Farm broadcasters letter - 1994

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Farm broadcasters letter - 1994
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Division
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Broadcasting and Film
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
-letter no. 2669 (July 1, 1994).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by: the Office of Communication, Radio and Television Service; 19 -<May 2, 1980>, Feb. 24, 1983-19 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division; <May 16, 1980>-Feb. 17, 1983 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Broadcasting and Film; <Apr. 27, 1990>-199 by: the Office of Public Affairs, Radio-TV Division; 199 -<1994> by: Office of Communications.
General Note:
Description based on: Letter no. 1882 (Nov. 3, 1978); title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34A

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02563831
lccn - sc 77000719
issn - 0364-5444
Classification:
lcc - S21 .A82
System ID:
AA00000580:00006

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Broadcasters letter

Full Text
LA a.4' q4 Library
FEB 2 3 1994


Farm Broadcasters Letterniversei of Forida



United States Department a culture Office of Co n cations Electronic Media Services Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2644 January 7, 1994

FARM DEBT -- One 1a positive aj sector economic indicators this year is comparison
of the actual debt-to-a ,.Slt e. maximum debt-to-asset ratio that is supportable by
cash income from farm ope It appears that debt could rise about 20 percent without
producing an uncomfortable squeeze. It indicates that the farm sector is better financially
positioned to absorb short term regional losses, such as those occurring last year, than it
would have been in the mid-'80s. While most measures point to an improved farm
economy, cash income levels in 1994 will depend on relatively high government payments.
Contact: James Ryan (202) 219-0798.

U.S. EXPORTS TO CHINA -- In the first of a series of steps opening China to a wide variety
of U.S. fruits and vegetables, USDA has reached agreement with Chinese plant quarantine
officials allowing import of U.S. apples. The apples must originate in designated orchards
in Washington state and be packaged in designated facilities. Agriculture Secretary Mike
Espy notes this is the first time that China has imported American apples in commercial
quantities. China is also importing nearly one million tons of U.S. wheat. Export of apples
and wheat to China were two of the topics Espy discussed with Chinese officials during his
trade mission there last year. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

FOOD DEMAND -- Growth in food expenditures during the next 20 years will be at a slower
rate than the previous two decades. From 1970 to 1990 total food expenditures grew by
39 percent. USDA studies indicate that during 1990 to 2010 food expenditures will grow
about 31 percent. Not all food categories will experience similar growth. Fish, dairy
products, and fresh fruit are expected to grow less than 16 percent. The greatest gain is
expected in food consumed away from home, which will grow by 37 percent. Contact: Noel
Blisard (202) 219-0862.

PROTECTING HAY -- In sections of the Midwest and Southeast hay is in short supply.
USDA Extension Service notes that leaving round bales unprotected outside can waste 20-
30 percent of the hay. Place the bales on well-drained sites or on pallets, and use hay wraps
or tarps. Contact: Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.

IMPROVING MEAT AND POULTRY INSPECTION -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy has
announced his intention to mandate Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point systems in
meat and poultry plants nationwide. A roundtable on implementing the systems will be held
early this year. USDA is initiating and accelerating change to improve the safety of meat
supplies from farm to table. Secretary Espy has appointed a liaison from USDA's Food
Safety and Inspection Service to work with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
to investigate and trace deadly bacteria that causes foodborne illness. Espy says the
Department must continue to enhance the safety of the meat and poultry supply, especially
in the area of developing new science. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.








VEGETABLE EXPORTS -- U.S. fresh vegetable exports in fiscal year 1993 totaled 1.7 million
tons, valued at nearly $1 billion. Volume was up 4 percent and value up 15 percent from
the previous year. Canada remains the leading market for U.S. fresh vegetables, accounting
for over 70 percent of total exports. Eleven percent of U.S. fresh vegetable exports went
to Japan. The shipments had a value of $106 million. Mexico registered the biggest
increase in volume, 69 percent. Contact: Frank Piason (202) 720-6590.

TOBACCO -- U.S. cigarette manufacturers intend to purchase 288 million pounds of the
1994 flue-cured crop, down nearly one third from last year. U.S. manufactured tobacco
exports for the first ten months of 1993 totaled 171,153 tons, valued at $1.1 billion, a
decrease of 18 percent in quality and 19 percent in value from year-earlier levels. However,
unmanufactured tobacco imports during the first ten months of 1993 totaled 324,957 tons,
valued at $862 million, a 22 percent increase in quantity and 6 percent in value. Contact:
Daniel Stevens (202) 720-9524.

EMPLOYMENT -- In the second quarter of 1993 rural employment grew by a moderate 1.3
percent as compared to the same period a year earlier. The increase in urban employment
increased about the same, 1.2 percent. The most rapid rural employment growth tended to
be in the Atlantic and Pacific coastal states. The lowest employment growth was in the
Northern Plains States. The rural West had the highest growth of unemployment and the
largest unemployment rate of any region, 9.3 percent. Contact; Paul Swaim (202) 219-
0552.

CAMPGROUND RESERVATIONS -- USDA's Forest Service accepts family and group
reservations for many of its campgrounds in the 156 national forests and grasslands. The
reservation center makes advance reservations, $7.50 per family and $15 for a group site.
Call the Forest Service campground reservation number, 1-800-280-2267. For hearing or
speech impaired the TDD number is 1-800-879-4496. Weekday hours are 9 am 9 pm EST,
and 11 am 7 pm Saturday & Sunday. Contact: Jill Bauermeister (202) 205-1134.

WORKER PROTECTION STANDARDS -- All agricultural employers whose workers perform
hand labor operations in fields, forests, nurseries, and greenhouses that have been treated
with pesticides -- or handle pesticides in these locations -- are covered by the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency's worker protection standard. Agricultural employers must
be in compliance with the regulation after April 15, 1994. Owners, operators, and their
immediate family members must also comply with provisions of the protection standard.
USDA has prepared a 10-page summary of the standard. To order a copy dial toll-free 1-
800-999-6779. Cost is $9 a copy. Contact: Jack Runyan (202) 219-0932.

CAROTENOIDS AND CANCER -- USDA research supports the hypothesis that the anti-cancer
potential of carotenoids is due to its anti-oxidant capability. Many members of the chemical
family known as carotenoids change into benign compounds indicating that they protect cell
molecules, including human DNA. Population studies have linked a high intake of fruits and
vegetables rich in carotenoids with a lower risk of cancers of the lung, esophagus, colon,
head and neck. Carotenoids are found in the red, orange and yellow pigments that give
tomatoes, carrots and squash their distinctive colors. They're also abundant in dark green,
leafy vegetables. Contact: Frederick Khachik (301) 504-8830.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1909 -- Brenda Curtis interviews USDA General Sales Manager Chris
Goldthwait about historic trade policy achievements in 1993 and the implications for world
grain trade in the years to come. (Weekly 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1391 -- Buffalo grass; U.S. strawberries gain popularity; fading holiday
pictures; home pesticide safety; the medfly battle vs. the environment. (Weekly 2-1/2 to
3 minute features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1901 -- Russian debt update; China's grain trade outlook; 1994
better for soybean growers?; 1994 tobacco program; soybeans on optional flexible acres.
(Weekly agricultural features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1654 -- Urban's knob project; watershed model; insect indigestion;
ant busters; fire ant disease. (Weekly research features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, January 18. crop & weather update,
vegetables; Friday, January 21, livestock and poultry, catfish processing, livestock
slaughter; Monday, January 24, U.S. ag trade update; Tuesday, January 25, crop &
weather update. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
advance lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358. COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on Smokey Bear attaining the age of 50. Lynn Wyvill
reports on food safety at college.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the Weston Genealogical Library. Pat
O'Leary reports about USDA research on vitamin A. Lynn Wyvill reports on new products
from wood waste.

CHANGES -- A reminder that the final program of Agriculture Update with anchors Eric
Parsons and Lori Spiczka was transmitted January 3. Farm program information that Ag
Update provided will be contained in the television service satellite transmissions.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays at 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays at 10:00 a.m., EDT; and Mondays
at 8:00 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4

OFFMIKE
LEVEE REPAIR...is a major concern of producers in the flooded Midwest, says Cindy Zimmerman
(Brownfield Network, Jefferson City, MO). It will have a major impact on plans for spring
planting. Cindy is spending time in the air too. She covered the Missouri and the Iowa Farm
Bureau meetings on the same day. New voice on the network is Tom Brand, from Hopkins, MO.

WINTER MEETINGS...have consumed a major portion of the schedule of Garry Kinnett (WIAI,
Danville, IL). Gary says he promos the meetings on his broadcasts in an effort to have producers
attend and get the latest information, giving them an upper hand in these changing times.

FORUM FOR GRAIN BROKERS...to provide their 1994 forecasts was provided by the 8th annual
WKFI Gain With Your Grain seminar, says Chip Nelson (WKFI, Wilmington, OH). Chip is taking
his morning farm program on the road once a week to area restaurants, broadcasting the plans
and concerns of farmers in his area. Program is titled "Koffee W/KFI."



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services .
U.S. Department of Agriculture x- C.
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340 ks < C

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











DELTA AG EXPO...January 25-26 will be covered by Chuck Early (WNIX, Greenville, MS). Also
on Chuck's schedule is the ag lending forum and its announcement of the Mid-Delta Farmer of the
Year. Producers in his region brought in a good crops of rice and soybeans, but cotton was
expensive to produce this season.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Orion Samuelson (WGN/Tribune Network, Chicago). For the fifth year
he served as moderator for the 27th Missouri Governor's. Conference on Agriculture.

LOOKING...Todd Whelan (KVLH, Pauls Valley, OK). Station sold. Call at (405) 447-3293.

RETIRED...January 1, Louis Rosandick (WFHR, Wisconsin Rapids). Lou's broadcasting capped a
44-year career in agriculture: Two-years as a vocational agriculture instructor; 31-years as a
county agricultural agent; and 11 years in farm radio broadcasting. Lou says now it'll be fishing,
hunting, golfing, snowmobiling, and serving on the county board of supervisors.

VIC POWELL Lee
Office of Communications




- I)


Farm Broadcasters Letter FEZ



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communica Electronic Media s Washinaton. DC 20250-1340


Genetic maps produced by USDA research can help develop animals resistant to certain diseases and bacteria
such as E. coli and Salmonella. At a news conference in Washington, D. C., Secretary ofAgriculture Mike Espy
said that development and implementation of the technology will result in a higher quality, safer and healthier
food supply for consumers. L to R, Dean Plowman, acting assistant secretary of Science and Education;
Secretary Espy; Dan Laster, director of the Meat and Animal Research Center, Clay NE; and U.S.. Senator
Robert Kerrey, who was linked to the conference from Nebraska by satellite. USDA photo by Bob Nichols.


ONE WETLAND MAP -- Farmers can now rely on a single wetland map from the Federal
government to determine wetlands. An agreement among the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the
Department of Interior recognizes USDA's Soil Conservation Service as the lead federal
agency for delineating wetlands on agricultural lands. James Lyons, assistant secretary for
Natural Resources and Environment, says the agreement simplifies the process by eliminating
multiple wetland maps for determining the extent of wetlands under the Swampbuster
program and the Clean Water Act. Permits for work in wetlands continue to be administered
by the Corps of Engineers and EPA.

WETLANDS RESERVE -- 1994 signup for the Wetlands Reserve Program will be conducted
at ASCS offices February 28 through March 11. Congress has provided $66 million to enroll
up to 75,000 acres. Permament easements are purchased from participating landowners of
farmed wetlands, converted wetlands, and riperian areas that link wetlands. Participants
agree to accept no more than fair market value of their land in return for a lump sum
payment and cost-share assistance for wetland restoration by the landowner and successors.
State ASCS Committees will have greater discretion in selecting wetlands that meet State
environmental goals such as flood protection, water quality, migratory birds and wildlife
habitat benefits. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.


I C 1, enc
jartton JC
Lobra't









VET FEES -- Beginning January 21, USDA will begin charging user fees for veterinary
services it provides directly to importers and exporters of animals, animal products, and
biological materials. USDA's Animal and Health Inspection Service conducts inspections and
tests of animals in international commerce to prevent the spread of pests and diseases. The
fees are expected to total $4 million each year. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

BLUE EARTAGS -- Mexico has requested, and the United States has agreed, that all cattle
imported from Mexico must now be identified with numbered blue eartags issued by the
Mexican government. Previous import regulations did not standardize either the color or
source of the eartags. The identification will help ensure that the cattle can be traced back
to their original herds. About one million cattle are imported from Mexico each year. Most
are consigned to feedlots before slaughter. Contact: Ron Hall (202) 720-3310.

ORGANIC LIVESTOCK HEARINGS -- USDA will conduct four public hearings on the
production and processing of organic livestock. Hearings will be held in Washington, D.C.,
January 27-28; Chicago, February 10; Denver, February 24; and in Sacramento, March
22. The purpose of the hearings is to provide the National Organic Standards Board and
USDA with information to develop regulatory standards for organic livestock and livestock
products. Contact: Harold Ricker (202) 720-2704.

LOW RATES -- Interest rates in 1994 will increase, but remain at a low level as compared
to previous years. Short-term rates are expected to increase up to 1 percent, and long-term
rates 0.8 of a percent. The rates will present opportunities to expand production. But U.S.
economic activity is not likely to induce a sharp expansion in credit demand, keeping rates
low and preventing an acceleration in inflation. Contact: David Torgerson (202) 219-0782.

LUMBER EXPORTS & IMPORTS -- Latest figures show that in the first three quarters of fiscal
year 1993 U.S. lumber exports were up 11 percent to a total of $5.5 billion. But imports
of solid wood products expanded to their highest levels ever, up 22 percent from year ago
levels to $5.9 billion. Its the biggest gap in exports versus imports since 1987. Imports of
Canadian softwood lumber dwarf wood imports from all countries combined. The value
through the first three quarters of FY '93 reached $3.4 billion, up $1 billion from year-earlier
figures, and is higher than the U.S. has imported for any full year. This trend is expected
to continue. Contact: Thomas Westcot (202) 720-0770.

NEW SCS CHIEF -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy has named Paul W. Johnson as chief
of the Soil Conservation Service. Johnson is an Iowa farmer, member of the board of
agriculture of the National Academy of Sciences, and a former member of the State's
General Assembly. Espy also announced appointment of Pearlie S. Reed as associate chief
of SCS. Reed is a 25-year career employee of SCS and a native of Arkansas.

WATCH THOSE SWEETS -- Research findings illustrate that table sugar can interfere with
the body's use of other nutrients. Studies were conducted at USDA's Human Nutrition
Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, to determine if a high intake of fructose sugar alters
the function of natural chemicals in human and animal brains. A group of animals that
received adequate zinc in the diet had normal brain receptors whether they got fructose or
starch as the carbohydrate. A marginal zinc diet and no fructose showed some changes in
brain receptors. But a diet of marginal zinc and high fructose showed much greater changes.
Table sugar is one-half fructose. Table sugar and sweeteners are steadily increasing in the
U.S. diet through processed foods and beverages. Contact: Sam Bhathena (301) 504-8422.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1910 -- Extention Service financial experts help consumers manage
their money better. Some also offer advice on how to choose your own financial advisor.
Brenda Curtis reports. (Weekly 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1392 -- Mapping meat quality improvement; selecting a financial
advisor; the Year of Water; 4-H and the National Service Act; Americans are eating more
rice. (Weekly 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1902 -- Genetic mapping for livestock; protecting rangeland health;
making wetlands issue simpler; will the "Flood of '93 be the "Flood of '94"?; a banner year
for rice. (Weekly features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1655 -- Wasp takes hold; cost-effective biocontrol; 20-year ant
study; fire ant parasite; insect identity crisis. (Weekly research features.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, January 21, oil crops outlook, livestock
outlook, catfish processing; Monday, January 24, U.S. export trade update; Tuesday,
January 25, weather & crop update; Thursday, January 27, world tobacco situation;
Monday, January 31, world dairy situation, world poultry situation. These are the USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are
not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on genetic maps, which are being developed by USDA
researchers, for better breeding of livestock.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy on gene maps for livestock breeding;
excerpts from the genetic map news conference; USDA chief meteorologist Norton
Strommen with a weekly weather and crop update.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on rural health care; Lynn Wyvill on USDA
forest products research; Patrick O'Leary on vitamin A.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE 0 5
ETHANOL...is on the agenda of most producers served by Mike Adams (WLDS, Jacksonville, IL).
Mike says they are cautiously optimistic, but plan to keep the pressure on to assure that ethanol
is included as a fuel. Mike is serving as MC at the Illinois county fair convention program that
selects the 1994 reigning State Fair Queen from 71 county fair queens.

TOBACCO MARKETS...have closed and producers received about the same prices as last year,
says Allen Aldridge (Kentucky Ag-Net, Louisville). But more product went under loan, boosting
stocks. Producers expect a quota cut of 10%. Allen says the wooly worm was right, black
worms indicate a hard winter. He's been providing information to help producers reduce livestock
stress from the freezing temperatures.

RICE PRODUCERS...plan to plant all their allotment acreage, says Gordon Barnes (KSSN, Little
Rock, AR). A price increase and a shipment to Japan is serving as a helpful tonic. Cotton and
wheat producers are hoping for better weather this year to recover from 1993's reduced yields.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










SEVERAL FARM BROADCASTERS...in Iowa will be moderating sessions at the Eastern Iowa
Conservation Tillage Show, January 25-26 in Cedar Rapids, says Rich Balvanz (WMT, Cedar
Rapids). Von Ketelsen (KOEL, Oelwein), Dale Hansen (KWWL-TV, Waterloo), Wade Wagner
(KGAN-TV, Cedar Rapids) will be among those helping out at the meetings and covering events.
Twelve conservation districts are joining to produce the programs. Attendance reaches 4,000.

