receipts............................................... ................................ 35
Import duties...................... ...... ........................ .................. 35
Export duties........................................... ............... 36
Miscellaneous custom receipts.......................................... ..... 37
Internal revenue receipts............................. ............. ............... 37
Miscellaneous receipts................. ......................................... 39
Receipts from Communes................................. ................. 40
Public Expenditures............................ ......................... ...... 41
Expenditures by Department and Service...................................... 41
Classifications of extraordinary expenditures................................. 46
Classifications of fiscal expenditures by object................................ 47
Expenditures by non fiscal accounts............................................ 48
Expenditures by Department and Service.......................................... 41
Classifications of extraordinary expenditures..................................... 46
Classifications of fiscal expenditures by object............................. ...... 47

.II


7h/PH-







IV APPENDICES
Pages
Expenditures by non fiscal accounts........................... ........ 48
Communal accounts.................................. .......... ..............* ........* 48
Telephone, telegraph, radiocommunications and hydraulic services... 50
Other public services administered on non fiscal accounts................ 50
Other non fiscal accounts of pension and of savings..................... 51
Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti, Fiscal Department......... 51
Treasury position.............. .......... ... ... ......................... 52
Public debt.......................... ....................... 53
The Budget............................................... .. 54
BANK AND MONEY...................................... .. 56
BALANCE OF PAYMENTS........................... .................................... 58
BUILDING ACTIVITIES........... ........ .......... .. ................ .. 73
INTERNATIONAL FAIR OF THE BICENTENARY OF PORT-AU-PRINCE...... 73
EXTRACT OF THE REPORT OF THE .ORGANISME DU DEVELOPPEMENT
DE LA VALLEE DE L'ARTIBONITE........................ ................ 74
REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE INTER AMERICAN COOPERATIVE
OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION-OCTOBER 1949 TO SEPTEMBER 1950 77
REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE INTER AMERICAN COOPERATIVE
OF PUBLIC HEALTH-OCTOBER 1949 TO SEPTEMBER 1950....... .............. 79
CONCLUSION........................................................... 84

TABLES:
1. Value of Imports and Exports, and Excess of Imports or Exports, fiscal years
1916-17 to 1949-50.......................................... -....................- 87
2. Value of Imports showing countries of origin in percentages, fiscal years
1916-1917 to 1949-50.............................. ................................................. 87
3. Value of Exports showing countries of destination in percentages, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1949-50......... ...................................... .... ...................... 88
4. Value of Total foreign Commerce by countries in percentages, fiscal years
1916-17 to 1949-50................................ ............ ............ .............. 88
,5. Value and percentage of value of Imports, Exports, and Total Foreign Com-
Smerce by countries, fiscal year 1949-50............................................... 89
6. Value of Exports by Ports of Entry, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50.......... 90
.7. Value of Exports by Ports of Shipment Fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50......... 90
8. Value and Percentage of Value of Imports, Exports and Total foreign Com-
merce by ports, fiscal year 1949-50.................................. ............ 90
9. Net tonnage of Steam and Motor Vessels in Foreign Commerce entered by
Registry and months, fiscal year 1949-50....................... ...................... 91
10. Net tonnage of Sailing Vessels in Foreign Commerce entered by Registry
and Months, fiscal year 1949-50................................ ...... ..................... 92
11. Value of Imports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year 1949-50......... 93
12. Value of Exports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year 1949-50......... 94
13. Value of Imports by Months and Ports of Entry, fiscal year 1949-50 compared
with 1948-49................................. .................................... 95
14. Value of Exports by Months and Ports of Shipment, fiscal year 1949-50 com-
pared with 1948-49..................... ...... ................................... 95
15. Value of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50............... 96
16. Quantity of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50.......... 97
17. Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50................. 98
18. Quantity of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50........... 99
19. Quantity and Value of Five Principal Exports by ports, fiscal year 1949-50
compared with 1948-49............................... ................ ......................... 100







APPENDICES V

Pages
20. Percentage of Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to
1949-50................................................................................................... 101
21. Quantity and Value of Exports by Commodities and Months, fiscal year
1949-50................................. ............................................................ 102
22. Expenses of the B.N.R.H. Fiscal Department and previous Administrations
by objects of Expenditures, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50.......................... 103
23. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures of the B.N.R.H.
Fiscal Department, fiscal year 1949-50......................................................... 103
24. Classification of Total Expenditures of the B.N.R.H. Fiscal Department, fiscal
year 1949-50 .............................................................................................. 104
25. Cost of Customs Operations by Ports and Cost of Administration, Repairs
and Maintenance, Acquisition of Property and Fixed Charges, fiscal years
1919-20 to 1949-50 ........................................................................................ 105
26. Operating Allowance of Internal Revenue Service, fiscal years 1923-24 to
1949-50.................................................................................................. 106
27. Revenue of Haiti by Source, fiscal years 1889-90 to 1949-50....................... 107
28. Relation between Import and Export Values and Customs Receipts, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1949-50............................................................................... 108
29. Customs Receipts by Months, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50.................... 109
30. Customs Receipts by Ports, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50.......................... 110
31. Customs Receipts by Sources and Ports, fiscal year 1949-50..................... 111
32. Customs Receipts by Sources and by Months, fiscal year 1949-50.............. 111
33. Distribution of Customs Receipts, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1949-50................. 112
34. Miscellaneous Receipts by Sources and Months, fiscal year 1949-50.............. 112
35. Total Receipts of Haitian Government by Sources, Months and Ports, fiscal
year 1949-50 ............................................................................................... 113
36. Ordinary, Supplementary and Extraordinary Appropriations from Revenue,
fiscal years 1946-47 to 1949-50...................................................................... 114
37. Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal years 1946-47 to 1949-50.......................... 115
38. Functional Classification of Expenditures, fiscal year 1949-50.................. 116
39. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures by Departments
and Services, fiscal year 1949-50.................................... ............................. 117
40. Classification of Total Expenditures by Departments and Services, fiscal year
1949-50............. ..... ........................... ....... .... ............................................ 118
41. Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal year 1949-50............................................ 119
42. Revenues and Expenditures and Excess of Revenues or Expenditures, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1949-50........................................... .......... 120
43. Treasury Assets and Liabilities............................ ...................................... 120
44. Public D ebt.......................... ................................................................ 121
45. Expenditures from Revenue for the Public Debt and Relation of such ex-
penditures to Revenue Receipts, fiscal years 1948-49 and 1949-50.............. 122
46. Notes of the Banque Nationale in circulation by Months, fiscal years 1919-20
to 1949-50. I ........ ........................................... 122
47. Loans and Deposits of Banks in Haiti by Months, fiscal year 1949-50............ 122
48. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources, fiscal years 1947-48 to 1949-50........... 123
49. Internal Revenue Receipts by Collection Districts, fiscal years 1947-48 to
1949-50................................. ..... ........ ........ ...................................... 123
50. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and Districts, fiscal year 1949-50...... 124
51. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and Months, fiscal year 1949-50......... 125
52. Communal Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal year 1949-50.......................... 126






APPENDICES


Pages


SCHEDULES:


1. Quantity and Value of Imports into Haiti by Countries of Origin, fiscal year
1949-50................................................................. ........ 131
2. Quantity and Value of Exports from Haiti by Countries of Destination, fiscal
year 1949-50 .................... .......... ........ ............... 161
3. Customs Receipts by Sources, Ports and Months, fiscal year 1949-50............ 173
4. Imports into Haiti by region, countries of origin, quantity and value, October
1949 to Septem ber 1950.......................................................................... 177
5. Exports from Haiti by regions, countries of destination, quantity and value,
October 1949 to September 1950................................................................. 187

























BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
OCTOBER 1949 SEPTEMBER 1950









BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

ANNUAL REPORT

of the

FISCAL DEPARTMENT

For the Fiscal Year

OCTOBER 1949- SEPTEMBER 1950

Port-au-Prince, Haiti, June 1, 1951
TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE
BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

Gentlemen:
The Annual Report of the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti,
Fiscal Department, for the fiscal year extending from October 1, 1949
to September 30, 1950, which we have the honor to submit herewith,
covers a particularly significant period.
Abroad, the period began with the devaluation of currencies of all
countries of the sterling area, except Pakistan, and of all countries of
Western Europe, except Switzerland, following the devaluation of the
British pound. The general object of these measures was to reduce the
external prices of the products of the countries whose currencies were
overvalued in order to facilitate competition with the products of the
dollar area, and thus to restore equilibrium in their foreign trade. These
goals were largely reached during the twelve months under review, and
the result was a general economic consolidation, with a better distribution
of world merchandise trade and more normal international movements
of funds:
Soon after some. improvement had taken place in the balances of pay-
ments of the countries which had devalued their currencies and soon
after they had started to lift the import restrictions with which they
had been defending their exchange position, the out-break of war in
Korea resulted in a rapid but temporary acceleration of the improvement,
particularly in the case of the sterling area. Because of the rearming
program of the Atlantic Pact countries, the prices of raw materials which
were scarce started to move up to unprecedented figures, with the strange
result that now many countries began to put controls on their exports,
while relaxing the controls of their imports.
Because of the political developments, international trade continues to
enjoy a paradoxical prosperity. Whether the stimulant to commercial







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


exchanges has been peace or war programs, there have been few periods
in world history during which goods moved from one country to another
in greater volume and at such large profits for merchants and producers.
Domestically, also, the fiscal year 1949-50 has been an interesting one.
Haiti benefited from the favorable turn in world economic conditions, and
particularly from the rise in price of its principal export (coffee), but
this benefit was partly offset by a decline in the production of certain
other export crops (bananas, cotton) due to special circumstances.
rhe high prices now being received by Haitian products in the world
markets are a unique opportunity which should be grasped in order to
realize the economic development program which is so necessary to
Haiti During the last twenty-five years, the various programs of public
works undertaken in this country did not achieve their goal because of
the lack of comprehension of the problem of planning, financing, admi-
nistering and controlling economic development. Moreover, the success
of such enterprises pressupposed the existence of a well organized sta-
tistical institute. It is a matter of great satisfaction that the groundwork
for such an institute has now been laid.

FOREIGN TRADE AND COMMERCIAL BALANCE
The total foreign trade of Haiti reached in the fiscal year 1949-50 a
record amount of Gdes 373,404,261 and exceeded by Gdes 61,170,896 the
value of total trade in 1948-49, amounting to Gdes 312,233,365. The latter
figure was slightly less than that of Gdes 315,467,351 recorded in 1947-48.
The component elements of our foreign trade also showed record
amount. Imports reached Gdes 181,004,620 while exports were somewhat
higher at Gdes 192,399,641. Compared with imports and exports of the
preceding fiscal year, the increases amounted to Gdes 23,870,509 and
Gdes 37,300,387 respectively.
Thus Haiti had an export surplus of Gdes 11,395,021 in the fiscal year
1949-50. This surplus gains significance from the fact that it follows the
import surpluses recorded in the two preceding fiscal years and amount-
ing to Gdes 6,618,083 in 1947-48 and Gdes 2,034,857 in 1948-49.
It is worth noting, moreover, that this export surplus does not result
from a contraction of imports accompanying an increase of exports but
to an increase of both imports and exports, in volume as well as in value.
For many of the imported articles, unit prices declined, while for many
of our exported products increases occurred. Such increases were sub-
stantial in the cases of coffee and cacao, and slight for raw sugar, goat-
skins and cotton.
Foreign trade statistics have been regularly compiled by the Fiscal
Department since the fiscal year of 1916-17. The figures of imports,
exports and foreign trade balances for each of the ensuing year are given








COMMERCE EXTERIEUR D'HAITI
M iLS EXERCICES 1956-57-1949-50
GOURDES
00n


C.UV


0
1937 1938 1939 1940,1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948


----------- -

--- E.~POR TA T/OS

E ECE EN1' T PrTA O .
m EICErzEH 7E'ORTAT/70A//

f I
J t


:U


1






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


in the table No. 1 of this report since that date. The following table
shows, by five year periods, the value of imports and exports and the
foreign trade balances:
Trade surplus
Imports Exports or Deficit (-)
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1916-17 to 1919-20...................... 316,513,992 315,297,813 1,216,179
1920-21 to 1924-25...................... 366,995,664 327,368,575 -39,627,089
1925-26 to 1929-30...................... 424,652,657 445,414,699 20,762,042
1930-31 to 1934-35...................... 210,367,914 214,749,249 4,381,335
1935-36 to 1939-40...................... 202,574,432 190,158,371 -12,416,061
1940-41 to 1944-45...................... 274,568,268 295,349,014 20,780,746
1945-46 to 1949-50..................... 714,941,190 773,532,395 58,591,205
Excess of exports over imports
from 1916-17 to 1949-50....... ... ........ ............... 51,255,999

The table presents a broad picture of our foreign trade which facilitates
a consideration of its characteristics. It shows for instance that from
1916-17 to 1949-50 inclusive, Haitian exports exceeded imports by Gdes
51,255,999.
Considered by five year periods, the table shows a decline in our foreign
trade during the world crisis (1932-36) similar to the decline which
occurred in the trade of all countries; and that after world war II there
was not only a complete recovery but a large expansion to record
amounts.
As for the foreign trade balance, it showed a deficit for the period
from 1916-17 to 1924-25 as a whole, a surplus for the following decade,
again a deficit during the crisis of 1932-36, and recovery to a large surplus
for the period 1940 to 1950.

IMPORTS
Irrports during 1949-50 were 15% higher in value than those of 1948-49.
Practically all import items increased in total value.
For instance, imports of textiles and clothing passed from Gdes
32,242,000 to Gdes 53,285,000. This latter amount includes Gdes 39,120,000
representing imports of cotton textiles whose volume amounted to
4,632,671 kilos, as against 2,882,322 kilos valued at Gdes 21,583,694 during
the fiscal year 1948-49.
Imports of textiles and clothing during the fiscal year 1949-50 accounted
for 29.40% of total imports while they represented only 20.50% in 1948-49
and 26.4% in 1947-48.
Although the proportion of the value of total imports represented by
foodstuff diminished by 2 percentage points, foodstuff imports exceeded
by Gdes 1,000,000 the figure for 1948-49. They amounted to Gdes 34,420,000
as against Gdes 33,408,000, or 19% as against 21% of the total imports in
the two fiscal years respectively. As usual, wheat flour was an important
element in the amount recorded by foodstuffs in 1949-50. Imports of this






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


product amounted to 23,528,674 kilos valued at Gdes 16,068,061 as against
22,205,209 kilos valued at Gdes 17,880,586 in 1948-49, showing thus an
increase of 5.96% in quantity and a decrease of 10% in value.
Imports of machinery and apparatus in 1949-50 showed an appreciable
decrease in total value compared with such imports in the previous year.
They were valued at Gdes 13,815,000 as against Gdes 16,207,000 in 1948-49,
these amounts representing 7.6% and 10.3% respectively of total imports.
A similar downward trend was apparent for steel and iron articles,
which recorded a decrease of Gdes 1,000,000 in total value between the
two periods, from Gdes 10,468,000 in 1948-49 to Gdes 9,544,000 in 1949-50.
The same is true of imports of gasoline, kerosine and mineral oils,
which amounted to Gdes 7,149,678 in 1949-50 as against Gdes 8,609,553
in 1948-49. The value of imports in this group represented only 3.9% of
total imports in 1949-50 while for the preceding fiscal year it was about
5.5%.
On the other hand, the total value of imports of automobiles and trucks
increased, although their ratio to total imports remained at about the
1948-49 level, or 3.7%. Imports of motor vehicles were valued at Gdes
6,714,021 as against Gdes 5,930,378 in the previous year. The number of
automobiles imported in 1949-50 was 483, valued at Gdes 3,973,779 and
the number of trucks imported was 271, valued at Gdes 2,740,242. During
the preceding fiscal year, 436 automobiles valued at Gdes 3,602,494 and
236 trucks valued at Gdes 2,327,884 had been imported.
Aside from tobacco products, and paper and articles made of paper,
which showed decreases, all other groups rose in value. The following
table summarizes all imports by main groups during the fiscal years
1949-50, 1948-49, 1947-48.

Imports into Haiti by Main Groups
1949-50 1948-49 1947-48
Groups Gourdes % Gourdes % Gourdes %
Textiles and clothing............... 53,285,022 29.4 32,241,885 20.5 42,563,014 26.4
Foodstuffs........................... 34,419,833 19.0 33,408,472 21.2 30,406,612 18.9
Gasoline, kerosene and
mineral oils......................... 7,149,678 3.9 8,609,553 5.5 6,859,237 4.3
Machinery and apparatus........ 13,815,477 7.6 16,206,584 10.3 9,074,205 5.6
Iron and steel products............ 9,543,926 5.3 10,468,304 6.7 6,390,548 4.0
Automobiles and trucks........ 6,714,021 3.7 6,930,378 3.8 6,732,652 4.2
Soap................................ 6,641,947 3.7 6,135,051 3.9 8,107,548 5.0
Rubber products................... 2,566,911 1.4 1,990,289 1.3 2,106,835 1.3
Chemical and pharmaceutical
products......................... 4,272,326 2.4 3,278,662 2.1 3,546,084 2.2
Household utensils.................. 4,451,469 2.5 2,844,997 1.8 3,369,366 2.1
Agricultural implements.......... 5,078,483 2.8 4,452,295 3.5 3,405,458 2.1
Jute bags............................... 2,876,221 1.6 1,195,818 0.8 2,922,763 1.8
Tobacco products................. 2,842,258 1.6 2,893,767 1.8 2,914,089 1.8
Paper and paper manufactures 2,788,096 1.5 2,811,474 1.8 2,902,273 1.8
All other........................... 24,558,952 13.6 23,666,582 15.0 29.742,033 18.5
Total............................ 181,004,620 100.0 157,134,111 100.0 161,042,717 100.0







VALEUR ET QUANTITY DES PRINCIPAUX ARTICLES IMPORTS
EXERCICES 1936-37-1949-50
Q__UANTTE ------ VALEUR

MiLLiONS MiwiON0S M.iONS MiiliONS MIUIONS MilinOs MniiONS Mio lON MILLiUO
KILOS G60URES KILOS 6OURES KILOS GOUROES KILOS 60URDE UNITES
35 35 7 I7 3 7 1 40

30 I I I --30 6 ---------- 6 1.2 12 6 Q -Q- --- 6 120
U1 LI SAIND111 5. ,
25 -FARINE 25 5 POISSONS PREPARES 5 1.0 -P015SONS SECHES -o SAINDOU too -16
OU FUMES p OUSALES- /09 -- -
20 ---- 20 4 4 08 "088 4 ---- ---- -/4 680-





5 5 I l I 02 I 02 I0- 1- 1 20

0l- I \ --- -- -- --- ^ 7 -- 0 -0--
MILDoNs MitIons MiLoLNs MiLti0s MiLlio0 Miions MiLLIONS MiuLi MiIS
KILO 60UROES KILOS 0U ROES KIL/ 6 D 60UR0V LT UR5 KiL
35 1-5 7 7 14 5 7

30 1--3.0 6 -60 62 D12 Q04 26-2 0
I .3_








_.-7ClMENT,-I- I __ _TiSS'USl _o S ,SVN l a A INE / 2H
5 _. | 5_ _-02_0.2 I I I ,_ l 20






20 -zO 4 -- -- 0 4-- 8 20 20

15 1.5 3 3 6 15

S10Lo 2 20 2 ri ,1_4 10 I,2 10

!!ili-./ :10 1 5;-i: ta


0 I I9I I I 1 0O
1937 1940 1945 1950


u
1937 1940 1945 1950
7 ~~~ 1 "T





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


CIF Prices of Leading Imports

The table below shows the average CIF prices of the main import
items during the fiscal year 1949-50 and the four preceding ones:

1949-50 1948-49 1947-48 1946-47 1945-46
Item Unit Gdes Gdes Gdes Gdes Gdes
Cem-nt................................Kilo 0.13 0.15 0.17 0.16 0.12
Fish ................................. 0.82 0.85 0.96 1.08 0.80
Wheat flour........................... 0.68 0.80 0.97 0.81 0.55
M eat..................................... 4.45 4.17 3.73 3.90 2.96
Liquors and beverages............Liter 2.28 2.35 2.50 2.48 1.97
Kerosene............................... 0.12 0.16 0.19 0.15 0.09
Gasoline................................ 0.15 0.16 0.14 0.11 0.10
Soap............. ......................Kilo 1.19 1.64 1.93 1.96 1.26
Cotton textiles........................ -8.44 7.49 11.18 12.80 9.07
Silk and silk manufactures...... 17.59 13.14 16.00 25.04 17.75
Lard................................ 1.72 2.00 3.34 3.71 2.36
Perfumery....... ........... 6.00 7.85 7.17 5.85 4.06
Cigarettes.............................Hundred 1.81 1.84 1.63 1.58 1.42


As may be seen, aside from the increases shown by CIF prices of
meat, cotton textiles, silk and silk articles, practically all imported pro-
ducts showed an appreciable drop in unit price as compared with the
fiscal year 1948-49.

Index of prices of the Main Import Items

In order to show more clearly the trend of -unit prices of the principal
import items, an index is presented below. The fiscal year 1936-37 has
been taken as a basis because it facilitates comparability with interna-
tional statistics of foreign trade and also because it is usually considered
to be an ideal year for such purpose. It will be seen that in 1950 unit
prices showed in general a tendency to decline from the levels of the
preceding year.

Index of Prices of Imported Goods
(Basis 1936-37 100)
Items 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950

Foodstuffs
Wheat flour...................... 95 64 74 72 79 103 123 131 141 208 246 205 174
Cheese............................. 94 88 103 115 126 138 146 115 132 194 217 201 195
Fresh, malted -
condensed milk............... 96 101 103 102 122 148 154 143 146 173 188 177 158
Confectionery...................... 108 102 96 100 118 133 152 156 157 194 188 188 204
Wines............................... 85 80 85 80 98 137 186 234 220 342 320 302 262
Fish pickled or smoked....... 113 103 106 113 216 345 271 342 368 319 274 229 226
Fish salted or dried............. 93 84 97 106 87 49 77 94 85 178 209 216 213
Spices............................ 102 107 111 126 180 197 340 226 338 370 233 269 427
Greases and Vegetables Oils
Oil for table use................ 75 64 99 90 115 113 105 104 113 204 199 146 106
Butter............................ 105 101 98 94 114 145 138 143 170 241 320 300 246
Oleomargarine and
butter substitutes.............. 94 103 98 98 152 178 155 152 166 283 224 204 171
Lard................................. 80 63 60 68 106 135 123 116 149 234 211 127 109






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


Index of Prices of Imported Goods (Continued)
(Basis 1936-37 = 100)
Items 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950

Cotton textiles, Fibers
and Soap
Cotton textiles..................... 99 87 88 89 152 180 211 211 227 317 276 183 200
Shoes and slippers.............. 96 91 121 157 184 235 335 334 329 295 293 301 245
Jute bags......................... 100 97 116 157 167 239 243 205 177 267 273 362 281
Soap................................ 100 96 100 91 173 204 216 227 225 350 345 293 211
Cars and Tyres
Automobiles...................... 115 112 108 115 131 151 161 129 142 185 207 208 207
Trucks............................. 94 114 96 98 131 166 206 196 177 205 218 232 237
Rubber and tubes................ 101 95 105 81 120 153 146 141 166 160 159 151 107
Mineral Products
Gasoline.......................... 100 90 120 90 140 130 120 130 100 110 140 160 150
Kerosene........................... 106 82 88 76 88 53 47 53 53 88 112 365 71
Mineral oils..................... 100 75 100 100 112 150 138 138 100 150 213 203 175
Lubricating oils................... 178 178 175 189 214 268 246 232 254 282 293 350 329
Tobacco and Matches
Cigarettes.......................... 100 100 92 100 108 108 108 108 108 123 123 138 138
Cigars............................... 90 100 100 74 79 92 100 136 346 138 154 128 141
Tobacco............................ 115 164 182 187 214 229 219 285 248 311 272 357 319
Matches............................ 109 112 135 134 128 159 159 138 228 242 230 233 233
Wood and Cement
Boards, plans and beams..... 89 96 99 127 138 256 224 208 210 165 273 245 199
Cement............................. 140 140 160 180 240 280 260 240 240 320 360 300 260



When the figures of the above table are considered, it is seen that the
price indexes of the various import products varied widely and the
variations were widest for foodstuffs, textiles, fibers and soap.

In general, prices did not change very much from 1936-37 to 1940-41,
but at the beginning of 1940-41, most of them recorded steep increases
and at the end of 1942-43 the rise in prices slowed down. At the beginning
of 1943-44, prices more or less stabilized, some rising, many staying at
about the same level and others recording small declines; there were
declines particularly in vegetable seeds and oils, most of the mineral pro-
ducts, cement, and woods. These last results were obtained due to the
price control in the United States (OPA) and on the local markets
(rationing and price fixation).

With the war and its restrictions over and with the controls lifted both
abroad and in Haiti, the price indexes resumed their upward trend at
the beginning of 1945-46, reached their highest level in 1946-47, and
stayed at approximately that level during the following year. Thereafter,
prices started a general decline, with occasional sharp movements. This
was natural enough, since the scarcities resulting from the war had been
overcome and there was again an abundance of raw materials and ma-
nufactured products in the world markets.






INDICES DES PRIX DES PRINCIPAUX ARTICLES IMPORTS
EXERCICES 1936-37 1949-50
1936-37= 100


INDICE INOICE
550 I 400




\ \ /
0 _--__--_-\ 550 -- ----------------
I \ I \

I ~ / \ / \ /
I \


250 --- 5300 -


I r C '
I \ '

200 1 ---- 5 2--,



SII.
S I / \ '

-I \- --- CEMENT TiSSUS






POPOSSOMS A5EE OU 5A3
50 -\,_ 00 t -
_' HUILE COMBUSTIBLES
01 50 1
..--7 1 0 1 5 1



0 LS'T" 50
1937 940 1945 1950 1957 1940 1945


1950





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


Origin of Imports

The statistical section of this report contains a table classifying imports
by continents, regions and countries with the details. The table makes it
possible to evaluate the importance of imports from specific areas in
relation to total Haitian imports. The value of Haitian imports by con-
tinents during the past four years is summarized below:

(In thousands of gourdes)
1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
North America................................... 125,403 139,213 127,177 148,055
Central America and Anitilles.............. 4,586 6,866 8,848 8,130
South America................................... 587 741 6,088 250

Western Hemisphere........................... 130,576 146,820 142,113 156,435
Europe.... ........................... 4,357 11,971 14,198 22,236
Middle East................................. 2 3 11 3
Far East....................................... 1,151 2,227 771 2,240
Africa............................. ......... 66 21 41 90
Total.......................................... 136,152 161,042 157,134 181,004


As indicated, Haiti imports mostly from America and most particularly
from North America, followed by Europe, the Far East, Africa and the
Middle East. Haiti has not imported in the past few years from Oceania
as she did during the prior years of 1942-43. In order to stress this
importance, imports by continents are presented below in percentages:


Imports by Continents as a Percentage of Total Imports from 1946-47 to 1949-50
1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
North America................................... 92.10 86.44 80.94 81.80
Central America and Antilles............... 3.37 4.27 5.64 4.48
South America..................................... .44 .45 3.88 .14

Western Hemisphere........................... 95.91 91.16 90.46 86.42
Europe.... ............................. 3.21 7.45 9.03 12.30
Far East............................................ .84 1.38 .49 1.23
Africa............................................. ... 04 .01 .02 .05
100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00


While the percentage share of the Western Hemisphere diminished
from 95.91% in 1946-47 to 86.42% in 1949-50, that of Europe on the con-
trary increased from 3.21% to 12.30%. The percentage shares of the
Far East and Africa remained at about the same level throughout this
period.

In view of the importance of our imports from North America over
a long period (80% to 90% of our total imports), it is necessary to consider





BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


the amounts involved, as well as the percentage shares of individual
North American countries. A summary of the relevant data for the
four last fiscal years is given below:
(In millions of gourdes)
1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
Imports from Value % Value % Value % Value %
Canada.................... 4,324 3.18 5,167 3.21 6,610 4.21 8,196 4.53
Mexico.................... 1,502 1.10 2,550 1.58 160 .10 1,974 1.09
United States............ 119,576 87.82 131,496 81.65 120,407 76.63 137,885 76.18
North America.......... 125,402 92.10 139,213 86.44 127,177 80.94 148,055 81.80


Thus it appears that Haiti's imports from the North American continent
have a net tendency to increase. While imports from the United States
of America increased in total value, their importance relative to total
imports diminished gradually.


Imports from the United States

The following table presents the imports of Haiti from the United States
of America for the last three years:
1949-50 1948-49 1947-48
Items Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Cement.................................................... 115,127 564,328 588,978
Fish............................ ............. 158,381 288,349 505,717
Wheat flour.................................... .. 14,122,858 15.499,673 17,867,741
Automobiles and trucks............................ 6,643,400 5,921,328 6,696,203
Perfumery................................................ 1,452,468 900,638 1,258,564
Beverages and liquors.............................. 488,019 530,986 524,129
Leather, hides and their manufactures....... 3,232,241 2,534,320 1,930,036
Jute bags................................................. 737,447 686,234 738,684
Chemical and pharmaceutical products....... 3,068,509 2,487,651 3,446,705
Soap........................................................ 2,520,292 2,399,483 3,889,954
Cotton and cotton textiles.......................... 41,968,384 25,148,091 33,776,482
Lard........................................................ 4,572,881 3,622,720 1,588,912
Glass and glassware................................. 1,712,213 1,442,179 1,190,415
Machinery and apparatus......................... 8,346,859 10,335,104 8,606,148
Paper and its manufactures...................... 1,646,988 1,673,589 2,237,774
Tires and inner tubes.............................. 1,416,159 1,341,882 1,613,790
Silk and silk manufactures....................... 6,144,113 4,968,880 4,563,273
Tobacco and tobacco manufactures............ 2,796,723 2,859,765 2,887,169
All other.................................................. 36,741,962 37,201,420 37,580,616
Total...................... ........................ 137,885,024 120,406,620 131,496,290


Cotton and cotton textiles are the most important group in the imports
from the United States of America. They accounted for 30.44% of such
imports in 1949-50 and rose in amount from Gdes 25,148,091 in 1948-49
to Gdes 41,968,384 in 1949-50 or an increase of 66.88%.

There was an appreciable decrease during 1949-50 in imports of wheat
flour, which amounted to Gdes 14,122,858 as against Gdes 15,499,673 in
1948-49. They still accounted, however, for more than one tenth of the
total imports from the United States of America.





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


On the other hand, imports of chemical and pharmaceutical products,
of lard, of glassware, and of silk and silk manufactures showed slight
increases.

Cement imports fell to Gdes 115,127 as against Gdes 564,328 in 1948-49
and Gdes 588,978 in 1947-48. The remaining groups showed mixed trends.


Ports of Entry of Imports
Table 6 establishes the value of imports by port of entry for the years
1945-46 to 1949-50 and also the average imports by port from 1916-17 to
1949-50. In the fiscal year 1949-50, imports increased at some ports and
decreased at others. For instance, Port-au-Prince recorded Gdes 144,-
453,297 as against Gdes 122,173,000 and Cap Haitien Gdes 11,799,204 as
against Gdes 11,163,007; while Cayes and Fort-Libert; recorded decreases.
The percentage shares of the various ports in total imports for the fiscal
years 1949-50, 1948-49 and 1947-48 are given below:

1949-50 1948-49 1947-48
% % %
Port-au-Prince........................... 79.81 77.75 84.09
Cap-Haitien.................................. 8.62 7.10 7.13
Cayes......................................... 3.40 5.99 1.93
Gonaives..................................... 2.04 1.49 1.87
Fort-Libert................................... 1.60 3.01 1.56
Saint-Marc................................ 1.34 1.57 1.10
Jer&mie......................................... 1.12 1.16 1.18
Jacmel....................................... 0.87 0.82 0.43
Port-de-Paix........ .................... 0.67 0.70 0.49
All other..................................... 0.53 0.41 0.22
Total................................... 100.00 100.00 100.00

Port-au-Prince, with 79.81% of total imports in 1949-50, was far in the
lead, followed by Cap-Haitien with 8.62%. In 1948-49, the percentages
for these two ports were 77.75% and 7.10% respectively.

EXPORTS
The total value of exports showed in 1949-50 a gain of Gdes 37,300,387
or 24%. Exports amounted to Gdes 192,399,641 as against Gdes 155,-
099,254 in 1948-49. This-is the highest level reached by our exports since
we applied present methods of recording the statistical data of foreign
trade. The next highest amount is that of Gdes 157,492,000 recorded in
1946-47. The increase in the value of exports in 1949-50 seems to have
been due almost entirely to the high price of coffee on the foreign
markets. Although the volume of coffee exports diminished by 1,581,295
kilos, measured by value they showed an increase of Gdes 35,032,247.
There was also some increase in shipments of raw sugar, cocoabeans and
castor beans, whereas appreciable decreases were recorded in the value






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


of shipments of bananas, cotton, sisal and goatskins. The table below
presents, by order of decreasing importance, the value of our main ex-
ported products and their percentage share of total exports:

1949-50 1948-49
Items Value % Value %
Coffee...................................... 102,276,481 53.15 67,244,234 43.36
Sisal.................................... 46,348,772 24.08 46,553,586 30.02
Raw sugar.................................... 14,536,828 7.56 7,812,278 5,04
Bananas....................................... 6,536,046 3.40 8,457,002 5.45
Handicraft industry...................... 4,564,435 2.37 6,504,748 4.19
Cocoabeans.................................. 4,313,854 2.24 4,468,002 2.88
Cotton...................... .................. 4,307,523 2.24 6,679,493 4.31
Essential oils............................ 3,078,008 1.60 1.572,617 1.01
Castor beans............................. 1,956,224 1.02 1,439,471 .92
Goatskins................................. 1,644,431 .85 1,950,662 1.26
Molasses............................... 541,174 .28 484,133 .31
Cottonseed cakes.......................... 488,518 .25 485,989 .31
Al other....................................... 1,807,347 .96 1,447,039 .94

Total...................................... 192,399,641 100.00 155,099,254 100.00


Volume of Exports

In volume, our exports regained in 1949-50 only about a third of the
loss recorded during the preceding fiscal year, and remained well below
the volume of 1946-47. The volume of our exports, in metric tons, is
shown below for the last four fiscal years:

1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
Items (In metric tons)
Coffee................................................. 24,659 22,733 27,824 26,242
Sisal.................................................... 21,157 26,077 29,711 33,426
Raw sugar.......................................... 26,104 20,093 17,558 30,794
Bananas............................................... 142,527 69,238 42,065 35,942
Cocoabeans......................................... 1.902 1,795 1,560 1,863
Goatskins.......................... ....... 266 306 327 271
Molasses............................................. 13,226 14,101 13,415 13,458
Cotton................................................. 268 3,290 2,055 1,289
Cottonseed cakes................................. 1,824 3,294 2,117 1,942
Castor beans....................................... 3,216 2,461 2,339 3,299
Handicraft industry.............................. 439 744 663 472
Essential oils....................................... 60 62 89 83
All other............................................. 11,602 2,496 7,260 4,210

Total.......................... .................. 247,250 166,690 146.983 153.291


This table shows that the substantial contraction in the volume of our
exports since 1946-47 has resulted almost exclusively from the fall in
banana exports. As a whole, coffee shipments were more or less stable
while sisal exports showed an upward trend. Shipments of raw sugar
varied from one year to another, while those of molasses, castor beans,
cotton, handicraft articles and essential oils remained more or less steady.




IMPORTANCE RELATIVE DE LA VALEUR DES PRODUCTS EXPORTED
PAR RAPPORT A LA VALEUR TOTAL DES EXPORTATIONS
EXERCICES 1936-37 1949-50
POUR CENT


COTTON
FIGUE-BANANE
SUCRE BRUT
-PITE


1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1945 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


@@@@@@


@@@@






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT 11

Index of Prices of Main Export Items

As already stated, most of our export products enjoyed better prices in
foreign markets in 1949-50 than in 1948-49. However, there was a decline
in prices of sisal, bananas, cocoabeans and castor beans. In order to show
the variations, the following table gives annual price index figures for
the various commodities, taking as a basis the prices of the fiscal year
1936-37.


Items 1945-46
Coffee...................................................... 167
Sisal......................................................... 142
Raw sugar.............................................. 327
Bananas.............................. ............... 243.
Cocoabeans............................................. 142
Goatskins............................................ 98
Molasses.................................................. 337
Cotton...................................................... 126
Cottonseed cakes..................................... 261
Castor beans............................................ 334


(Basis 1936-37 --100)
1946-47 1947-48 1947-48
261 251 257
217 252 254
438 444 358
297 283 277
291 508 410
147 150 159
339 549 100
204 199 229
316 946 223
616 573 399


1949-50
413
225
381
251
332
162
111
235
245
384


Destination of Exports by Major Areas

Schedule No. 5, published at the end of this report, gives in detail the
quantity and value of our exports during the fiscal year 1949-50, classified
by continents, regions and countries.

The following table shows the total amount of exports by continents for
the last four fiscal years:


Areas
North America...................................
Central America and Antilles................
South America...................................


1946-47
Value
94,103
2,415
547


Western Hemisphere...................... 97,070
Europe.... ............................. 59,974
Middle East............................. 424
Far East........................................... 24
A frica................................................ ........

Total........................................ 157,492


(In Millions of gourdes)
1947-48 1948-49
Value Value
92,659 92,443
1,325 7,320
45 753


94,029
60,355
.41


154,425


100,516
54,025
536

22

155,099


For the years prior to 1949-50, the value of our exports to North
America and to Europe did not exceed levels of Gdes 94.1 million and
Gdes 60.4 million respectively, but in the fiscal year 1949-50, the figures
moved up substantially. The rise in exports to Europe was particularly
noteworthy. Our exports to Central America and to the Antilles
Dropped appreciably from the exceptionally high level reached in 1948-49
but remained slightly above the 1947-48 level. Exports to South America


1949-50
Value
109,208
1,513
1,330

112,051
80,010
339


192,400






BANQUET NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


almost doubled but still made up only a small part of our total exports.
The Western Hemisphere in 1949-50 took 58.23% of all Haitian exports,
Europe took 41.59%, and the Middle East took 0.18%.


Destination of Exports by Country

The following table shows the percentage distribution of Haiti's exports
by countries of destination (including their Dominions, dependencies and
colonies) for the fiscal years 1947-48, 1948-49, and 1949-50:
1949-50 1948-49 1947-48
Country % % %
United States.............................. 56.01 59.28 60.07
Belgium................................ 15.82 11.54 12.19
British Commonwealth.................. 4.31 8.80 10.70
Italy............................. 11.53 9.16 6.15
Cuba ............................ 0.12 3.98 0.08
Netherlands................................ 8.91 3.84 3.32
Norway............................... 0.17 1.06 3.48
All other.............................. 3.10 2.34 4.01
100.00 100.00 100.00


The percentage share of the United States of America declined whereas
the shares of Belgium and the Netherlands showed an upward trend. For
the British Commonwealth, the trend has been rather sharply down-
ward, the percentage share standing at only 4.31% in 1949-50 compared
with 8.80% in 1948-49 and 10.70% in 1947-48. The decrease in exports
to the British Commonwealth may be attributed to the devaluation of the
pound sterling in September 1949, when the exchange parity was reduced
to $2.80 from $4.03. It is likely that the depreciation of the pound sterling
rendered Haitian products very expensive for English importers.
In contrast to the British Commonwealth, Italy has tended to take an
increasing proportion of Haiti's exports since 1947-48. Italy's percentage
share rose from 6.15% in 1947-48 to 9.16% in 1948-49 and 11.53% in
1949-50. The increases in the percentage shares of Italy, Belgium and the
Netherlands are the more significant because the aggregate value of our
exports has also increased.


Exports to the United States

While 56.04% of Haitian exports in 1949-50 went to the United States
and to its dependencies, 55.82% or Gdes 107,392,589 were taken by the
continental country. The corresponding figures for the three preceding
years were: Gdes 93,929,955 in 1946-47, Gdes 92,458,778 in 1947-48, and
Gdes 91,626,488 in 1948-49.











iNDiCE
700 r


INDICES DES PRIX DES PRINCIPAUX PRODUCTS D'EXPORTATION
EXERCICES. 1936-37 -1949-50
1936-37=100

INDICE
700



600

I -
I
I r
I


500 V-





--F6UE-BANAN0 2.--0.
I \ _







f-20 7G// RAINES DERICIN
--'..-- fc"..--.---- 0 __ --- I I "






100 I
o1o40 -K45 P 0 L.^ EAUXDE CHE
COTON
._ 9 FiGUE-BANANi .. 0 20 5 ------


1940 1945 1950 197 1940 1945


0 1
1937


1950





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The percentage of increase in 1949-50 over the preceding fiscal year
was 17.20%. The following table shows the value of products exported
to the United States of America during each of the last four fiscal years:
1949-50 1948-49 1947-48 1946-47
Items Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Coffee................................................ 40,091,122 20,592,830 15,952,886 17,413,487
Sisal................................................. 43,379,678 45,222,920 39,267,560 28,319,833
Bananas........................................ 6,536,016 8,457,002 14,201,497 30,648,647
Cocoabeans........................................ 4,285,554 4,450,046 5,385,690 3,660,664
Goatskins........................................ 1,644,420 1,950,662 1,716,276 1,440,483
Raw and refined sugar........................ 563,815 416,593 530,092 320
Molasses.......................................... 541,174 484,133 2,813,181 1,632,275
Handicraft industry.......................... 4,118,742 5,951,912 8,478,171 4,457,378
Essential oils................................... 2966,858 1,572,617 1,024,731 2,681,272
All other......................................... 3,265,210 2,527,773 3,088,694 5,675,596
Total......................................... 107,392,589 91,626,488 92,458,778 93,929,955


The total value of coffee bought by the United States increased by
94.68% in comparison with the value recorded in 1948-49, but the quan-
tity increased by only 20%, from 8,655,449 kilos to 10,381,035 kilos. The
average unit price per kilo increased from Gdes 2.38 to Gdes 3.86.
Although the proceeds of sisal shipments diminished only slightly (by
Gdes 1,843,242) there was an important decrease in the volume shipped,
from 28,885,231 in 1948-49 to 21,236,596 kilos for the fiscal year 1949-50.
As usual the United States took the Haitian exports of bananas; however,
due to the decreasing production, the volume taken also decreased. Haiti
exported to the United States in 1948-49 2,156,092 stems valued at Gdes
8,457,002 as compared with 1,842,209 stems valued at Gdes 6,536,016 in
1949-50.

Other products exported by this country remained at about the same
level as in 1948-49, except for the value of handicraft articles, which
declined substantially, and shipments of essential oils, which increased.
The increase in the total value of essential oils exports was not due to a
corresponding increase in the volume but rather to the good prices
received.

Ports of Shipment of Exports

As in preceding years, Port-au-Prince ranked first in exports with
37.55% of the total value of Haitian exports as against 35.88% for the
fiscal year 1948-49. Fort-Libert6 came second with 14.24%, while Cape-
Haitian was third with 12.22% a slight increase over its percentage
share in the preceding year. The other ports shared the remaining
exports, with some variations from the percentage shares recorded in
1948-49. The following table shows for the last four fiscal years the







14 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

percentage shares of the various ports of shipment in the value of total
Haitian exports: 1949-50 1943-49 1947-48 1946-47


Port
Port-au-Prince.............. ........
Fort-Libert6..... ................
Cap-Haitien............................
Saint-Marc..............................
Jacmel...................................
Gonaives..................................
Cayes........................................
J6r6mie......... ..............
Port-de-Paix.................. .......
Petit-Go&ve...............................
All other...............................


%
37.55
14.24
12.22
5.44
6.23
6.29
6.73
4.40
2.22
4.35
0.33

100.00


%
35.88
18.85
11.38
7.71
5.92
5.51
4.97
4.28
2.83
2.39
0.28

100.00


%
42.02
15.74
13.59
5.95
5.88
4.86
2.94
4.24
2.70
1.72
0.36

100.00


%
38.33
9.62
13.15
7.14
6.14
6.43
5.51
5.45
5.52
1.95
0.76

100.00


Major Export Items
Coffee
Due to the good prices recorded in foreign markets during the fiscal
year, the value of Haitian coffee exports increased in relation to the
value of all exports. While coffee shipments represented 43.36% of our
total exports in 1948-49 and 33.89% in 1947-48, in 1949-50, they made up
53.15% of the total. The following table shows for the past six years
the quantity and value of coffee shipped abroad, together with the average
unit price per kilo. Average
Unit price
Quantity Value per kilo
Fiscal Year Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1944-45............................ 29,968,230 36,450,688 1.21
1945-46.............................. 24,282,605 38,148,993 1.57
1946-47............................ 24,659,421 60,656,839 2.45
1947-48.............................. 22,732,810 53,875,658 2.36
1948-49............................ 27,823,670 67,244,234 2.42
1949-50............................. 26,242,375 102,276,481 3.89
Compared to the preceding fiscal year, shipments of coffee in 1949-50
decreased in volume by 6% or 1,581,295 kilos, but increased in value by
52% or Gdes 35,032,247.
In order better to illustrate the trend of the price of coffee as well as
the variations in quantity and value of the shipments, the following table
presents indexes of the prices, total values and total quantities, taking as
a basis the corresponding figures for the year 1936-37.
Fiscal Year Index of Prices Index of values Index of quantities


1936-37........................... 100
1937-38............................ 73
1938-39............................. 67
1939-40............................. 67
1940-41............................. 61
1941-42............................. 101
1942-43............................ 117
1943-44............................ 119
1944-45............................ 128
1945-46............................ 167
1946-47........................... 261
1947-48............................. 251
1948-49............................. 257
1949-50............. ............. 413


100
101
118
65
91
73
104
93
121
98
99
91
112
105







VALEUR ET QUANTITE DES PRINCIPAUX PRODUCTS D'EXPORTATION
EXERCICES 1936-37 1949-50
OUANTITE VALEUR
MiLLIONS MILLION MiLLIONS MILLu NS M.IONS MiLLiONS MILLIONS
KILOS GOURDES KILO GOURDE5 REGIMES GOUROES KILOS
5 140 35 70 14 1 I 535 140
-- CAFE- I -- PTE3 -- ---FIGUE-BANAN-- 1i SUCRE BRUT
0 -120 0 -60 12 -- __ _- --- 30 120 --
-- __/ --_ 110 o --- --__ _/ _I ____110 --- -
5 -- --' 2 -- 50 25------50 10 t---------'--t, 25 100------
~/ 90 -------- -
20 80 20 ------ 408 -------- 20 80
Ty-- O- O ----/- -i 1 7 -- 70-0
I5 --C/- 60 15 ----------/---30 6 15 60 ----'- -
--------50 ---- 5 50
5 / 5 I
0 -- ---40 10 -20 4 10 40
5A 30 50------ 0 2--- 20 ----L --
5 20 5 0 5 20
50 "- 2 -5 .20


-- 0
MiLLiONS
6OURDES


HiLLiONS






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


A noteworthy feature of the Haitian coffee trade during the fiscal year
1949-50 was the tendency for the country's three main customers to
maintain, on a quantity basis, the same relative position as for the two
preceding fiscal years while increasing their individual shares. The per-
centage shares of the United States, Belgium and Italy increased from
31.1%, 26.2%, 19.8% respectively in 1948-49 to 39.56%, 27.14%, 22.53%.
The table below shows the quantity and percentage share of our coffee
taken by various countries during the fiscal years 1947-48, 1948-49,
1949-50.
1949-50 1948-49 1947-48
Country Kilos % Kilos % Kilos ro
Belgium............................ 7,121,385 27.14 7,291,800 26.2 6.848,734 30.1
Canada............................. 392,085 1.50 328,806 1.2 82,160 0.4
Cuba................................. ......... ...... 2,507,840 9.0 ..... .....
France.............................. 11,740 0.05 11,136 0.1 6,468 ......
Italy................................ 5,913,633 22.53 5,505,215 19.8 3,817,667 16.8
Netherlands...................... 1,755,495 6.69 2,324,635 8.3 1,571,746 6.9
Norway............................ 124,000 0.47 688,080 2.5 2,344,492 10.3
Switzerland....................... 462,080 1.76 328,486 1.2 1,001,544 4.4
Syria..............:.............. 79,000 0.30 178,000 0.6 16,000 0.1
United States.................... 10,381,035 39.56 8,655,449 31.1 6,808,362 30.0
All other........................... 1,922 ...... 4,223 ...... 235,637 1.0
Total......................... 26,242,375 100.0 27,823,670 100.0 22,732,810 100.0


For many years coffee has played an important role in the Haitian
economy and constituted the most important item of its exports. In
recent years the impetus of banana, sisal and essential oil shipments has
caused some occasional changes in the picture. However, with the decline
in banana production, the stabilization of the value of sisal shipments, the
decline in essential oil exports and the substantial rise in the price of
coffee in foreign markets, the importance of coffee as our main export
commodity has been strongly emphasized. The table below shows the
share of Haiti's total exports represented by value of coffee shipments
from 1936-37 to 1949-50:

Fiscal Year
1936-37..................... ....... ................... 52.15
1937-38.......................................................... 49.88
1938-39........................ ... .... ............ ..... 51.54
1939-40................................. ... ......... .. 37.95
1940-41................................. ... ......... .. 38.80
1941-42................................. .......... .. 40.53
1942-43 ................................. ... ......... .. 53.86
1943-44........................ ......... ............. 32.26
1944-45....................... .......... ......... .. 42.60
1945-46........................... .......... ......... .. 33.43
1946-47........................................... ...... 39.51
1947-48.......................................... ....... 34.80
1948-49 ........................................................... 43.36
1949-50 ............................................................ 53.15






16 BANQUET NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

The monthly quotations for Haitian coffee in the New York market
during the fiscal year 1949-50 are shown below in U. S. cents, per pound:
Natural Washed
U. S. cents U.S. cents
Month per pound per pound
October 1949.......................................... 31.25 35.94
November ............................................. 44.80 51.00
December ............................................. 43.80 50.60
January 1950....................................... 44.60 49.15
February .. ................................... ... 44.50 47.50
March ......................... ...... ........ 43.00 45.63
April ............................................ 42.90 45.85
May ..................................... ... 42.50 45.30
June ........................... ........ 44.30 47.45
July ......................................... 47.60 52.20
August .............................. ........ 49.40 54.95
September ..................................... .. 51.40 56.60
The price increase in foreign markets had a stimulating effect on the
domestic market. During the first three months of the fiscal year, local
quotations reached a level never seen before. Exporters wishing to take
advantage of the demand coming from abroad increased substantially the
volume of their purchases. Naturally the producers also benefitted from
the effect of competition and received from the intermediaries higher
prices than for the previous crops.