ITS AN OLD FASHIONED WINTER...says Mike Hergert (KKXL, Grand Forks, ND). Its been below
zero for days on end, some parts of the state have received 50 inches of snow, and the wind is
strong. Mike says conditions make transportation a little difficult. Congratulations to Mike. He
received the Meritorious Service Award from the Red River Valley Potato Growers Association.
Also a salute to Mike and his listeners for abiding the winter weather.

KEEP 'EM SAFE...remind producers to vent gas space heaters to the outdoors, or open a window
slightly when in use. Don'tt a gas clothes dryer or water heater into the house for heating.

VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




A .3Y -.LA Marston ScienceJ
Library

Farm Br asters Letter MR1994
Florida

United States Department ricDttyr 2 ffiof Comnu ications Electronic Media Services Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2646 *\ January 21, 1994

EZ/EC -- Applicationts ed at USDA for communities to be designated as
Empowerment Zones anf Communities (EZ/EC). The zones and communities will
receive special consideration for various federal programs and other assistance. Three rural
empowerment zones and 30 rural enterprise communities will be designated. Applicants
must provide detail regarding economic opportunity, community development, partnership,
and goals. Communities that apply but are not chosen will qualify for assistance in seeking
regulation waivers for federal programs. Deadline for application to USDA's Rural
Development Administration is June 30. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

CORN -- 1993 corn for grain production is estimated at 6.3 billion bushels, 33 percent below
the record high 1992 crop. The U.S. yield per acre for corn is 100.7 bushels, 30 bushels
below the record high yield of 131 bushels set last year. Corn stocks total nearly 6 billion
bushels, down 25 percent from last year. Of the total stocks, almost 4 billion bushels are
stored on farms, 34 percent less than a year earlier. Off-farm stocks, at 2 billion bushels are
down only 2 percent from the previous year. Contact: Charles Van Lahr (202) 720-7369.

WHEAT -- Winter wheat seedings for 1994 are estimated at 50 million acres, down 2
percent from 1993 levels. Hard winter wheat seedings total 35 million acres, soft red winter
wheat is 10 million acres, and white totals 4 million acres. Favorable conditions exist for
durum wheat. Farmers in Arizona and California intend to seed 130,000 acres, up 35
percent from last year. Seeding will continue through this month. All wheat in storage
totals 1.5 billion bushels, about the same as last year. On-farm storage is 656 million
bushels. Off-farm is 930 million bushels, both about the same as last year. Contact: Ed
Allen (202) 219-0841.

SOYBEANS -- 1993 soybean production totaled 1.8 billion bushels, down 17 percent from
1992. Yield per acre averaged 32 bushels, 5.6 bushels below the record set in 1992.
Soybean storage totals 1.5 billion bushels, down 15 percent from year ago levels. On-farm
stocks, at 677 million bushels are down 23 percent and account for 44 percent of total
stocks. Off-farm holdings are down 9 percent at 877 million bushels. Contact: Dan
Kerestes (202) 720-9526.

PEANUTS -- Production of peanuts totaled 3.3 billion pounds in 1993, 22 percent below the
1992 crop and the lowest level in ten years. Planted acreage of 1.7 million acres was up
2 percent. Yields averaged 2,032 pounds per acre, 530 pounds below last year. Contact:
Scott Sanford (202) 219-0840.

COTTON -- All U.S. cotton production in 1993 totaled 16 million bales, down nearly 43,000
bales from 1992. Texas upland cotton experienced a large increase, 56 percent above last
year, due to harvesting 91 percent of planted acreage compared to only 56 percent in 1992.
Contact: Roger Latham (202) 720-5944.








RICE -- Average yield of all U.S. rice was 5,510 pounds per acre, 226 pounds below the
1992 average. Rice production totaled 156 million CWT during 1993, 13 percent below
year-earlier levels. Contact: Janet Livezey (202) 219-0840.

OATS -- The U.S. produced more oats in 1886 than were produced last year. Production
is estimated at 206 million bushels, 30 percent below last year's crop. Area harvested for
grain was 3.7 million acres, down 16 percent from 1992 and a record low. Yields per
harvested acre averaged 54 bushels. Contact: Thomas Tice (202) 219-0840.

GRAIN STORAGE -- Five states account for more than half of the nation's on-farm grain
storage capacity. Iowa leads with 1.7 billion bushels followed by Minnesota with 1.3 billion;
Illinois with 1.2 billion; Nebraska with 1 billion; and North Dakota at 810 million bushels.
U.S. on-farm grain storage capacity totals 11.6 billion bushels, down 4 percent from 1992
levels. Contact: Roger Hexem (202) 219-0419.

U.S. FOOD AID -- USDA has allocated $326 million dollars for commodity loans and grants
under the Food For Peace Program in fiscal year 1994. An additional $108 million is being
held in reserve to fund unforeseen needs during the year. The concessional sales program
promotes exports of U.S. agricultural commodities and fosters development in countries
receiving the aid. Contact: Mary Chambliss (202) 720-3573.

GRAZING FEES -- The new grazing fee for western public lands administered by USDA's
Forest Service and the Department of Interior's Bureau of Land Management is $1.98 per
head month. A head month is the amount of forage needed to sustain one cow and her calf,
or one horse, or five sheep or goats for one month. The 1994 grazing fee for the national
grasslands is $2.08 per head month, a four-cent increase from 1993. Last year the Forest
Service collected $9 million in public land grazing fees in the 16 western states. Half the
amount is used to improve rangelands, and half is returned to the States and the U.S.
treasury. Contact: Pamela Finney (202) 205-1584.

LABELS FOR COOKING & HANDLING -- Publication is expected soon of the final rule for an
instruction label regarding the safe handling and cooking of raw meat and poultry. Comment
period for the proposed rule ended last month. The proposed label notes that some food
products may contain bacteria that can cause illness if mishandled or cooked improperly.
The label notes that raw meat and poultry should be thawed in a refrigerator or microwave;
kept separate from other foods or working surfaces; cooked throughly; consumed or
refrigerated immediately; and hands and utensils should be washed after touching raw
meats. Some firms have voluntarily attached the labels to meat and poultry products while
USDA moves forward with the process to mandate the labels. Steve Kinsella (202) 720-
4623.

MAKE MINE OIL -- A study by USDA researchers shows that the semisolid fats found in stick
margarine are less friendly to the heart than the oils they come from. A test group of men
and women on a cholesterol-lowering diet had the "bad" LDL cholesterol reduced only 58
percent as much when corn oil stick margarine was substituted for corn oil in their diets.
Volunteers in the tests using only corn oil had a more favorable ratio of total cholesterol to
HDL cholesterol, the kind that protects arteries from damage, than did those using stick
margarine. The findings should discourage use of stick margarine in cholesterol-lowering
diets. Contact: Alice Lichtenstein (617) 556-3127.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1911 -- Scientists are studying the special nutritional needs of older
Americans. Jim Henry reports. (Weekly 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1393 -- A financial plan; are consumers less bargain conscious?;
celebrating the family; video/audioclubs; broccoli, nutritional powerhouse. (Weekly 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1903 -- Will GATT pass?; GATT and meat exports; new crop
production/price estimates; soybeans, lower supplies/higher prices; new role for ethanol?
(Weekly features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1656 -- No quick weight loss; strain of dieting; nutritional
newcomer; natural cooking oil; soybean savings. (Weekly research feature stories.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, January 27, world tobacco situation,
hearings held on organic livestock standards; Friday, January 28, cattle on feed; Monday,
January 31, agricultural prices, world dairy situation, world poultry situation; Tuesday,
February 1, catfish production, crop and weather update, horticultural exports. No reports
are scheduled for February 2-7, but our Newsline will be updated daily with breaking news
and features. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES

Will Pemble reports on plumcots, a new hybrid fruit developed by USDA research scientists.
Pat O'Leary reports on a Soil Conservation Service program called "Neighbor To Neighbor."
It provides farmers an opportunity to learn beneficial practices from other farmers through
on-site demonstrations.
Lynn Wyvill reports on research at USDA laboratories in Peoria, IL that is aimed at making
cooking oils better.
DeBoria Janifer reports on carbonated beverages made from milk. The products are the
result of USDA research in New Orleans, LA.
Dave Luciani of Michigan State University reports on a sweet secret. Michigan wines rival
some of California's best.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 5 5
BUSINESSES AND PRODUCERS...will be saluted on National Agriculture Day, March 17, says Jim
Flemming (WDZQ/WCZQ/WDZ, Decatur, IL). Planning is underway on a banquet for 800 people.
Former Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz will be the featured speaker. Two producers will be
selected for Farmer of the Year, one a young farmer, and the stations will report on their
production operations throughout the year. Jim also says farm income in his area is expected to
increase. Prices for corn and beans are well above average, and producers in his region had
record yields.

BITTER COLD...temperatures with wind chill below minus 50 degrees has producers concerned
about livestock stress, says Mike Buchanan (KBIZ, Ottumwa, IA). The line of Alberta Clippers on
the DTN screen means there's little relief in sight. Mike covered the Iowa Pork Congress, January
18-20 in Des Moines, about 10,000 producers attended, and the Iowa Conservation Tillage
Conference held in Ottumwa. Mike says the floods last year have caused a heightened interest in
conservation tillage.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












MODERNIZING MEETINGS...for today's agriculture have boosted attendance, says Bob Bosold
(WAXX, Eau Claire, WI). New themes such as financing, computerized feed rations, and
expansion presented by out-of-state speakers are providing information producers want. Bob
says the CANN network ceased operations December 31. WAXX served as its flagship station.

WARM TEMPERATURES...this time of year? Yes, in southern Texas, says Jim Farr (KKUB,
Brownfield, TX). Temperatures reach 60 degrees, but it is very dry. Only 11 inches of rain all
last year, and none on the horizon this year for several weeks. Jim says irrigation systems are
selling well, raising irrigated acreage in his area above 50 percent.

OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENT...of three weeks is scheduled for Larry Burchfield (KWCK, Searcy. AR).
Larry is a volunteer in the Farmer-To-Farmer program serving in Biskek, Kyrgyzstan, a former
member nation of the USSR, Feb. 17 Mar. 12. He'll conduct training in banking and financial
management, information critical to that nation's agricultural community.

VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




A A* R 7 99



Farm Broacasters Letter1994



United States apartment ffi Conu nations Electronic Media Services Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2647 j January 28, 1994

EXPORTS IN 1994 -- bsti s to developing countries kept the U.S. export rate
from declining in 1993 a 'o year earlier levels. An expected modest recovery by
our trading partners will likely raise U.S. exports enough to prevent the trade deficit from
increasing as sharply as it did in 1993. Given the dollar's value, many American
manufactured goods are competitively priced relative to foreign goods of comparable quality.
The increase in exports will likely mitigate the expected rise in imports which comes with an
enlargement in U.S. income. Contact: David Torgerson (202) 219-0782.

WATER QUALITY -- A new tool is now available to help farm managers, advisors and
scientists select the best practices for keeping farm pesticides and fertilizers out of water
supplies. The computer program, developed by USDA researchers, is designed to help
determine the amount of dissolved agrichemicals that will be transported to ground and
surface water supplies under specific farming methods. The Opus computer program comes
with documentation manuals. It requires an IBM-compatible computer and runs best on a
386 or faster microprocessor. Contact: Roger Smith (303) 491-8263.

NEW USES -- USDA researchers have found that mixtures of cornstarch and natural gums
have many of the properties required for fat substitutes and food thickeners. The
Agricultural Research Service is exploring commercial development of food additives made
from cornstarch and naturally occurring gums obtained from plants. Natural gums are
already being used as thickeners in food products such as puddings, pie fillings and salad
dressings. A mixture of 95 percent cornstarch and gum will be tested as a thickener in dairy
products. Contact: George Fanta (309) 685-4011.

LOAN RATES -- USDA is reducing interest rates on disaster loans from 4.5 percent to 3.75
percent, and changing eligibility requirements for emergency loans from Farmers Home
Administration. Eligibility calculations will no longer include payments from crop insurance
and ASCS. Farmers must show a 30 percent loss from normal production. Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy says reducing interest rates and easing eligibility requirements will assist
borrowers in meeting their financial obligations, and benefit the entire rural economy by
helping maintain financial stability of the family farm. Contact: Joe O'Neill (202) 720-6903.

NEW APPOINTMENT -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy has named Karl Stauber as deputy
under secretary of agriculture for small community and rural development. Stauber will help
in policy and budget development for USDA's Farmers Home Administration, Rural
Development Administration, Rural Electrification Administration, and the Agricultural
Cooperative Service. Stauber has a Ph.D. in public policy, and served as vice president of
a private foundation working to increase the economic vitality of low-income communities.
Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.








HOG OUTLOOK -- Barrow and gilt prices are expected to average slightly higher this year,
but higher costs, especially for feed, will reduce producers' net returns. Feed costs are
expected to remain high until the 1994 crops are harvested. Prices for feed will be very
sensitive to crop prospects during the year. Hog prices are expected to recover from the low
$40's per cwt this winter and move into the low $50's during spring and summer, retreating
to the mid $40's per cwt this fall. Total pork exports will remain weak, about 3 percent
below 1993 levels. Retail pork prices will average 1-3 percent above last year's $1.98 per
pound. Contact: Leland Southard (202) 219-0767.

SUNFLOWERS -- U.S. production of sunflowers in 1993 totaled 2.6 billion pounds, down
slightly from 1992. Average yield was 1,037 pounds per acre, down 220 pounds from
1992. Harvested area was 2.5 million acres, up from 2 million a year ago.
Contact: Mark Ash (202) 219-0840.

HAY -- Production of all hay in 1993 is estimated at 149 million tons, down slightly from
1992. Growers harvested 60 million acres. Average yield was 2.4 tons per acre, nearly the
same as in 1992. Contact: Herb Eldridge (202) 720-7621.

FALL POTATOES -- Despite flood losses in the upper Midwest the fall potato crop was the
second largest on record, 377 million cwt, down 1 percent from 1992. The yield averaged
333 cwt per acre, about the same as year ago levels. Colorado and Washington produced
record highs in acreage and production. Contact: Arvin Budge (202) 720-4285.

IMPORTS FROM GERMANY -- USDA has proposed to allow import from Germany of fresh,
chilled and frozen meats and dairy products from ruminant animals. The action comes from
a USDA proposal to declare Germany free of foot-and-mouth disease and rinderpest, two
communicable and destructive diseases of livestock. There is limited demand in the United
States for import of German meat and dairy products, and the USDA proposal is not
expected to have a major impact on current trade patterns. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301)
436-4898.

AGRICULTURE IN THE CITY -- Farm and farm-related industries account for 23 million jobs,
about 17 percent, of total U.S. employment. Nearly 71 percent of all farm and farm-related
jobs are located in metro counties. Agricultural wholesale and retail trade account for two-
thirds of these jobs, about 15 percent of total metro employment, and is the fastest growing
segment of agricultural employment. The jobs are located in metro areas because
employment in wholesale and retail trade depends on the size and growth of consumer
markets. Contact: Thomas Rowley (202) 219-0546.

MAPLE SYRUP -- A favorite food on cold mornings is maple syrup and pancakes. Syrup
prices increased in 1993, reflecting tight supplies. Maple syrup production last year totaled
one million gallons, down 39 percent from 1992 totals. Northeastern producers had one of
their worst years due to deep snow, unfavorable temperatures for syrup production, and a
spring blizzard. Producers are looking forward to the 1994 season. Contact: Annette
Clausen (202) 219-0880.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1912 -- Brenda Curtis talks with Agriculture Secretary Mike Espyabout
his first year in office. (Weekly 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1394 -- Improving meat inspections; the hazards of heat tape; working
with your financial planner; broccoli or cauliflower; keepers of the past. (Weekly 2-1/2 to
3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1904 -- U.S. pork to Russia; USDA's reorganization plan on
schedule; GATT and the EEP; a varying farm financial picture; lower interest rates on
disaster loans. (Weekly features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1657 -- Cows protect sheep; grazing in harmony; "far-ranging"
research; apple expedition; apples in peril. (Weekly research feature stories.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, February 8, weekly weather and crop
situation; Thursday, February 10, world ag supply and demand, crop production; Friday,
February, February 11, world ag and grain production, world oilseed situation, world cotton
situation, cattle and sheep outlook; Monday, February 14, feed update, oil crops update;
Tuesday, February 15, weekly weather and crop, farm labor, ag income and finance.
These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on the Extension Service "Master Gardener" program. Will
Pemble looks at shock treatment to improve plants.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski on the weather and crop situation.
USDA world board chairman James Donald on supply and demand estimates.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the livestock and poultry outlook. Pat
O'Leary reports on precision farming.


Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
l4ll l1lJil rl I III Jllll l I
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 554 5
SEVERE COLD WEATHER...is often harder on producers than their livestock, says Colleen
Callahan (WMBD, Peoria, IL). She interviewed Extension personnel who noted that while many
animals can withstand the cold, owners must provide water, extra bedding and feed. Colleen told
her audience that in extreme cold conditions animals need three times the energy in their feed to
maintain body heat, requiring addition of concentrates to regular feed. She will be covering the
Illinois Pork Conference, February 1, in Peoria.

PROJECT DAIRY 2020...is an industry initiative in Wisconsin designed to keep the state's
producers profitable into the 21st Century, says Michael Austin (WGEE/WDEZ, Green Bay, WI).
Mike is covering developments for his listeners, including a legislative initiative for property tax
relief. With wind chill temperatures to -77 degrees, Mike says dairy producers have been busy
keeping pipes from freezing and maintaining sufficient feed supplies. Tight supply has forced
some producers to send cows to slaughter. Mike's station is sponsoring for the 4th year the
Farm Show, scheduled February 20 in Green Bay. A larger exhibit area will be available this year.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











THE WORST WEEK OF COLD WEATHER...since 1957, says Al Carstens (KATE, Albert Lea, MN).
Mid-January provided consistent -25 to -30 temperatures, with wind chill to -80 degrees. Al says
producers plug in their electric heat tapes to keep water flowing to livestock. The forecast calls
for 20 above. Al says that's definitely short sleeves and Bermudas weather.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Cary Martin (KVOO, Tulsa, OK). He received the Media Recognition
Award from the Oklahoma Farm Bureau at its 52nd annual convention for best describing the
importance of agriculture to the farm and nonfarm public.