Sisal
Contrary to what occurred in the case of coffee, sisal exports increased
in quantity by 13% but declined slightly in value. The average unit
price per kilo in 1949-50 was Gdes 1.38 against Gdes 1.56 in 1948-49, but
the latter had been the highest level ever recorded for a single year. The
following table, giving the quantity and value of sisal exports during the
last six fiscal years, illustrates the upward trend in quantity as well as
the stabilization of the value since 1947-48, following the parallel upward
movement of both elements during the previous years:
Fiscal year Kilos Gourdes
1944-45............................. 9,167,222 8,381,183
1945-46............................ 16,821,334 14,740,732
1946-47............................. 21,156,636 28,356,768
1947-48............................. 26,077,017 40,564,784
1948-49............................. 29,710,353 46,553,586
1949-50............................. 33,425,636 46,348,772
Among the countries of destination, Haitian exports of sisal, in quantity
and value, compared as follows in the last two fiscal years:
1949-50 1948-49
Country Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes
Belgium................... ................ 1,270,792 1,514,206 80,076 110,978
Canada........................................... 87,801 158,729 15,198 28,420
Dominican Republic..................... 304,157 507,050 308,475 536,268
France.......................................... 485,939 718,125 254,107 457,030
Germany........................ ........... 845 246 2,807 3,660
United Kingdom................................. ............ ............ 152,685 170,796
United States................................. 31,236,596 43,379,678 28,885,231 45,222,920
All other........................... ............ 39,506 70,738 11,774 23,514
Total.................... ................. 33,425,636 46,348,772 29,710,353 46,553,586






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The United States alone took 93.45% of sisal exports, while Belgium
took 3.81%, France 1.45% and the Dominican Republic 0.91 %. Only
0.39% went to all other countries combined. The regions in which sisal
is cultivated sent their production through the nearest ports. The
following two tables classify sisal shipments by ports for the last three
fiscal years, first according to quantity and second according to value.

Volume of Sisal Shipments by Port


1947-48
Port Kilos
Cap-Haitien........................ ......... 6,397,384
Cayes........................ ......... 74,139
Fort-Libert......... ................ .......... 14,523,996
Miragoane......................... ........ ..........
Ouanaminthe........................ ....... 170,778
Port-au-Prince................................... 2,220,969
Saint-M arc.......................................... 2,689,751

Total............................................ 26,077,017


1948-49
Kilos
6,352,263

17,349,106

102,064
1,783,336
4,123,584

29,710,353


-049-50
Kilos
7,397,850

18,255,203
303,818

3,249,244
4,219,521

33,425,636


Value of Sisal Shipments by Port


Port : :;
Cap-Haitien.......................... ..........
Cayes.................................................
Fort-Libert6.................... ..............
Miragoane........................................
Ouanaminthe....................................
Port-au-Prince..................... ..........
Saint-Marc.......................................

Total............ ......... ................


1947-48"
Gourdes
9,500,530
82,532
24,304,730

296,801
2,589,003
3.791,188

40,564,784


S1948-49
Gourdes
9,351,262

29,101,225

177,558
2,061,960
5,861,581

46,553,586


- 1949-50
; Gourdes
9,853,835

27,359,966
358,615

3,660,447
5,115,909

46,348,772


Since the decline in banana exports which started at the outset of
1947-48, sisal, with an increasing production, has occupied second rank
among Haitian export commodities. Its percentage share of the total
value of Haiti's exports from 1936-37 to 1949-50, is shown below:


Fiscal year Percentage
1936-37........... ............................................. 8.52
1937-38............................................................ 9.31
1938-39............................................................ 7.43
1939-40............................................................ 12.47
1940-41............................................................ 12.96
1941-42............................................................ 19.75
1942-43............................................................ 18.60
1943-44............................................................ 9.59
1944-45............................................................ 9.79
1945-46........................................................... 12.91
1946-47............................................................ 18.00
1947-48........................................................... 26.27
1948-49........................................................... 30.02
1949-50....................................................... 24.08







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The following table gives the indexes of prices as well as the variations
in total value and quantity exported from 1936-37 to 1949-50, taking
as a basis the figures for 1936-37:


Fiscal year Index of Prices
1936-37........................... 100
1937-38............................ 73
1938-39............................ 59
1939-40............................ 69
1940-41.............................. 65
1941-42............................. 118
1942-43............................. 149
1943-44............................. 142
1944-45............................. 148
1945-46............................. 142
1946-47.......................... 217
1947-48........................... 252
1948-49............................. 254
1949-50............................. 225


Index of values
100
84
71
88
113
221
258
202
219
385
741
1.061
1.217
1.212


Index of quantities
100
117
121
127
174
187
173
142
148
271
341
420
479
539


Raw Sugar

In value, raw sugar was third among Haitian exports in 1949-50. Ship-
ments increased by 75% in quantity and 86% in value compared to those
of the fiscal year 1948-49. The average price per kilo moved from Gde 0.44
in 1948-49 to Gde 0.47 in 1949-50. The total value and quantity of exports
during the last five fiscal years is shown below:

Fiscal year Kilos Gourdes
1945-46.............................. 20,667,165 8,377,479
1946-47......................... 26,103,870 14,174,963
1947-48............................ 20,092,898 11,076,712
1948-49........................... 17,558,159 7,812,278
1949-50............................ 30,793,593 14,536,828


The United Kingdom, which used to take practically the whole of our
sugar shipments, took in 1949-50 only 24.41% of the quantity, representing
23.77%o of the total value. Compared with the figures of the preceding
fiscal year, shipments to the United Kingdom diminished in value by
53.29% and in quantity by 51.33%. On the other hand, a new customer,
the Netherlands, took the larger part of our exports or 68.22%o in quantity,
representing 69.27%o of the total value. Another customer was added to
the list when Germany took 907,000 kilos valued at Gdes 600,000. The
following table shows the distribution by countries of destination, for the
last three fiscal years, of the volume and value of raw sugar shipments:


Country
United Kingdom...
United States........
Germany.............
Netherlands..........
All other............

Total..............


1949-50 1948-49 1947-48
Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes
7,517,216 3,455,200 16,769,863 7,395,750 19,130,556 10,546,063
1,036,280 563,815 788,296 416,528 961,448 530,021
907,000 600,000 ............ ............ ......... .......
21,333,096 9,917,812 ............ ............ ............
1 1 ............ .............. 138 67

30,793,593 14,536,828 17,558,159 7,812,278 20,092,142 11,076,151






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The average FOB price of raw sugar shipped abroad fluctuated as
follows in the last 14 fiscal years:
Per kilo
Fiscal year Gourdes
1936-37........................................................ 0,124
1937-38......................................................... 0,111
1938-39 ............................................................ 0,131
1939-40........................................... ....... 0,158
1940-41............................................................ 0,103
1941-42 ............................................................ 0,276
1942-43 ............................................................ 0,293
1943-44............................................................ 0,279
1944-45........................................................... 0,333
1945-46............................................................ 0,405
1946-47......................................................... 0,543
1947-48............................... .... 0,551 .s
1948-49 ............................................................ 0,444
1949-50............................................................ 0,472


In value, raw sugar represented only 7.56% of the total of our exports
in 1949-50. The following table compares the exports of raw sugar with
total exports in the last ten fiscal years.
Percentage of
Fiscal year Total Exports
1940-41........................................................... 7.70
1941-42............................................................ 12.65 "
1942-43............................................................ 6.46 :
1943-44 ............................................................ 26.90
1944-45 ............................................................ 11.40
1945-46........................................................... 7.34
1946-47.......................................................... 9.00
1947-48......................................................... 7.17
1948-49 .......................................................... 5.04
1949-50......................................... ..... ... 7.56


Bananas

Shipments of bananas contracted further in quantity as well as in
value. In quantity the decline amounted to .15% or 313,864 stems, while
in value there was a drop of 23% or Gdes 1,920,956, from the figures of
the preceding fiscal year. The following table shows the quantity and
value of banana shipments during the last six fiscal years. The 1949-50
figures represent only 25% of the quantity and 21% of the value of
banana exports in 1946-47 (the highest ever recorded):

Value .."".
Fiscal year Stems Gourdes
1945-46.......................... 5,859,175 20,115,535
1946-47....................... 7,301,565 30,648,647
1947-48....................... 3,547,067 14,201,497
1948-49............................. 2,156,092 8,457,002
1949-50.......................... 1,842,228 6,536,046

In order to show how the decrease in shipments of banana was spead
over various regions of the country, the following two tables have been






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


prepared indicating for the last five fiscal years: a) quantities by port of
shipment, b) the corresponding values by port of shipment.
1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
Port Stems Stems Stems Stems Stems
Aquin............................... ............ 23,178 5,961 160 ............
Cap-Haitien........................... 833,166 1,314,225 596,437 152,147 39,071
Cayes.............................. 444,207 245,018 89,798 50,704 30,430
Gonayves........................... 51,082 497,456 193,368 79,967 49,168
Jacmel............................... 319,898 348,278 110,322 54,328 35,055
Jer6mie.................................. 976,945 1,388,783 996,306 380,319 274,177
Mirago5ne.......................... 243,322 226,319 56,216 29,067 32,910
Port-au-Prince..................... 284,284 335,062 124,130 43,338 38,267
Port-de-Paix...................... 1,155,268 1,368,940 513,580 465,834 405,263
Saint-Marc.................. 1,551,003 1,554,306 860,949 900,228 937,887

Total............................ 5,859,175 7,301,565 3,547,067 2,156,092 1,842,228

Port Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aquin............................. 110,142 16,370 640 ............
Cap-Haitien..; ............. 2,863,720 6,510,719 2,961,613 778,232 197,300
Cayes.............................. 1,369,381 1,090,933 434,865 263,345 123,259
Gona'ves...... ..................... 198,679 1,570,196 1,022,381 340,042 172,464
Jacmel................................ 976,496 1,424,680 469,658 158,400 145,811
Jdremie........................ 3,367,724 3,802,472 2,591,340 1,145,727 817,169
Miragoane......................... 978,681 1,053,452 237,063 120,774 114,460
Port-de-Paix....................... 4,080,022 6,376,329 2,276,898 2,042,103 1,720,355
Port-au-Prince................. 812,484 1,216,208 427,108 158,084 152,163
Saint-Marc........................ 5,468,348 7,493,516 3,764,201 3,449,655 3,093,065
Total value...................... 20,116,535 30,648,647 14,201,497 8,457,002 6,536,046


The Saint-Mare region has suffered the least from the decrease in ba-
nana exports. In that region decreases compared with the fiscal year
1946-47, were 40% in quantity and 59% in value. The regions which
recorded larger decreases were those of Port-de-Paix, J6r6mie and Cap-
Haitien. During the fiscal year 1949-50, Saint-Marc shipped more than
half of Haiti's banana exports, in physical term, while in value the
shipments through Saint-Marc represented about 47% of the total.

The price of bananas per stem has also varied a great deal. During the
war, the price increased steadily and reached the highest point in 1946-47
when it was Gdes 4,197. Since then, it has been declining. The table
below shows the average FOB price of the stem from 1939-40 to 1949-50:

Price per stem
Fiscal year Gourdes
1939-40 ............................................................ 1.387
1940-41............................................................ 2.363
1941-42 ............................................................ 2.354
1942-43 ............................................................ 2.350
1943-44 ............................................................ 2.742
1944-45 ............................................................ 3.122
1945-46 ............................................................ 3.433
1946-47.......................... ......... ............ ... 4.197
1947-48............................................................ 4.003
1948-49............................................................ 3.922
1949-50............................................................ 3.548








REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


Handicraft articles

The various items making up the handicraft industry ranked fifth in
value in the export table of 1949-50, but-were 30% lower in value than in
1948-49. The following table presents for the last six fiscal years the
value of exports of these products classified by main categories:


1944-45 1945-46 1946-47
Articles in: Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Mahogany............... 2,263,401 1,665,867 1,049,530
Sisal....... .......... 2,570,513 5,523,345 2,832,614
Straw..................... 2,196,634 2,748,897 1,333,610

Total value....... 7,030,598 9,938,109 5,215,754


1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
803,130 1,056,564 1,139,518
7,371,231 4,788,278 2,685,730
857,518 659,906 739,187

9,031,879 6,504,748 4,564.435


The highest annual export value obtained for these articles was in
1945-46. Since 1947-48, the value of shipments has shown a decided
downward tendency. However, articles made of mahogany increased
slightly while those made of sisal decreased greatly. The percentage for
the main categories of handicraft exports during the past six years have
been as follows:


1944-45
Articles in: 7
Mahogany.............................. 32.19
Sisal....................................... 36.56
Straw................................. 31.25

Total............................... 100.00


1945-46
%
16.76
55.58
27.66

100.00


1946-47
%
20.11
54.31
25.58

100.00


1947-48
%
8.89
81.61
9.50

100.00


1948-49
%
16.25
73.60
10.15

100.00


1949-50
%
24.98
58.83
16.19

100.00


During the year 1949-50, sisal hand bags and sisal shoes and slippers,
the two most important articles of the sisal industry, constituted 12.31%
and 82.72%, or together 95.03% of the value of the exports of sisal
products. The following table shows the value of exports of these two
items in recent years:


Sisal hand bags
Fiscal year Gourdes
1944-45............................. 1,683,959
1945-46............................. 1,905,383
1946-47.............................. 660,414
1947-48............................. 1,447,447
1948-49............................ 871,102
1949-50............................ 330,608


Sisal shoes and slippers
Gourdes
679,866
3,323,239
2,080,739
5,859,507
3,625,983
2,221,656


The volume of exports of handicraft articles has also diminished since
1947-48, as may be seen from the following table:


1944-45
Articles in: Kilos
Mahogany.................... 298,319
Sisal............................ 252,358
Straw........................... 255,667

Total Kilos.............. 806,344


1945-46
Kilos
198,808
523,505
589,816

1,312,129


1946-47
Kilos
109,376
249,767
218,341

577,484


1947-48 1948-49
Kilos Kilos
92,335 109,022
616,034 430,911
190,698 115,757

899,067 655,690


1949-50
Kilos
109,917
257,342
120,484

487,743








BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


Cocoabeans
The value of Haitian exports of cocoabeans in 1949-50 remained at
about the same level as in 1948-49, while the volume increased by 19%.
The following table shows the trends in the value and quantity of cocoa-
beans exported during the last six fiscal years:

Fiscal year Kilos Gourdes
1944-45............................ 1,264,194 1,077,955
1945-46............................. 1,254,346 1,240,501
1946-47............................. 1,902,404 3,867,361
1947-48............................. 1,794,604 6,360,990
1948-49............................ 1,559,886 4,468,002
1949-50........................... 1,862,653 4,313,854


As usual, the United States of America took practically all of our
exports of cocoabeans. The Netherlands took 0.01%. Cocoabeans are
among those Haitian products whose exports have not varied much in
quantity for some years. During the war however, the price of cocoa-
beans in foreign markets rose sharply to a level three or four twice the
prewar level, resulting in a marked increase in the total value of Haiti's
cocoabean exports. The following table gives the indexes of prices, values
and quantities of cocoabean exports, taking as a basis the figures for
1936-37.
Index Index Index
Fiscal year of prices of values of quantities
1936-37............................. 100 100 100
1937-38............................. 64 69 109
1938-39............................ 49 61 126
1939-40............................ 58 49 85
1940-41............................ 45 68 105
1941-42............................ 114 99 87
1942-43........................... 104 128 123
1943-44........................... 107 109 102
1944-45............................. 122 108 88
1945-46............................. 142 124 87
1946-47............................. 291 386 132
1947-48............................. 508 635 125
1948-49............................. 410 446 109
1949-50............................. 332 431 103

Cotton

Shipments of raw cotton diminished by 37% in quantity and 36% in
value comparatively to the figures of the previous fiscal year, which in
turn had been 37% lower in quantity and 28% lower in value than the
1947-48 figures. The following table shows the volume shipped and the
value of the shipments, for the last three fiscal years:

Quantity Value
Fiscal year Kilos Gourdes
1947-48............................. 3,289,856 9,304,487
1948-49............................. 2,055,265 6,679,493
1949-50............................ 1,289,365 4,307,523







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT 23

In both 1936-37 and 1937-38, cotton ranked second in the table of
exports. Thereafter, exports of this commodity decreased steadily for a
decade, but they have shown some gain during the past two fiscal years.
The value of cotton exports made up the following percentage of the
value of total exports from 1936-37 to 1949-50, inclusive.

Fiscal year Percentage
1936-37............................................................ 17.08
1937-38............................................................ 15.15
1938-39 ............................................................ 12.15
1939-40 ............................................................ 12.20
1940-41 ............................................................ 6.95
1941-42 ........................................................... 5.50
1942-43 ........................................................... 4.04
1943-44 ............ ............................................... 6.80
1944-45................. ........................................ 7.92
1945-46......................................................... .. 7.65
1946-47......................................................... .50
1947-48............................................................ 6.03
1948-49 ............................................................ 4.31
1949-50..................................... ................ 2.24


Cotton production in Haiti has been hampered by the bollweevil, the
ravages of which are reported to have discouraged farmers from devoting
themselves to this culture. However, the price of cotton on the foreign
markets has more than doubled as compared to its price in the fiscal year
1936-37. Below are given indexes of the price, value and volume of
cotton shipped abroad, taking as a basis the figures for 1936-37:

Index Index Index
Fiscal year of prices of values of quantities
1936-37............................. 100 100 100
1937-38............................. 79 69 87
1938-39............................. 67 58 87
1939-40............................. 69 40 58
1940-41............................. 62 30 49
1941-42............................. 73 31 42
1942-43............................. 75 28 37
1943-44............................. 82 71 87
1944-45............................. 112 21 19
1945-46............................ 126 114 90
1946-47............................. 204 10 5
1947-48............................. 199 12 61
1948-49............................. 229 87 38
1949-50............................. 235 56 24

The table below gives the quantities and values of shipments of raw
cotton by countries of destination for the last two fiscal years:

1949-50 1948-49
Quantity Value Quantity Value
Country Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes
Belgium................................... 46,556 120,901 144,053 472,159
Colombia.............................'..... 350,153 1,307,678 247,081 741,243
The Netherlands....................... 10,978 41,143 102,168 371,637
United Kingdom....................... 881,674 2,837,726 1,560,587 5,090,989
All other.................................. 4 75 1,376 3,465

Total........................................ 1,289,365 4,307,523 2,055,265 6,679,493







24 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

As usual, although taking less, the United Kingdom has been the main
client of Haiti for cotton shipments, taking in 1949-50 68.38% of the total
quantity and 65.8% of the total value. The decreases as compared to
1948-49, were of 43.51% in quantity and 44% in value. Colombia took
in 1949-50 for 24% of the volume and 30% of the total value of Haitian
cotton exports.
Essential oils
The production of essential oils in Haiti assumed considerable impor-
tance in Haiti during the war and reached its peak in 1946-47. After a
severe decline in 1947-48, the value of essential oils exports showed an
upward tendency. The following table shows the quantities and values
of exports from 1941-42 to 1949-50:
Quantity Value
Fiscal year Kilos Gourdes
1941-42............................ 6,888 371,455
1942-43............................. 15,121 364,953
1943-44............................ 13,797 894,491
1944-45............................. 29,375 1,772,919
1945-46............................ 27,466 2,501,141
1946-47............................. 60,299 2,694,592
1947-48............................. 61,762 1,032,306
1943-49..... ...................... 88,930 1,572,617
1949-50............................. 84,667 3,078,008

The following table shows for the last five fiscal years a) the value of
exports of essential oils, b) the volume of such exports, and c) the average
FOB price per kilo:

a) Value of essential oils exports
1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
Oils Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Amyris.............................. 212,792 296,530 143,175 350,029 576,128
Sweet Basil........................ 23,503 2,100 950 1,050 2,725
Lime................................. 337,425 211,460 175,252 293,438 394,173
Citronnella........................ 34,365 2,500 9,850 13,377 3,700
Lemon-grass....................... 143,585 .673,138 276,162 215,000 217,900
Neroli............................... 15 8,475 11,000 9,500 20,500
Petit-Grain....................... 84,855 85,566 201,057 45,723 162,950
Vetiver.............................. 1,614,000 1,414,500 214,775 644,500 1,699,932
All other........................... 604 323 85 ......... .........
Total................................ 2,501,141 2,694,592 1,032,306 1,572,617 3,078,008

b) Quantities exported
Oils Kilos Kilos Kilos Kilos Kilos
Amyris........................... 8,511 17,613 10,316 41,318 34,986
Sweet Basil.................... 67 6 12 15 22
Lime........................ 7,791 5,068 5,943 10,147 8,944
Citronnella.................... 687 181 1,294 1,401 328
Lemon-grass................ 8,071 23,903 33,422 24,175 16,780
Neroli............................. ....... 12 14 54 199
Petit-Grain................... 4,640 3,737 8,707 2,182 5,872
Vetiver.......................... 7,658 9,686 2,048 9,638 17,545
All other....................... 38 93 6 ......... .........
Total........................... 37,466 60,299 61,762 88,930 84,676







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


c) Price per Kilo
Oils Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Amyris.............................. 25.00 16.83 13.87 8.47 16.46
Sweet Basil...................... 350.75 350.00 79.16 70.00 123.86
Lime................................. 49.70 41.72 29.48 23.91 44.07
Citronnella........ ;............... 50.02 13.81 7.61 9.54 11.28
Lemon-grass...................... 17.79 28.16 8.26 8.89 12.98
Neroli............................... ......... 703.25 785.70 175.92 103.01
Petit-Grain........................ 18.23 22.89 23.09 20.95 27.75
Vetiver.............................. 210.75 146.03 104.87 66.87 96.88

Beginning in 1947-48 a noticeable decrease took place in the price per
kilo of all essential oils. After reaching their lowest level in 1948-49,
prices rose slightly in 1949-50 with the exception of the price of neroli
oil, which continues to drop.

Prices, World Export and Production*
of some Haitian Products.
The value of Haitian shipments in 1949-50 of coffee, sisal, sugar, cocoa
and cotton accounted for 90% of total exports. As those key products
interest many other producing and consuming countries, it is pertinent
to have a look at the situation with respect to world export and world
production of the same products, and with respect to variations in their
prices on foreign markets during the fiscal year. Haitian foreign trade
is necessarily dominated by world conditions of supply and demand.

Coffee
The world export of coffee during the fiscal year 1949-50 amounted to
29,085,000 bags of 132 lbs. By exporting continent, it was distributed as
follows: Thousands of bags
Continent: of 132 Ibs.
Latin Am erica........................ ....................... 24,920
A frica............................................................ 3,805
A sia.................................... .. ................ 290
Oceania.................................. ... .............. .. 70
Total.................. ........ ............... 29,035

As may be seen, Latin America furnished 85.67% of the world total
of coffee exports while Africa furnished only 13.08%. The table below
shows how the Latin American export volume was distributed by ex-
porting countries, in order of decreasing importance. Brazil ranked
first with 60% of the total, followed by Colombia with 13.08%.
Thousands of bags
Country of 132 lbs.
B razil............................................................ 14,950
Colom bia.................................... ................ 5,250
El Salvador................................................ .. 1,150
Guatem ala.................................. ................ 900
Mexico.......................................................... 650
H aiti............................................................. 440
Costa R ica.................................... ................ 330
V enezuela.........:.......................... ................ 270
*The statistical data used in this section are drawn from the Commodity Year Book 1951.







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


It should be remarked here that during the fiscal year 1949-50, the
United States bought for its internal consumption 19,878,000 bags of
132 lbs. The price per pound recorded wide fluctuations during the
fiscal year, with a general upward trend. The following table presents
the average price in U. S. cents for each month of the year on the New
York market.
Price of coffee on the
New York market.
Month In US. cents per lb.
October 1949............................ 35.5
November ............................ 49.6
December ............................ 49.0
January 1950............................ 49.6
February ......................... 48.5
March ........................... 47.1
April ............................ 47.3
M ay .............................. 46.2
June ............................ 47.8
July .............................. 53.8
August .............................. 55.3
September ............................ 56.1

Two factors dominated the international trade in coffee: the exportable
production of Brazil and the level of consumption of the United States.
The Brazilian crop was in deficit in 1950, and United States imports also
declined substantially. The decrease in the Brazilian crop should be
attributed to the disappearance of old plantations. Moreover, weather
conditions were not particularly favorable, successive droughts and va-
rious frosts causing heavy damage to coffee plantations.
The reduction in American imports of coffee is imputable to the resis-
tance of consumers to the high resale prices of this product in the United
States. It may be said, without fear of being mistaken, that the report
of Senator Gillette on the causes of the rise in the price of coffee and
the public debate which followed, played an important role in the
decrease of consumption. It may be remembered that ignoring the two
factors of increase, the Under-Committee of Agriculture under the chair-
manship of Senator Gillette, accused the American importers and the
Brazilian exporters of having provoked by illicit speculation the advance
in the price of coffee. It should be remembered also that the press and
the radio gave wide publicity to the work of the Committee. After this
well orchestrated propaganda, the consumer had the impression that he
was being cheated by profiteers and black market operators. To thwart
this pernicious propaganda, the Pan American Coffee Bureau and the
National Coffee Association undertook a campaign of publicity to make
known the two real causes of increase in the price of coffee.
After a serious inquiry, they established the fact that this increase was
due to the normal play of supply and demand and to the monetary mani-
pulations which took place in the second half of 1949. Their thesis relied
upon facts and numerical data, in particular on the decrease which had







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


occurred in the coffee production of this hemisphere, the exhaustion of
all stocks of the National Coffee Department of Brazil, the increasing
level of United States consumption, and the reopening of European
markets.
It is equally true that the pound devaluation and the rumors of a
devaluation of the Cruzeiro had an important influence upon the coffee
markets. Indeed, in September 1949, because of uncertainty as to the
future value of the Cruzeiro, the Brazilian exporters converted their
cash into stocks of coffee and these large purchases whipped up the
market for futures on the Rio Exchange. The Rio quotations reacted on
those of the New York Exchange and, on two occasions, prices rose by
the maximum amount allowed by the internal rules of the term market.
A spectacular advance in wholesale and retail quotations also took
place. Wholesalers and retailers fixed their selling prices by taking
into account the cost of replacement of their stocks. As has already been
seen, rumors about scarcity and a prospective rationing of coffee started.
Contrary to their best interests, consumers bought more than their imme-
diate needs, thus accelerating the upward trend.
The price rise, the quantities hoarded by American families, and the
coming of spring (the great consumers of coffee) reduced the selling by roasters and encouraged
them to get out of the market.
This was the state of affairs when war started in Korea in June 1950.
An immediate change in the general economic situation then occurred
and what had been a slow recovery from recession became an inflationary
trend. Coffee prices, which were high already, followed the general trend
but with a limited unwedging.