TWO USDA RADIO STAFFERS...participating in the Department's Management Development
Program will be absent from our services for the next six weeks. Brenda Curtis will be working
on radio services with Jim Davis, press secretary at the House Agriculture Committee. Maria
Bynum will help Dean Plowman, acting assistant secretary for Science and Education, to plan and
execute public information programs. Lori Spiczka will temporarily transfer to the radio staff.

VIC POWELL / u t
Office of Communications




A2 ,3-/ :z 2 yq


Marston Science
Library


Farm Broadcasters Letter


MAR 1 8 1994

^ ^rida


United States Department of Agriculture ice 'mmunications c tronic Media Services Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2648 4 February 4, 1994

EZ/EC INFO -- In the sprit of m f over n formation more accessible to Americans
across the nation, USDA is using aerr^ il System to receive inquiries about the new
rural revitalization program, Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Communities (EZ/EC).
Contact Internet via computer at: info@ezec.usda.gov. USDA will use a competitive
application process to designate 3 rural Empowerment Zones and 30 rural Enterprise
Communities. The Zones and Communities will receive special consideration for various
Federal programs and assistance to revitalize distressed communities and create economic
opportunities. Information and application forms are also available from USDA's Farmer's
Home Administration by calling (202) 690-1045. Application deadline is June 30. Contact:
Joe O'Neill (202) 720-6903.


SMALL BUSINESS EXPORT HELP -- USDA's Foreign Agriculture Service has produced a fact
sheet listing assistance available to small and disadvantaged businesses interested in
exporting food and agricultural products. It describes the assistance available from the
Foreign Agricultural Service, the Small Business Administration, the Agency for
Development, and the Export-Import Bank. For a copy of Helping Small and Disadvantaged
Businesses Export Food and Agricultural Products, contact USDA's Trade Assistance and
Promotion Office (202) 720-7103 or FAX (202) 690-4374. Contact: Geraldine Schumacher
(202) 720-7115.

ANIMAL WELFARE LICENSE CHANGES -- USDA is proposing that licensed animal dealers,
exhibitors and auction sale operators must maintain standardized animal identification
records on USDA forms. Currently no standard form is required. Proper record keeping by
licensees enables USDA inspectors to trace back the source of individual animals and provide
a means of comparison with other records in the market chain. USDA is also proposing that
licensees certify that they are in compliance with the new identification requirements, as well
as with other provisions of the Animal Welfare Act. Comment deadline to USDA's Animal
and Plant Health Inspection Service is February 18. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

ASSISTANCE TO EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS -- Emergency food stamp aid is being provided
for earthquake damaged households in the Los Angeles area. Normal food stamp rules have
been suspended to help people as quickly as possible. Families currently participating in the
Food Stamp Program may also be eligible for emergency stamps if they were adversely
affected by the January 17 earthquake. USDA's Food and Nutrition Service also provided
commodity foods for emergency feeding of earthquake victims. The Soil Conservation
Service reviewed dams, reservoirs and irrigation systems for earthquake damage. The Forest
Service suppressed fires in the earthquake area, removed debris from Forest Service roads,
and is assisting the California Highway Patrol in enforcing speed and lane control laws on
two highways on forest land that are serving as alternates to collapsed roads. Contact:
Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.








FARM LABOR -- Although much of U.S. agriculture is mechanized, many fruit, vegetable, and
horticultural crops require hand harvesting to preserve the quality and value of the produce.
On these farms labor is the largest input expense, accounting for 40 percent of total
production expenses, compared with an average 8 percent for labor on all other types of
farms. In 1994 and beyond, three factors are likely to affect farm labor patterns. First,
changes in immigration policy or stricter enforcement could affect the supply of foreign
farmworkers. Second, population growth and an increased concern over a healthy diet have
increased demand for fresh fruits and vegetables. And third, changes in agricultural trade
policies could alter the flow of fruits and vegetables between the United States and other
countries and affect the demand for U.S. labor. Contact: Jack Runyan (202) 219-0932.

IMPORTED LUMBER REGS -- USDA is responding to an interest in importing logs expressed
by sawmills and wood processing companies in the Pacific Northwest. In the past there
were few imports of foreign unmanufactured wood products, and current regulations do not
address these items. Regulations are necessary to prevent importation of logs that have
plant pests and pathogens damaging to U.S. forests. USDA is proposing debarking and
fumigating treatments for imported logs, lumber, wood chips and wood packing materials.
A public hearing will be held February 23 at USDA headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Written public comments will be accepted until April 20 at APHIS, USDA, Room 804 Federal
Building, 6505 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville, MD 20782. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-7255.

WHEAT QUALITY -- A USDA study shows that wheat quality matters most in markets that
do not receive export assistance. Countries that import through a state trading system are
more likely to be sensitive to price rather than to quality. Cleaning all wheat for export
would outweigh benefits. However, delivering a higher quality wheat to select import
customers could help maintain market share or possibly expand it, leading to a net benefit
for the U.S. wheat sector of $7 million each year. The study, The Role of Quality in Wheat
Import Decisionmaking, reveals that unless the U.S. wheat sector continues to improve the
cleanliness of wheat the United States may experience a decline in its share of the world
market over the next few years. A copy of the study can be ordered by dialing 1-800-999-
6779. Cost is $12. Contact: Stephanie Mercier (202) 219-0880.

PESTICIDE POSTER -- A four-color poster, Protect Yourself From Pesticides, is available for
people who work with farm chemicals. The poster features nine agricultural scenes that
illustrate proper work clothing, how to prevent pesticides from entering the body, what to
do when exposed to harmful pesticides, the decontamination process, and emergency care.
Text is presented in both English and Spanish. Cost is $1.50 each and includes shipping and
handling. Order from the Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA
15220. Contact: Allie Fields (703) 305-7666.

ETHANOL CONSUMPTION -- Annual household expenditure for alcoholic beverages in
constant 1991 dollars decreased by 35 percent between 1980 ($459) and 1991 ($297).
USDA's Economic Research Service expects ethanol consumption to decline further in the
future due to an increase in the age of the population over 60; an increasing concern with
health, fitness, nutrition and exercise; and tastes which have switched from distilled spirits
to beer and wine with lower ethanol content. Beer consumption peaked in 1981 at 36.8
gallons per adult. Consumption of distilled spirits peaked in 1978 at 3.1 gallons per adult.
The national household survey on drug abuse shows that 10 percent of Americans are
problem drinkers. Joan Courtless (301) 436-8461.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1913 -- The second of a series of interviews with Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy. Brenda Curtis talks with the Secretary about expected developments
in 1994. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1395 -- Groundhog Day postmortem; winter vegetables; frozen yard
plants; the dangers of deicers; rural enterprise zones. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1905 -- More U.S. grain to the Ukraine?; new report urges genetic
diversity; cattle price increases on hold; disasters disrupt meat industry; 1994 rice program
details. (Weekly reel of features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1658 -- Citrus detectives; root stock ruminations; modeling grain
infestations; corn foam foils insects; corn foam starter beds. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, February 10, U.S. crop production,
agriculture supply and demand; Friday, February 11, world cotton situation, world oilseed
situation, world ag & grain production, cattle and sheep outlook; Monday, February 14, feed
update; Tuesday, February 15, crop & weather update, ag income outlook, farm labor;
Wednesday, February 16, milk production; Friday, February 18, cattle on feed, ag outlook,
U.S. farm trade update; Monday, February 21, HOLIDAY; Tuesday, February 22, wheat
outlook, livestock outlook, crop & weather update. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on two areas of USDA research at Iowa State
University: farming more efficiently by understanding the secrets of soil; and how
earthworms contribute to soil productivity.

ACTUALITIES -- Richard Rominger, deputy secretary of agriculture, speaks at a recent
conference on southern agriculture in Jackson, MS. Excerpts include improving farmer
services and rural health care. Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with his weekly
weather and crop update.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary presents a five part series on precision farming. Lynn
Wyvill reports on USDA forest products research. DeBoria Janifer reports on livestock and
poultry producer prospects.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, charml 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, dowrk frequency 4160 MHL: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00 a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 4 21i3i1
MANAGEMENT IS SERIOUS...about reaching the agribusiness community, says Joe Comely
(WRFD, Columbus, OH). More farm programming is underway. The mid-day program at noon
will be expanded to 90 minutes of farm news, market information and weather. Joe will be
joined by three members of his farm department, Heather McConnell, Gary Jackson, and Valerie
Parks. Valerie is assistant farm director and ag accounts manager. Congratulations to Joe. He
received the Service Award from the Ohio Veterinary Medical Association.

WINTER MEETINGS...have turned up a growing interest in using no-till this spring, says Tom
Beavers (KMA, Shenandoah, IA). He believes it is a reaction to the flood conditions of last year
and the forecast of a wet spring and dry summer for this year. Tom's station is participating in
the effort to raise funds to upgrade the buildings and grounds at the Iowa State Fair. Iowa
citizens can check off $1 on their state tax returns for the fairground project. Congratulations to
Tom. He received the Reporting Excellence in Broadcasting award from the Iowa Soil and Water
Conservation Society.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










ATTENDANCE...was lower at this year's Iowa Pork Conference, says Gary Digiuseppe (KWMT,
Fort Dodge, IA). The -22 degree temperature kept many producers close to home. Gary recently
presented a seminar on market analysis. He said that this year the soybean market has been easy
to read, if you have beans you can get a good price, but next season will likely be a different
matter. Kris Todd joins the station as assistant farm director.

EQUIPMENT SALES...have increased, says Joe Munsell (KXXX/KQLS, Colby, KS). Producers are
hoping for an early spring, putting the equipment to work and increasing productivity this year.

IT WAS THE BIGGEST LUNCH...London, England had seen in 50 years, says Curt Lancaster (VSA
Radio Network, San Angelo, TX). Curt filed reports from the 1st world convention of Ford-New
Holland. The 5,000 dealers and attendees booked 22 hotels. Curt says he is also working on
projects for year's National Ag Week. The 21st anniversary is in March.


VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




A (21. ^-q 2DC LhrF !'7
APR 0 41994


Farm Broadcasters Letteersof Florda



United States Department of Agricul r Office of Communic o Electronic Media Services Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2649 MAR 81 1994 February 11, 1994

USDA FY 1995 BUDGE he USDA bu e for Fiscal Year 1995 is $61.7 billion, $3.6
billion lower than the 199 ,.. Th is designed to streamline USDA by reducing
its agencies from 43 to 29, ar' consolidating 1,100 county offices in the creation
of 2,500 one-stop Field Office Service Centers. The budget would require farmers
participating in certain USDA programs to carry basic crop insurance. The budget expands
export programs to $8.4 billion. Commodity support programs will total $9 billion, down
from $12.1 billion in FY 1994. Increased funding for 116,000 rural housing units will create
45,000 new jobs. Rural business loan guarantees will be increased nearly $1 billion. The
$1.5 billion in water and waste dispoal programs will create 34,000 jobs. The Women,
Infants and Children food programs will increase $353 million to $3.6 billion. The Wetlands
Reserve Program includes $241 million to enroll 300,000 new acres. Food safety, research
and Extension programs will be expanded. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

WHAT'S HOT -- Trade liberalization has played a key role in boosting sales to key consumer
food markets such as Canada, Japan and Mexico. Since the United States-Canadian Free
Trade Agreement lowered tariffs on U.S. exports, U.S. consumer food sales to Canada hit
a record $3.8 billion in FY 1993, with 10 categories of food hitting new highs. Since
Mexico lowered its tariffs and licensing requirements, U.S. exports surged to $1.3 billion in
1993. Canada and Japan account for half of U.S. consumer food sales, and Mexico ranks
as our third largest single-country market. Among best prospects for U.S. consumer food
exports are Hong Kong, where record highs were set in 13 categories, and Taiwan where
new records were set in 11 of 16 consumer food categories. Contact: Michael Dwyer (202)
720-1294.

HIGH VALUE TREND -- High value products are an expanding component of the U.S. export
picture. In FY 1993 high value product exports totaled $24 billion. They have risen from
31 percent of total agricultural exports in 1980 to 56 percent in FY 1993. These gains are
offsetting declines in traditional bulk commodities such as wheat, corn and soybeans. The
biggest gains in FY 19.93 were in fruit, fruit juice and vegetable exports to Canada, Japan
and the EC. The trend toward greater exports of high-value products is expected to continue
this year. Steve MacDonald (202) 219-0822.

AIR QUALITY -- Studies show that poor air circulation in closed livestock and poultry
buildings allows concentration of dust from feed, and ammonia fumes from animal waste
that lead to respiratory illness in animals and humans. A university of Iowa study reveals
that teenagers who work for prolonged times in enclosed swine houses have a greatly
reduced lung capacity, the result of damaged bronchial tubes. Scientists at the University
of Georgia have found that fine dust in poultry houses causes coughing, stress and disease
transmission through respiratory and circulatory systems. Studies are underway on damage
to lung tissue of broilers. Contact: Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.








NEW APPOINTEE -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy has named P. Scott Shearer as
deputy assistant secretary for congressional relations at USDA. Shearer will help direct the
legislative efforts of the Department. Before joining USDA, Shearer served as director of
legislative affairs for a bio-science, agricultural seed and pharmaceutical firm in Wilmington,
DE. Shearer has a M.S. degree from the University of Illinois in agriculture economics.
Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

SAVING FOOD -- The most likely problem to occur whenever disaster strikes is a power
outage. Sometimes food can be saved and protected. If the room temperature is above
freezing a refrigerator should stay cold for about one day, if the door remains closed. A full-
loaded free-standing freezer will keep foods frozen for two days if the door stays closed.
If the power outage will last more than two days try to buy "dry ice" for the freezer. Don't
use "dry ice" in the refrigerator, use block ice. After floods, sanitize undamaged canned
goods by removing the label and washing the cans with a brush in strong detergent and soak
the cans in a solution of two teaspoons of chlorine bleach per quart of water at room
temperature. Most other foods subjected to flood waters should be discarded. For tips on
saving food after a disaster call USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-800-535-4555.
Contact: Larry Mark (202) 720-3310.

SILAGE RESEARCH -- Corn is the number one silage, but soybeans potentially can produce
more protein. USDA researchers have grown a variety of soybean that reaches 6 feet tall,
twice the height of varieties grown for grain. The hay-type soybeans can open the way to
a new dairy silage for sustainable farming systems. Silage is plant material, mainly leaves
and stems, that is pickled by natural microorganisms to yield long-lasting nutritious feed.
The best experimental soybean lines will be tested this year in Virginia and Pennsylvania.
Silage varieties could be available in three years. Contact: Thomas Devine (301) 504-6375.

FARM LABOR -- Labor is the single largest expense on fruit, vegetable, and horticultural
speciality farms. A number of issues are developing that can affect the supply of labor and
its costs. Consumer demand for fruits and vegetables should remain high and production
is expected to continue expanding, increasing the demand for labor. Modification of
agricultural trade policies could alter the flow of fruits and vegetabels between the U.S. and
other countries, affecting the demand for labor. Changes in the immigration law or its
enforcement could also impact the farm labor supply. Changes in federal laws, regulations
and programs such as workplace protections for hired farmworkers, and farmworker
assistance programs could impact the number of farm jobs available. Mechanization is not
expected to increase on fruits, vegetable, and horticultural farms unless labor costs rise.
Contact: Shannon Hamm (202) 219-0886.

BETA CAROTENE STUDY -- USDA researchers are reviewing the diets of women aged 19
to 50 to determine the main contributors of the common carotenoids. The study is part of
an effort to assess the anti-cancer value of beta carotene and other carotenoids.
Carotenoids are a group of nearly 600 yellow, orange and red pigments that give foods like
carrots, peaches, squash and tomatoes their distinctive colors. Leafy green vegetables also
have the compounds but are masked by the green color of chlorophyll. Carrots, canteloupe
and broccoli supply the most beta carotene. Joanne Holden (301) 504-8186.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1914 -- The USDA budget proposal for FY 1995 is a basic outline of
the Department's proposed reorganization and where USDA intends to place its priorities.
Gary Crawford reports. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1396 -- Health care in rural areas; USDA budget focuses on consumer
issues; food safety when disaster strikes; where are your oats coming from?; craving for
carrots. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1906 -- New budget proposal affects farm programs; USDA
reorganization gets Congressional attention; guard cows for sheep; some help for oats; to
BST or not to BST. (Weekly reel of features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1659 -- Boosting vitamin E; vitamin E & malaria; sterilizing
mosquitoes; microbes vs. mosquitoes; weight loss inequity. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.) Headsup. This series will cease production next month. The final tape of
the series will be #1663, mailed March 8, 1994. The Agricultural Research Service
information in the series will be incorporated into the Consumer Time and Agritape Features
segments of the weekly cassette. The number of cuts in these two series will be expanded
as necessary to accommodate the research stories.

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, February 16, milk production;
Friday, February 18, ag outlook, U.S. farm trade update; Monday, February 21 HOLIDAY;
Tuesday, February 22, crop & weather update, wheat outlook, livestock update;
Wednesday, February 23, poultry outlook, daity outlook, catfish processing; Thursday,
February 24, cotton & wool outlook, world tobacco update; Friday, February 25, ag export
outlook; Monday, February 28, ag prices; Tuesday, March 1, crop & weather update.
These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on wood composites.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; USDA
budget analyst Steve Dewhurst on the proposed budget for FY 1995.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on livestock and poultry. Pat O'Leary
reports on precision farming.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE
CONTRACT FARMING...for the production of chickens is a major interest for producers served by
Miles Carter (KMZU/KOAL/KTRX, Carrollton, MO). Teresa Reische covered for the stations the
Mid Missouri Ag Expo, in Sedalia, which offered information about raising poultry and the new
processing plant being constructed near Sedalia. Miles also says conditions this winter have
allowed bottomland to dry out.