Sisal

Sisal and similar fibers have many uses. They serve to make ropes,
binders and baler twines, tying twines, some types of paper, padding for
mattresses, automobile upholstery, etc...
Haitian exports of sisal have increased more rapidly than world pro-
duction. In the previous annual report, Haiti's share in world exports
of sisal was indicated. The ratio has been as follows:
1949 1948 1934-38
% % %
Haitian exports as a percentage of world exports...... 11.11 10.83 2.48

Sisal is cultivated principally in Africa, in Brazil and in Haiti. How-
ever, other hard fibers are produced in other areas, e. g., manila in the
Philippines and Central Armerica and henequen in Mexico. The United
States buy all of these fibers in quantity for its national stockpile (pro-








28 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

gram of national defense), and for its commercial needs. The following
table shows the consumption of these fibers, in thousands of tons, in the
United States.
Manila or Sisal or
Year abaca henequen Total
1945............................ 12 151 163
1946............................. 35 115 150
1947............................. 78 117 195
1948............................. 63 114 177
1949....................... .... 43 126 169
1950............... ............ 55 153 208


Sugar

During the fiscal year 1949-50, Haitian sugar cane production amounted
to 52,645,581 kilos, of which 31,277,801 kilos was exported, while 21,367,-
780 went into local consumption. The world production of sugar cane
amounted to 20,430,000 tons, while the world sugar beet output amounted
to 11,625,000 tons. The main producing countries for sugar cane were
as follows:

Country Tons
Cuba...................................................... 6,126,000
Porto-Rico............................................... 1,286,000
India..................................................... 1,251,000
H awaii.............................. .................... 960,000


and the principal areas producing sugar beet were:

Area Tons
United States........................................... 1,564,000
Europe..................................................... 7,532,000
Russia...................................................... 2,200,000


Like the price of coffee, sugar quotations on the New York markets
recorded wide fluctuations during the fiscal year with a net tendency to
increase during the last months. The following table shows the average
price, in U. S. cents, per pound.

Average price, in U.S.
Month cents per pound
October 1949............................................... 6.02
November ............................................... 5.91
December ............................................... 5.74
January 1950............................................... 5.74
February ................................................ 5.59
M arch ............................................... 5.54
A pril ................................................ 5.52
M ay ................................................ 5.71
June ................................................ 5.78
July ................................................ 6.07
August ............................................... 6.25
September ............................................... 6.25







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT 29

Cocoabeans

The Haitian export of cocoabeans (or cacao) amounted to 4,107,280 lbs.
in 1949-50 while world exports amounted to 696,000,000 lbs. The Haitian
shipments thus constituted a very low proportion of world exports of
cocoabeans.

Cacao is mostly produced in Africa and South America. The world
production in 1949-50 amounted to 1,704,000,000 lbs. The following table
gives in millions of pounds the output of the main product countries,
classified by continent:

Latin America: Millions of pounds
B razil................................................................ 355
Dominican Republic.......................................... 73
Ecuador......................................................... 43
Venezuela................................................ ... 32
Colom bia........................................................... 24

Africa:
Gold Coast and Togoland................................. 572
Nigeria and Cameroons...................................... 228
Ivory Coast and Dahomey.................................. 122

World exports are distributed as follows among the main producing
countries:
Latin America: Millions of pounds
B razil........................................... ................... 132
Dominican Republic......................................... 20
Ecuador....................................... .. ................ 19
V enezuela.............. ....... .............. ............. :...... 14
Trinidad...................................... ................... 10
H aiti................................................................. 4

Africa:
Gold Coast......................................... ....... 253
N igeria.......................................... .................. 104
Ivory Coast................................ ........ ..... 56
French Cameroon........................................ 47


The United States was by far the greatest consuming country of cocoa-
beans in 1949-50, with Great Britain second and France third. The
following table shows in thousands of metric tons, the total imports of
cacao by the main consuming countries:

Thousands
Country of metric tons
United States..................................................... 285
England......................................... .................. 149
France................................... ......................... 66
The Netherlands.......................................... 39
Canada............................................................ 18
Belgium ............................................................ 11
A ustralia........ ................................................ 8
Sw itzerland.........:............................................. 8
Italy.............................. ... ..................... 4







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


Like the quotations for other Haitian products, the price of cocoabeans
changed widely during the year, with a net tendency to increase from
month to month. The price has averaged as follows, in U. S. cents, per
pound:

U.S. cents
Month per pound
October 1949........................ ...... ........ 20.5
Novem ber ................................................ 24.6
December ................ ......................... 25.9
January 1950............................................... 27.2
February .......................................... ..... 25.1
M arch ................................................ 22.8
April ................................................ 24.0
M ay ............................................. 28.6
June ................................................ 30.8
July .............................................. 35.6
August ................................................ 40.5
Septem ber ................................................ 42.0


Cotton

The Haitian production of cotton amounted during the year 1949-50 to
3,856,842 Ibs., of which 2,843,140 lbs. were exported and 1,013,702 Ibs.
were used by the local spinning mill. In addition, the Haitian mill pro-
duced during the year 986,528 Ibs. of textiles, equal to 2,726,922 3/4 yards.

The world production of cotton amounted to 14,245,834,000 Ibs. or
29,803,000 bales of 478 Ibs. each. The United States' production was, of
course, the biggest.

The cotton output of the great producing countries of the world is
given below, in thousands of bales of 478 Ibs:

Thousands of
Country bales of 478 Ibs.
United States....................................... 16,008
Russia................................ ...................... 2,700
India...................................................... 2,092
Brazil...................................................... 2,092
Egypt...................................................... 1,385
Pakistan.................................................. 970
M exico....................................................... 933
China............................................ ..... 750
Argentina.......................................... .... .. 575
A ll other.................................................. 2,633


A great part of the United States production was exported to feed the
spinning mills of Great Britain, Continental Europe, the Orient and va-
rious other areas. The cotton textile production of the United States
amounted to 8,406,000,000 linear yards and a great part was exported.







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT 31

The main countries of destination of the United States' cotton textile
exports were as follows:
Millions of
Country square yards
Canada................. ....... ...... ................. ... 173.7
Philippines......................... ............... 112.7
South Africa........................... ...................... 54.8
Central Am erica............................................. 44.9
Cuba.................................... ....................... 44.2
Indonesia...................................................... 38.3
England......................................................... 23.2
H aiti.............................................................. 15.0
Colom bia..................................................... 6.8
Argentina............................ ................. 2.0


The average wholesale price of cotton print cloth (64 x 60 x 38/z") at
the spinning mills of the United States changed as follows during the
fiscal year 1949-50:
U.S. cents
Month per yard
October 1949............. ............... ..... .... 16.6
Novem ber ............................................ .. 17.0
December ............................................... 17.0
January 1950............................................... 16.6
February ............................................... 16.0
M arch ........................ ................... 15.2
A pril ................................................ 14.0
M ay ..................................... ... 14.2
June ................................. ...... ....... 15.1
July ............................................... 17.5
August .................................. ............. 19.8
Septem ber ................................................ 22.4


MARITIME TRAFFIC

The number of steamers arriving in Haitian ports, as well as their
total tonnage, were above the figures of the previous fiscal year. During
1949-50, Haitian ports were visited by 743 foreign steamers and by 153
sailboats; of the sailing vessels, 107 were English and 46 Haitian, the
latter carrying on coasting trade in the Caribbean. In order of decreasing
importance, the table below shows the number of steamers travelling
under the various national flags, which assured our trade with other
countries of the world: -

Flag Number
B ritish .............................................................. 164
D utch............................................................. 148
H onduran......................................................... 98
Panam anian............................. ....................... 60
Norwegian...................................................... 57
French ............... ............ .. ....................... 47
Haitian..................................................... 42
Canadian.................................... ................ 15
American.................................................. 8
All other........................................................... 104
Total........................................................... 743







BANQUET NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The tonnage of the ships which visited Haiti and the value of the goods
carried are shown in the following table, by flag and in order of decreasing
tonnage:
Flag Tonnage Value
Dutch................................... 145,960 56,454,023
Norwegian............................. 139,745 25,786,933
French ............................... 126,406 18,349,542
Honduran.............................. 93,571 29,176,314
British.......... ...................... 88,190 10,005,851
Panamanian.......................... 46,310 9,146,713
Canadian.............................. 44,571 4,650,658
American............................. 10,590 13,303,518
H aitian.................................. 2,512 ...............
Others.............................. 144,238 14,131,068
Total............................. 847,093 181,004,620

The Dutch ships ranked first in tonnage and in value, while the Norwe-
gian ships, with a tonnage slightly inferior to that of the Dutch, brought
into Haiti goods having a value a little less than half of the value of
goods carried by the Dutch ships.

AIR TRAFFIC

The air traffic during the fiscal year 1949-50 was more intense than
that recorded during the previous year. The number of air planes coming
and going increased by 384. The number of passengers landing increased
by 3.046 and that of out-going passengers rose by 3.749. The number of
parcels coming from abroad, as well as their volume, more than doubled,
while the corresponding values rose more than tenfold. Parcels shipped
abroad increased in number, volume and value. The statistical data
compiled in this connection are presented below:
Planes and Passengers
1949-50 1948-49 1947-48
Number of airplanes landing in and leaving Haiti..... 1,496 1,112 1,279
Number of passengers arriving...........:...:........... 13,977 9,931 8,718
Number of passengers leaving................................ 13,652 9,903 8,717

Air Express
Number of packages...................................... 26,274 12,631 11,396
W eight (Kilos)................................................. 379,337 173,534 107,624
Value (Gourdes).............................................. 5,262,170 2,520,376 2,160,200
Outgoing:
Number of packages........................................ 10,547 6,807 14,682
Weight (Kilos)................................................. 166,385 98,394 71,952
Value (Gourdes).............................................. 836,284 1,694,604 1,146,131

TARIFF MODIFICATIONS

During the fiscal year, the following modifications were made in the
Haitian customs tariff. By the law of October 8, 1949, additions were
made to paragraph 11001 of the tariff, extending the free list to articles
which normally are subject to duty under paragraphs 1424, 13260, 2115,






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


9114-A, 11009, 1481, 1536, 1562, 12122, 12001, 12. This exemption from
duty is conditional and is granted only in specific cases, with a view
to encouraging the agricultural industries and the veterinary art.
Article 5 of the same law regulates exports of oleaginous seeds and
cakes. Circular letter No. 10 of January 16, 1950 implements as of
January 1, 1950, the new direct tariff concessions granted by Haiti to the
United States of America and the repeal of the Haitian-American Com-
mercial Convention of May 4, 1935.
The decree-law of August 5, 1950, published in Moniteur No. 94 of
August 19, 1950, modifies the taxes on bananas. In the conditions which
are stipulated, the additional tax of Gde 0.05 per Gde 1.25 of banana
exports is removed. With a view to encouraging the industrial develop-
ment of Haiti, the decree of August 9, 1950, published in Moniteur No. 96
of August 14, 1950, modifies and adds to the customs tariff of imports and
exports. Various modifications and additions were made in the following
paragraphs of the customs tariff: 8020, 8021, 11001-E, 11002-A, 11003,
11005, 11006, 11007, 11007-A, 11010, 11011, 11013, 11014, 11014-A, 11015-A,
11031, 11062, 11063, 11064, 11100-A, 2110-A, 2117-A, 2003-A, 2213-A.
In order to offset the deficiency of local production, a law of September
13, 1950, published in Moniteur No. 109, modifies the taxation of oleagi-
nous products, namely those of cotton, copra, and coconuts, which were
originally classified under paragraphs 2001 and 2001-A. The decree of
November 8, 1950, published in Moniteur No. 129 of November 9, 1950,
frees exports of coconuts, which may be made henceforth without res-
triction.
As a means of encouraging deeds of charity and of social assistance, the
decree-law of November 23, 1950 modifies paragraph 13267 of the tariff.
It is also pertinent to consider the measures adopted at the Annecy
Conference in September 1949, which provided for various modifications
to be made to the customs tariffs of the participating countries, including
Haiti. But according to article 2 of the ArrWte of December 30, 1949,
these provisions should be applied by Haiti only gradually as the applica-
tion of Annecy concessions By the other contracting parties are made
and the Secretaries of State for Finance and for Commerce may, by way
of reciprocity, and after deliberation approved by the Council of Secre-
taries of State and published in the Moniteur, put into effect the cor-
responding modifications of the Haitian custom tariff. In fact, only the
concessions made to the United States of America have been put into
effect, according to circular letter No. 10 of January 16, 1950. The others
are still in suspense, and will probably be considered when ratification of
the protocol of the Torquay Conference of September 1950 takes place.







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


PUBLIC FINANCE
Since the fiscal year 1945-46, Government receipts and expenditures
have increased from year to year, starting in 1946-47, the figures of every
ensuing year were record amounts for both receipts and expenditures.
Contrary to what happened in the previous years, the fiscal year 1949-50
closed with an excess of receipts over expenditures in an amount of
Gdes 2,189,798, while in 1948-49, the Government accounts closed with
a budgetary deficit amounting to Gdes 10,216,000.

RECEIPTS OF THE GOVERNMENT

Fiscal receipts in 1949-50 reached a record amount of Gdes 109,100,-
657.77 as against Gdes 83,098,855.91 recorded in 1948-49. This difference
of Gdes 26,001,801.86 represents an increase of 31.29%. All sources of
Government receipts increased greatly. Customs receipts accounted for
73.49% of total fiscal receipts and were responsible for about 81% of the
increase. The following table is a comparison between the various sources
of Government receipts in 1949-50 and 1948-49 and between the corres-
ponding percentages of the total receipts:
1949-50 1948-49
Source, Gourdes % Gourdes %
Customs receipts:
Imports.......................... 58,629,051.81 53.74 43,598,454.60 52.47
Exports...................... ........ 20,611,071.33 18.89 14,768,457.75 17.77
Miscellaneous.................. 944,352.24 0.86 804,544.87 0.97
Total customs receipts........ 80,184,475.38 73.49 59,171,457.22 27.21
Internal revenue receipts............. 22,660,744.58 20.77 20,390,504.63 24.54
Miscellaneous receipts.............. 5,669,208.54 5.20 2,970,962.67 3.57
15% of Communal receipts........... 586,229.27 0.54 565,931.39 .68
Total................................. 109,100,657.77 100.00 83,098,855.91 100.00

The various sources of Government revenue showed considerable va-
riation in trends. Customs receipts increased in percentage as well as
in absolute value, while internal revenue receipts, in spite of an increase
in value, showed on the contrary a decrease as to the percentage of total
Government receipts. Miscellaneous receipts increased in value as well
as in percentage. The following table gives the percentage of increase of
each source of receipts over the corresponding figures for 1948-49:
Percentages
Customs receipts: of increase
Imports.................................... ........... 34.47
Exports...................................................... 39.56
Miscellaneous ......................... ............. .... 17.37
Total customs receipts................................. .. 35.51
Internal revenue receipts.......................................... 11.13
Miscellaneous receipts............................................. 90.82
15% of Communal receipts.................................. 3.58
Total fiscal receipts....................................... 31.29









RECETTES ET DEFENSES FISCALES DU 60UVERNEMENT
Lo EXERCICES 1936-57 1949-50
GOURDES



100
RECETTES
---- OEPENSES
90 0 EXCEDENT RECETTES


go I
EXCEODENT EXPENSES

80 -----


70


60 -- -


50 -


40





20 -- ---





RECETTES. FISCALES DU GOUVERNEMENT
OS"- EXERCISE 1949-50
120


100 --- --- .
100 RECTTrF5sOUAN/AERES
801i RECETTES /INTERNES

80 ... ||
0 RECETTES D/VERSES


.. ..60. .- ... 1 -..



20 ___


193 1938193I 19424142119459469194794 1949M8







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


Customs Receipts
Table 27 of the statistical section of this report presents the Govern-
ment receipts from 1890 up to 1950. Since the fiscal year 1944-45, all
sources of customs receipts increased from year to year.
Import duties
Import duties amounted to Gdes 58.6 million as against Gdes 43.6
million in 1948-49. This large increase is reflected in all main categories
except those of steel and iron articles, machinery and apparatus, and
gasoline and kerosene. The following table shows the sources of import
duties in order of importance, and compares them with the figures of the
previous fiscal year:
1949-50 1948-49
Source of import duties: Gourdes Gourdes
Cotton goods.................................................... 13,524,569.24 7,606,583.33
Wheat flour........................................... 9,207,710.85 7,213,582.32
Gasoline and Kerosene..................................... 5,383,055.16 5,439,868.67
SWool, linen, silk goods and jute bags................... 5,310,113.18 3,291,951.17 -
Foodstuffs other than wheat flour....................... 4,760,264.87 3,801,929.47
Cigarettes and tobacco............................... 3,309,339.94 3,048,566.84
Chemical and pharmaceutical products.............. 3,198,282.95 2,401,869.42 '
Iron and steel manufactures machinery
and apparatus...................................... 3,028,294.51 3,320,230.13 "
Soap.................................................................. 1,882,161.52 1,225,449.17
Leather shoes and leather goods........................ 1,440,754.64 640,414.78
Cement, lumber, etc......................................... 1,393,403.14 709,891.12
Automobiles and trucks................................. 73,644.09 597,392.40 :
Rubber goods..................................................... 714,099.23 501,602.47 ,
Paper, etc........................................................... 690,115.39 586,202.30
Glassw are.......................................................... 633,777.44 405,374.21 .
Earthenware, etc................................................ 61,773.03 51,107.16
All other............................................................ 3,317,692.63 2,756.439.64
Total....................... ......................... 38,629,051.81 43,598,454.60
The duties on cotton textiles were by far the most important and re-
Presented about 23.06% of the total import duties collected in 1949-50.
They amounted to Gdes 13,524,569.24 as against Gdes 7,606,583.33 in
1948-49, showing thus an increase of 77.80%. The duties on wheat flour
yielded Gdes 9,207,710.85 and ranked second in importance with a gain
of 27.64% over those of 1948-49, which amounted to Gdes 7,213,582.33.
In fact, duties on imported goods were paid on a total value of Gdes
171,267,302 and not on Gdes 181,004,620 as recorded. The discrepancy of
Gdes 9,737,318 represents the value of merchandise entered duty-free.
For the preceding fiscal year, 87.95% of the goods imported paid duties
while the other 12.05% or Gdes 18,925,710 were admitted free of duty.
This explains partially the high ratio of import duties to the total value
of imports in 1949-50, namely, 32.39% as against only 27.75% in the
Previous fiscal year.
In order to achieve the maximum yield, the tariff provides for alter-
native taxation, either specific or ad valorem, depending upon the case.
Because cotton textile imports increased greatly in value as well as in
quantity, with a gain in the average price per kilo, the improvement in





36 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

their percentage share may be explained by this gain in price, which
raised the amount of the import duties: In the fiscal year 1949-50, a
decrease occurred in goods entered duty-free, owing to the fact that the
International Fair had entailed in 1947-48 and in 1948-49 a heavy in flow
of special duty-free imports which subsided in 1949-50.

SExport Duties
While the total value of exports in 1949-50 increased by one fourth,
export duty receipts increased by only one fifth as compared to the
figures of the preceding fiscal year. They amounted in 1949-50 to Gdes
20,611,071 as against Gdes 14,768,458 in 1948-49. As in the case of import
duties, the 1949-50 revenue from export duties was a record. Since the
fiscal year 1944-45, export duty receipts have increased regularly from
year to year. Because of the constant increase in the price of coffee on
the foreign markets, receipts from coffee export taxes increased in
1949-50 to 82.06%, from the 79.15% recorded in 1948-49. The following
two tables compare, for the last four fiscal years:
a) the amounts collected on the main exported goods, and
b) 1949-50 1948-49 1947-48 1946-47
Source of export duties: Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Coffee............................ 16,913,780 11,688,924 9,501,006 6,942,031
Raw sugar...................... 2,180,976 1,075,851 1,969,388 2,369,527
Bananas......................... 719,884 1,336,632 2,337,769 3,243,809
Sisal.............................. 476,866 424,429 372,154 300,673
Goatskins......................... 72,287 87,265 81,648 70,964
Molasses.......................... 71,490 63,954 371,621 215,623
Cocoabeans...................... 28,552 15,093 27,536 16,311
Cotton............................. 27,026 43,081 68,986 5,617
Handicraft articles............ 5260 7,193 9,726 6,107
Essential oils.................... 920 957 664 654
All other.......................... 114,030 25,079 35,940 139,662
S Total export duties..... 20,611,071 14,768,458 14,776,438 13,310,978
Percentage of the total of export duties
.' 1949-50 1948-49 1947-48 1946-47
% % % %
Coffee............................................ 82.06 79.15 64.30 52.15
Raw sugar.............................. 10.58 7.29 13.30 17.80
Bananas........................... 3.49 9.05 15.82 24.37
Sisal............................................ 2.32 2.87 2.52 2.26
Goatskins.................................... 0.35 0.59 0.55 0.61
Molasses...................................... 0.35 0.43 2.51 1.61
Cocoabeans.................................... 0.14 0.10 0.19 0.12
Cotton.............................. 0.13 0.29 0.47 0.04
All other..................................... 0.58 0.23 0.34 1.04
Total....................................... 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
More than three fourths of the proceeds of export duties came from
coffee, while the duties on raw sugar shipments made up only one tenth
of the total. Bananas are of diminishing importance; in 1946-47 they
finished about one fourth of export duty receipts, but in 1949-50 they
accounted for only 3.49%. Concerning this latter product, one should





IMPORTANCE RELATIVE DU RENDEMENT DES TAXES SUR LES PRODUCTS EXPORTED
PAR RAPPORT AU TOTAL DES DROITS D'EXPORTATION
EXERCICES 1936-57 -1949-50
POUR CENT
100. --,---.--- 1 AUTRES


1957 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946


1947 1948 1949 1950


II1111


IllJ1


L SMITH






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT 37

note the reduction of the fiscal-charge mentionedin the section on tariff
modifications.
The yield of the tax on sisal increased slightly. However, it should be
remembered that this product is also taxed on the basis of the balance
sheet of the corporations and business concerns established in Haiti.

Miscellaneous Custom Receipts
Miscellaneous custom receipts were as follows for the fiscal years 1949-
50 and 1948-49: 194-s 1948-4A


Sto
Tra
Na
Fin
:Aue
Oth
Har


Gourdes
rage charges.................................... 62,471.56
nsit fees.......................................... 2,592.20
ligation taxes.................................... 25,735.00
es on vessels............. ..... .. 4,100.00
action sales.... .................... ..... 10,432.66
er............................................... 538.75
idling charges................................. 838,482.07

Total................... ...................... 944,352.24


Gourdes
56,963.30
1,696.10
20,567.00
6,675.00
25,702.40
906.80
692,034.27

804,544.87


This table shows that the handling charges constituted about 88.78%o
of all miscellaneous custom receipts. They amounted to Gdes 838,482.07
as compared with Gdes 692,034.27. This increase of Gdes 146,447.80 or
31% in percentage is due to the increased volume of merchandise entered
through the custom-house.

Internal Revenue Receipts
In the statistical section of this report, tables 48 to.51 deal with internal
revenue receipts. Compared with the figures for the previous fiscal year,
internal revenue receipts increased by Gdes 2,270,239.95 or 11.13%. The
following table gives the main taxes collected under this heading:


Source
Excise tax.........................
Consular fees...................
Recording fees.................
Identity cards...................
Licence............................
Public land rentals....... ......
Civic contribution..............
Income tax:
Commercial:
a) Normal....................
b) Excess profits............
Individual:
a) Public sector.............
b) Private sector............


Fiscal year
Gourde
...............


10,519,737.89
9,048,033.29
1,471,674.60
723,711.05
196,165.75
530,545.30


Stam ps............................... ...............
On commercial account
books.......................... 12,631.80
Stamped papers................ 1,406,060.64
Postage stamps................. 607,976.21
Other................... ..... ...........


1:


1949-50 Fiscal year 1948-49
es Gourdes
2,832,255.91 ............... 2,421,999.51
2,072,781.00 ............... 1,613,626.50
1,043,301.69 ............... 988,812.36
489,936.93 ............... 481,041.79
394,325.69 ............... 369,704.90
507,420.60 ............... 479,065.72
517,303.61 ............ ...............
1,246,448.94 ............... 10,382,174.03
............... 9,979,546.76 ...............
............... 7,544,590.56 ...............
............... 2,434,956.20 ...............

............... 402,627.27 ...........
............... 194,475.66 ..............
............... 208,151.61 ..............
2,026,668.65 ............ 1,712,910.86


1,530,301.51


Total........................ ....:.......... 22,660,744.53


9,760.80 ...............
1,205,600.41 ...............
497,549.65 .......... ..
............... 1,941,168.96
.............. 20,390,504.63


2






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The income tax constituted about half of the internal revenue receip
and included two main categories, the commercial income tax and tl
individual income tax.
The following table summarizes the percentage of internal revenue
receipts derived from each of these two categories of income tax:
1949-50 1948-49
% %/ % %
Normal income tax: ...... 49.62 ...... 50.91
Commercial.......................... 46.42 ...... 48.94 ......
Individual............................. 3.20 ...... 1.97


The commercial income tax is of two sorts: the normal income tax an(
what is called in the law the excess profit tax. The normal tax is eithe:
calculated from the balance sheet of the business or estimated on the
Basis of the rental value of the commercial premises. The excess profit
tax, under the law of December 15, 1946, is based on the indicated by the value of the sisal exports. The aim of the law is tc
divide between the state and the exporters the profits realized on sisal
shipments. According to the first article of the law, any difference
between the exporter's cost per half kilo of sisal and his selling price
will be shared as follows between the exporter and the state, each one
being taxed separately:
State Exporter
Up to second U.S. cent.................................nothing 100
From second to third U. S. cent..................... 20 80
From third to fourth U.S. cent...................... 30 70
From fourth to fifth U.S. cent...................... 40 60
From the fifth U. S. cent up......................... 50 50

The decrease in the yield of the excess profit tax between 1948-49 and
1949-50 may be explained by the decline in the margin between the cost
of sisal and the price obtained abroad. An increased quantity has been
exported at a lesser value.
The individual income tax is divided into two sections, public and
. private.
Receipts from the income tax on the salaries and wages of public
Employees showed in 1949-50 a slight increase over 1948-49.
The figure recorded for the private sector includes the taxes imposed
on commercial employees, professional people, and persons working for
themselves or having their own income. An important increase in receipts
was recorded for this tax from 208,151.61 in 1948-49 to Gdes 530,545.30 in
-1949-50.
Excise taxes increased in value and in importance in the table of inter-
nal revenue receipts, passing from Gdes 2,421,999.51 to Gdes 2,832,255.91
with corresponding percentages of 11.88% and 12.49%. Excise taxes on
cigarettes, by far the most important, remained at about the same level
as in the preceding fiscal year; they amounted to Gdes 1,365,220.58 as






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


against Gdes 1,362,028.23. Excise taxes on alcohol from sugar cane oc-
cupied the second place in importance with a value of Gdes 556,606.90 as
against Gdes 491,379.20. They were followed by those on raw sugar,
manufactured textiles and cotton articles. The following table shows
for some products the value of excise taxes collected during the fiscal
year and the quantities of the same products which served as a basis for
applying the taxes.
Excise taxes Quantity or
Items Value Weight
Cigarettes. ;..................... 1,365,220.58 16,440,175
Cigars................................. 14,814.94 1,992,662
Tobacco..................... 19,800.30 105,994 kilos
Oi................................. 203,986.85 438,539.06 kilos
Lard.................................. 5,070.07 19,794.57 kilos
Sugar...:............................. 353,381.25 21,367,780 kilos
Manufactured textiles*......... 232,169.10" 145,271 kilos*

In order of importance, the third category of taxes is that of consular
fees, which yielded Gdes 2,072,781, or 459,154.50 more than in the pre-
ceding fiscal year.
Sales of stamps yielded Gdes 2,026,668.65 as against Gdes 1,712,910.86.
The documentary stamps totalled Gdes 1,406,060.64 and constituted about
69.37% of the total stamp sales. Postal stamps and cards amounted to
Gdes 607,976.21 or about 30% of the total
The Recording and Mortgage Bureau collected for various services
rendered Gdes 1,043,301.69 as against Gdes 988,812.36 .in the preceding
fiscal year.
A new tax on internal revenue, the civic contribution, yielded during
the year 1949-50 Gdes 517,303.61. It was established by the law of
September 8, 1948 to make possible the erection in the main cities of the
Republic of statues of heroes of the Independence. The civic contribu-
tion is a sort of surtax, levied by special stamps or by receipts on prac-
tically all classes of tax-payers. The proceeds of this tax were credited
during the fiscal year 1948-49 to a non-fiscal account and the drawings
were made to serve the initial aim of the law. With the budget of 1949-50,
the proceeds of this tax fell into the category of internal revenue taxes.

Miscellaneous Receipts
The Government's miscellaneous receipts amounted to Gdes 5,669,208.54
as against Gdes 2,970,962.67 during the preceding fiscal year, an increase
of Gdes 2,698,245.87.
Of the amount recorded in 1949-50, Gdes 2,699,753.76 represented the
profit accruing to the state from the operations of the Tobacco Adminis-
tration, and Gdes 1,388,203.37, the taxes on sugar sales. The interest on
investments in Haitian bonds held by some Government accounts

*Excise taxes on manufactured textiles started to be collected only in January 1950.







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


amounted to Gdes 198,828.25. The account was
also credited during the fiscal year with the transfer of the counter-part
value of those unissued bonds of the Interior Loan 5%o 1957, which had
been drawn by lot for amortization purposes, and which amounted to
.Gdes 627,700. This account was also credited during the fiscal year with
the dividend paid to the Public Treasury by the Commercial Department
of the National Bank, amounting to Gdes 100,000.

By the the Government made available to the Department of Finance an ex-
traordinary credit of Gdes 429,803.60 in order to pay the cost of coining
nickel pieces of 5 and 10 centimes having a face value of Gdes 1,000,000.
The gross profit resulting from these operations thus amounted to Gdes
570,196.40, representing the excess of the face value of the issue over
the cost of the coining. From this gross profit, the Government transferred
Gdes 500,000 to the National Bank in accordance with the terms of Article
3 of the above mentioned law, reading as follows:

-Article 3.-In accordance with the law and convention pertaining
to this matter, the profits derived from the coining will be used to
guarantee the new issue to the extent of 50% of the said issue..

The account of the Government was also
credited with Gdes 500,000, calculated as follows:
Gourdes
Coinage cost reimbursed to the Public Treasury............... 429,803.60
Disposable profit on the operation:
Gross profit.............................. ............ 570,196.40
Deduction for maximum guaranty representing
50% of the new issue....................... ........ 500,000.00
Net disposable profit credited to Miscellaneous
Receipts ....... .......... ....................... 70,196.40
Total credited to Miscellaneous Receipts..................... 500,000.00

Receipts from Communes

The Internal Revenue Service is entrusted with the collection of com-
munal receipts all over the Republic and for rendering this service, it
deducts 15% from the gross communal receipts.
For some years, because of the constant increase in the communal
receipts, the portion taken by the Internal Revenue Service has been
increasing gradually. The following table shows the upward trend of the
share taken by the Internal Revenue Service during the last five fiscal
years:
Fiscal year Gourdes
1945-46.... ........................ .......... ..... 436,407.01
1946-47.... ............................... ...... 495,086.77
1947-48......................... .................... 522,805.60
1948-49.............................. ......... 565,931.39
1949-50............................ .................. 586,229.27








REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


PUBLIC EXPENDITURES

Table No. 36 shows for the last three fiscal years the amounts made
available to the various services of the Government by budgetary and
extraordinary appropriations and also shows the true fiscal receipts and
expenditures during each year. For these three years, the amounts in-
volved show an upward trend. For the fiscal year 1949-50, all of these
figures exceeded the Gdes 100,000,000 mark for the first time in the finan-
cial history of the Republic of Haiti.


Budgetary and
extraordinary
appropriations
Fiscal year Gourdes
1947-48.................... 91,096,711.91
1948-49................... 93,451,275.42
1949-50................... 111,123,059.55


Fiscal
Receipts
Gourdes
78,767,279.34
83,098,855.91
109,100,657.77


Fiscal
Expenditures
Gourdes
83,581,496.58
93,315.308.32
106,910,859.18


Expenditures by Departments and Services

Table No. 37 classifies Government receipts for the last three fiscal
years by main sources, and the actual expenditures by Departments and
Services, with a special classification for expenditures in connection with
the Public Debt. Fiscal expenditures in 1949-50 exceeded by 14.57%
those of the previous year, which in turn were greater by 11.65% than
those of 1947-48. The increase of Gdes 13,596,000 in the public expen-
ditures in 1949-50 reflected and upwr-' A.d in the expenditures of all
Departments and Services except those relating to the Public debt, which
showed no important change, and those of the Departments of National
Economy and Public Works, which diminished by Gdes 215,000 and Gdes
2,280,000 respectively. The following table compares the expenditures of
Departments and Services in the fiscal years 1948-49 and 1949-50.


Expenditures
1949-50
Gourdes
Army of Haiti................ 17,165,180.69
Finances....................... 16,823,286.29
National Education.......... 10,988,481.77
Public Debt................... 10,374,553.58
Public Health.................. 9,194,498.03-
Interior.......................... 7,635,220.26
Public Works.................. 7,385,720.25
International Institutions. 5,103,935.70
Foreign Affairs............... 4,703.334.70
Agricultural Service........ 3,735,924.34
Fiscal Department BNRH 2,999,052.20
Internal Revenue Service. 2,795,360.54
Justice......................... 2,758,823.81
National Economy.......... 2,196,391.47
Tourism......................... 922,797.78
Commerce..................... 917,514.37
Religion..................... 733,421.06
Labor............................. 423,493.67


Expenditures
1948-49
Gourdes
15,091,415.82
14,227,394.07
9,905,125.16
10,268,544.05
7,739,239.96
4,781,549.59
9,667,548.21
1,609,499.05
3,984,343.42
3,546,071.98
2,385,985.83
2,533,914.35
2,730,280.33
2,411,430.71
582,916.45
907.498.61
591,857.88
315,383.45


Increase
or Decrease(-)
Gourdes
2,073,764.87
2,595,892.22
1,083,356.61
106,009.53
1,455,258.12
2,853,670.67
2,281,827.96-
3,499,436.65
718,991.28
189,852.36
613,036.37
261,446.19
28,543.48
215,039.24-
339,881.33
10,015.76
141,566.18
108,115.22








BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The breakdown of the above-listed expenditures by supplementary
and budgetary credits and by extraordinary credits is as follows:


Budgetary and
supplementary
expenditures
Gourdes
Public Debt......................... 10,374,553.58
International Institutions.. 5,108,935.70
Foreign Affairs................ 3,690,241.00
Finance.......................... 2,145,035.16
Fiscal Department, BNRH 2,999,052.20
Internal Revenue Service.. 2,795,360.54
National Economy............ 181,240.09
Commerce...................... 875,261.50
Interior.......................... 3,757,652.19
Army of Haiti.................14,712,281.95
Public Health.................. 7,165,845.22
Public Works................... 3,622,488.99
Justice.......................... 2,725,844.69
Agriculture..................... 48,860.62
Agricultural Service......... 2,760,874.71
Labor............................. 323,137.73
National Education...........10,086,186.31
Religion......................... 655,925.06
Tourism ......................... 769,603.23

Total........................ 74,79 ,380.47


Extraordinary
expenditures
Gourdes

1,013,093.70
14,678,251.13

2,015,151.38
42,252.87
3,877,568.07
2,452,898.74
2,028,652.86
3,763,231.26
32,979.12

975,049.63
100,360.94
902,295.46
77,499.00
153,194.55

32,112,478.71


Total
Gourdes
10,374,553.58
5,108,935.70
4,703,334.70
16,823,286.29
2,999,052.20
2,795,360.54
2,196,391.47
917,514.37
7,635,220.26
17,165,180.69
9,194,498.08
7,385,720.25
2,758,823.81
48,860.62
3,735,924.34
423,498.67
10,988,481.77
733,424.06
922,797.78

106,910.859.18


The largest expenditures were those of the Army of Haiti, to which
was allocated 16.06% of the fiscal outlay. The expenditures of this Ser-
vice amounted to Gdes 17,165,18Qi69 as against Gdes 15,091,415.82. The
Army's expenditures out o'0 "'detary and supplementary appropriations
amounted to Gdes 14,712,2&1.9j, and financed the ordinary operation of
the Army of Haiti. The expenditures out of extraordinary appropriations
served mostly for the payment of military equipment, costing Gdes
1,292,279, automotive equipment costing Gdes 253,000, and construction
amounting to Gdes 386,397; other disbursements by the Army covered
police expenses, expenses of missions and diplomatic receptions. The
total of expenditures made out of extraordinary credits was Gdes
2,452,898.74.
The Department of Finance ranked second in importance in the table
of expenditures. For its ordinary operation however, only Gdes 2,145,-
035.16 were spent, while Gdes 14,678,251.13 was disbursed out of extra-
ordinary credits in order to finance the cost of the International Fair,
which amounted to Gdes 12,986,821.20. The following table summarizes
by main categories, the extraordinary expenditures made by this Depart-
ment during the year 1949-50.
Gourdes
International Fair........................................... 12,986,821.20
Electrical installation......................................... 500,000.00
Purchases of buildings....................................... 455,657.80
Coining of nickel............................................... 429,803.00
Completion of Belladere.............................. 67,052.38
M aterial............................................................ 55,706.15
Cars................................................ ............... 31,500.00







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The Department of National Education disbursed 10.28% of the fiscal
expenditures in 1949-50 or an amount of Gdes 10,988,481.65 as against
Gdes 9,905,125.16 in 1948-49. Expenditures out of extraordinary credits
amounted to Gdes 902,295.46 and served mostly for the repair or cons-
truction of buildings, for the financing of Haitian scholars abroad and
foreign professors in Haiti, etc...
The service of Public Debt absorbed Gdes 10,374,553.58 and the un-
expended balance of the original appropriation for this item amounted
to Gdes 771,696.42. The net amount of amortization during the year was
Gdes 8,500,000, while interest and other charges amounted to Gdes
1,874,553.58. Further details are furnished in the < section
of this report.
The Department of Public Works recorded a decrease in its expen-
ditures. They amounted to Gdes 7,385,720.25 as against Gdes 9,667,548
in 1948-49. The amount derived from budgetary appropriations amounted
to Gdes 3,622,488.99 and that coming from extraordinary appropriations
Gdes 3,763,231.26. Of the latter amount, the financing of the Interna-
tional Fair and payment of the Italian architects together took Gdes
1,231,855.29. The construction and purchase of buildings took a slice of
Gdes 1,700,861.59, and the balance was used for the financing of various
projects, such as water and telephone installation, repair of the National
Palace, purchase of electrical equipment, etc... Altogether, this Depart-
ment spent only 6.91% of the total of the fiscal expenditures.
The Department of the Interior expended during the fiscal year 1949-50
Gdes 7,635,220.26, or Gdes 2,853,670.67 more than in the previous year.
Of the 1949-50 'expenditures, Gdes 3,757,652.19 came from the ordinary
budget and Gdes 3,877,568.07 from extraordinary credits. This latter
amount served mainly to equip the Army of Haiti, to pay expenses of
the secret police and the primary Assembly and the operations of the
Consultative Council and to prepare the elections of the Primary Assem-
bly of October 1950. The details are as follows:

Gourdes Gourdes
Army of Haiti..................... ....... 1,180,742.70
Materiel........................................ 34,635.15
Cars............................................. 55,697.50
Secret Police................................. 513,000.00 1,784,075.35
January 1950 Primary Assembly....... 250,000.00
Consultative Council........................ 159,713.00
October 1950 electoral operations.. 43,351.74
October 1950 Primary Assembly........ 670,127.20 1,123,191.94
National Holidays.......................... 300,000.00
Bicentenary preparations................. 50,000.00 350,000.00
Parliament................................... 1,925,00
Building construction.................. 130,000.00
Other expenditure...................... 488,375.78 620,300.78
Total..................... ....... ...... 3,877,568.07







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The expenditures of the Department of Public Health amounted in
"1949-50 to Gdes 9,194,798.08 as against Gdes 7,739,239.96 in 1948-49 and
represented 8.60% of the total of fiscal expenditures. Budgetary expen-
ditures amounted to Gdes 7,165,845.22 and disbursements out of extra-
ordinary credits to Gdes 2,028,652.86. The latter amount went mostly
to pay the Government's share in the Haitian-American cooperative
program of health and sanitation, for water installation, for purchases of
equipment and for construction work.
The Agricultural Service spent during the year Gdes 3,735,924.34 as
against Gdes 3,546,071.98 in 1948-49. Of the Gdes 975,049.63 which it
spent out of extraordinary credits, Gdes 852,500 represented Haitian
participation in the Haitian-American cooperative program of food pro-
duction.
Expenditures of the Department of Foreign Affairs in 1949-50 totaled
Gdes 4,703,334.70 as against Gdes 3,984,343.42 in the previous fiscal year.
An amount of Gdes 228,281 was used for the purchase of buildings and
the repair of Haitian Embassies abroad. Practically all of the extra-
ordinary credits spent by this Department went to pay the expenses of
Haitian delegates on missions abroad.
The item of contributions to international institutions showed expen-
ditures of Gdes 5,108,935.70 as against Gdes 1,609,499.05 in 1948-49, or an
increase of Gdes 3,499,436.65. Actually, the Haitian contribution to inter-
national institutions in 1949-50 amounted only to Gdes 436,435.70 while
the balance of Gdes 4,672,500 was expended as follows:
Gourdes
Knappen Tippetts Abbett Engineering Co............ 900,562.50
Development of the Artibonite Valley................ 2,849,437.50
Total expenses of the Artibonite Project............... 3,750,000.00
Contribution to the Inter-American Public Health
Service............................................................ 575,000.00
Contribution to the Inter-American Agricultural
Production Service.......................................... 347,500.00
4,672,500.00

With the exception of the amount paid to the Knappen Tippetts Abbett
Engineering Co., practically all of these funds were expended in Haiti.
The Department of Justice, which disbursed 2.58% of the total of fiscal
expenditures, spent Gdes 2,758,823.81 in 1949-50 as against Gdes 2,730,-
280.33 in 1948-49. This department's expenditures serves to pay the
salaries of the staff of the Secretary of State of Justice, of the judges
of the various courts, and of the officers of vital statistics in the Republic.
In comparison with the preceding fiscal year, the expenditures of the
Internal Revenue Service increased by 10% or Gdes 261,446.19. They
amounted to Gdes 2,795,360.54. However, this Service spent Gdes 123,-






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


664.81 less than the -amount appropriated for it, which was made up as
follows: Gourdes
10% of the internal revenue collections.............. 2,204,871.15
15% of communal receipts............................... 586,229.27
5% of stamp sales......:..................... ................ 122,689.44
5% of vital statistics receipts............................. 5,235.49
Total of the appropriation........................... 2,919,025.35
On the basis of estimated receipts the budget voted for the fiscal year
1949-50 contained an operating credit of Gdes 1,000,000 in favor of the
Internal Revenue Service. But, by virtue of the organic laws relating to
that Service, the percentage of receipts attributed to it becomes automa-
tically available upon collection. Thus, the excess recorded in the account
of the Internal Revenue Service over the amount carried in the budget
amounted to Gdes 1,919,025.35 for the fiscal year under review.
The Department of National Economy expended Gdes 2,196,391.47 as
against Gdes 2,411,430.71. By budgetary credits it spent Gdes 181,240.09
to defray the operating cost of the office of the Secretary of State of
National Economy. Through the Census Bureau, this Department had
responsibility for preliminary work on the census as well as for the
census itself, which took place in August 1950. Total expenditures in
connection with the census amounted to Gdes 2,015,151.38.
Expenditures of the Department of Commerce amounted to Gdes 917,-
514.37 as against Gdes 907,498.61 in 1948-49. By extraordinary credits,
it spent Gdes 42,252.00 to pay the operations of the Office of Control and
Development of Export Commodities.
The Department of Tourism disbursed in 1949-50 Gdes 922,797.78 as
against Gdes 582,916.45 in 1948-49, or an increase of Gdes 339,881.33.
The year 1949-50 was the third year of operation for the Department of
Tourism, which continued to grow and devoted special efforts to attracting
tourists to the International Fair of the Bicentenary of Port-au-Prince.
The expenditures of this Department out of extraordinary credits
amounted to Gdes 153,194.55 and financed the operation of the de Verdure Massillon Coicou>, the repair of the Exposition buildings
and the payment of certain travel expenses.
The expenses of the Department of Religion rose from Gdes 591,857.88
in 1948-49 to Gdes 733,424.06 in 1949-50. This amount was used to defray
the cost of operation of the Secretary of State for Religion, the salaries
of the priests, and the care of the apostolic scholars. Out of the Gdes
77,499 spent by extraordinary credits during the fiscal year, Gdes 75,000
covered construction costs, of Gdes 25,000 each, of the Cathedrals of
Cayes and Port-de-Paix and of the Bishop's Palace in Gonaives.
The Department of Labor spent in 1949-50 Gdes 108,115.22 more than
in the preceding fiscal year. Out of Gdes 523,498.67 of outlay recorded
during the year, Gdes 323,137.73 represented budgetary expenditures
and Gdes 100,360.94 extraordinary expenditures. The latter amount went





BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


to defray the cost of the 1st. of May Celebration amounting to Gdes
26,252.26, to continue the fight against illiteracy (Gdes 51,743.18) and to,
finance the purchase of two cars (Gdes 22,365.50).

Classification of Extraordinary Expenditures
Government expenditures incurred during the year 1949-50 out of
extraordinary credits totalled Gdes 32,112,478.71. They ate classified by
main categories in the following table:

Expenditures made out of Extraordinary Credits
During the Fiscal Year 1949-50
Nature of the Expenditure: Gourdes
EXTERNAL EXPENDITURES..................... ............... 2,744,005.05
Help to foreign states................................ 50,000.00
Missions abroad....................................... 785,089.65
Scholars abroad....................................... 30,170.50
Guests of the Government........................ 435,254.15
Repairs to Embassies................................ 69,425.00
Acquisition of buildings........................... 826,569.55
Coining of nickel money........................... 429,803.60
Purchases of cars..................................... 37,711.50
Shipping expenses.................................... 79,981.10
PUBLIC UTILITY, MATERIEL, SANITATION
AND AGRICULTURE
Construction and installation.................... ............... 18,210,016.03
Construction and Services..................... 17,166,550.06
Hydraulic water installations................. 425,449.69
Electrical installations........................... 573,016.28
Telephone installations.......................... 45,000.00
Materiel and automotive equipment............ .............. 2,197.007.60
Materiel.............................. ........... 1,763,589.19
Cars......................... ... ......... ....... 433,418.41
Health and sanitation.................. ............... 903,20830
Agriculture....................... 963,916.17
Wages of specialists.............................. 38,673.19
Food production................................... 852,500.00
Plantations............................................ 24,614.89
Disease control..................................... 6,212.60
Irrigation and drainage.......................... 41,915.49
SECURITY OF THE STATE.................. ............... 1,955,486.70
Secret Police........ ....* ..................... 513,000.00
Police expenses......................................... 256,273.35
Arm y....... ............................................... 1,186,213.35
ADMINISTRATION............................................ 2,551,987.00
Census.......................... ............ 2,015,151.38
Parliament.... ........... ..... ........... 1,925.00
Consultative Council................................. 159,713.00
National Museum........................... .. 23,154.97
Education......................... 294,458.65
Library.................................................... 57,584.00
MISCELLANEOUS................ ......... ............... 1,349,950.00
Primary Assembly...................... 276,252.26
National Holidays............................ .... 350,718.80
Elections ............... I ..... ............. 713,478.94
D onations................................................. 6,500.00
Publicity ................................. 3,000.00
ALL OTHER................................... ... .... ......... 1,236,901.86

32,112,478.71




REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


SConstruction and installations carried out during the year took 56.70%
of the total, the purchases of materiel and cars took 6.84% while expenses
of the secret police and the acquisition of equipment for the Army took-
about 3.69%.

Classification of Fiscal Expenditures by Object
Tables 39 and 40 classify the expenditures of the Government (fiscal
and non-fiscal) by Department and by object. In order to emphasize the
variation of expenditures -by objects, the following table gives a com-
parison of the fiscal expenditures by object for the last five fiscal years.
1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Salaries and wages............. 21,530,468.41 27,426,693.04 34,967,694.35 40,609,906.97 45,046,618.28
Supplies and materiel......... 4,138,662.56 5,681,916.50 8,022,657.52 11.154,748.07 12,349,929.23
Transportation.................... 2,375,504.09 3,048,755.63 4,823,404.21 3,804,925.73 5,025.368.25
Communications................ 343.157.46 198,144.62 183,108.44 232,819.34 350,967.29
Rent................................. 218,550.26 256,770.36 316,095.83 383,142.72 581,257.89
Miscellaneous..................... 1,073,339.83 1,026,730.41 9,486,328.01 14,170,672.53 9,014,860.88
Total Administration and
Operation...................... 29,679,682.61 37,639,010.56 57,799,488.36 70,356,215.36 72,369,001.82
Repairs and maintenance.... 2,051,859.67 4,376,819.93 7,581,017.99 3,858,752.61 4,473,658.80
Properties and installations. 965,038.87 2,057,783.02 6,671,182.37 6,414,098.35 12,797,459.74
Fixed charges.................... 7,680,636.79 16,364.802.99 11,529,807.86 12,686,242.00 17,270,738.82
TOTAL....................... 40.377,217.94 60,438,416.50 83.581.496.58 93,315,308.32 106,910,859.18.