24-INCH SNOWFALL...collapsed about 70% of tobacco greenhouses, says Jack Crowner
(Kentucky Ag Network/Farm Service Network, Louisville). Jack says it will force a change in
spring planting to traditional bedding and transportation of young plants from Florida. With the
10% allotment cut this year the greenhouse damage is not expected to have a major impact at
planting time. He says it has been a learning experience for producers about the structural
requirements of greenhouses and emergency measures that can be taken to save plants. Jack is
covering the National Farm Machinery Show, February 16-19, the largest indoor farm show in the
nation. About 400,000 people attend each year.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











SPECIAL AG PROGRAMMING...was featured by Larry Steckline (Mid America Ag Network,
Wichita, KS) the week of February 7-11. Each day the network broadcast from a different city in
the State, invited farmers to attend and ask questions of ag policy leaders in Washington, D.C.
via satellite, and hear luncheon presentations by commodity and exchange traders. The final
presentation featured the latest research on the healthful benefits of meat consumption. Over
$2,000 in prizes were given away each day.

FARMLAND...in Michigan could be taxed at a higher rate, says Rod Zamarron (Michigan Farm
Radio Network, Lansing). The network is keeping listeners informed about school finance reform
legislation which changes the distribution of funds to public schools, and the debate on tax rates.
Rod replaces Owen Davis, who has joined a finance firm in Ann Arbor.

KEEP 'EM SAFE...remind producers to ventilate space heaters and enclosed animal pens.


VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




A2l.i3y 2
Firston Sc ; .e
Lib ,..


Farm Broadcasters Letter"04M"



United States Department of A i ture Office of Comm ions Electronic Media Services Washington, DC 20250-1340
Lt N.AR 81 .!
Letter No. 2650 February 18, 1994

RETURNING CROPLA WETLA USDA's Soil Conservation Service will purchase
easements from landow o restore farmed, converted, or potential wetlands
in eight midwest States. Mi nd Iowa will have the largest acreage accepted in the
program, and will receive two-thirds of the funding, $10 million. Paul Johnson, chief of the
Soil Conservation Service, says the 25,000 acre program enhances the environment,
increases the water-holding capacity of the floodplains, and gives midwestern landowners
an opportunity to recoup some of their losses from the disastrous floods. Contact: Mary
Ann McQuinn (202) 205-6202.

WETLANDS IN THE 1995 BUDGET -- The proposed Fiscal Year 1995 USDA budget includes
$241 million to enroll 300,000 new acres in the Wetland Reserve Program. The program
is an alternative to levy repair in flooded sections of the upper midwest. Contact: Mary
Dixon (202) 720-4623.

CROP INSURANCE PROPOSAL -- The Administration's proposed FY 1995 budget proposal
for USDA contains a proposal to replace the current crop insurance system with a basic level
of insurance for all producers in farm programs. Coverage is based on 50 percent of normal
yield, with eligible losses reimbursed at 60 percent of the expected price for the crop. The
policy will be available for $50. Higher levels of coverage would be available through private
insurance companies. The new system is designed to be the primary source of disaster relief
for producers, and is expected to save taxpayers $750 million over a five year period.
Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

HUNGER FORUM -- The second in a series of hunger forums was held February 14 in
Weslaco, TX. Ellen Haas, USDA assistant secretary for Food and Consumer Services,'akd
Representative Kika de la Garza, chairman of the House Agriculture Commitee, heard
testimony. Among those speaking was Sherry Lee, executive director of a food bank in
Albuquerque, NM. Lee said that communities cannot begin to effectively conquer crime and
violence, illiteracy and health problems until hunger and malnutrition have been eradicated
from people living in poverty. Additional forums will be held in Kansas City, MO and Dayton,
OH. Contact: Laura Trivers (703) 305-2039.

NORTHWEST TIMBER SALES -- If an injunction is modified that has stopped timber sales in
northern spotted owl habitat, the U.S. Department of Agriculture will offer for sale 31 million
board feet of timber from 24 timber sales in Oregon, Washington and California. The action
is the result of an agreement that environmental groups will not oppose a request to release
sales from a court injunction if the request is consistent with President Clinton's forestry
management plan and existing environmental laws. The 24 sales represent a portion of 54
sales pending. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.








POULTRY LABELS -- USDA is examining its policy on the use of the term "fresh" on poultry
product labels. Current policy permits a "fresh" label if the poultry product has never been
at or below zero degrees Fahrenheit. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy notes that California
recently enacted a state law restricting use of the term "fresh" to poultry that has never
been at or below 25 degrees Fahrenheit. Espy says USDA's Food Safety and Inspection
Service should examine whether its current policy is reasonable and meets today's consumer
expectations of food safety. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

SOYBEANS -- Large competitor supplies of soybeans will likely keep U.S. exports at a slow
pace. U.S. ending stocks will probably fall to an unusually tight 150 million bushels. U.S.
prices are expected to average $6.10 to $7.10 per bushel, well above the $5.56 of last year.
Reduced U.S. soybean crush and below-average oil yields will combine to produce much
tighter oil supplies. This is expected to boost prices to 27 cents per pound, up from an
average 21 cents in 1992/93. Contact: Scott Sanford (202) 219-0840.

OIL AND AG -- The price of crude oil is the key determinant of petroleum-based products.
The continued decline in oil prices does not stimulate alternatives to petroleum-based fuels
and lubricants, but it does offer the prospect of reduced input costs for farmers. Most
analysts are forecasting that crude oil prices will be about 10 percent lower in 1994 than in
1993. Despite the motor fuel tax increase, gasoline prices are expected to average about
$1.20 per gallon this year and diesel fuel about $1.18. Contact: Arthur Wiese (202) 219-
0782.

150 YEAR ANNIVERSARY -- The system of agricultural cooperatives celebrates its 150th
year in 1994. The cooperative form of business activity traces its beginnings to a set of
principles established by tradesmen in Rochdale, England. The Rochdale Society of Equitable
Pioneers organized a cooperative in 1844 to purchase food and supply items. The rules for
governing their society were subsequently widely embraced in countries around the world.
A logo recognizing the anniversary has been created by staff members of the Associated
Electric Cooperatives, Springfield, MO. Designed to resemble a round stamp of approval, it
contains the slogan, Time Tested, Member Approved, that surrounds the phrase "1844-
1944, 150 years of cooperation." No special permission is required to use the logo.
Camera-ready copies can be obtained by calling Leta Mach at (202) 638-6222. Contact:
Randall Torgerson (202) 720-7558.

CUT FATS AND CHOLESTEROL -- One of the most important defenses against high blood
cholesterol is a diet low in both saturated fats and cholesterol. Dietary changes alone can
cut blood cholesterol count by 15 percent, a proven way to lower the risk of heart attack.
The way the food is cooked can make as big a difference in healthful eating as what is
cooked. Use methods that allow fat to drain off food, or require little or no added fat, such
as steaming, broiling, stir-frying and baking. Use nonstick pans and liquid vegetable oil or
spray when frying. For soups and stews remove most of the fat by cooling the dish, then
skimming the fat from the top and reheating. Contact: Beth Reames (504) 388-3329.



Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1915 -- Now is the time to decide what things to buy for this spring's
home garden. Brenda Curtis reports. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1397 -- What is "fresh" poultry?; gardening by the fire; hungry for a
good steak; cold and your camera; craving carrots. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1907 -- Farm financial update; using genetics for leaner meat;
shrinking oilseed supplies; bossie means business; wheat outlook; help for beginning
farmers. (Weekly reel of features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1660 -- Malaria medicine; pharmaceutical crop; travel advisory;
coccidiosis study; "bio-geo-chemical" diseases. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)
Program note: This series will cease production next month. The final tape, #1663, will be
mailed March 8, 1994. Following that date Agricultural Research Service information will
be incorporated into the Consumer Time and Agritape Features segments of the weekly
cassette. The number of cuts in these two series will be expanded as necessary to include
research stories.

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, February 23, summer food program
gets a boost, catfish processing, poultry outlook, daity outlook; Thursday, February 24,
world tobacco situation, cotton and wool outlook; Friday, February 25, export update;
Monday, February 28, ag prices update; Tuesday, March 1, horticultural exports, crop &
weather update. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. USDA has no
major economic or statistical reports scheduled for March 2-9, but as always the Newsline
will have new stories every workday based on breaking news or unscheduled releases.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on research by the USDA Forest Service to build better
timber bridges. Pat O'Leary reports on a toll-free number to reserve National Forest
campsites. Tyson Gair, Mississippi State U., on BST dairy farmers and consumers.

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with the weekly weather and
crop report.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary presents a five-part series on Precision Farming. Lynn
Wyvill reports on putting wood waste to work. DeBoria Janifer reports on a Resource
Conservation and Development project in West Virginia.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00 a.m., EDT.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE
TWO FARM BROADCASTERS...and an ag writer represented the U.S. last month at the
International Study Tour in Berlin, Germany. Cathy Patton (Kansas Ag Network/WIBW, Topeka,
KS), Herb Plambeck (WMT, Cedar Rapids, IA) and Jack DeHus with a Bellingham, WA
commodities firm, participated with journalists from 23 nations. They toured farms in eastern
Germany, visited the International Agriculture and Horticulture Exposition and Food Fair, and the
International Grune Week. Herb says over half a million people visited the Grune Week. U.S.
participants were chosen by the ag consulate of the German Embassy in Washington, D.C.

FUND RAISER...to send ambulances and medical equipment to needy hospitals in Poland is being
MC'd by Ed Slusarczyk (Ag Radio Network, Utica, NY). The April 8 program in Utica will feature
the Jan Lewan Show Band.

SPRING...can't be far away, says Jack McConnell (KMMJ, Grand Island, NE), the scout birds for
sand hill cranes are beginning to arrive on their way north.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










ANOTHER NETWORK...has been acquired by Clear Channel Communications, says Ron Hays
(Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City). Virginia Ag Net, in Richmond, VA, is providing 10 daily
feeds to stations. Norm Hyde is behind the microphone. Ron says daily markets are fed to the
network from his operation in Oklahoma City.

REASSIGNMENT...for Tom Wilborn (Associated Press, Washington, D.C.), from AP radio's
agriculture beat at USDA to business reporting. AP has ended its daily series of ag reports. Tom
will continue Sunrise and ag market info on the broadcast wire.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Joann Locke (KTTS, Springfield, MO). She is the featured farm
broadcaster in the February, 1994 Mid-AM Reporter salute.

NATIONAL AGRICULTURE WEEK...is March 14-20. National Agriculture Day is March 20, the
first day of spring. Info kit available from the Ag Council of America, (202) 682-9200.

VIC POWELL i
Office of Communications





Marston Science
Library

Farm Broadcasters Lette PR 4



United States Departme t Agculture e of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2651 February 25, 1994

Problems discussed a i reatc i.
Plais' Summit oh. Ruraur l are
conducted in Lenn S D, ed gaY
included too few medical pro v ers
ir iuural communities and insurance
discrimination of farmers and sma lla
!business owners. Visiting a health
cate. clinic in Lennox is (L-R) Dr.
Larry Sittner, Hill ry Rodham Clinton,
Scott Rogers, Louise Kerschman
(seated), Linda Bruns, U.S. Senator
Tom Daschle, and Secretary Mike
Espy. USDA photo by Bob Nichols.

FOOD ASSISTANCE -- USDA's proposed 1995 budget calls for the Food Stamp program to
be increased $1 billion to $25 billion. The request supports continued expansion of
electronic benefits transfer, which allows food stamp recipients to use a plastic card to pay
for their purchases, and basic program expansion as mandated by legislation last year. $3.7
billion is proposed for the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and
Children, up from $3.3 this year. More than $31 million is proposed to establish and
improve nutrition education and training in Child Nutrition Programs. USDA food assistance
programs help 40 million needy Americans. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

MEAT AND POULTRY INSPECTION -- USDA's 1995 budget plan boosts the budget for the
Food Safety and Inspection Service from $585 million to $605 million to improve the
nation's meat and poultry inspection system. The budget includes funds to hire and train
200 more inspectors and $25 million for research and strategy on pathogen reduction in
meat. Funding is being proposed for Microbiological monitoring in baseline studies,
evaluation of new processing operations to reduce contamination and consumer education.
Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

LOAN DELINQUENCIES -- USDA is forming a Loan Resolution Task Force to address loan
delinquencies, fraud, and abuse in programs such as USDA's Farmers Home Administration.
The group will be headed by Ron Blackley, who will move from USDA chief of staff to
devote full time to the effort. The task force will include representatives from USDA, the
Internal Revenue Service, Justice Department, Office of Management and Budget, Farm
Credit Administration, and a private CPA firm. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says, "We
want to zealously collect on delinquent farm loans where borrowers have not acted in good
faith to repay what they owe. This process will allow the successor agency, the Farm
Service Administration, to focus on the mission of providing supervised credit to deserving
and needy farm borrowers." Contact: Ali Webb (202) 720-4623.








AG LOANS -- Total farm debt (excluding households) at the end of 1993 is estimated at
$141 billion, up $2 billion from a year earlier but 27 percent below the 1984 peak of $193
billion. Commercial banks were the leading farm lender and posted another profitable year,
surpassing their 1992 performance. Farm borrowing is forecast to increase about 2 percent
this year, the fourth annual increase after six successive years of debt retirement. Adequate
credit is available, except for beginning farmers. Average interest rate on outstanding farm
debt was 8.1 percent last year, down from a high of 11 percent in 1982. Contact: George
Wallace (202) 219-0892.

GENETIC COTTON -- USDA has determined that the genetically modified BXN cotton line
does not present a plant pest risk and will no longer be regulated. The cotton was
genetically engineered to have an enzyme that degrades herbicide, giving it herbicide
tolerance. Fifteen field trials in 13 States over five growing seasons found no plant pest risk.
State officials, universities, cooperative extension services, businesses, farmer and
professional associations favor deregulation. The final rule on BXN cotton was published in
the Federal Register. Contact: Cynthia Eck (301) 436-5931.

BEEF CATTLE TWINS -- Beef cattle germplasm is now available that has a 40 percent value
for producing twin bulls and a 30 percent value for producing twin cows. The germplasm
is from an experimental herd at USDA's Meat Animal Research Center at Clay Center, NE,
and represents a 12-year study of producing cattle twins. Under a cooperative marketing
agreement with the USDA Agricultural Research Service, American Breeders Service of
DeForest, WI, is offering beef cattle semen and embryos. Public auction at the research
center of young bulls is also available. Fourteen breeds are represented in the project.
Contact: Keith Gregory (402) 762-4176.

BEEF IS KING -- Recent surveys show that the two favorite foods when eating out are
hamburgers and steak. The survey by the National Restaurant Association found that what
people feel they should order and what they actually order are two different things. When
respondents were asked what they would like to order, fresh fruit was the number one
choice. But when orders were actually placed, 87 percent chose hamburger. Of those
patrons who said they would order poultry without skin, only 73 percent actually followed
through. A meal can be improved by choosing small portions, and adding a salad, vegetable,
bread, rice, or pasta. The study shows that while people say they want to include mort
fruits and vegetables in their restaurant diets, beef remains the king of the away-from-home
market. Contact: Beth Reames (504) 388-3329.

BST AND SCIENCE -- Tests show that when BST (recombinant bovine somatotropin) is
administered to cows it doesn't increase normal BST in milk. BST is a normal component
of milk. Larry Guthrie, a dairy specialist with the University of Georgia Extension Service,
says there is no scientific way to tell the difference between milk from BST-treated cows and
that from nontreated cows, therefore labeling isn't possible. Guthrie says BST doesn't harm
cows. BST has received a safety seal of approval from the National Institutes of Health,
World Health Organization, American Medical Association, the Food and Drug Administration,
and the American Dietetic Association. Contact: Larry Guthrie (706) 542-2581.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1916 -- While many sectors of agriculture seem to be doing very well
these days, surveys show that some smaller family-farmers are having a more difficult time
than ever before. Gary Crawford talks with experts about the perils of small family farmers.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1398 -- Summer Food Program growing; a health care summit; the
vitamin E debate; potatoes: white or sweet?; advice for those seeking financial advice.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1908 -- Farm Program signup information; a possible peanut
shortage; tougher days for "family" farms?; the new crop insurance proposal. (Weekly reel
of features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1661 -- Pickle/wine test; selenium/virus connection; selenium
folklore; blocking plant viruses; disease-resistant elms. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.) NOTE: This series ceases production next month. The final tape, #1662, will be mailed
March 8, 1994. Following that date Agricultural Research Service information will be incorporated
into the Consumer Time andAgritape Features segments of the weekly cassette. The number of cuts
in these two series will be expanded as necessary to include research stories.


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- No reports are scheduled for the week of March
1-7, but the Newsline will have new stories each day. Tuesday, March 8, crop/weather
update; Thursday, March 10, U.S. crop production, world ag supply & demand; Friday,
March 11, aquaculture update, world ag grain production, world oilseed situation, world
cotton situation; Monday, March 14, feed update, oil crops update. These are the USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are
not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on new products from wood waste.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the weather and crop
situation; FFA national officers meet Secretary Mike Espy.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on livestock and poultry; Pat O'Leary
reports on precision farming.


Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 12 0830 574
OFFMIKE
NATIONAL FARM AND MACHINERY SHOW...was covered by Charlie Blake (WIKY, Evansville,
IN), filing reports back to the station. Over 1,000 exhibitors this year. Charlie says soil and
water conservation district meetings have been providing good information to producers about no-
till, and the beneficial coexistence of wildlife and farming.

LEVEE REPAIR...is a hot issue with farmers served by Jim Coyle (KRES, Moberly, MO). The
Army Corps of Engineers says it is not planning to repair levees protecting only farmland. Jim
says producers are not clear about repairs to be made through the Soil Conservation Service. It
has prompted many farmers to begin their own repairs. They are worried about flood waters
returning this spring when snow melt in the upper midwest combines with rain.