As may be seen, total salaries and wages rose from Gdes 21,530,468.41
to more than Gdes 45,000,000, but their percentage of the total of fiscal
expenditures declined from 55.33% to 42.14%.
To operate the various Services of the State, the Governient in 1949-50
spent Gdes 72,369,001.82 for salaries and wages, furniture, transportation,
communications and rent, while in 1945-46, it spent for these purposes
only Gdes 29,679,682.61. For the maintenance and repair of the pro-
perties and equipment belonging to the various Services of the Govern-
ment, expenditures amounted to Gdes 4,473,658.80 in 1949-50 as against
Gdes 7,581,017.99 in 1947-48. This rather large figure was due to the
fact that a great amount was spent for the construction and upkeep of the
International Fair and the Construction of the model town of Belladere.
Nevertheless, expenditures for the acquisition of properties and installa-
tions showed and upward trend. Indeed, this item has increased from
only Gdes 965,038.87 in 1945-46 to Gdes 12,797,459.74 in 1949-50. The
high figure for 1949-50 is due mainly to the expenditures incurred for
purchases of equipment for the Army of Haiti and of materiel for the
Department of Public Works, and for public works connected with the
International Fair, which include not only the cost of construction, but
also purchases of land.
The fixed charges of the Government increased also in 1949-50 to a
total of Gdes 17,270,738.82. This category of expenditures includes the
amortization of loans, and interest and charges on loans.




BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The foll6wiiig table shows the percentage of total fiscal expenditures
represented by each category of expenditures classified by object, for
the past seven fiscal years:
1936-37 1940-41 1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1948-50
Salaries and wages................ 52.00 59.35 53.33 45.38 41.84 43.52 42.14
Materiel.............................. 9.17 10.37 10.25 9.40 9.60 11.95 11.55
Transportation...................... 460 5.90 5.88 5.05 5.77 4.08 4.70
Communications.................... 0.14 0.27 0.85 0.33 0.22 0.25 0.33
Rent................................... 0.66 0.69 0.54 0.42 0.38 0.41 0.54
Miscellaneous...................... 1.22 1.64 2.66 1.70 11.35 15.19 8.43
Total Administration and
Operation........................ 67.79 78.22 73.51 62.28 69.16 75.40 67.69
Repairs and maintenance....... 2.67 3.56 5.08 7.24 9.07 4.13 4.19
Properties and installation..... 5.62 1.54 2.39 3.40 7.98 6.87 11.97
Fixed charges...................... 23.92 16.68 19.02 27.08 13.79 13.60 16.15
TOTAL......................... 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

Expenditures by Non-Fiscal Accounts

Articles 15 and 16 of the law on the budgeting of the public accounts
fixe the classification of the non-fiscal receipts and the procedure which
it is necessary to follow in order to draw from the funds accruing to those
accounts. In general, the non-fiscal accounts may be classified in three
main categories:
lo. The account which relate to the Services of the Government, which
are more or less clearly autonomous in their daily operations, and
which operate with their own budget.
2o. The working funds, which are maintained through funds coming
from the budget or which benefit from certain percentage deduc-
tions from some of the non-fiscal receipts; in some instances they
have also their own receipts.
3o. The trust funds, representing the guarantees of ministerial officers
or of accountants of public funds or other fiduciary funds admi-
nistered by the state.

Communal accounts
The gross receipts of the communes during the fiscal year 1949-50
amounted to Gdes 3,908,178.88 as against Gdes 3,772,858.73 in 1948-49.
The deductions made directly by the Internal Revenue Service for itself
and for the various fiscal accounts amounted to Gdes 1,344,561. The
balance of Gdes 2,563,678.27 was deposited in the National Bank to the
credit of the communes. To this amount must be added Gdes 79,713.22,
representing the balance standing to the credit of the communes in the
National Bank on October 1, 1949, giving a total of Gdes 2,643,391.49,
which the communes had available for expenditures during the fiscal
year 1949-50.











REPARTITION


PAR OBJETDES DEFENSES FiSCALES
SEXERCICE1949-50

ET





--42,447,
E-4,19




.. ..... *.... ......G-0.054%.


A-- OBLIGATIONS PERMANENTES E- TRANSPORT
B- COMMUNICATIONS F- DIVERS
C-- SALAIRES APPOINTMENTSS 6- LOCATIONS
D FOURNITURES H REPARATIONS ENTRETIENS
I- PROPRIETES INSTALLATIONS

I.8>1[TH





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


, From the ordinary budgets appropriated to them the communes spent
during the year a total of Gdes 2,015,235.68. Their extraordinary ex-
penditures during the year amounted to Gdes 270,224.67, bringing the
total spent during the year to Gdes 2,285,460.35 and leaving an un-
expended balance of Gdes 357,331.14. However, at the end of September
1950, sums obligated but not yet drawn by some communes amounted to
Gdes 23,690.99. After setting aside funds to cover these obligations, the
net surplus in the communal accounts stood at Gdes 334,240.15.
The following table gives full details of the communal operations during
the year 1949-50.
Gourdes Gourdes
Gross communal receipts deposited in the Bank from
October 1, 1949 to September 30, 1950.................. 3,908,178.88
Deductions made by the Internal Revenue Service
in favor of:
Inter-municipal Cooperation Pan-American
Comm ittee............................................... 810.00
Communal Affairs Inspection and Control...... 89,214.20
Rural and Urban Primary Schools (10%)......... 390,819.87
Collection fee of Internal Revenue Service
(15% )........................................................ 586,229.27
Department of National Education for Com-
munal Schools and Agricultural Police........ 86,349.92
Street lighting at Cayes................................. 13,200.00
Purchase of tools for peasants.................. 22,640.00
Salesian Schools fellowships.......................... 17,500.00
Library funds................................................ 43,170.00
Amortization of Cap-Haitien and Verrettes
Communal loans......................................... 94,567.35
TOTAL DEDUCTIONS.............................. 1,344,500.61
Net amount deposited to the credit of the communes 2,563,678.27
Plus: Unexpended balance as of September 30, 1949 79,713.22
TOTAL................................... .. .......... 2,643,391.49
Expenditures:
Budgetary ...................................................... 2,015,235.68
Extraordinary ................................................. 270,224.67
2,285,460.35
Surplus communal funds, fiscal year 1949-50......... 357,931.14
Less: Amount not yet drawn by communes............ 23,690.99
UNEXPENDED BALANCE......................... 334,240.15

The unexpended balance of communal funds has been distributed as
follows, according to the terms of the law of August 3, 1949:
a) 75% or Gdes 250,680.11, has been transferred to the account -Reserve for
Communal Project of Public Utility and Extraordinary Expenses*.
b) 25% of the balance of each commune has been carried to the credit of that
commune; the combined balance so credited was Gdes 83,560.04.
During the fiscal year 1949-50, disbursements from the account Serve for Communal Project of Public Utility and Extraordinary Ex-
Penses> amounted to Gdes 121,345,23 and the balance not yet expended
stood at Gdes 12,875.96 at the end of September 1950.





BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The funds transferred from the global account Communal Funds> to
the special fund of reserve were as follows:

Gourdes
Communal projects of public utility (40%)....................... 100,272.14
Construction and equipment of rural schools and cultural
centers (20% )................................................................. 50,136.07
Sanitation projects and malaria control (20%)................. 50,136.07
Organization and improvement of fire services (10%)......... 25,068.03
Extraordinary expenditures (10%) .................................... 25,068.03

250,680.34

Telephone, Telegraph, Radiocommunications and Hydraulic Services

Since the fiscal year 1944-45 the Telephone, Telegraph and Radiocom-
munications Service, on the one hand, and the Hydraulic Service, on
the other, have their respective budgets distinct from the general budget
of the Republic, with their own ways and means and expenditures
estimates, approved by their Boards of Administration before being
submitted for legislative sanction. Financially, these two Services are
administered on a non-fiscal basis, their receipts being credited to special
accounts while expenditures connected with the operation and betterment
of the two Services are drawn from these special accounts.
The following tables show the results of the last five fiscal years for
these two autonomous administrations.


Telegraph, Telephone and Radiocommunications
Excess or
Receipts Expenditures Deficit(-)
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1944-45.................... 842,387.97 792,639.10 49,748.87
1945-46.................... 1,053,065.47 1,028,775.58 24,289.89
1946-47.................... 1,045,708.73 1,074,249.08 -28,540.35
1947-48.................... 1,237,220.13 1,217,087.96 20,132,17
1948-49.................... 1,132,856.82 1,145,485.62 -12,628.80
1949-50.................... 1,158,260.70 1,165,666.39 7,405.69

Hydraulic Services
Excess or
Receipts Expenditures Deficit(-)
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1944-45.................... 522,064.11 453,938.99 68,125.12
1945-46.................... 568,813.25 610,529.30 --41,716.05
1946-47..................... 570,642.14 591,621.95 -20,979.81
1947-48..................... 568,834.29 543,827.40 25,006.89
1948-49.................... 708,508.72 712,430.36 3,921.64
1949-50.................... 861,469.38 828,767.74 32,701.64

Other Public Services Administered as Non-Fiscal Accounts

It seems desirable to present at this point the receipts and expenditures,
for 1949-50, of several non-fiscal accounts dealing with the operations of
certain public organizations which may be considered as State enterprises.
In studying the figures in question, one should not lose sight of the fact







REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


that some of those organizations render certain services to the State
without charge while receiving from the State all or part of the salaries
of their staff: Excess or
Collections Expenditures Deficit(-)
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Government Printing Shop.... 585,508.65 549,198.83 36,309.82
State Lottery .................... 1,014,852.65 1,015,792.59 939.94
Dry Dock, Haitian Coast Guard.. 136,592.05 141,970.48 5,378.43

Other Non-Fiscal Accounts-Pension and Savings
Each month the state deducts 3% from the checks of public employees'
salary and transfers it to a non-fiscal account called >.
This account is also fed by the budgetary twelfth of Gdes 50,000 which
is furnished each month by the Department of Finance. The amounts
carried to the credit of this account for the fiscal year 1949-50 amounted
to Gdes 1,869,570.74, while Gdes 1,724,544.53 were withdrawn from this
account to pay pensioners of the State.
In the same order of ideas, the Army of Haiti retains each month a
certain part of the salaries of its officers and soldiers and transfers them
to a pension fund. The total amount thus collected during the year was
Gdes 300,648.28 and the sums paid to beneficiaries totaled Gdes 258,426.15.
There is also in the Army of Haiti a system of compulsory savings. The
deductions from soldiers' pay which accrued to this account during the
year amounted to Gdes 1,245,536.62 and the sums disbursed to the savers
amounted to Gdes 1,039,206.26.

Banque Nationale de la RWpublique d'Haati
Fiscal Department
Expenditures of the Fiscal Department of the B.N.R.H. amounted to
Gdes 2,999,052.20 in 1949-50 as compared with Gdes 2,385,985.83 in 1948-
49, an increase of 25.70%. Such expenditures were distributed as follows
in the two fiscal years:
1949-50 1948-49
Gourdes Gourdes
Salaries and wages......................... 2,460,012.99 2,014,282.08
Supplies and materiel........................ 203,655.50 154,927.45
Transportation.................................. 144,342.85 129,370.02
Communications............................... 14,397.75 12,896.40
Rent................................................. 747.00
Repairs and Maintenance................. 66,838.67 25,273.50
Equipment.................................... 69,315.23 33,271.97
Special and miscellaneous................ 34,742.21 15,964.41
Total........................................ 2,999,052.20 2,385,985.83

These expenditures were made not only for the operations of the
Customs Administration (Customs Control, Customs statistics, 15 customs
bureaus and one customs agency), but also for those of the Central
Service of Public Accouting (including expenditures for the ordering of
checks and other supplies to be used by the various Services of the







52 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

Government), the General Inspection of Customs, the inspection of in-
ternal receipts, and the handling of goods at the custom-house of Port-
au-Prince.
The substantial difference between the expenditures in 1949-50 and
those in the previous year is due mainly to an increase in the salaries paid
to the employees of this Department and also to an increase in the per-
sonnel made necessary by the increased activity of the Service. However,
it is noteworthy that the total expenditures of the customs administration
represented only 3.74% of the aggregate customs receipts for the period
(Gdes 80,184,500) while the total expenditures in 1948-49 represented
4:03% of the total of customs receipts (Gdes 59,171,500).

TREASURY POSITION
The various items making up the assets and the liabilities of the Trea-
sury might be grouped as follows:
ASSETS Gourdes Gourdes
CURRENT ASSETS:
Deposits in Banks:
Haiti Gourde Account......................................... 6,945,908.02
New York current account.................................. 362,428.45
Cash in hand of disbursing officers...................... 181,098.57
Miscellaneous unpaid checks-Reserve................... 3,461.21
7,492,896.25
INVESTMENTS
SCapital stock in Banque Nationale de la Rep. d'Haiti.. 5,000,000.00
Internal Loan Bonds................................................ 6,027,569.50
Capital stock in Haitian-Cuban Sugar Company......... 1,000,000.00
12,027,569.50
OTHER ASSETS
Fiduciary currency in vault.................................. 1,728,500.00
Advances by the Government-reimbursable............. 93,917.04
1,822,417.04
Deficit balance........................................... ........ 2,167,757.05
Total Assets........................................ ....... 23,510,639.84
LIABILITIES
CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Unpaid checks...................................................... 3,368,902.32
Balance of extraordinary appropriations................... 2,662,877.20
Balance of non-fiscal accounts (excluding Provision
for Economic Equipment of the Country)............... 5,825,585.81
Miscellaneous checks............................................... 3,461.21
11,860,826.54
OTHER LIABILITIES
Provision for Economic Equipment of the Country
(non-fiscal account).............................................. 1,433,396.26
Capital stock in Banque Nationale de la Rep. d'Haiti.. 5,000,000.00
Fiduciary currency fund..... ;.......................... 4,122,500.00
Advances by the Government-reimbursable........... 93,917.04
Capital stock in Haitian-Cuban Sugar Company........ 1,000,000.00
Total Treasury Liabilities............................ 11,649,813.30

23,510,639.84




REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The situation of the Treasury at .the end of the last three fiscal years,
may be summarized as follows, for purposes of comparison: : .
.. September 30, 1950 September 30, 1949 September 30,1948
ASSETS Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Current Assets............ 7,492,896.25 3,251,886.03 15,106,189.69
Investments................... 12,027,569.50 14,438,060.05 16,899,211.60
Other assets.................. 1,822,417.04 1,328,167.04 1,279,167.04
Deficit.............. .......... 2,167,757.0. 3,047,542.22 ..............
23,510,639.84 22,065,655.34 33,284,568.33
LIABILITIES
Current liabilities........... 11,860,826.54 9,157,714.65 15,536,330.06' :
Other liabilities............. 11,649,813.30 12,907,940.69 16,605,667.94
Surplus.......................... ............... ............... 1,142,570.33
23,510,639.84 22,065,655.34 33,284,568.33

The striking point to be noted here is the decrease of Gdes 879,785.17
which occurred in the accounting deficit, concurrently with the change
in current assets, which rose from Gdes 3,251,886.03 at the.end of Sep-
tember 30, 1949, to Gdes 7,492,896.25 at the end of September 1950,
while the investment item declined slightly to Gdes 12,027,569.50 as
against Gdes 14,438,069.95 at the end of the preceding fiscal year.
The conversion into cash of the internal loan funds which were in the
portfolio of various Government accounts and also the excess of fiscal
receipts over fiscal expenditures contributed to an improvement in the
liquidity of the Treasury. The current liabilities which were Gdes
9,157,714.65 at the end of September 30, 1949, amounted to Gdes 11,860,-
826.54 at the end of September 1950. The item of unpaid checks rose
from Gdes 1,994,692.94 to Gdes 3,368,902.32. The balance of extraor-
dinary credits increased from Gdes 1,354,735.66 to Gdes 2,662,877.20.
However, the balance of the non-fiscall accounts, at Gdes 5,801,367.30,
stood at about the same level as a'year earlier.
The amount carried to the liability side for the fiduciary currency,
representing half of the legal guaranty, was increased by Gdes 500,000
following the additional coining mentioned elsewhere in this report.

PUBLIC DEBT
On September 30, 1950, the gross public debt of the Republic of Haiti
amounted to Gdes 40,616,250.15 as against Gdes 39,802,877.79 on Sep-
tember 30, 1949. These amounts included the following elements:
September 30, 1950 September 30, 1949
Gourdes Gourdes
Internal Loan..................... ........ 33,755,266.70 30,619,516.70
Public Works Contract........... .... 2,350,000.00 5,350,000.00
National Defense Loan.................... 388,483.45 210,861.09
Fiduciary currency........................ 4,122,500.00 3,622,500.00
40,616,250.15 39,802,877.79
Internal Loan
The outstanding bonds in circulation totalled Gdes 30,600,000 as of
September 30, 1949. But on that date, the nominal balance of bonds not




54 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
yet sold amounted to Gdes 6,000,000, while on September 30, 1950, the
balance stood at only Gdes 400,000. It is apparent, therefore, that con-
currently with the repurchase of the bonds through the amortization
procedure, most of the bonds which had not yet been issued were sold
by the fiscal agent during the fiscal year or given by the Government of
the Republic in payment of contractual services, or for the acquisition of
equipment or furniture. The proceeds of the bonds sold during 1949-50
exceeded the nominal amount amortized during the same period, the
final result being an increase in the public debt.
National Defense Bonds
Authorized originally for $3,000,000 or Gdes 15,000,000 by the law of
February 14, 1949, the issue of this loan was brought back to $1,120,800
or Gdes 5,604,000 by the decree of November 24, 1950 (Moniteur No. 135).
A peculiarity of the bonds of this loan is that they are put into circulation
only gradually as equipment ordered for the Army of Haiti is delivered.
This explains why at the end of September 1950, the nominal amount
outstanding was only $236,030. As $100,000 of redeemed bonds have
been taken out of circulation, the balance of outstanding bonds was
reduced to $136,030 or Gdes 680,150. From this last figure has been
deducted in accordance with custom, the balance of the sinking fund in
the Bank which had not yet been used but which had been set aside
exclusively for the redemption of bonds of the Internal Loan.
Fiduciary Currency
Up to the most recent minting of nickel coins, the fractional currency
was shown as an item of the public debt in the amount of Gdes 3,622,500,
i. e., the non-guaranteed half of the total face amount (Gdes 7,245,000) of
the nickel and bronze coins outstanding.
Of the last issue of nickel put into circulation totalling Gdes 1,000,000,
only 50% or Gdes 500,000 were secured with the necessary guaranty.
The other half, circulating without any counter-part, has been treated
in accordance with custom as an increase in the public debt. The fidu-
ciary currency element of the public debt has consequently risen from
Gdes 3,622,500 to Gdes 4,122,500.
THE BUDGET
The law of September 26, 1949, published in Moniteur No. 95, set at
Gdes 73,216,350 the budget of ways and means for the fiscal year 1949-50
and at Gdes 73,216,315.29 the budget of expenditures. The total expen-
diture appropriations for the year amounted to Gdes 112,153,437.92, and
embraced the following items:
1) Total ordinary budget.
2) Unexpended balance in extraordinary credits as of September 30,
1949, since article 7 of the finance law assigns a two-year duration to
these appropriations.






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


3) Such amount as the organic laws of the Internal Revenue Service
automatically authorize that Service to expend in excess of its
budgetary allowance, as was explained in the section of this report
dealing with expenditures of the Internal Revenue Service.
4) Total allocations authorized during the fiscal year, less all credits
the funds for which are supplied through legal cancellation of other
authorizations.

Assuming that all provisions of the finance law relative to ordinary,
supplementary and extraordinary credits have been strictly adhered to,
it is obvious that the difference between total authorized expenditures
and total unused credits during the course of the fiscal year are equivalent
to the amount actually expended. For the fiscal year 1949-50 the unused
expenditure authorizations were as follows:
1) The unexpended balance in budgetary appropriations at September
30, 1950 (to be cancelled on October 1, 1950).
2) The balance in the extraordinary credits which expired during the
course of the fiscal year, in conformity with article 7 above men-
tioned.
3) The unexpended balance in extraordinary credits at September 30,
1950 (to be carried forward on October 1, 1950).
4) The cancellation on June 30, 1950 of the credit balance of article
226 of the budget.

BUDGETARY OPERATIONS 1949-50
Gourdes Gourdes
Unexpended balance of extraordinary appro-
priations as of September 30, 1949............ 1,354,735.66
Operating budget as of October 1, 1949......... 73,216,315.29
Total authorized expenditures at beginning of
year ..................................................... 74,571,050.95
Accrual to operating account of Internal Re-
venue Service over amount carried in budget 1,919,025.35
Appropriations opened and not compensated
by cancellation of other credits............... 35,663,361.62
Total authorized expenditures during year...... 112,153,437.92
Unexpended balance of budgetary credits as of
September 30, 1950............................ 1,448,072.38
Balance in extraordinary credits which expired
in course of year.............................. 771,755.29
Unexpended balance in extraordinary credits as
of Sept. 30, 1950, carried over into 1950-51...... 2,662,877.20
Cancellation on June 30, 1950 of the credit
balance of article 226.............................. 359,873.87
Unused expenditure authorizations during the
fiscal year .. ................................ 5,242,578.74
Fiscal expenditures 1949-50................... ...... 106,910,859.18






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


' .The following table shows for each'Department the unexpended bud-
getary credit balances on September 30, 1950 and the unexpended ex-
traordinary credit balances which were carried over'to the fiscal year


1950-51:
: I .


* : 'Public debt...........:........:.....
International Institutions.............
Foreign Affairs..........................
Finance................... ................
SFiscal Department BNRH............
Internal Revenue Service............
Commerce...............................
National Economy .....................
Interior............................. ......
Army of Haiti............................
Public Health..........................
Public Works...........................
Justice.....................................
Agriculture..............................
Agricultural Service....:............
Labor.......................................
National Education...................
Religion....................................
Tourism..................................


(


Cancelled budgetary
credit balances as
of September 30,
1950
Gourdes
771,696.42
1,670.35
134,665.37
44,739.77
947.80
123,664.81
14,477.03
27,119.91
62,978.94
815.29
55,246.73
5,503.48
59,835.31
2,182.23
61,338.59
2,182.27
44,523.10
6,871.94
27,613.04

1,448,072.38


MONEY AND BANKING

The National Bank of the Republic of Haiti and the Royal Bank of
Canada are the only two banks at present functioning in Haiti. The Royal
Bank of Canada operates only in Port-au-Prince. The National Bank has
its main office in Port-au-Prince, but also has branches and agencies in
various other cities of the Republic, mostly in the ports.
Statistics for the two banks are presented in tables 46 and 47.
Table 46 gives the five-year average and the monthly averages for
1948-49 and 1949-50 of the outstanding bank-notes of the National Bank.
The monthly average in 1949-50 was Gdes 35,116,059 while in 1948-49
it was only Gdes 28,369,698 and in 1947-48 only Gdes 27,707,098.
The monthly average of loans and discounts made in 1949-50 by the
two banks amounted to Gdes 23,676,515.30 as against Gdes 23,007,307.90
in 1948-49 and Gdes 16,178,484.25 in 1947-48.
The monthly average of individual deposits in the two banks increased
slightly in comparison with 1948-49 but without regaining the high level
of 1947-48. The figures were Gdes 36,638,190.40, Gdes 34,848,938.48 and
Gdes 38,866,655.06 respectively.
With a view to showing how the two banks use the deposits of indi-
viduals and of business houses in general (i. e., all deposits except govern-


Extraordinary credit i
balances carried
over to October 1.
1950 .
Gourdes


113,120.10
185,580,65

1,203.16
216,987.38
28,474.20
447,970.77
78,023.46
1,449,521.45
13,201.47
109,917.49

7,124.27

11,752.80

2,662,877.20






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


mental deposits), the following table gives the total of loans and discounts
and the ratio of that total:to the aggregate non-governmental deposits,in
the two banks, as of the end of each month of the fiscal year 1949-50:


-Monthly average
October 31, 1949.................
November 30, ...................
December 31, ..............
January 31, 1950................
cr February 28, .................
March 31, :... ........
April 30, ..................
May 31, ..................
June 30, .................
;July :31, ................
August 31, .................
September 30, ..................


Loans and discounts
As a percentage
of the deposits
Amount in of individuals and
Gourdes business houses
22,179,311.00 73.65
28,460,918.01 88.25
28,106,784.76 79.59
27,205,582.84 72.02
25,506,496.64 68.56
25,703,602.90 67.45
24,100,840.00 60.10
21,736,551.71 53.75
20,527,842.26 55.17
19,649,384.55 54.74
19,467,912.07 47.82
21,472,957.32 62.11


The total known money supply in Haiti at the end of each month of the
fiscal year is given by the following table, which reveals that the known
money supply reached its highest peak in March 1950.

TOTAL KNOWN MONEY SUPPLY IN HAITI AT THE END OF EACH MONTH
OF FISCAL YEAR 1949-50


Outstanding


n
Nati


October 31,1949....
November 30, ........
December 31, .......
January 31,1950......
February 28, .........
March 31, .........
April 30, .........
May 31, .........
June 30, ......
July 31, .........
August 31, .........
September 30, .........


30
38
39
39
40
38
37
34
32
23
26
31


otes of the Outstanding
onalBank(a) nickel coins(b)
Gourdes Gourdes
,232,015.00 6,336,115.40(c)
,529,738.00 6,958,879.01(d)
,217,488.00 7,215,709.83
,232,340.00 7,150,530.00
1,786,706.00 7,193,286.13
,915,696.00 7,091,555.46
,835,679.09 6,809,518.93
,324,641.03 6,568,762.04
,082,846.00 6,374,993.25
,521,797.00 6,188,076.94
,160,748.00 6,130,111.78
,879,458.00 6,516,839.81


(a) Net amount of outstanding
banks.


Deposits
in the Banks
Gourdes
34,743,052.00
37,880,478.09
41,444,856.94
43,086,423.27
43,336,118.53
46,349,488.04
47,407,890.83
49,141,104.70
49,518,352.66
48,010,714.33
53,825,280.21
44,744,510.84


Total known
money supplies
Gourdes
71,311,182.40
83,369,095.10
87,878,054.77
89,469,293.27
91,316,110.66
92,356,739.50
92,054,088.76
90,034,507.74
87,976,191,91
82,720,588.27
86,116,139.99
83,140,808.65


National Bank notes held outside the


(b) Net amount of outstanding Haitian nickel coins held outside the
banks.
(c) & (d) Prior to November 1949, the coins in circulation amounted
to Gdes 7,245,000. At the beginning of November 1949, additional
coinage of Gdes 1,000,000 was authorized which brought the total
issue of Haitian nickel coins to Gdes 8,245,000.






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


In general, the total money supply increased not only in the form of
outstanding gourde bank-notes and Haitian nickel coins but also in the
form of deposits in the banks. In the above table, the total deposits in
the banks include those of the Government.
These three items, outstanding gourde bank-notes, outstanding Haitian
nickel coins, and the amounts deposited in the banks, give the total of the
statistically measurable money supply in Haiti. It has not been possible
to establish the amounts outstanding of U. S. dollar bank-notes and
American coins because they may be freely brought into and taken out
of Haiti and do not in any way fall under the control of the banks. But
the amount of United States currency circulating in Haiti is believed to
be high and it probably equals at least half of the outstanding Haitian
bank-notes. Because of the lack of statistical data, no estimate for U. S.
currency has been inserted in the table of the Haitian money supply, but
it is fairly certain that the monthly average of the total money supply in
Haiti during 1949-50 exceeded the Gdes 100,000,000 mark.

BALANCE OF PAYMENTS*
Fiscal Year 1949-50
In its last two annual reports, the Fiscal Department presented esti-
mates of the balance of International payments of Haiti for the calendar
years 1947, 1948, 1949. These estimates were arrived at by methods
quite different from the classical ones used for balance of payment com-
putations, owing to the difficulties encountered in establishing the figures
for certain items. The estimates consequently were not comparable with
the balance of payment estimates of other countries. Nevertheless, they
were aimed to cover all international transactions made through the
banks by the Haitian Government and by residents of Haiti.
While the method used for the 1947, 1948 and 1949 estimates gave a
fairly clear picture of the international position of the country, it omitted
the following types of transactions.
1) Gifts in nature,
2) Barter transactions,
3) Exports paid for abroad and the proceeds of which were not imme-
diately repatriated, but were either deposited in banks abroad or
used to pay for imports into Haiti.
The last mentioned omission was partially corrected by the adjustments
made in the capital items. This year, the balance of payments has been
estimated according to principles which the International Monetary Fund

*For clarity and statistical purposes, changes have been made in the tables and in the teIt
of this English version of the balance of payments, but they do not change the sense and the
exactitude of the French one.





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


has recommended and publicized in its Balance of Payments Manual.
The latest issue of this manual contains the balances of payments of 59
countries.
According to the International Monetary Fund, the balance of pay-
ments for a given period is a systematic record of all economic transac-
tions during the period between residents of the reporting country and
residents of other countries, referred to for convenience as foreigners.
By is meant all transactions involving a
transfer of goods, of titles to goods, of services and of financial claims
between residents of the reporting country and residents of other coun-
tries. Economic transactions are divided into two great categories:
1) Those which give rise to two operations (quid pro quo), for example:
a) Sales of goods or the rendering of services against payment in
money, other credit instruments, or titles to investment, i. e.
capital items,
b) Barter,
c) The interchange of capital items, such as sales of securities
against money, sales of one currency against another currency,
the discharge of previously incurred commercial debt, etc...
2) Transactions which gave place to only one operation (no quid pro
quo) such as:
a) -Gifts in kind in the form of goods or services
b) Gifts of money, and other capital items.
This method, as may be seen, covers theoretically all operations which
may occur between any one country and the rest of the world.
In the Haitian balance of payments presented below, the Fiscal Depart-
ment has covered all international transactions between Haiti and the
rest of the world which it has been able to ascertain. The Department is
glad to express here its gratitude to the Internal Revenue Service, to the
Royal Bank of Canada, and to the Commercial Department of the Na-
tional Bank, for their cooperation.
The table of the balance of payments of Haiti records the current
transactions and the capital transactions. The value of the current tran-
sactions which appear in the first half of the table, is recorded on a gross
basis. The second half of the table, called monetary gold>, records only the net changes in the assets and liabilities
of the country during the fiscal year.
The system of double-entry bookkeeping is used. Because of this double-
entry system, a net credit or debit in the current account is offset by an
equal and opposite movement in the capital account. Since the capital
account balance is expressed as a movement in net assets instead of a net
credit or debit, it is equal in sign as well as in magnitude to the current
account balance.





BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The difference between the balances of these two accounts represents
the magnitude of the errors and omissions made in the recording of the
operations.
Haiti's balance of payments for the fiscal year 1949-50 showed a favor-
able balance in the current transactions. The surplus reflected itself in
an increase of Haiti's deposits abroad, in an increase of foreign exchange
holdings of the local banks, and in an increase in the amount of dollars in
circulation in Haiti.
The aim of Table 2 is to present the elements of Table 1 under another
form in order to show how the balance of payments of Haiti was equili-
brated. This equilibrium in Haiti takes place automatically, while in most
other countries monetary and fiscal measures have to be taken by the
authorities to equilibrate their balance of payments.


Table 1
BALANCE OF PAYMENTS OF HAITI

CURRENT AND CAPITAL TRANSACTIONS
A.-Current Transactions

October 1, 1949 September 30, 1950


Credit


1. Merchandise
2. Non monetary
gold movement
(net)
3. Foreign travel
4. Transportation
5. Insurance
6. Investment
income
7. Government, not
included elsewhere
8. Miscellaneous
9. Donations

10. Total current
transactions

Erreurs and omissions
(16-10)


199.836.131,00


..................
9.600.000,00
41.380,00
885.468,75

11.041,00

6.875.585,10

650.000,00


217.899.605,85


(in gourdes)
Debit

183.313.328,00


223.342,00
6.045.035,65
4.310.969,55
1.746.360,60

1.284.035,20

4.695.239,60
568.274,06
50.000,00


202.236.584,66


Net credit

16.522.803,00


- 223.342,00
3.554.964,35
- 4.269.589,55
- 860.891,85

- 1.272.994,20

2.180.345,50
- 568.274,06
600.000,00


15.663.021,19


3.788.995,01






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


.BALANCE OF PAYMENTS OF HAITI

CURRENT AND CAPITAL TRANSACTIONS

B.-Movement of Capital and Monetary gold

October 1, 1949 September 30, 1950
Net movement increasing or decreasing (-)
(in gourdes)
Assets Liabilities Net Assets


PRIVATE (excluding
banking institutions)
11. Long-term capital
12. Short-term capital

OFFICIAL AND BANK-
ING INSTITUTIONS
13. Long-term capital
14. Short-term capital
15. Monetary gold


3.780...........389,05..
3.780.389,05


11,256.851,95.......
11,256.851,95


1.479.500,00 1.479.500,00
- 125.695,05 3.906.084,10


- 4.790.750,00
22.269,85


5.790.750,00
11.234.582,10


16. Total movement of
capital and monteray
gold


15.037.241,00 4.414.675,20


19.451.916,20






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


Table 2

FINANCING OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSACTIONS
October 1, 1949 September 30, 1950

A. MERCHANDISE Gourdes
Exportations f.o.b.................................................. 199.836.131,00
Imports c.i.f. (including non monetary gold)........... -183.536.670,00

Commercial Balance.................................... 16.299.461,00

B. SERVICES
Foreign travel..................................................... 3.554.964,35
Transportation...................................................- 4.269.589,55
Insurance....................................................... ..... 860.891,85
Investment income..............................................- 1.272.994,20
Governments....................................................... 2.180.345,50
M iscellaneous...................................................- 568.274,06

Total............................................................- 1.236.439,81

C. DONATIONS 650.000,00
D. PRIVATE CAPITAL MOVEMENTS
Long-term capital.............................................. 1.479.500,00
Short-term capital ............................................... 384.304,95

Total....................................................... ... 1.863.804,95
E. SPECIAL OFFICIAL FINANCING
Official donation................................................- 50.000,00
Public debt amortization ............................. .....- 5.790.750,00

Total........................................................... 5.840.750,00

F. ERRORS AND OMISSIONS.................................. 3.788.895,01
G. SURPLUS OR DEFICIT (-) (A to F)................... 15.524.971,15
H. COMPENSATORY OFFICIAL FINANCING
Dollar currency outside banks............................- 4.290.389,05
Commercial banks:
Dollar currency in Haiti..................................- 2.071.585,95
Balances abroad............................................- 9.185.266,00
Due abroad.............................. ................... 22.269,85
M monetary gold............................................ .................

Total......................................................... 15.524.971,15





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


A-Current Transactions
The current transactions record all transactions other than those re-
presenting changes in the international creditor-debtor position of the
reporting country and in its monetary gold holdings. They include two
distinct types of transactions: items 1 through 8 in Table 1 refer to trans-
fers of goods and services, and item 9 covers donations. Transactions are
in general recorded on a gross credit-debit basis. The credit entries under
items 1 through 8 correspond to goods and services supplied and the debit
entries to goods and services received. The credit under item 9 shows
donations received by the reporting country, while the debit shows dona-
tions made by the reporting country.

1. Merchandise

The figures for the toms statistics of the Fiscal Department. The credit to this account,
amounting to Gdes 199,836,131, was made up as follows:
Gourdes
Value of exports (f.o.b.)............................... 192,399,641
Re-exports (f.o.b.) .......................................... 7,436,490
Total of exports and re-exports................... 199,836,131

On the debit side, the account shows a figure of Gdes
183,313,328, representing the net c.i.f. price of imports of goods of Haiti,
less the non monetary gold. It is calculated as follows:
Gourdes
Imports during 1949-50 ci.i.f. price..................... 181,004,620
Plus special imports of goods by the Government 2,532,050
Total....................................................... 183,536,670
From this gross figure has been deducted the
value of non monetary gold imports (item 2) or 223,342
which gives a net of........................................ 183.313,328
as imports of goods during the fiscal year 1949-50.

2. Non Monetary Gold Movement (Net)
The decree-law of September 4, 1942, Moniteur No. 73, gave the National
Bank the exclusive monopoly of buying gold in whatever form in Haiti.
To this effect, the National Bank-at first maintained buying posts in the
producing centers, but since its operations always ended in a deficit,
it was obliged to close these posts at the end of the war. While some gold
is being mined in Haiti and is being sold to neighboring countries, the
quantities are negligible.
Accordingly, no statistical data are available to permit an estimate for
the credit side of this item. However, the customs statistics of the Fiscal
Department showed that the c.iif. value of non monetary gold imported by







64 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

residents of Haiti during the fiscal year 1949-50 was Gdes 223,342, which
amount has been carried to the debit side of item 2 of the balance of
payments.

3. Travel

In this account are entered expenditures made by tourists, business-
men, students, medical patients, Government officials and all other travel-
lers. Because of the constant improvement of travelling facilities, the
increasing number of people of all nationalities who travel, and the efforts
which various countries, including Haiti, are making to develop tourism,
it is certain that this account will assume an increasing importance in
the Haitian balance of payments. The following table shows the number
of incoming and outgoing travellers for the last six fiscal years:

Fiscal Year Incoming Outgoing
1943-44......................................... 4,434 4,522
1944-45......................................... 4,903 4,939
1945-46......................................... 3,693 3,832
1946-47......................................... 7,276 7,460
1947-48......................................... 8,718 8,717
1948-49......................................... 9,931 9,903
1949-50......................................... 13,977 13,642


According to the statistics of the Department of Tourism, the number of
foreign tourists who visited Haiti during the fiscal year 1949-50 amount-
ed to 12,023 as against 7,810 in 1948-49. The monthly figures for the two
years were as follows:
Number of foreign tourists
Month 1949-50 1948-49
October 1949................................ 377 305
November ................................ 532 356
December ................................ 758 412
January 1950................................ 1,205 637
February ................................ 3,107 1,837
M arch ............................... 1.398 1,287
April ................................ 1,037 477
M ay ................................. 601 446
June ................................. 581 448
July ................................. 914 581
August ................................ 1,010 632
September ................................ 503 392
12,023 7,810


According to the custom statistics, the number of Haitians and fo-
reigners entering and leaving the country during the year 1949-50 was
as follows:
Incoming Outgoing
H aitians............ ............................... 2,098 1,954
Foreigners................................. 11,879 11,688

13,977 13,642






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The small difference between the figures recorded by the Fiscal Depart-
ment and those of the Department of Tourism, so far as incoming fo-
reigners are concerned, came, without any doubt, from different defini-
tions of the word < by those two services. The difference is,
however, too small to affect the balance of payments estimates, and one
may assume as an average that 12,000 tourists visited Haiti during the
fiscal year 1949-50.

The credit side of the < as an estimate of what foreign travellers spent in Haiti for hotels, taxis,
purchases and entertainment. This amount includes expenditures made
by 22,000 American sailors whose vessels called at Haitian ports during
the fiscal year. These expenditures have been estimated at an average of
$10.00 per sailor.

Total tourist expenditures during the year were distributed approxi-
mately as follows:
Gourdes
H otels.................................. ............................. 4,000,000
Purchases.......................................................... 3,000,000
Taxis fares and others......................................... 1,500,000
Expenditures of 22,000 American sailors................. 1,100,000
9,600,000

Taking the average of 12,000 incoming tourists, the average expen-
ditures per tourist were as follows:
Gourdes
H otels..................... .. ............... ........................ 333
Purchases..................................................................... 250
Taxis fares and others................................................... 125
708

These figures have been established with care after inquiries as to the
gross annual turn-over of hotels receiving foreigners, shops selling articles
of the handicraft industry, and agencies furnishing important tourist
services.
During the fiscal year 1949-50, Haitians bought travellers checks for a
total value of Gdes 1,704,435. Unfortunately, it has not been possible to
determine the amount of private checks that tourists cashed through
Haitian banks during the year.
Travellers leaving Haiti bought from the banks about Gdes 3,000,000
of travellers checks. The number of purchasers was about 800, giving an
average of Gdes 3,750 of travellers checks bought by each client. If one
assumes that the 1,954 outgoing Haitians carried with them abroad an
average of Gdes 5,000 in cash and checks, total expenditures abroad by
Haitian travellers during the fiscal year 1949-50 can be estimated at Gdes
9,970,000.







BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


4. Transportation
In general, the < account covers all transactions dealing
with any form of transportation (air, sea, land) existing between a given
country and the other countries of the world.
Transportation between Haiti and the countries of the outside world
is assured almost exclusively by foreign companies. Thus the receipts side
of the transportation account shows only a small amount of Gdes 41,380,
consisting of Gdes 21,076 paid by foreign importers to Haitian residents
whose boats carried certain Haitian exports abroad and Gdes 20,304
received from foreigners by Haitian residents for bringing goods into
Haiti.
Since the value of freight paid to foreign shipping companies is already
included in the debit of the Merchandise account, no amount appears
Son the debit side of the < account as a payment for freight.
However, the debit side of this account shows a value of Gdes 4,310,-
919.55, representing the exact amount which residents of Haiti paid to
foreign companies in Haiti for travel to foreign countries. These expen-
ditures are distributed as follows:
Gourdes
A ir tickets......................................................... 4.125,241.70
Ship tickets.................................... .............. 185,727.85
Total........................... ................ 4,310,969.55

5. Insurance
This account includes all the amounts received or paid in connection
with insurance and re-insurance contracts between residents and fo-
reigners, including marine, life, accident, and fire insurance contracts.
The premiums collected by the 14 most important foreign insurance
agencies established in Haiti and the insurance payments made to Haitian
residents were as follows in the fiscal year 1949-50.
Credit: Debit:
Insurances paid Premiums paid
to Haitians by Haitians
Nature of insurance Gourdes Gourdes
M arine........................... 2,134.15 64,084.10
Life................................... 629,298.50 871,106.65
Accident.......................... 228,193.80 249,992.25
Fire................................... 25,842.30 561,177.60
Total............................ 885,468.75 1,746,360.60

6. Investment Income
This account consists of interest and other income from the investment
of funds abroad. It has not been possible to establish the amount of
income earned by Haitians on their investments abroad, because no cen-
sus has been taken for this purpose. However, an amount of Gdes 11,040
is shown on the credit side of this account representing the estimated






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


income received by Haitians on long term deposits held by them in
American banks; such deposits averaged Gdes 883,000 during the year
'1950.

Haitian private balances (short term deposits) in American banks
amounted to $3,359,000 as of December 31, 1949 as compared with
$3,282,000 as of December 31, 1950. While it is possible that Haitians have
investments in other countries, no information concerning such invest-
ments is available and hence, no estimate of income thereon could be
made.

The question is different so far as foreign investments in Haiti are
concerned. It is certain that such investments are sizable in volume and
.that foreign investors have derived substantial income from them.

Unfortunately, it has not been possible to determine which of the con-
'cerns operating in Haiti are financed by foreign capital and which ones
are working with Haitian capital, because almost all of them are regis-
tered and operate as Haitian concerns.

For this account, one needs to know the amount of distributed profits,
interest and dividends transferred abroad; this amount would be carried
to the debit side of the account.

Moreover, it would be desirable to know the amount of undistributed
profits, as well as the amount of interest and dividends due to foreigners
but not yet transferred. These amounts would also be carried to the
debit of the investment income account, but with an off-setting entry
in the capital items of the balance of payments. This off-setting entry
would in fact counterbalance the figure just carried in the current account
of the balance of payments, because no outflow of capital has taken place,
and at the same time, it would increase the investments in Haiti of
foreigners, or in other terms, increase the liabilities due to foreigners by
Haiti.
Although it is impossible to determine the amount of income trans-
ferred abroad on account of foreign investments in Haiti, it is easy to
establish the amount of income paid abroad on the Government public
debt, or by concerns controlled by the Government. Interest and other
payments from these sources amounted to Gdes 1,284,135.20 during the
fiscal year 1949-50, as follows:
Other income
Interest payments Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Internal Loan 5% 1957................. 268,518.75 34,313.50 302,832.25
National Defense Loan 3% 1959....... ............ 13,179.00 13,179.00
Public Works Contrat 1938.............. 138,547.90 89,00 138,636.90
SHADA................................. 829,387.05 ............ 829,387.05
1,236,453.70 47.581.50 1,284,035.20






68 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI

SHADA (short for Soci6t6 Haitiano-Am6ricaine de D6veloppement
Agricole) was organized in August 1941 by joint action of the Haitian and
United States Governments with a view to developing Haitian agricul-
tural resources on a sound basis (See the 1941-42 annual Report of the
Fiscal Department, pages 37-39).
The internal loan maturing in 1957, was floated in 1947 in order to
repay the external loan of 1922 which had been held mostly in the U. S.
Many holders of the 1922 external loan exchanged their bonds against
bonds of the 1947 internal loan.

7. Government

This account covers the Haitian Government's transactions with fo-
reigners and those of foreign governments with Haitian residents. Nor-
mally one should include as payments the military and diplomatic
expenditures abroad and pensions paid abroad, and as receipts the mili-
tary and diplomatic expenditures of diplomatic missions established in
Haiti.
Credit Debit
Gourdes Gourdes
7.1 Diplomatic and foreign institutions......... 5,000,000.00 3,724.964.35
7.2 Contributions to international institutions... 1,875,585.10 754,561.45
7.3 Governmental pensions.... ............. ............. 10,031.55
7.4 Purchases of embassies ................. ......... .............. 205,682.25
6,875,585.10 4,695,239.60
The figures for this section have been taken from the records of the
Fiscal and Commercial Departments of the National Bank of Haiti.
The receipts recorded in the sub-item of tional institutions> include the expenditures made in Haiti by the United
Nations and its specialized agencies. (UNICEF, UNESCO, WHO, FAO)
and by specialized agencies of the American Government (SCIPA,
SCISP).

8. Miscellaneous
Credit Debit
Gourdes Gourdes
8.1 W workers earnings.......................... ............
8.2 Private pensions........................
8.3 Management and brokerage fees................
8.4 Communications......................... ........... 51,443.26
8.5 Advertising.............. ............
8.6 Publicity......... ............ ............ 266,830.80
8.7 Film rental............................ .. ............ 250,000.00
Total...................... .......... .. ....568,274.06

The credit column remains blank, because of the lack of statistical data.
On the debit side, an amount of Gdes 568,274.06 represents an estimate
of the cost of renting films from abroad by the movie houses of Port-au-
Prince, the cost of advertising in foreign news papers by the various








Government services, the amounts transferred abroad by the radio
communication services, and the mail charges paid by Haiti to foreign
countries.

9. Donations
In this section are entered all donations made by one government or
country to another, whether the donations are official or private and
whether they are voluntary, automatic or compulsory. The break-down
of this account is as follows:
Credit Debit
Gourdes Gourdes
9.1 Official Donations.............................. ......:..... 50,000
9.2 Migrants' transfers.... ............... .....................
9.3 Reparations............................. ............ .........
9.4 Private remittances......................... 650,000 .........
Total........................ ............. 650,000 50,000

The Gdes 50,000 debited under item 9.1 represent economic help given
by the Government of Haiti to the Republic of Guatemala in connection
with the natural disaster which occurred during the fiscal year in that
country.
The credit under private remittances, item 9.4, represents an estimate
of the amounts received from abroad by foreign and religious institu-
tions, mostly foreign missionary agencies in Haiti.


B.-Capital Transactions

Movement of Capital and Monetary Gold
The capital account records all transactions representing changes in
the international creditor-debtor position of the reporting country and
in its monetary gold holdings.
Contrary to the current account, which shows international transactions
on a gross credit and debit basis, the capital account figures are in terms
of net change increase or decrease in assets and liabilities during
a given period.
Amounts on the asset side represent net changes in Haitian investments
abroad, increases being shown by a plus sign (debit) and decreases by
a minus sign (credit). On the liabilities side the figures represent the
net changes in foreigners' investments in Haiti, increases being indicated
by a plus sign (credit) and decreases by a minus sign (debit).
In other words, an outflow of capital results in increases in assets held
abroad or decreases in liabilities to foreigners, and an inflow of capital
may be translated by decreases in foreign assets or increases in liabilities
to foreigners.






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


It is with the aid of the technical data developed by the International
Monetary Fund, as presented in its Balance of Payments Manual, that
the movements of capital and monetary gold have been established.
This part of the balance of payments consists of:
1) A private sector,
2) An official and banking sector.
Each sector is subdivided between:
a) Long term capital,
b) Short term capital.
The private sector records the transactions between residents and
foreigners, while the banking and official sector records transactions
between the official and banking institutions of the reporting country and
the outside world.

Private Sector
11. Long term capital
It has not been possible to put any figure on the asset side because it is
not known whether long term Haitian investments abroad have increased
or decreased. Moreover, neither the Fiscal Department of the Bank nor
any agency of the Haitian Government is informed as to the total value
of Haitian long term assets abroad.
On the liability side is a figure of Gdes 1,479,500 representing the
investment of foreigners in commercial and industrial enterprises which
were established in Haiti during the fiscal year 1949-50. According to the
official journal <, the capital of these enterprises amounted
to Gdes 2,860,500, of which Gdes 1,381,000 was furnished by residents of
Haiti and Gdes 1,479,500 by foreigners.
It should be noted that the authorized capital of the new enterprises
does not always represent the capital put in. However, a reserve must be
made. The figure carried to the liability side of the long term capital
should represent the net change in long term foreign investments in
Haiti, whether these increased or decreased. In fact, they must have
increased. Unfortunately, this Office, despite diligent inquiry, has not
been able to estimate them. The lack of statistical data on long term
foreign investments in Haiti is undoubtedly a source of errors in the
balance of payments.

12. Short term capital
The figure of Gdes 3,780,389.05 on the asset side of this account repre-
sents the increase in foreign assets in the hands of the public, (the dollar
notes and U. S. fractional currency in circulation in Haiti) and the in-
crease in assets held in foreign banks by Haitian residents.