ON THE AIR AGAlN:is~Paul Pippert (WHB, Kansas City, MO), formerly of WIBW, Topeka, KS.
Paul will be producing reports and hosting a live call-in program, "Farm Feedback," that airs from
11:30 to noon.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Electronic Media Services
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











TRIUMPH OF AGRICULTURE SHOW...in Omaha, NE will be covered live by Joe Gangwish (WOW,
Omaha) and crew. Among the exhibits, producers will get a look at the latest equipment. Joe
says there was a good voter participation in his area on the soybean referendum. Results are
expected in March. The direction the 1995 Farm Bill will take is generating comment. Experts on
Joe's programs predict that the legislation will move more into environmental issues.

EFFECTS...of the ice storm that hit Tennessee and Kentucky are still being felt, says Dan Gordon
(Tennessee Agrinet, Nashville). Trees toppled, pulling power lines down with them. Some
producers went seven days without electric power. Widespread damage to farm buildings and
fences. Dan says the markets were closed for two days.

THANKS...for the feedback from Wyatt Cox (Peoples Radio Network, White Springs, FL). Wyatt
uses items from our daily Newsline and weekly cassette service on his programs that feed 100
stations.

VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




- 2.L 3 'Z 2 StOn Sc1eZc2.
r aSre I


Farm Broadcasters LetteP IA"



United States Departrq of Agriculture officec e of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2552 MAR 25 1934 -- March 4, 1994

MARKET SENSITI EPORTS -- a test project, USDA will release certain monthly
crop reports at 8:3 .r;-,- 4he usual 3 p.m. ET release. Beginning May 10 the
Crop Production Repo arld Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates will be
issued 6-1/2 hours early. If the results are successful, additional reports could be included.
Under the current 3 p.m. release for reports, some foreign markets can now trade on USDA
numbers before U.S. commodity markets open for business. Agriculture Secretary Mike
Espy says it is the intent of USDA to establish release times which best serve the interests
of U.S. agriculture. Contact: Jim Donald (202) 720-6030.

FARM LABOR -- U.S. farms and ranches provided employment to 2.4 million people during
January 1994. This compares with 2.5 million during the survey week in January 1993.
Self-employed farm operators accounted for 1.3 million of the total. Farm operators paid
their hired workers an average wage of $6.54 per hour, up 14 cents from a year earlier.
Workers paid on an hourly basis received an average $6.11 per hour, up 12 cents from a
year ago. Field workers received an average $6.14 per hour, up 12 cents, and livestock
workers earned $5.75 per hour, up 11 cents. Benefits such as housing and meals were
provided to 43 percent of hired workers, down 2 percent from a year ago. Contact: Dean
Groskurth (202) 690-3228.

TESTING WHEAT -- USDA is proposing that a new testing service be established for
pesticide residues in wheat. Under the U.S. Grain Standards Act, the new service operated
by USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service would test for 32 pesticides residues. Testing
would be conducted on a fee basis at the Grain Inspection Service technical center in Kansas
City, MO. USDA is seeking comments on the proposal. Reply by March 30 to George
Wollam, USDA, FGIS, P.O. Box 96454, Washington, D.C. 20090-6454, or FAX at (202)
720-4628. Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

DISASTER ASSISTANCE -- USDA has provided over $2 billion in direct disaster assistance
to the nine Midwest states affected by floods last year. The assistance includes crop
disaster payments, crop insurance indemnity payments, emergency food stamps,
commodities for group feeding, loans, and Emergency Watershed Protection projects.
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy, coordinator of Federal long-term recovery efforts, says the
payments from USDA, along with assistance from other Federal agencies and states, will
help Midwest producers to recover from the effects of the weather disaster. Contact: Steve
Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL DAY -- New products and new uses is the theme of the 40
exhibits featured at the National Agricultural Day celebration in Washington, D.C., March 17.
Exhibit subjects range from using corn in windshield washer fluid, to use of wheat straw in
walls for homes. Several USDA agencies will have exhibits at the event. Contact: Jim
Brownlee (202) 720-2091.








MEAT SAFETY -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says USDA will ask the Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) to approve the safety of treating red meats with irradiation to eliminate
bacteria. Poultry received FDA approval in 1990, along with fruits and vegetables.
Irradiation can kill the strain of E.coli that killed three children and sickened hundreds in the
Pacific Northwest last year. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

CATTLE -- Cattle herd expansion continues at a slow rate, only 4 percent over the past 5
years. The slow growth will help maintain stable beef prices. The meat complex has
adjusted to tight grain supplies. Producers have shifted to lower quality grain, and delayed
placements by using more forage. But a good wheat crop this spring, and a normal spring
planting season will be necessary to avoid further industry adjustments. Contact: Ron
Gustafson (202) 219-0767.

PROGRAM SIGNUP -- The signup period will be conducted until April 29 for producers to
participate in USDA's 1994 production adjustment and price support programs. A new
feature of this year's program provisions is use of the Secretary's authority to permit the
planting of 12 experimental and industrial crops on program idled acreage. Planting of the
crops on Acreage Conservation Reserve will not result in reduction of deficiency payments
for producers. Details and signup are available at county office's of USDA's Agricultural
Stabilization and Conservation Service. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

WELL WATER -- A study at the University of Georgia shows that nitrates are the most
common contaminant found in well water, and most often found in shallow wells.
Individuals who have prolonged exposure to high levels of nitrates can experience an oxygen
deficit in the blood. The study found that shallow wells are more likely to contain dangerous
levels of copper and lead. Wells that are surrounded by large tracts of farmland were found
to be less likely to have contaminated water. Contact: Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.

INSTANT INFO -- The current paper-based information delivery system is inadequate to keep
pace with the needs of modern agriculture, prompting USDA's National Agricultural Library
to begin providing full electronic access to its information. To achieve the electronic library
goal, the National Agricultural Library will convert its own publications from print to
electronic media, shift and add resources to acquire and make available information in
electronic format, and connect to electronic networks worldwide. The system will allow the
Library's collection to be computer accessed by anyone, anywhere. The goal of January 1,
1995 is set as the date that electronic information becomes the preferred medium for library
materials. The National Agricultural Library, the largest agricultural library in the world, is
one of three national libraries in the United States. The other two are the Library of
Congress and the National Library of Medicine. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778,
REDUCING THE RISK -- A primary risk factor for heart disease is lack of regular exercise.
Moderate exercise, such as walking, gardening, biking, swimming, jogging or dancing for a
half-hour three times a week, is sufficient to decrease risk. The kinds and amounts of foods
eaten can also help reduce the chances of a heart attack. Reduced sodium intake and
shedding extra pounds can help lower high blood pressure. High levels of blood cholesterol
can be lowered through proper diet. Eat less animal fat, and eat more water-soluable dietary
fiber. Use polyunsaturated vegetable oils to replace saturated fat in cooking. Use soft
margarines. Contact: Ruth Patrick (504) 388-1425.


We seek your comment or complaints. Use our address on page 4, or call (202) 720-7762.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1917 -- The techniques and importance of family traditions to future
generations is discussed by Brenda Curtis with a family life specialist. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1399 -- Chemicals and lawn care; supermarkets, how are they doing;
getting the lead out of your garden; smuggled birds can cause health problems; potatoes,
fresh vs. processed. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1909 -- Details on new loan rates and deficiency payments; USDA
unveils crop insurance proposal; where's the pork?; U.S. farmers facing more competition;
update on ethanol program. (Weekly reel of features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1662 -- A pharmaceutical herbicide?; a perfume protects kiwi; a
late blight inhibitor; natural alternatives; "farmaceuticals?" (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.) PLEASE NOTE: This is the final tape of this series.

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, March 10, U.S. crop production,
world ag supply & demand; Friday, March 11, cotton update, aquaculture outlook, world
grain/ag production, world oilseed situation; Monday, March 14, feed update, oilcrops
update; Tuesday, March 15, crop & weather update, milk production; Thursday, March 17,
sugar/sweetener outlook; Friday, March 18, cattle on feed, agricultural outlook summary;
Monday, March 21, ag chemical usage. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Eric Parsons reports on provisions of the 1994 farm program signup.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy and Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
manager Ken Ackerman on crop insurance reform proposal.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- March 10 & 12, A 5-part series on Precision Farming by Pat
O'Leary. Part 1, USDA scientists are developing a new input application system called
Precision Farming. Part 2, Satellites are used to pinpoint locations in fields. Part 3, Remote
sensing technology gives farmers a clear view of field problem areas. Part 4, Field maps
save money and protect the environment. Part 5, Hi-tech spreaders and sprayers are
programmed to treat only problem areas. Each segment about 2:20.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE 79
POSSIBILITY OF FLOODING...is on the minds of producers served by Tony Randall (KXRB, Sioux
Falls, SD). The ground is saturated and normal precipitation is forecast. Producers are
questioning whether the disaster payment being received this year for crops damaged last year
counts as '93 or '94 income. It could influence how the '94 crop is marketed. Tony says feed
corn is in short supply. Elevators are charging a 10-15 cent per bushel premium.

A SURVEY...of maple syrup producers in north central Ohio is being conducted by Cheryl Lynn
(WBCO, Bucyrus, OH). The sap is running, and if the weather cooperates it could be a good year.
The station is also operating a tree trivia contest that offers tree seedlings as prizes. Cheryl says
she's from the Chicago suburbs, and that covering agriculture since last July has been an
enjoyable learning experience.

PRODUCERS...begin syrup operations in mid-March, says Bob Flint (WCFR, Springfield, VT).
They've had a hard-freeze winter, and n6w need a spring that doesn't get too warm too quickly.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications, Rm 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












CHANGE...in programming is underway, says Gary Kinnett (WACF/WPRF, Paris, IL). Gary has
been promoted to general manager of the stations. He will produce farm programming for the
stations as well as continuing to air his material at WIAI, Danville, IL. He's changing the Paris
outlets from automation to live. Gary says the owners recognize the value and influence of farm
broadcasting and membership in NAFB.

FORMAT CHANGES...are being undertaken on USDA radio's weekly cassette service to improve
our service to broadcasters. The News Feature Five series ends with the mailing of March 8,
allowing additional time on the cassette for material outside the usual format and length. On the
cassette of March 15 we'll be offering a five part series produced by our Pat O'Leary on precision
farming. On future cassettes we'll offer shortened versions of some regular-length features. We
seek feedback on the changes, and look forward to your comments as we make efforts to
accommodate the needs of broadcasters.


VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




AS1 Marston Science
Library


Farm Broadcasters Letter l



United States Departme of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2653 March 11, 1994

CROP INSURAN 1 F I F A prop ahas been introduced to change the response of
the Federal over t to natural dis st rs in rural America. The Federal Crop Insurance
Reform Act of 19 ,~, announced Q agriculture Secretary Mike Espy, would offer as
standard features co ~g or~ prevented planting and a new basic catastrophic
coverage for $50 per cr ty, up to $100 per farmer. The proposed legislation
replaces crop loss disaster payments, ending the conflict between crop insurance and
disaster relief bills, and would require all producers participating in farm programs to obtain
coverage. The reforms would save an estimated $750 million over a five-year period. Espy
has also announced changes to improve the fiscal soundness of federal crop insurance.
Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

OPTIONS PROJECT -- A test project for farmer participation in the Options Contract program
will be continued in 1994. Begun last year, producers in the pilot program may enroll corn,
wheat and soybeans for alternative protection equivalent to the target price and price
support loan levels. The test project is available to producers in three counties each in
Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa, and two counties in Kansas and North Dakota. The project is
designed to familiarize producers with income protection offered by contract options.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

MEAT INSPECTION DISCUSSION -- USDA will conduct an open forum on issues relative to
the inspection system for meat and poultry plants. The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control
Point (HACCP) system is one of several initiatives USDA is undertaking to improve inspection
and safety of the nation's meat and poultry supply. The forum will be held March 30-31 in
Washington, D.C., and will include public health officials, representatives from the meat
industry, consumer groups, scientists, professional organizations, government officials,
farmers and producer groups. The sessions will be open to the public. Contact: Mary Dixon
(202) 720-4623.

HELPING ICE-DAMAGED REGIONS -- USDA's Rural Electrification Administration is providing
cash-flow assistance, technical support and information to the agency's electric power
providers in the 94-county, ice-damaged areas of Mississippi and Tennessee. USDA's Food
and Nutrition Service has provided $6 million in benefits to nearly 30,000 Mississippi
households to replace lost food, benefits, and commodities distributed by disaster-relief
organizations. Trees and utility poles that were snapped by heavy ice turned the region into
a disaster area. Considerable damage has been reported to the pecan crop. Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy sent Wally Beyer, administrator of USDA's Rural Electrification
Administration, to the storm-damaged area to assess efforts in restoring power. Contact:
Eileen McMahon (202) 720-1363.

SRadio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









EXPORTS & IMPORTS -- Agricultural exports this year are forecast to reach $42 billion. The
volume is expected to be down slightly, primarily because of weakening demand for U.S.
coarse grain and soybean exports. The declines are partially offset by increased levels of
wheat and cotton exports. Despite the lower export volume, higher prices have boosted
export value. U.S. agricultural imports during fiscal year 1994 are forecast at $24 billion.
The projected U.S. agricultural trade surplus is expected to be $18 billion. Contact: Joel
Greene (202) 219-0821.

NEW USES -- Kenaf, the fibrous plant grown in the south for papermaking, is now being
used as an inexpensive potting medium for nurseries and greenhouses. Researchers have
found that a blend of 70 percent kenaf and 30 percent peat moss is an ideal mixture for
young plants. Adding kenaf reduces production costs by replacing peat moss, which is an
expensive import from Canada. Kenaf is a versatile plant. Its leaves are used in making
cattle feed, its bark is used to make wallboards and high quality newsprint, and now the
stems are used as a potting medium. Contact: Yin Tung Wang (210) 968-5585.

SON OF NEW USES -- Tobacco, considered by some scientists as one of the causes of
cancer, may play a significant role in fighting that disease as well as other human ailments.
Researchers at North Carolina State University have field tested strains of tobacco that
harness the plant's energy for production of anti-cancer and anti-Aids drugs and other
pharmaceutical compounds. Tobacco is readily amenable to genetic manipulation and is
termed the white mouse of the plant world. It is ideal for producing large quantities of
protein for making blood protein and drugs, and for such use can gross up to $12,000 per
acre. Gene transfer and the use of genetically altered viruses are two methods used to turn
tobacco plants into chemical factories. Contact: David Pace (606) 257-7272.

SOYBEAN SEED SUPPLY -- Increased consumption and exports of soybeans, shrinking
stocks and high prices are causing concern about a sufficient supply of certified soybean
seeds for this year's crop in the southeast. The extent of seed shortage will depend on how
many acres soybean farmers plant. With market prices hitting $7 a bushel, and if the
weather cooperates, farmers will likely want to boost their acreage. John Woodruff, a
soybean specialist at the University of Georgia Extension Service, suggests securing needed
varieties early. Contact: John Woodruff (912) 386-3430.

AGRICULTURE WEEK -- Both private and public organizations are observing National
Agriculture Week, March 14-20. An example is the Science Museum of Virginia display of
agricultural experiments and projects from an elementary school, and exhibits of art that has
an agricultural theme. The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
prepared and distributed an information kit about events in the state during the week, and
the value of agriculture in the state. Contact: Elaine Lidholm (804) 371-8579.

HEALTHY WEIGHT -- The saying goes that, 'You can't be too rich, or too thin.' The "thin"
part is definitely a myth, says Carol Suter, nutrition specialist with the Texas Agricultural
Extension Service. Carol says being too thin or too heavy increases the chances of
developing health problems. The waist-to-hip ratio is a simple way to determine if your
weight is a health risk. Measure your waist, and measure around the largest part of your
hips. Divide the number of waist inches by those of the hips to obtain the risk ratio. High-
risk for men is 0.95 or above. For women its 0.80 and above. Contact: Carol Suter (409)
845-2798.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:

AGRICULTURE USA #1918 -- A long series of devastating natural disasters in the preceding
three years has policymakers looking for better ways to make sure farmers' businesses
survive. Lori Spiczka reports on a new proposal for crop insurance. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1400 -- Exercise and breast feeding; termites!; home gardens when
to transplant; "convenience" gardens; time for turf. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1910 -- A five-part series on precision farming; details on 1994
farm program changes; tax info for farmers; a new farmworker protection standard.
(Weekly reel of features.)



USDA RADIO NEWSLINE:

Thursday, March 17, sugar & sweetener outlook; Friday, March 18, cattle on feed, ag
outlook; Monday, March 21, ag chemical usage; Tuesday, March 22, crop & weather
update, catfish processing; Wednesday, March 23, fruit outlook, livestock situation;
Thursday, March 24, U.S. ag trade update. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.




FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on "Precision Farming" in a special five-part series.
Part 1 is an introduction to the subject; Part 2 covers the Global Positioning System
satellites; Part 3 is about remote sensing; Part 4 covers Geographic Information Systems
technology; Part 5 is on Variable Rate Technology. The reports can be aired in sequence
or individually, and might fit your programming needs during National Agriculture Week,
March 14-20. For a tape copy call (202) 720-7039.



Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.






4

OFFMIKE 4
ITS BEEN THE HARDEST WINTER...in memory, says Robert Driscoll (WTKA, Ann Arbor, MI).
Frost has-ieached down 7 feet, moving foundations, cracking walls, and snapping water pipes.
Listeners tell Bob that insurance doesn't cover damage resulting from such movement of the
earth. Bob says a mid-March vote is scheduled in the Michigan legislature regarding funding for
education. There has been a major effort to keep ag production land from being taxed at higher
commercial rates. Bob has been producing special programs on the issue for his listeners.