REPFOtT 07 THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The amount of U. S. currency in circulation in Haiti has been estimated
as follows:
Gourdes Gourdes
1. Net imports of dollars by banks
a) Imports of dollars by banks.................... 4,500,000.00
b) Exports of dollars by banks.................... 2,318,525.00 2,181,475.00
2. Net exports of dollars by travellers
a) Imports of dollars by tourists................... 6,988,500.00
b) Imports of dollars by American marines... 1,100,000.00
c) Total dollar imports by travellers*.......... 8,038,500.00
d) Less exports of dollars by residents........ 3,908,000.00 4,180,500.00
3. Net imports of dollars by banks and travellers 6,361,975.00
4. Less net increase of dollar notes and U. S.
fractional currency held by banks in Haiti..... 2,071,585.95
5. Net increase of dollars in circulation in Haiti 4,290,389.05*

The final figure above has been combined with a negative item of Gdes
510,000, representing an adjustment of the Gdes 385,000, decrease re-
corded in the amount of private deposits held in banks of the Second
Federal Reserve District (New York) by residents of Haiti at the end
of the calendar years 1949 and 1950. Since it was not possible to ascer-
tain the level of such deposits as of the end of the Haitian fiscal year,
the change during the calendar year was used; hence the amount of Gdes
3,780,389.06 carried to the asset side of the short term capital account.
Private deposits of Haitian residents in the banks of the Second Federal
Reserve District of the United States have changed as follows during
the past six years:
Private balances Net change
December 31 in dollars in dollars
1945......................................... 3,723,000
1946........................................ 5,752,000 2,029,000
1947........................................ 4,897,000 1,145,000
1948......................................... 4,985,000 88,000
1949........................................ 3.359,000 1,626,000
1950........................................ 3,282,000 77,000

The amount carried to the liability side of the short term capital
account represents the net change in the amount of foreign short term
capital in Haiti.
This net change consists, first, of net transfers to foreign countries by in-
surance companies established in Iaiti, amounting to...Gdes-384.009.30
To which has been added an amount of .............. ......... 258,314.25
representing the increase in deposits of foreign institutions --- -
in Haitian banks, making a net reduction of...................... -125,695.05


*This figure is accurate, of course, only to the extent that the elements of item 2 are close
to reality.






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


Official and Banking Insfitutions

This section of the balance of payments contains exact figures taken
from the accounting records of the Fiscal Department and of the banks
established in Haiti.

13. Long term capital

An amount of Gdes 5,790,750 carried to the liability side represents
the decrease in the Haitian foreign debt for the fiscal year 1949-50. The
payments made as amortization of the Government debt and of the Ex-
port-Import Bank's loan made to SHADA* were distributed as follows:

Gourdes
Internal Loan 5% 1957.............................. 1,359,500
Public Works Contract 1938...................... 3.000,000
SHAiDA.................................................... 1,431,250
Total....................... ......... ........... 5,790,750

No figure appears on the asset side, since no Haitian official agency or
banking institution has made any loan to foreigners.

14. Short term capital

The figure on the asset side represents the net change recorded in
Haiti's official holdings of foreign exchange, as follows:
Gourdes
Increase in foreign currency held by the banks in Haiti............ 2,071,585.95
Increase of banking balances abroad......................................... 9,185,266.00
Total net increase of short term capital............................. 11,256,851.95

The foreign resources of banks in Haiti have been distributed during
the past two fiscal years as follows:
September 30, 1949 September 30, 1950
Gourdes Gourdes
Foreign exchange in Haiti.............. 13,431,415.80 15,503,001.75
Banking balances abroad................ 11,531,193.85 20,716,459.85
Total....................................... 24,962,609.65 35,219,461.60
Monetary gold in New-York............. 13,244,771.15 13,244,771.15
Total...................................... 38,207,380.80 49,464,232.75

On the liability side is shown an amount of Gdes 22,269.85 representing
a net increase in the deposits of foreign banks in local banks. Such
deposits amounted to Gdes 5,552.55 as of September 30, 1949 and to
Gdes 27,822.40 as of September 30, 1950.


*SHADA, a corporation established in Haiti, is jointly managed by the Export-Import Bank
and the Haitian Government. The latter guaranteed the loan which was made by the Export-
Import Bank in 1941).






REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


15. Monetary Gold Movement
The entire stock of monetary gold of the National Bank of the Re-
public of Haiti is held under earmark at the Federal Reserve Bank of
New York. This stock, valued at Gdes 13,244,711.15, is used to guarantee
the outstanding bank notes of the B.N.R.H. The Haitian monetary gold
stock being unchanged for many years already, no figure has been carried
in the balance of payments as monetary gold movement.

BUILDING ACTIVITIES

According to informations furnished by the Private Building Control
Section (Department of Public Works), construction permits granted
during the fiscal year 1949-50 numbered 195 for Port-au-Prince, 21 for
suburban Petionville and 3 for nearby Kenscoff. Similar data for other
Haitian cities are not available. The following table shows how the
1949-50 building industry data for the three localities just mentioned
compared with the 1948-49 data:

Buildings constructed
1949-50 1948-49
Buildings Value Buildings Value
Gourdes Gourdes
Port-au-Prince........................ 195 7,238,033.50 220 7,068,153.00
Petionville............................... 21 1,123,100.00 33 2,421.254.00
Kenscoff.................................. 3 184,000.00 6 447,000.00

To these figures must be added the applications for permits to make
Tepairs, improvements, transformations, etc., which numbered 201 for
Port-au-Prince, 4 for Petionville and one for Kenscoff.

INTERNATIONAL FAIR OF THE BICENTENARY
OF PORT-AU-PRINCE
By a contract of July 19, 1948, the Government entrusted the Architect
A. F. Schmiedigen with the work of putting up the buildings of the Inter-
national Exposition at a cost of Gdes 19,979,990. This amount has been
Paid in full since the month of August 1949. The same contractor was
also asked to carry out supplementary work costing Gdes 2,561,030.57.
The International Exposition was opened in December 1949 and offi-
cially closed in June 1950. Moniteur No. 120 of October 12, 1950 published
a report of the Auditing Commission of the Accounts of the International
Exposition of the Bicentenary of Port-au-Prince. The interested reader
mray find in that document the details of all matters related to the
construction of the various buildings as well as the report of the autho-
rized experts on the litigation between the Haitian State and the Archi-
tect Schmiedigen.





BANQUET NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUL D'HAITI


EXTRACT FROM THE ARTIBONITE VALLEY
RECLAMATION PROJECT
The annual report for the fiscal year 1948-49 mentions in the section
devoted to the public debt the agreement signed in Washington on July 6,
1949 between the Republic of Haiti and the Export-Import Bank of
Washington for the financing by the latter, up to the sum of $4,000,000,
of the project for the development of the Artibonite valley.
The cost of the initial project was $6,000,000, of which $4,000,000 was
to be loaned by the Export-Import Bank and $2,000,000 to be furnished
by the Republic of Haiti.
The agreement which provided for the opening of the $4,000,000 was
ratified by the Legislative Chambers on August 30, 1949 and the law was
promulgated on September 1st of the same year.
Purpose,-The purpose of the projects is:
1) to utilize the waters of the Artibonite River in order to irrigate the
surrounding 40,400 hectares of irrigable lands;
2) to drain the portion of the valley which ought to be drained in order
to remedy their alkalinity;
3) to prevent the periodical floods which have affected unfavorably the
economy of the region;
4) to undertake throughout the area a systematic program of agri-
cultural development based on up-to-date methods;
5) to effect a logical resettlement of part of the population of the valley
in order to raise its standard of living through the benefits which
are to be derived from improving the land and rendering it suitable
for cultivation.
6) to realize in the Artibonite a zone of production and exchange des-
tined to influence the rest of the country and help in improving our
trade.
The Knappen Tippet Contract
The agreement signed between Haiti and the Export-Import Bank on
July 6, 1949, for the Artibonite Project was based on a preliminary report
by the SCIPA technicians. The contract drawn by the Haitian Govern-
ment with the Knappen Tippet Abbet Engineering Company had as its
object: to revise the initial project, to make a more complete study of the
Artibonite Valley with regard to hydrology, the possibilities of flood con-
trol by various methods like dams and a general system of drainage. The
company was to make the preliminary studies, to estimate the costs, and
to prepare technical and financial reports on the means of execution.
Later, it appeared necessary to include hydro-electric development in
the general plan, and a new contract was signed by the Government with
the same firm.
The first draft of the general plan in January 1950 was so far away
from the narrow conception of the initial project than an engineer, Mr.






REPO3.T OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


Kimbell, was requested by the Export-Import Bank in February 1950 to
acquaint himself with the new ideas and convince himself of their suita-
bility. The final report had been expected to be ready by May 1950, but
because of the modifications, was submitted only on July 13th to the Junte
Government.
Broadly, the Knappen Tippet Abbet report made the following points:
1) General irrigation and flood control were note possible without a
dam in the Valley, the best location for which would be between
Mirebalais and Lascahobas in the Peligre Rock;
2) In regard to the scope of the work, it would be useful to establish
at the same time a hydro-electric plant powerful enough to serve
the Artibonite, the Central Plateau and the Plaine du Cul-de-Sac,
that is, half of the country;
3) The cost of the proposed works would be about $20,000,000;
4) About 40,000 hectares of land would be irrigated, and drainage
would be closely associated with irrigation because of the saline and
alkaline nature of the soil. The existing dike would have a normal
spill-over and an overflow basin would be dug between Pont Sond6
and Rivibre Sal6e. Furthermore, a drop in the inlet channel above
Pont Sond6 would facilitate the subsequent building of another
plant of 2,000 kw. A diversion mechanism with a movable sluice-
gate, placed in the river bed near Verrettes, would provide he water
for the distribution system. The flow of the Estere River would be
directed from Pont Sond6 to the sea, and the tributaries of the
Estere would also receive adequate management.
5) The necessity of not causing earth movements of flooding beyond
the national boundary has limited the dam's height to 67 meters;
the artificial lake so created would have nevertheless a capacity of
nearly half a billion cubic meters and an area of 27 square kilo-
meters;
6) The central hydro-electric plant will function at first with only one
alternative turbine, but it will have three, with a total power of
54.000 HP. The transmission line will bring electric energy to the
Port-au-Prince region as well as to the Artibonite.
This report was studied by a committee consisting of the Secretary of
Agriculture, the resident representative of the United Nations and a
member of the Artibonite project, and was transmitted to the Export-
Import Bank by the Governmeni concurrently with the program of
agricultural development which was elaborated almost at the same time.

The Program of Agricultural Development
Concurrently with the report on the engineering works, a program of
agricultural development was also to be prepared by specialists agreed
to by the Bank. The Department of Agriculture, taking the matter in
hand from the outset, formed a committee composed of the Director of






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


Agriculture and the Chief of SCIPA, with a working group consisting of
technicians of the two services. This group, to which were added later
some staff members of the Census Bureau, had to work in four different
areas representative of the various parts of the Artibonite Plain and to
collect all the data which could be used as a basis for the agricultural
project. In the opinion of the Bank, this preliminary work was to pave
the way for the final development program which would be elaborated
with the aid of qualified specialists. However, after the members of the
working group, under the direction of Mr. William Green, had made some
studies and compilations at Jacques, Savary, Gilbert and Duclos in the
Artibonite, the so-called Green Plan was prepared.
The Green Plan provided for small family plots, assistance and advice
to farmers, a large model farm, and direction and management centers
with agricultural equipment. Sums thus invested would be reimbursed
under a share-cropping system similar to the one now in force between
proprietors and cultivators.
This plan, submitted to the United Nations' resident representative, was
re-exmamined and resulted in a counter-project setting forth a kind of
land collectivation or State Administration (Regie) aiming at the achieve-
ment of large scale farming, which the plan considers to be the only
profitable type. Under this counter-project, the peasant would receive a
straight salary as in the case of the Standard Fruit farms. After discus-
sion, the conclusion was reached that the Green Plan seemed more easily
adaptable to our customs and could, perhaps, be adopted with some modi-
fications, whereas the other project might be applied in the case of State
lands.
Dr. Eaton's Report
The study of the Artibonite soil and of the best methods of cultivation
was confided to a specialist of the United Nations, Dr. Frank Eaton, who
arrived in Haiti on April 2, 1950. Some of his main conclusions were the
following:
a) The first condition for the development of the Artibonite plain is
the establishment and maintenance in good order of proper drains;
b) The drains should be completed before allocation of the irrigation
waters, for irrigation without sufficient drainage would result in
lower actual productivity of the soil;
c) Without drainage, alkali and salts would accumulate and sodium
would replace the calcium, while it is possible to restore fertility
by draining and washing the soil by means of irrigation.
Meanwhile, consideration had been given to the possibility of making
a cadastral survey of the land in the Artibonite Valley and of creating
the first land court in Haiti, with jurisdiction throughout the Artibonite
Valley. In May 1950, after much negotiation, a contract was signed with
the Knappen Tippett Abbet Company to operate on the cadastral survey.





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


SCIPA REPORT-DECEMBER 1949 TO SEPTEMBER 1950
During the fiscal year 1949-50, SCIPA continued to operate with the
funds allocated by the two Governments in accordance with the agree-
ment signed on July 1, 1949 and ending on June 30, 1950. On the latter
date, the agreement was to be renewed for a new year and new funds
allocated, but it was decided to change the text of the agreement and to
adopt a new one. The negotiations lasted several months. An accord was
reached with the Department of Agriculture authorizing SCIPA to con-
tinue its activities during the interim period with the remaining funds
of the last contract year, 1949-50. This policy was to go on up to the
signature of the new agreement, which took place on September 29, 1950.
As for the preceding years, the contribution of the Haitian Government
amounted to $300,000 and that of the American Government to $100,000.
The most important fact of the fiscal year under review was the inau-
guration of the Moreau Intake in the Artibonite Valley (Villard's project
No. 7) which took place on January 14, 1950. The main canal from
Moreau, with a capacity of 6 CM, brings the water to the lands in the
valley.
On September 30, 1950, an area of about 4,600 acres of land was irri-
gated by the Villard system. The construction works executed under the
Villard project, besides the completion of the main canal were the
construction of gates, distribution basins, irrigation channels and se-
condary drains, the establishment of the irrigation and drainage system
of Paye and Cadeau, the pavement of the main road to Gonaives from
the Moreau Intake to Carrefour Paye, and the Lachicotte drain to the
sea. The Haitian Government made a special contribution of $4,000 to the
Villard project.
At Bois Dehors, the agricultural works were continued with the pea-
sants' participation. About 600,000 pounds of rice were obtained from
the lands irrigated by the Villard system, and 120,000 pounds from the
Bois Dehors farm. The Extension Service was considerably developed
with the addition of five new stations, bringing the total to 13 under the
supervision of 19 agents.
Two conferences for the field agents were held at Damien during the
year, in November 1949 and March 1950. The vaccination campaign un-
dertaken by SCIPA was a great success. The number of hogs vaccinated
against fowlpox. Three breeding stations were established and a pure
blooded bull was supplied to each of them.
The statistics of the field agents' activities during the fiscal year show
7,613 visits to farmers, 46,000 pounds of seeds sold or distributed, 128
hen-houses constructed, the formation of 38 cooperatives with 1,509
members and of 47 (4-c) clubs with 1,303 members. A considerable num-
ber of chickens was also distributed by this service.






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


The Damien farm, which served SCIPA for more than three years as a
demonstration and seed propagation farm, was returned to the Depart-
ment of Agriculture on August 1950 at the latter's request.
During the year, experiments were made on the following crops:
tomatoes, onions, eggplants, peppers, radish, soya beans, cabbage, and
. More than 50,000 pounds of this last variety were
distributed and 1,000 pounds of soya beans harvested. Practical training
was offered on improved methods of cultivation, construction of irrigation
trenches, and practices of soil conservation. Equipment was furnished to
the Damien farm.
The milk production of the Damien dairy increased during this year up
to 250 quarts a day, with the addition of new animals imported from the
U. S. These shipments included 5 bulls and 5 heifers of the breed Brown
Swiss, with three calves. Three of the bulls were sent to the newly
established breeding stations. Three small wells were dug and provided
with hand pumps. After pasteurization, the milk is delivered to the
groceries in town to be sold. Between 70 and 80 tons of grains were
stored in silos.
The poultry project on the Damien farm was continued with success.
100 chickens were offered to the National School of Agriculture in order
to provide the students with practical training in poultry husbandry.
About 18,000 New Hampshire chickens were received and distributed.
The number of chickens prepared and sold to the groceries was 667, and
about 4,800 were sold to individuals at Damien. About 2,000 dozens of
eggs were also sold. The portadrill given back to SCIPA by the Depart-
ment of National Economy has been used during that year for drilling by
some agricultural and industrial enterprises. On September 30, 1950,
8 wells had been dug in the Cul-de-Sac plain, the northern plain, the
plain of Arcahaie, and near Damien. The <
project bought two new Farmall tractors, bringing to 6 the number of
tractors devoted to ploughing by contract. New arrangements were made
at Damien with a view to extending the activities of this project, namely
in the construction of a central storehouse.
At Saint-Raphael, the diversion dam measuring 70 meters in length
and 350 meters in height was completed. This job entailed the use of
1.150 cm3 of concrete, 1.000 cm3 of masonry in the dam, the construction
of 8.4 kilometers of main canal and of a masonry-covered section through
the town and two big aqueduct-bridges. At Fond Parisien, activities were
concentrated on the maintenance of the main canal.
In the Cul-de-Sac plain a certain number of small springs were cleared,
increasing their flow by 25 to 1007%. SCIPA gave technical assistance
for this and the peasants provided the labor.






REPORT OW THE FISCAL DE-1'A:T1.TNT


SCIPA's contribution in the agricultural field included also the pre-
paration of the plan for the development of the Artibonite Valley. The
plan was given to the Department of Agriculture on May 20, 1950 for
transmission to the Export-Import Bank. SCIPA also worked in colla-
boration with Dr. Frank Eaton, the soil specialist sent by FAO for a
study of drainage in the lower part of the Artibonite Valley.
Scholarships were granted to two of SCIPA's technicians: Mr. Antonio
Rimpel, Engineer, received four months' training in Puerto-Rico with
the Puerto-Rico Resources Authority, and Mr. Remy Lemoine, a geo-
logist, worked with the U. S. Geological Survey for one year.


INTER-AMERICAN COOPERATIVE SERVICE
FOR PUBLIC HEALTH
(Activities during fiscal year October 1, 1949 to September 30, 1950)
The 1949-50 Extension to the Basic Agreement between the Republic
of Haiti and the Institute of Inter-American Affairs operating through
the INTER-AMERICAN COOPERATIVE SERVICE FOR PUBLIC
HEALTH expired on June 30, 1950. In order to continue the cooperative
program a new Extension Agreement was signed on October 12, 1950,
retroactive to July 1, 1950, extending the cooperative health and sanita-
tion program for five years. This new Extension Agreement was pu-
blished in the Moniteur of October 26, 1950.
The principal accomplishments of the SCISP during the fiscal year
under review are as follows:

Enlargement of Garage and Storage Space at Chancerelles
There was lack of space in the garage to properly service the auto-
motive equipment needed in the rapidly expanding health and sanitation
program, and to store them protected from the weather. To provide
additional space, the Garage at Chancerelles was extended 34 feet to
the north and connected with a new building, 34 feet wide and 84 feet
long, extending to the west. The extension of the old building gives
adequate garage space as well as space to store spare parts. The new
building shelters a minimum of twenty vehicles protected from the sun
and rain. The work was completed in April 1950 and cost $4.357,84.

Entomological Survey
Under this project a larviciding program is maintained and house-to-
house spraying with DDT is carried on in the areas heavily infected with
malaria. The project was temporarily discontinued in September 1949
and was reopened in June 1950. Expenditures for this 4-month period
(June-September 1950) totalled $437,55.






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


Nurses Training Program Port-au-Prince
Since 1943 SCISP has been operating a Nursing School in conjunction
with the Haitian General Hospital and under the supervision of a qualified
American nurse. The purpose of this school is to supply Haiti with well
trained nurses. In the beginning it was difficult to obtain girls with the
required educational background since nursing in Haiti was generally
considered a menial job comparable to servant work. Since the Nursing
School has been able to raise the level of the profession, suitable candi-
dates are entering the School. In fact the number of applicants has
increased to the point that SCISP is being forced to plan for the con-
struction of a new and much larger building to accommodate the larger
classes. The average enrollment at the Nursing School is now approxi-
mately 40 students. The course of study covers a period of 3 years.
Since October 1949 the School has a small group of male nurses and a
group of Auxiliary nurses. The course for the auxiliary nurses (aide-
nurses) lasts 6 months.
Funds for the food items required in the diet kitchen for the proper
training of the nurses are provided by SCISP. This contribution in the
fiscal year 1949-50 amounted to $1,730.72.

Eradication of Yaws
Yaws ranks with malaria as a public health problem in Haiti. Yaws is
non-venereal but is very infectious, especially when open wounds and
abrasions come in contact with infected serum from yaws lesions. Crowd-
ing and lack of hygienic knowledge and facilities accelerate its spread.
Yaws is a painful disease which causes a severe loss of manpower in Haiti.
In order to combat this scourge the SCISP has maintained a country-wide
anti-yaws program since 1943. At present it has in operation in rural
areas 5 mobile clinics (Gressier, Vialet, Kenscoff, Mirebalais, Cabaret)
and 6 fixed clinics (Moron, Pilate, Port-de-Paix, Dondon, Peredeau and
Cavaillon), with 8 doctors and 38 medical-aides.
These clinics attempt to cure the yaws patient and them, through
education, to prevent his becoming reinfected.
SCISP maintains also since April 1950 an Experimental Center at
Gressier for the treatment of yaws, malaria and intestinal parasites. A
large part of the medical supplies utilized at this Center are provided free
of charge by the American firms Eli Lilly, Chas. Pfizer, etc...
As a result of studies conducted at the Yaws Experimental Center in
Gressier a dose of 4 cc (1,200,000 units) of procaine penicillin in oil was
administered at one visit and repeated at an interval of preferably 4 days.
Simultaneously with these studies to determine the optimum dosage of
procaine penicillin, investigations were being made at the Yaws Experi-
mental Center in Gressier to ascertain the effectiveness of three antibio.
tics, including aureomycin and terramycin, in the treatment of yaws.





REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT


The cost of operation of these various clinics for the period October 1,
1949 through September 30, 1950 was $109,090.01.

Health Center Portail Leogane
The Inter American Cooperative Service for Public Health operates a
health center in Port-au-Prince for the dual purpose of demonstrating
the possibilities of a modern health center and providing the necessary
medical attention to thousands of poor people in and around Port-au-
Prince who otherwise could not get such service. The health center
consists of the following clinics:
1. Tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment.
2. Venereal diseases diagnosis and treatment.
.3. Prenatal examination, treatment and care of pregnant women,.
4. Post-partum examination, treatment and care of women..after
childbirth.
5. Sick baby -- examination and treatment.
6. Well baby physical check-up and training of mothers in .the
proper feeding and care of the child.
7. Nutrition The feeding of undernourished children and instruction
of mothers in the proper care of children suffering from malnutrition.
The extension of the Health Center building which began in October
1949 was completed in March 1950. This has practically doubled the
usable space for the operation of the Center, relieved congestion -and
allowed separate entrances to the Tuberculosis and Venereal Disease
clinics. The total coast of the work was $8,975.38.
The cost of operation of the Health Center for the period October 1,
1949 through September 30, 1950 amounted to $24,280.38.

Water Supplies
Due to the geology of Haiti, adequate water supplies are a major public
health problem. SCISP has increased the municipal water supply in
Port-au-Prince several times through the drilling and extension of tunnels
in the limestone mountains near the city. At the present times, operations
are under way at Diquini which will more than double the present water
supply when completed.
The Freres and Millet springs have been captured and piped into Port-
au-Prince. These projects were completed and turned over to the Hy-
draulic Service in May 1950, and have been in satisfactory service since
that time. Freres provides water to the North-East section of Port-au-
Prince and Millet serves Petionville. Expenditures for these projects
amounted to $323,406.34.
Verrettes
Due to the failure of the deep well, originally drilled, to supply fan
adequate quantity of water during the dry season, a spring was captured






BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI


and connected to the elevated steel tank, with approximately 4,000 ft. of
cast iron pipe. The project was completed during the summer and has
been in satisfactory service since that time. The total cost of the project
was $21,581.53.
Aux Cayes and J6remie
At the request of the Government, investigations were started and
plans drafted with respect to the possibilities of improving the water
supply systems of Aux Cayes and J6r6mie.
The engineering studies for Aux Cayes were completed during Sep-
tember 1940. The proposed work included improvement and extension
of the present distribution system, as well as improvement of the sanitary
conditions around the well. The well was tested and found to be adequate
from the standpoint of both the quality and the quantity of the water.
In order to remedy the unsatisfactory situation of the water supply in
J6remie, SCISP will provide captation of the Debarasse and Martineau
springs located some nine kilometers from the town. The elevation of
these springs is such that the water will flow by gravity into J6r6mie
and should provide an adequate water supply for years to come.

Assistance to Hydraulic Service
One SCISP Sanitary Engineer who has received his degree at Harvard
University is directing the Hydraulic Service. The cost of this assistance
for the period under review was $3,745.83.
Malaria Control General Sanitary Improvements
Belladire: The drainage work and the installation of a system of sewers
for waste disposal which were started in Belladere in March 1949, were
completed during July 1950. These jobs were carried out at the request
of the Haitian Government in order to assure a healthful environment for
the people of this town. Total expenditures for this improvement work
amounted to $26,418.74.
Gros-Morne: The malaria control drainage project at Gros-Morne
which was started on December 1, 1949, was completed during July 1950.
The work involved placing approximately 60,000 cubic feet of fill,
installing approximately 1,400 meters of concrete lined canals, and
draining numerous springs into the canal.
The total cost of this project was $40,180.92.

Material Assistance to the Health Department
In January 1950, the Minister of Health requested assistance from
SCISP in providing much needed transportation to carry on the health
and sanitation program, as funds at his disposal were inadequate to permit
the purchase of automotive equipment. The Service made available to
the Government, by Grant-in-Kind, one of its used pickup trucks of
$800 value.