THANKS...to Larry DeSha (KGNC, Amarillo, TX) for stopping by while covering a hometown
delegation of the American Agriculture Movement visiting government leaders in Washington,
D.C. While in USDA's radio studios Larry met chief meteorologist Norton Strommen and quickly
arranged a live broadcast interview for his listeners back home. Larry noted that dryness has
settled over Texas, there has been little rainfall for the past 60 days. Norton says he sees little
relief in the next 90 days.




Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











UPDATE...on the station's progress in moving across town is provided by Kim Dlouhy (WOW,
Omaha, NE). A few months back Kim told us about ground breaking ceremonies for new
facilities. The move into the new building begins the middle of this month. Kim and her farm
department staff are looking forward to working with the new all digital audio production
equipment.

CHANGE...is underway at USDA Radio & TV. Broadcaster comments are guiding improvements
in programming. Format and content changes have been made in our weekly radio cassette
service, and other improvements are planned to better meet the variety of farm broadcast
formats. Larry Quinn, now heading USDA's radio and TV team, is developing a new Video,
Teleconference and Radio Center in USDA's south building. A new radio studio will use digital
technology. We welcome suggestions and comments. Contact Larry at (202) 720-4330, FAX
(202) 720-5773, or write Chief, VTR Center 1618-S, OPA, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250.


VIC POWELL
Office of Communications








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of b? culture Office\of ommuniFan Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2654 U 21 394 9 JUL 31996 March 18, 1994

POULTRY ENHANCEME T ROGRAM --U ASl jAlygvgj strengthen the poultry
inspection system. A Pou y ancqejdnt ogram wo d inspect poultry carcasses both
before and after internal org k6. ed to ensure the product is inspected at a key
point of potential contamination. o fecal matter will be allowed on raw poultry. The
poultry industry will be required to use FDA-approved rinses that reduce overall bacteria
levels on raw product. Carcasses will be allowed to be washed inside and outside rather
than trimmed. Microbial testing will be required on a statistical sampling of the product.
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says the program incorporates science and new
technologies into the nation's meat and poultry system. Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

REDUCING E. COLI -- A USDA one-year study of dairy herds reveals that calves grouped
before weaning were nine times more likely to test positive for the pathogen E. coli 0157:H7
than if they are grouped after weaning. The study indicates that herd management may
have an impact on the prevalence of the pathogen in dairy herds. The study included 1,811
dairy operations in 28 states. Cattle carry and shed the bacteria without becoming ill. The
finding is part of the USDA effort to lower levels of the bacteria in cattle and thus reduce
the potential for food poisoning in humans. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

NEW PRODUCT -- Research has found a use for low-grade wool that currently has no market
value. Waste wool absorbs 10 to 30 times its weight in oil, offering a low-cost, fully
biodegradeable product that is tough enough for Arctic conditions, but gentle enough to
remove oil from birds. USDA's Alternative Agriculture Research and Commercialization
Center is providing $700,000 to a wool environmental products consortium to turn low-
grade wool into products used by industry. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 401) 4860.

AN EXTRA 40 BUSHELS -- Tests show that farmers can get an extra 40 bushels per acre
of corn from their irrigated fields by applying two types of nitrogen fertilizer, ammonium and
nitrate. Most farmers apply only one or the other. USDA scientists have found that a 50-50
mix, applied without increasing total nitrogen, more than paid for itself by increasing yields
to more than 220 bushels per acre. The mix capitalizes in how plants use nitrogen from the
two sources. The plants rapidly use ammonium but must first convert the nitrate form to
ammonium, resulting in a season-long delivery of nitrogen. Contact: Ronald Follett (303)
490-8220.

AGSTAR PROGRAM -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Department of Energy, and
the Environmental Protection Agency have joined to established the AgSTAR program.
AgSTAR will establish demonstration projects in methane recovery technologies. Program
participants will be able to cut their energy bills and get extra income from manure
byproducts. The program is part of the USDA effort to help create farm-based industrial
products. Contact: Douglas Beach (202) 219-0085.









VALUABLE INGREDIENTS -- Numerous pharmaceuticals are derived from animal byproducts.
Insulin is probably the most well known. Insulin requires the pancreases of 35 beef cattle
or 130 hogs to provide the drug for one diabetic for one year. Animal byproducts are also
used to treat circulatory ailments. Heparin, extracted from cow lungs and pig intestines,
prevents blood clots, and is essential in open heart surgery. Hog heart valves are widely
used to replace defective valves in human hearts. 30,000 heart valves from pigs have been
implanted into humans. Genetically engineered pigs are creating human hemoglobin. This
new supply of human-quality blood is being tested and if found successful will eliminate
potential disease problems in collecting blood from humans. Contact: Donald Van Dyne
(314) 882-4512.

ASIAN GYPSY MOTH -- The European gypsy moth has been established in the United States
for many years. The Asian gypsy moth is now trying to get a foothold. An infestation of
the Asian variety has been discovered in North Carolina, brought to the U.S. on a cargo ship
from Germany. The Asian gypsy moth has a greater potential for damage because in feeds
on conifers, which the European does not, and the Asian female can fly long distances,
unlike the European female which does not fly. More than 400 species of trees and shrubs
are at risk from Asian gypsy moths. USDA and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture
have organized a $7 million survey and eradication effort during 1994. Contact: Ed Curlett
(301) 436-3256.

HAY CONTINUES HIGH -- Farm prices for alfalfa hay are continuing to rise, reaching nearly
$95 per ton in some areas. The price increases during the previous six months reflect
reduced supplies of high-quality alfalfa hay desired by dairy producers, and they reflect
generally tight feed supplies. Producers in Wisconsin and Minnesota are confronted with
limited supplies of high-quality hay, and are purchasing from producers in other States.
Contact: Tim Cole (202) 219-0840.

SOYBEAN REFERENDUM -- A majority of soybean producers voting in a national referendum
last month approved continuation of the National Soybean Promotion and Research Program.
Changes that the referendum put into motion become effective April 1, 1994. Of the
85,606 valid ballots cast, 53.8 percent favored the program. Contact: Connie Crunkleton
(202) 720-8998.

BONE LOSS -- Tooth loss may be an important early warning of bone loss in women as they
age. In a USDA study of 329 women past menopause, bone loss correlated directly with
tooth loss. The more teeth lost the less bone women had in the spine, wrist and hip. Those
are the three areas most prone to fractures from osteoporosis. The findings suggest that
dentists may become key in identifying high-risk women before they develop osteoporosis.
Contact: Elizabeth Krall (617) 556-3074.

WEIGHT LOSS -- Tests show that nicotinamide, a form of the B vitamin Niacin, suppresses
hunger. Researchers at the University of Georgia, Athens, have discovered that high doses
of nicotinamide lower food intakes and weight gain in laboratory animals. The study
indicates that the use of nicotinamide may have human applications. Diets supplemented
with nicotinamide could one day be a useful therapy in treating human obesity. Contact:
Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1919 -- Malaria is creeping back into the United States. Jim Henry
talks with USDA chemist Orville Levander about old and new treatments for malaria.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1401 -- Coping with military base closings; what do food shoppers look
for; flooding again this year; controlling mice; high-tech wine test. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1911 -- Agriculture Secretary testifies for GATT; floods delay
planting; U.S. rice in Japan; grain bin computer model; Africanized bees not much sting.
(Weekly reel of features.)



UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, March 24, U.S. Ag trade update;
Friday, March 25, hogs and pigs report; Tuesday, March 29, weekly weather and crop
report; Wednesday, March 30 ag prices. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.







FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- 1994 loan rates and advance payments are reported by Eric Parsons.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy on GATT; USDA chief meteorologist
Norton Strommen on weather and crop conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on new uses of agricultural products; Lynn
Wyvill reports on non-destructive testing of wood.



Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08300 563 6
OFFMIKE
COTTON...planting gets underway in California on the first day of spring, says George Gatley
(Western Agri-Radio Networks, Yuma, AZ). Acreage will be slightly larger than last year, 1.1
million. Cotton has already emerged in Arizona. George says the efforts to reduce whitefly
infestations appear to be working. Reduced egg masses were seen last fall, indicating that
numbers may be smaller this spring.

BIGGEST CONCERN...of farmers in the region served by Peggy Kaye Fish (WCVS/WFMB,
Springfield, IL) is the outlook for flooding this spring. Rivers are at flood stage, the gound is
saturated, the outlook is for rain, levees aren't repaired, and the snow in the upper Mississippi is
melting. Ag Day Breakfast on March 18 was co-hosted by Peggy's stations. 350 people,
including the Chamber of Commerce, were served and heard leading ag speakers.

ETHANOL...story is heating up again, says Amy Alberts (KROC, Rochester, MN). Studies by the
Missesota Corn Growers find ethanol plants are more efficient in operation than oil refineries.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











LIVE COVERAGE...of the North Dakota Winter Show, in Valley City, was broadcast by Lyle
Romine and Mick Kjar (America Ag Net/WDAY, Fargo, ND). Over 70,000 people viewed the
exhibits, programs, and national shows of several cattle breeds. Mick says the region usually
gets most of its moisture during the winter months, and on that basis this winter began last June.
Flood warnings have been issued. Warmer temperatures are melting snow and breaking river ice.
Wildlife have been trapped on ice floating down the Missouri River.

RECOVERY...from the ice storm that hit Mississippi and Tennessee last month has been slow.
Bob Wade (Progressive Farmer Network, Starkville, MS) says some, producers were without
electric power for more than four weeks. The storm hit the timber industry hard, setting it back
ten years. Bob says the agriculture minister from the former Soviet Republic of Uzbekistan visited
the network recently and grappled with concepts such as advertising, the network purchasing its
equipment with profits rather than government grants, and a media organization paying taxes to
the government. Bob says the delegation learned much about modern agriculture. It was a return
visit of sorts. Bob visited Uzbskitan two years ago.

VIC POWELL
Office of Com nications




A l2, ,T Librarv
MAY 19 1994

Farm Broadcasters LetterUnveof Florda



United States Department of Agriculture Office communications i ashington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2655 ( MAY 9 1994 A March 25, 1994

GETTING A BOOST -- A USDA report shove t t under the u uay round of the General
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) the State! boost its exports by over a
billion dollars to nearly $5 billion by the year 20 08 billion in 2005. Grains and
animal products will account for almost 75% of the increase. The report, "Effects of the
Uruguay Round on U.S. Agricultural Products," notes that employment generated by exports
is expected to increase by 112,000 jobs in 2000, and reach 190,000 new jobs in 2005.
U.S. Farm sector net income under GATT is expected to be raised $1 billion in 2000, and
up to $2.5 billion five years later. Government outlays should decline by $1.3 billion in the
year 2000, and as much as $2.6 billion in 2005. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

CRP LAND -- Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts begin expiring in 1995. A
recent USDA survey found that over 40 percent of the reserve acreage will be returned to
production when the contracts expire. About 25 percent of the land will be used for hay
production or livestock grazing, and 13 percent will be rented to other farmers. Under the
CRP, 36 million acres of environmentally sensitive land was retired from production for 10
to 15 years. It is not known whether Congress will renew expiring contracts. Contact: Tim
Osborn (202) 219-0403.

REVENUE GUARANTEE -- Guaranteeing a farmer's return for a given crop has been getting
increased attention. Many of the designs guarantee that per-acre revenue would not fall
below some fraction of a revenue target. The target would be either a fixed revenue or a
moving average of past revenues. The revenue guarantee approach could streamline the
current array of farm commodity programs into one program. The system will likely be an
issue in the 1995 farm bill debate. Contact: Cathy Greene (202) 219-0313.

MORE VEGGIES -- USDA has exceeded its goal of doubling the amount of fresh produce
purchased for the National School Lunch Program, providing almost 21 million pounds of
fresh fruits and vegetables to schools across the nation in the 1993-94 school year. The
amount purchased during the previous school year was 9 million pounds. In addition a bonus
distribution of nearly 9 million pounds has been purchased this year compared with almost
4 million pounds last year. Contact: Ron Webster (703) 305-2276.

COOKING/HANDLING LABELS -- USDA is requiring cooking and handling labels be placed on
certain meat and poultry products. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy has announced that all
raw or partially cooked ground meat and poultry must have safe cooking and handling labels.
Espy also announced that all other raw or partially cooked meat and poultry products must
have the labels by July 6, 1994. A final rule mandating the labels will be published in the
Federal Register and take effect 60 days after publication. After July 6, USDA will require
nutrition labeling on processed meat and poultry products in addition to the safe cooking and
handling information. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.








STRAWBERRIES -- The 1994 strawberry crop is likely to set a record, continuing a nearly
unbroken chain of records for the past 20 years. Growers in California and Florida have
expanded acreage to meet the increasing demand from consumers. While larger acreage has
boosted production an even larger role has been played by increasing yields. National
average yields have tripled in the last 20 years to 14 tons per acre. Yields in California have
been even higher, reaching 24 tons per acre. California's increase is due to adoption of an
annual planting system, development of new varieties, and soil fumigation. U.S. grown
strawberries are now second in value only to apples. Strawberries remain a bargain for
consumers. Inflation-adjusted prices have remained flat since 1980. Contact: Diane
Bertelsen (202) 219-0884.

PECAN PROMOTION PLAN ENDED -- Pecan producers and importers have voted to terminate
the Pecan Promotion and Research Plan. In the referendum 63 percent voted against the
program that had been in effect since 1992. All activities under the plan end within six
months of the referendum vote published in the March 15 Federal Register. Contact: Connie
Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

QUARANTINE TO END -- No evidence of citrus canker has been found in Florida for two
years, therefore USDA is proposing to remove a citrus canker quarantine from the remaining
three counties where the disease existed. B. Glen Lee, deputy administrator of USDA's
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, says the action removes restrictions on the
movement of citrus plants, plant parts and fresh fruit. The disease was first detected in
Florida in 1984. Citrus canker is a plant disease caused by a bacterium. It is eradicated by
destroying all infected plants. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

INSECT CONTROL -- Daylight is getting longer and warm weather begins its trek north.
Along with it come flying insects such as mosquitoes, midges, flies and fleas. A new way
of controlling the pests has been found by using a hormone that interferes with egg
production and development. USDA Agricultural Research Service scientists have developed
a synthetic chemical that mimics the hormone used by the pests to produce eggs. The
hormone is only present during certain times of the insect's life cycle, and if ingested at the
wrong time egg production is blocked. The discovery opens the way to controlling harmful
insects without using harsh chemicals. Contact: Paul Flinn (919( 776-2707.

HUNGER FORUM -- The final USDA regional hunger forum will be held April 22 in Dayton,
OH. Previous regional forums were held in Burlington, VT; McAllen, TX; and Kansas City,
MO. Contact: Laura Trivers (703) 305-2039.

DON'T CHEW THE FAT -- Consumers face a challenge in cutting fat intake when eating out,
but it can be done. Here's an example using chicken. Roasted chicken contains less fat
than fried chicken, particularly if a rotisserie is used, a cooking method that allows the fat
to drain away from the meat. Consumers can reduce fat intake by as much a fourth if they
choose roasted over fried chicken, and by as much as two-thirds if they choose white meat
over dark, trim away all visible fat, and discard the skin. Contact: Judith Putnam (202) 219-
0870.

SRadio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1920 -- The final steps are now being taken to implement the GATT
agreement. Brenda Curtis talks with USDA's principal economic advisor Joe Glauber about
the process and economic impact of the historic trade agreement. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1402 -- Looking at very low-fat diets; losing big money through credit
card fraud; USDA's plan to make food safer; it's raining new food products; never too
early to eat healthy. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1912 -- Biocontrol complications; soybean gene map; twinning
technology available; wheat, to clean or not to clean; tall forage. (Weekly reel of features.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, March 31, grain stocks, prospective
plantings, rice stocks, world livestock situation, world tobacco situation; Friday, April 1,
horticultural products review; Tuesday, April 5, tobacco outlook, weekly weather and crop
report. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359'
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.







FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on new uses for farm products with five stories from the
National Agriculture Day exhibit in Washington, D.C. Includes: new farm products are Ag
Day theme; defense vehicle tests new farm products; new soybean product funded by
USDA; excess wool absorbs oil spills; milkweed makes pillows and jobs.

ACTUALITIES -- Patricia Jensen, acting assistant secretary for Marketing and Inspection
Programs, on safe handling labels for meat and poultry (with B-roll of labels).


Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT, Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.






4
OFFMIKE 0
NEARY 1,000...4th graders were the highlight at National Agriculture Day festivities, says Skip
Davis (WASK, Lafayette, IN). Tour guides escorted groups of 20 children through exhibits at the
county fairground. After the tour Extension volunteers provided cookies, and served soft drinks
that contained corn sugar processed locally. The kids and the public improved their knowledge
about agriculture. Skip says he and his son and daughter were extras in the recently released
movie "Blue Chips." Basketball and audience scenes were shot locally.

PRODUCERS...are watching corn prices, says John Everly (KDTH, Dubuque, IA). Brokers are
saying prices won't go out of sight, which is encouraging pork producers. John says while
producers are waiting for the ground to dry they are giving BST a workout in coffee shops. Many
say they aren't set up to use it.

SUPPLIES...have been purchased and producers are ready for warmer weather, says Jim
Bernhardt (KSIR, Colorado Farm-Ranch Network). Let the warm temperatures roll.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










TRIUMPH OF AGRICULTURE...two-day display earlier this month in Omaha found producers in an
optimistic mood, says Roger Flemmer (KFAB, Omaha, NE). It was encouraging to hear producers
who came though tough times last year say that they are ready to get into the fields. Roger says
the state conventions for corn, sorghum, and soybean producers were combined this year and
attracted major speakers.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Orion Samuelson (WGN/Tribune Network, Chicago) for serving as M.C.
at the National Agriculture Day Congressional Reception in Washington, D.C., March 17.

THINKING POSITIVE...and hoping for a normal year is the attitude of producers served by Judy
Stratman (WNAX, Yankton, SD). Judy is the coordinator for this year's NAFB north central
region meeting. Judy made an observation that would make many previous convention leaders
nod in approval, saying that when the convention is concluded it makes one appreciate the
ordinary stress of their regular job. Lets give all the chairpersons and coordinators a round of
applause this year.

VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




3arston Sciencp
Library
MAY 16 1994

Farm Broadcasters Letter o



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2656 April 1, 1994

FIELD OFFICE STUDY -- USDA field offices of the future are being examined at focus group
studies in eight states. The effort is providing USDA information about improving customer
service and determining technology requirements for field offices. The focus groups are
meeting in California, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and
Vermont. The meetings are taking place through April 15. Four focus groups are formed
at each location and represent current USDA customers, potential customers, agriculture
support groups, and front-line USDA employees. Contact: Karren Alenier (202) 720-5865.

VOMITOXIN TESTING -- USDA will begin vomitoxin testing of grain on a permanent basis
beginning April 23. USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service had been testing for vomitoxin
on a request basis. The change is in response to the widespread occurrence of scab damage
in last year's wheat crop and to the market's need for rapid onsite testing capabilities.
Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

CO-OP'S SHARE -- Cooperative's share of total farm marketing has leveled off in the last
11 years, while their share of major farm production expenditures is slowly increasing.
Cooperatives marketed farm commodities totaling a record $58.2 billion in 1992, but their
share of the market remained at 27 percent for the third year. The largest single item of
sales for cooperatives is milk, totaling $20 billion, 34 percent of all commodity marketing.
There is increasing interest among cooperatives in boosting exports. Congressional approval
of NAFTA, and recent GATT agreements can open the way to correcting the imbalance
between domestic demand and the large supplies available. Contact: Carolyn Liebrand (202)
690-1414.

TOP EXPORT MARKETS -- Japan was the leading market for United States agricultural
exports last year in both value and share. Ag exports to Japan totaled $8.4 billion, and
represented 20 percent of total agricultural exports. The nations of ~ gfnion
received $7 billion in U.S. exports, representing 16 percent of th expo et.
Canada was third with $5.2 billion and a 12 percent share. Expor Japan and C a
reached record highs. Contact: Tom Warden (202) 219-0822. MA4
pj MAY 4 1994
EMERGENCY LOANS -- More specialists are being sent to flood stats the Midwest to e
process emergency farm loans. USDA has sent 100 additional I dn specialists fro* e
Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) to assist producers and help en rp oper di on
of the loans. FmHA administrator Michael Dunn says the addition P. a sary
because the next few weeks are critical in terms of financing this year's cri production.
The action is part of the commitment to help overcome the impact of the flooding on the
farm community. The loan specialists are equipped with laptop computers designed to help
determine loan qualification. The computer system cuts the time of the qualification process
from two hours to 20 minutes. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.








HELPING BEGINNING FARMERS -- The reluctance of private lenders to lend to beginning
farmers, combined with rapidly aging farm populations, have prompted the creation of
programs to provide affordable financing to beginning farmers. States may now finance
equity capital requirements for beginning farmers through low cost and low risk options. The
Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1993 makes permanent the tax exempt status of states'
"aggie bonds." Applicants can borrow up to $200,000. The Agricultural Credit
Improvement Act authorizes the Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) to establish a
partnership with states for loans up to $250,000 to beginning farmers. FmHA has also
established the Down Payment Farm Ownership and the Special Operating Loan programs
that cover 30 percent of farmland purchase at a below-market interest rate. Contact:
Audrae Erickson (202) 219-0892.

IMPROVING KENAF -- USDA scientists have identified a variety of kenaf that has yields
three times normal, and tolerates root-feeding nematodes. The nematodes are kenaf's major
pest problem. During three years of tests in nematode infested fields, the SF459 variety
averaged 8,450 pounds of fiber per acre, compared to 2,800 pounds from the standard
variety. Nematodes feed on the test variety, but the plant has resistance to disease-causing
fungi introduced by the pests. A commercial variety of nematode-tolerant kenaf will be
available within a year. Kenaf is used in the manufacture of many products, including paper,
garden potting mix, oil spill cleanup, and lawn seed mats. Contact: Charles Cook (210)
969-4812.

TIDY TREES -- Warmer weather prompts removing from the lawn winter's tree debris, and
removing damaged tree limbs. When branches are pruned the branch collar should not be
removed. Don't flush-cut against the trunk and don't paint the wound. Allow young trees
to develop good leaf crowns before pruning. The best time to water landscape trees is at
night from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. Contact: Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.

HOW SWEET IT IS -- Research shows that Aspartame, now the leading high-intensity
sweetener, is 200 times as sweet as sugar. Only small amounts are needed to achieve a
sweetening effect equivalent to much larger amounts of sugar. It provides 4 calories per
gram. Aspartame gradually loses its sweetness in liquids as a function of time and
temperature. Its largest use is in diet soft drinks. Saccharin is 300 times sweeter than
sugar. Saccharin is not metabolized, therefore it has no calories. Saccharin is the second
most widely used high-intensity sweetner. Acesulfame-K, called Ace-K, is 200 times
sweeter than sugar, has no calories, and is stable at cooking temperatures. It is usually used
in chewing gum, puddings and imitation dairy products. Aspartame, saccharin, and ace-K
are approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration. Pending FDA approval are
sucralose and alitame. If these new high-intensity sweeteners are approved they could be
used as a direct sugar substitute. Peter Bussanell (202) 219-0888.

STOKE THE FIRE -- A low calorie diet is a good way to achieve a healthy weight, but as in
many other things it's not best when dieting becomes extreme. Chronic dieting, under-
eating, or skipping meals can contribute to a sluggish metabolism, which can make it harder
to lose weight. Fueling metabolism is like stoking a fire, if the wood is removed the fire will
diminish. To fuel metabolism, a sufficient amount of calories must be consumed or the body
will slow down to compensate. Proper dieting requires following the recommended daily
allowances of the USDA Food Guide Pyramid. Contact: Carol Suter (409) 845-2798.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:

AGRICULTURE USA #1921 -- West Virginia is home to strip mines that have been returned
to a state of beauty. Patrick O'Leary reports on a strip mine reclaiming program called
RAMP. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1403 -- Bloomin' bushes; the case for cabbage; safe food labels;
specialty coffees; Homocysteine and vascular disease. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1913 -- Rising interest rates?; nervously watching oats decline;
U.S. farmers facing more competition; honey bees and mites; pesky ground squirrels.
(Weekly reel of features.)


ON THE USDA RADIO NEWSUNE:

Tuesday, April 12, crop production report, world ag supply & demand, weekly weather and
crop situation; Wednesday, April 13, hog outlook, cotton and wool update, world ag
production, world grain situation & outlook, world oilseed situation & outlook, world cotton
situation, world tobacco situation; Thursday, April 14, feed update, oil crops update;
Friday, April 15, milk production report. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSUNE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions; FmHA deputy administrator Wayne Fawbush on additional loan specialists to
help process applications in Midwest flood states; USDA program manager Debra Bowling
on studying customer needs to design USDA field offices of the future; and USDA
economist Dennis Shields on the outlook for fruit.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on new cotton products; and Lynn Wyvill
reports on-recommendations for food safety regarding cutting boards.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.

SRadio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 0
AN INDICATOR...that spring has arrived is tractors in the field. Everett Griner (Southeast Agrinet,
Moultrie, GA) says corn planting is underway, and peanut planting will begin in mid-April. Everett
says weather has been ideal for getting the peach crop to a good start. During the winter
growers received the required amount of cold weather, trees and buds made it through the frost
season without being bitten, and there is good ground moisture. If the remainder of the growing
season is as good as the beginning there could be an excellent crop of peaches in the southeast.

70 MPH WINDS...have been hitting sections of the Great Plains causing soil loss, says Bruce
Gaarder (KNEB, Scottsbluff, NE). In between wind storms producers are getting field work
accomplished. Some producers have already put beets in the ground. Of concern is the low level
of snowpack in the mountains. It could cause problems this summer.

FILLING IN...is Curtis Lackey (KOLT, Scottsbluff, NE) until a full-time farm broadcaster is hired to
replace Howard Hale who has left the station.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












FIELD WORK...is underway and some corn has been planted, says Rita Frazer (WSMI, Litchfield,
IL). Rita says National Agriculture Day was a hit in her area. Local commodity groups donated
products which were given away to listeners answering trivia questions.

NAFB...Northeast Region vice president Pat Driscoll (Michigan Farm Radio Network, Lansing) has
distributed the mailing announcing the May 13-15 meeting in Traverse City at Sugarloaf Resort on
Lake Michigan. Agriculture is second only to automotive production in the state, and a number of
options are available to attendees that demonstrate the variety of production in Michigan.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Rick Haines (Northern Ag Network, Billings, MT). Rick recently
received the Media Award of the Montana Grain Growers Association. Rick was cited for his
outstanding coye ge of wheat industry issues.


I POWELL
Office of Communications




A-2? 1,4~s7


Farm Broadcasters Letter MAY 1 1
f l oii rida

United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340


Letter No. 2657


April 8, 1994


COTTON GOES ELECTRONIC -- Warehouses will soon be issuing electronic reciepts in stead
of paper receipts for cotton. USDA is instituting the change beginning May 2, 1994 under
Congressional amendments to the United touse Act. The electronic receipts are
fully negotiable and can be transfer er to another through a provider
approved by USDA's Agricultural St nation and C ovation Service. Contact: Robert
Feist (202) 720-6789.
MAY 9 1994
GETTING RESEARCH TO MARKE -- Products based SDA technology that use 100
percent vegetable oil to produce ink le bout to enter t marketplace. USDA's Agricultural
Research Service patented technolo 1992 tha s vegetable oils such as soybean,
cottonseed, corn, and sunflower as a e ~3' qp wspapers. The vegetable oils have
a high level of biodegradability, which mea wspapers printed with the ink will pose
a substantially reduced environmental problem if disposed in a landfill. On average, 90
percent of the USDA vegetable ink degraded in 25 days, compared to only 22 percent
degradability with a petroleum-based ink. Contact: Sevim Erhan (309) 681-6531.

EXTENDING SHELF LIFE -- Oranges and other citrus fruits will stay fresh up to three weeks
at room temperature with a new coating developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Ingredients of the coating have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The
new coating also reduced the chance of off-flavors developing because it allows better gas
exchange between the fruit and air. USDA's Agriculture Research Service is working with
a manufacturing company in Florida to further develop the potential of the new coating.
Contact: Robert Hagenmaier (813) 293-4133.


BROILER EXPORTS -- Reductions in international
expected to boost U.S. broiler exports to a record
share of the world broiler market has risen sharply
1993. Emerging markets such as Poland, China,
Union are contributing to export growth. Contact:


trade barriers and strong demand are
two billion pounds this year. The U.S.
in recent years, reaching 38 percent in
Iran, and nations of the former Soviet
Lee Christensen (202) 219-0767.


BIOTECHNOLOGY -- Scientists at 117 laboratories in Europe have embarked on a
coordinated research program that they hope will propel plant biotechnology into the 21st
century. The program is intended to help industry produce improved plants for agriculture.
The areas of research include plant and biochemical genetics with an emphasis on producing
environmentally friendly agriculture. Meanwhile, in the United States scientists and
researchers are discussing potential partnerships among Federal agencies and the
biotechnology industry to strengthen biotechnology research in agriculture, health care, the
environment, energy production, and national economic competitiveness. Contact: Marti
Asner (703) 235-4419.


Marston Science
Library









FUTURE COMPETITION -- Since the fall of the Berlin Wall the countries of Central and
Eastern Europe have been looking to the European Union (EU) instead of the former Soviet
Union for help in developing their economies. The EU has signed association agreements
with the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland, Bulgaria and Romania. Membership will
likely be offered within ten years. The farms in these countries are expected to be much
larger than the EU's average 32 acres. The privatization process could result in the farmers
having far greater incentive to produce than under current systems, and the farms are large
enough to offer economies of scale that make them much more competitive. Building to that
situation will likely be a drain on the EU budget, and a strain on the EU's Common
Agricultural Policy. The effect on U.S. trade is unclear at this time. Contact: Elizabeth
Jones (202) 219-0620.

DIET SODA -- The U.S. carbonated soft drink industry is the largest single commercial user
of high-intensity sweeteners. U.S. soft drink consumption totaled 12 billion gallons in 1992,
about 48 gallons per person, with diet soft drinks capturing 30 percent of the market.
Aspartame is the leading sweetner for diet soft drinks. High intensity sweetener's share of
the soft drink market has been declining recently. Nonalcoholic drinks containing natural
ingredients without preservatives have gained consumer acceptance, such as tea and fruit
juice. Some analysts believe that diet soft drinks are at a saturation point and will lose share
to new-age beverages, good news for fruit and citrus growers. Contact Fred Gray (202)
219-0888.

ANIMAL WELFARE ENFORCEMENT -- USDA has permanently revoked the license of a
Kaukauna, Wisconsin animal dealer for violations of the Animal Welfare Act. The animal
dealer failed to meet recordkeeping requirements, veterinary care, maintenance of facilities,
and did not comply with an exercise requirement for dogs. The Animal Welfare Act requires
that animal dealers, exhibitors, research facilities and transportation companies provide
animals with care and treatment according to standards set by USDA's Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service. Patricia Jensen, acting assistant secretary for Marketing and
Inspection Services says the permanent revocation of the Wisconsin dealer's license is an
example of USDA's increased efforts to prevent animal dealers from violating regulations.
Contact: Cynthia Eck (301) 436-5931.

STAYING HEALTHY -- Vitamin C helps make healthy bones, gums and teeth, keeps blood
vessels strong, heals cuts and scrapes, and fights infections. Good scources of vitamin C
include citrus fruits, potatoes, tomatoes, strawberries, cabbage, watermelon, bell peppers,
broccoli, okra, blackberries, blueberries and collards. Contact: Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.

LOWERING YOUR RISK -- You can do something about the leading cause of death in the
United States. The three main risk factors of heart disease are all well known, high blood
cholesterol, high blood pressure and smoking. They are all controllable factors of one's life.
A fourth factor is now recognized as contributing to heart disease, lack of exercise. Studies
have shown that exercise strengthens the heart muscle, and can lead to less medication that
is required to control blood pressure. Exercise should be brisk enough to raise the heart rate
and depth of breathing, but not exhausting. Aerobic exercise of 20 to 40 minutes at least
three times a week is recommended. Contact: Holly Alley (912) 681-5639.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:

AGRICULTURE USA #1922 -- Winter has stressed lawns and gardens. Brenda Curtis reports
on ways to reduce the damage. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1404 -- Better weather warnings; mosquito test to begin; making meat
safer; winterkill in your yard; snowmold on your lawn? (Weekly reel of 2 1/2 minute
consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1914 -- Funding for levee repair; rural weather warnings; it's
planting time, sort of; Espy putting emphasis on rural problems; predicting screwworm
outbreaks; "bugging" insect's brains; tobacco outlook; details on wetlands reserve.
(Weekly reel of features.)

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE:

Wednesday, April 13, cotton and wool update, hog outlook; Thursday, April 14, feed
update, oil crops update; Friday, April 15, milk production, GATT to be signed; Tuesday,
April 19, crop and weather update; Wednesday, April 20, catfish processing, ag outlook
summary; Thursday, April 21, dairy outlook, U.S. trade update; Friday, April 22, cattle on
feed, livestock outlook, rice outlook. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Environmental stories for upcoming "Earth Day" programming: Pat O'Leary
reports on USDA's "We C.A.R.E." program to protect natural resources, and on conserving
water at home; Lynn Wyvill reports on "green" products from USDA and Forest Service
research.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen gives the long term weather
and crop forecasts, plus a look at spring flooding possibilities.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on safe handling labels for meat and poultry;
Pat O'Leary reports on new cotton products from USDA research.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE 4
RESULTS OF HARD FREEZE...last December and January are becoming apparent, says Karl
Guenther (WKZO, Kalamazoo, MI). It was so cold that blueberry bushes were killed, and trees
split in many peach orchards. Karl says vegetable planting is underway, cabbage and carrots
usually go in first. The station has made programming changes. A half-hour farm program at
noon was dropped, while the morning farm program was expanded to one hour.

ITS DRY...says Mike LePort (KRVN, Lexington, NE). Subsoil is in good shape, but March provided
little moisture in the winter wheat areas. Water issues are in the news. They range from water
allocations resulting from relicensing a dam, to a proposed plan that ties ground water use to the
effects it makes on surface water quality. Mike says spring field work is mostly completed and
producers are marking time, waiting for soil temperature to rise.

NAFB'S WASHINGTON AG WATCH...is April 16-19. Chairman Randy Rasmussen (KMA,
Shenandoah, IA) says new items are meetings with a Japanese delegation and the World Bank.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












CATTLE AND WHEAT PRODUCERS...are facing a difficult spring, says Bob Givens (KGNC,
Amarillo, TX). Cattle market conditions are down, and a local processing plant is threatened with
a strike. The region is in a drought, and among the few items growing are wheat aphids.

WORLD FOOD DEMAND...and population growth were among the issues discussed at a recent
Hudson Institute meeting covered by Ron Powers (WOWO, Ft. Wayne, IN). During Agriculture
Week, Ron spoke to the Van Wert, OH, Rotary Club about agriculture's role in the region.

SOME PRODUCERS...could be facing disaster for the second year, says Hal Hanna (KXEL,
Waterloo, IA). 250,000 acres cannot be planted this year because of flood damage, and another
50,000 acres along rivers will not be planted. But those who can plant have an optimistic
attitude. Hal reports that he has bought a puppy. Says he may call it Beaver. Because it chews
everything in sigh


VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




marston wciencp
4^ Library
f\Z\^ JUN 06 1994

Farm Broadcas s Letternwr of Forida



United States Department of Agriculture ffiq of fommunica' Washington, DC 20250-1340


Letter No. 2658 April 15, 1994

GOOD WEATHER NEEDED -- The last 15 tnessed a recurring drama of surplus
and tight food stocks. The current outlook for.1994 is that the U.S. food and fiber system
will provide sufficient supply at reasonable prices. That forecast is strongly premised on a
return to normal yields. Flood induced low supplies and strong prices have set the stage this
year, but spring plantings and weather are the key factors in the outcome. A combination
of low U.S. yields and unexpected demand abroad could set in motion a disruptive
adjustment in crop and livestock markets that could take several years to play out. USDA's
first forecasts for the 1994/95 season will be released next month. Contact: Keith Collins
(202) 720-5955.

TOWN HALL MEETINGS -- USDA's Forest Service is conducting public meetings in locations
across the nation to receive comment on how the Forest Service should be redesigned to
meet customer needs and to improve its efficiency. James Lyons, USDA assistant secretary
for Natural Resources and Environment, says the Forest Service will also issue customer
surveys in an effort to assess direction for the agency. Comments and ideas will be
analyzed and a proposal drafted. Meetings have been held in Sacramento, Seattle and
Ashville. Upcoming meetings are Boise, Idaho, April 23; Phoenix, Arizona, April 26;
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, April 30; Burlington, Vermont, May 6; and Washington,
D.C. May 11. Contact: Carl Holguin (703) 522-8437.

SALMONELLA DETECTION -- A new test procedure uses electrical current to detect
salmonella bacteria in poultry. The procedure is designed to detect salmonella in minutes.
Present methods take 24 hours. It samples water used to wash poultry carcasses during
processing. The test is being designed by a chemist with USDA's Agricultural Research
Service. If the design proves to be feasible it could improve the ability of processors and
inspectors to ensure that contaminated products do not reach the marketplace. Contact:
Jeffrey Brewster (215) 233-6447.

WETLANDS RESERVE -- Preliminary wetland restoration plans are now being created for
acreage offered in the Wetlands Reserve Program signup. USDA's Soil Conservation Service
and the Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service are developing plans that will serve
as the basis for landowners to determine whether to accept offers by the Agricultural
Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS) for enrollment in the program. ASCS offers
are expected to be made before May 1, 1994. Producers offered 580,725 acres for
enrollment in the Wetlands Reserve Program, more than seven times this year's goal of
75,000 acres. The program hopes to sign up 975,000 acres by the year 2000 to conserve
soil and improve water and wildlife habitat. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








PESTICIDE RECORDKEEPING -- USDA is proposing to change requirements for the records
kept by producers using regulated pesticides. Among the proposed changes are reducing
from 30 days to 7 days the time allowed to record the use of a pesticide; giving licensed
health care professionals access to the records, and under what circumstances they may
release the information; and requiring "spot" pesticide use to be recorded the same as
general use. The regulations, authorized in the 1990 Farm Bill, affect commercial pesticide
applicators and most farmers who use pesticides. USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service
is seeking comments on the proposals until June 6. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-
6179.

ATTACK OF THE CHINCH BUG -- One of the worst crop pests of a century ago, chinch bug,
is rebounding in Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska and Texas. The bug attacks the
roots of young grain plants, stunting the crop's growth. USDA scientists are screening corn
varieties for resistance. Seedlings that withstand damage will be field tested. Scientists
believe that mild winters and increased plantings of grain crops over the past decade have
provided conditions for the chinch bug outbreaks. Frank Davis (601) 325-2311.

TOBACCO -- Tobacco leaf volume may continue its decline in 1994 due to large foreign
supplies at lower prices. The volume of U.S. leaf exports was down 10 percent last year,
however the value of exports exceeded imports by $4 billion. Cigarette consumption is
expected to continue its decline this year despite lower prices. Annual consumption per U.S.
adult in 1993 was 2,539 cigarettes, down 4 percent. Assuming average yields the U.S.
tobacco crop this year will decline 8 percent from 1993's 1.61 billion pounds, reflecting
grower intentions to reduce plantings by 8 percent. Supply of domestic tobacco will likely
decline only one percent due to large carrying. Contact: Verner Grise (202) 219-0890.

FLYING NORTH -- Insect infestation in the spring can sometimes seem to arrive overnight.
In some in stances that's exactly what happens. Adult moths of corn earworms,
armyworms and loopers can ride winds as far as 250 miles in one night. USDA researchers
tracing the flights by radar have discovered that large numbers of the pests begin their flight
about 30 minutes after sunset. The moths reach altitudes of nearly 3,000 feet and speeds
of about 20 miles an hour in their flight, infesting crops over a wide area. USDA is using the
information to help scientists develop for farmers better methods of wide-area pest control.
Contact: Kenneth Beerwinkle (409) 260-9351.

SECOND TIME AROUND FOR AG INFO -- Surplus agricultural books and journals are being
shipped overseas by USDA's National Agricultural Library to help farmers and researchers
in Central Europe. The publications were provided by U.S. scientists in response to a call
for agricultural information to be sent to ag libraries in Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia,
and the Czech Republic. Agricultural Research Service scientists sent thousands of items,
including personal collections. The library has received letters of thanks from directors of
libraries receiving the publications. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

EASE OFF THE PILLS -- Unless your doctor has prescribed otherwise, get your nutrition from
a variety of foods not pills. Iron in the diet helps red blood cells carry the oxygen needed
by the body. Foods high in iron include lean meats, liver, peas and beans, egg yolks, fish,
oysters, tuna and shrimp. Fiber is also necessary to good nutrition. Old-fashioned, slow-
cooking oatmeal has more fiber than "instant" oatmeal. Other processed and refined foods
have less fiber than their original forms. Contact: Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:

AGRICULTURE USA #1923 -- Everything you ever wanted to know about bird watching is
reported by Gary Crawford. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1405 -- Snow mold; historic or nostalgic tomatoes; "Bird is the Word";
tomatoes from seeds; let your yard go wild. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1915 -- Planting time in Russia; integrated farm management;
Japan trade; Japan trade 2; crop export update. (Weekly reel of features.)


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE:

Monday, April 25 crop progress report; Tuesday, April 26, weekly weather and crop update;
Wednesday, April 27, vegetables; Thursday, April 28, tobacco world markets and trade;
Friday, April 29, catfish production, agricultural prices. These are the USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.







FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the GATT agreement to liberalize farm trade. Eric
Parsons reports on integrated farm management.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on new cotton products, and Lynn Wyvill
reports on cutting board recommendations that enhance food safety.


Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
III i ill
OFFMIKE
WE SKIPPED SPRING...and went straight into summer, says Jim Hearn (KURV, Edinburg, TX).
Cotton is up and temperatures are in the 90's. Producers have noted a heavy infestation of boll
weevils. If there is no break in conditions spraying will make the crop expensive to produce this
year. Onion harvest is underway. Prices are down due to oversupply from imports. Jim says the
citrus bloom in the valley was really nice this year, a positive indicator of a good crop.

OPTIMISM...is reflected in equipment sales, says Bill Mason (WGEL, Greenville, IL). Dealers can't
keep a supply to fill orders for new machinery. Used equipment is not moving off dealer's lots.
Bill says spring has been cool and dry. Field work shows a dry surface, but the subsoil has
adequate moisture. The 30-day outlook calls for both temperatures and rainfall to be below
normal.

THE WINDOW...for planting is moving north. Talk to 'em about safety.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











WE'RE WAITING FOR SPRING...says Al Gustin (KFYR, Bismarck, ND). Planting usually begins in
mid-April. Attitudes are positive. Ag credit is available and demand is up. Al says the region had
a near ideal snow melt. Mild days, cool nights and dry topsoil conditions eliminated the danger of
flooding. Producers are closely watching United States-Canadian meetings on wheat and barley.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Ken Tanner (WRAL/Tobacco Network, Raleigh, NC). Ken has been
named senior farm editor at WRAL-TV and the radio network. Ken will be joining farm
broadcasters from across the country at the NAFB Washington Ag Watch, April 16-19, in
Washington, D.C. They'll be taking home a bumper crop of recorded tapes.

SOUTHEAST...regional meeting will be held April 21-24 at the San Destin Resort, in Destin, FL.
SE region VP Gary Cooper (Southeast Agrinet, Ocala, FL) has a program that includes leading
speakers on chemical registration, government takings and property rights.


OffiC POWELL
Office of Communications




1.. SY4 0 Marston Science
Library


Farm Bro a ..sters Letter JUN 0619



United States Department of ici 46 d(6e o. mmunications LtjIAhton, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 21/59 ,/ JUN 06 994 April 22, 1994

GATT SIGNED -- Trade negoti a17 nations on tHil erT1abAg~ioXh ient on Tariffs
and Trade (GATT) ended with e signing of the multi-thousand page document in
Marrakech, Morocco, April 15. U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy, who attended the
signing ceremony said, "...we have a really good deal for U.S. agriculture, one that will
improve farmer income and open new markets all over the world. Agriculture-related
employment is expected to increase as much as 190,000 jobs by the year 2005." Espy
predicts that GATT will have a major impact on income throughout rural America. Contact:
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

FARMLAND TAXES -- Two-thirds of the tax revenue raised by local government is from the
tax on real property. A USDA report, "Taxing Farmland in the United States," shows that
owners with farmland holdings valued at $5 million or more paid 47 cents per $100 of
market value, whereas owners of holdings valued at less than $70,000 paid $1.45 per $100
of value. Taxes per acre follow the same pattern, higher valued holdings of farmland pay
lower taxes per $100 than lesser valued holdings. The report mentions a plausible
explanation for the relatively light taxation of large landholdings, a systematic overappraisal
of low-valued properties and underappraisal of high-valued properties. Contact: Gene
Wunderlich (202) 219-0425.

ENHANCING NATURE'S DEFENSE -- Supercharged white blood cells, known at neutrophils,
may soon be deployed to fight mastitis, a disease of cows' udders. Mastitis costs U.S. dairy
producers $2 billion annually in lost production and treatment. Neutrophils are part of a
cow's natural first line of defense. They fight infection by surrounding and killing the
invaders with a burst of hydrogen proxide. In laboratory tests neutrophils treated with
monoclonal antibodies produced 10 times as much hydrogen proxide and became active in
finding and killing bacteria. If the boosted neutrophils are as aggressive in cows as in a test
tube they may replace antibiotics as a treatment for mastitis. Contact: Max Paape (301)
504-8302.

E.COLI -- Studies show that each year about 15,000 people become ill, and 300 die, from
symptoms caused by the bacteria E.coli 0157:H7. USDA's Economic Research Service
estimates the medical costs and productivity losses can reach $580 million annually. E.coli
0157:H7 is the fourth most costly foodborne disease. The other three are Salmonella,
Campylobacter, and Toxoplasma gondii. The H7 variety of infection can be severe to the
very young or very old, those with weak immune systems, causing kidney failure or death.
Most cases involve bloody diarrhea lasting about one week. USDA plans to overhaul meat
and poultry inspection systems and replace them with a more scientifically based system to
intercept the bacteria. The H7 variety can also be ingested from unpasteurized milk,
unpasteurized apple cider, water, raw potatoes, turkey roll, and mayonnaise. Contact:
Suzanne Marks (202) 219-0864.









SLOW GROWTH -- While the U.S. population grew by nearly 10 percent during the 1980's,
nonmetro population increased by only 4 percent. Nonmetro areas had a population of 57
million people in 1990. The decreasing ability of nonmetro areas to retain and attract
residents resulted in the slower population growth. The slowdown was most evident in
more rural areas. Despite continued suburbanization of population and economic activity,
nonmetro areas did not benefit from "metro spillover" as much as in the 1970's. Contact:
John Cromartie (202) 219-0534.

PESTICIDE RESIDUE SUMMARY -- Produce samples at terminal markets and distribution
centers are tested for pesticide residues under USDA's Pesticide Data Program. The
information obtained is used by the Environmental Protection Agency for dietary risk
assessments and re-registration of pesticides. Samples are gathered in proportion to
population and distribution of represented products. Residue sampling was recently
conducted on 5,750 samples of 12 fruit and vegetable commodities in accordance with
EPA's laboratory guidelines. Generally, detected pesticides were well below EPA-established
tolerances. Contact: William Franks (202) 720-5231.

USING THE NATURAL APPROACH -- Goatgrass is an expensive weed. It has infested more
than 5 million acres of winter wheat in the U.S., reducing wheat yields and causing losses
totaling more than $145 annually. USDA scientists have found three strains of bacteria that
colonize on goatgrass roots. Laboratory and field tests show that the microorganisms reduce
the weed's growth, up to 40 percent, without harming wheat plants. Ongoing tests are
revealing other promising soil bacteria and the best strategies for applying them. Contact:
(509) 335-1554.

ONE MORE TIME -- This spring flowering plants will enter into a struggle with fungus and
mildew. Raindrops falling on leaves can spread diseases. However, if the fungus spores
can't adhere to a leaf, germinate and penetrate cells, they can't cause infection. USDA
research plant pathologist James Locke has found that a spray of one-percent neem oil in
water acts as a raincoat for plants against spores of fungi spread by rain and wind. The oil
is extracted from seeds of the neem tree, native to India. The spray gives 95 to 100 percent
protection against powdery mildew to lilacs, phlox and hydrangeas. On plants where
mildrew had developed the infection was arrested. Contact: James Locke (301) 504-6413.

PROTECTION AGAINST DIABETES -- Certain families are more prone to adult-onset diabetes
than are others, but development of the disease is not inevitable. Changes in life-style can
reduce the risk. One of the most effective changes is exercise. Exercise helps the body to
make better use of insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels. A second benefit
of exercise is weight control. Fat around the waist keeps insulin from working well.
Soluable fiber also helps control blood sugar. Oats and many fruits and vegetables are high
in soluable fiber. Fiber also is filling, making people feel full so that they eat less. People
can lose their "spare tire" by eating less fat and cholesterol, eating five fruits and vegetables
a day, and being more active. Yearly check-ups can ensure that diabetes will be found early
and treated promptly to prevent diabetic complications. Contact: Connie Crawley (706) 542-
8860.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:

AGRICULTURE USA #1924 -- Farmers in the land "down under" are going through many of
the changes that U.S. farmers are confronting. Brenda Curtis talks with an Australian radio
reporter about Australian farm issues. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1406 -- Making it from milkweed; repelling termites; the low fat diets;
eating healthy on a lean budget; Salmonella test. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1916 -- A Japanese trade war?; shorter version of the "Japanese
trade war?" story; kenaf-strategic fiber; women's issues "down under'; a milkweed
miracle; farm workers update. (Weekly reel of features.)


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE:

Monday, May 2, world horticultural trade; Tuesday, May 3, weekly weather and crop
update; Friday, May 6, dairy products report. These are the USDA reports we know about
in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on government agencies teaming up to tackle
environmental projects, and on USDA efforts in the area of organic standards certification.

ACTUALITIES -- Jim Lyons, USDA assistant secretary for Natural Resources & Environment,
on environmental issues; USDA organic standards coordinator Hal Ricker on organic and
sustainable agriculture; USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the crop and
weather update.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on the search for vitamin A in the body,
and on new products from cotton and the desert shrub guayule; Lynn Wyvill reports on
meat and poultry safe handling labels.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2 1 OCO f 1111A f 6QO C
OFFMIKE
CHOMPING AT THE BIT...is the way Jack McConnell (KMMJ, Grand Island, NE) described
producers waiting to get into the fields. Soil temperatures were rising at about the same pace as
a watched pot. Jack notes that the weather this time of year is variable. A recent storm dumped
heavy rain and ten inches of snow, downing power lines and closing schools.

AGRICULTURE...got a boost on the FOX network during National Agriculture. Week. Ed
Slusarczyk and Jeff Stewart (Ag Radio Network, Utica, NY) produced the Northeast segment of
the Salute To Agriculture program, a project of NAMA. Ed and Jeff took viewers to the dairy
farm of Ed's neighbor and reviewed operations. The farm supports three families.

NEW VOICE...on the station, but an experienced broadcaster, says Mike Hergert (KKXL, Grand
Forks, ND). Gary Weber joins the staff as farm editor. In broadcasting since 1963, Gary was
formerly general manager at KDRQ, Wishek, MN.




Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










ITS DRY...says Ken Lane (KVRP, Haskell, TX). Producers are forced to sell cattle and can't get
milo in the ground. The window for early milo extends to May 1, if rains arrive, and late milo can
go in until July. A boll weevil eradication program is underway in Ken's region. Numbers have
been building. Land planted to cotton has been held down by participation in the acreage
diversion program.

ITS WET...and the forecast calls for more rain, says Doug Erdman (WTCH, Shewano, WI). Doug
says producers in his area have a positive attitude toward developments this year.

THE NETWORK...is now using DTN for distribution of programming to affiliates, says Bob Hoff
(Northwest Ag News Network, Seattle, WA). Bob says environment and endangered species are
two major items on the minds of producers in his area. Barging grain down the Snake and
Columbia rivers is being threatened by dry conditions and concerns other than those of grain and
cattle producers.

VIC POWELL 4 e 'C
Office of Communications




A^


I e ', ,ic u i, o c ie nc e
L,2l 2 to G ( Library

JUN 081994

Farm Broadcasters Letteruners of Flor



United States Department of Agricultuc Office of Co kications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2660 Ay April 29, 1994

ENVIRONMENTAL COORDINA -- Secretary o riculture Mike Espy has created the
Agricultural Council on Environ e I Quality. council will promote coordination in
resolving environmental problems- -,venvironmental policy, and serve as the
focal point for USDA interaction for e I issues with other Departments, agencies,
environmental groups and the agricultural community. The council membership includes
USDA assistant and under secretaries whose responsibilities include programs charged with
environmental protection. Carole Florman (202) 720-7173.

SOYBEAN OIL RECORD -- U.S. consumption of soybean oil in 1993/94 is expected to reach
13.2 billion pounds, an all-time record. Use of soybean oil in baking and frying has led the
expansion. Oil production this year is expected to hit 13.6 billion pounds. The oil extraction
rate is 10.86 pounds per bushel. Tight domestic supplies of vegetable oils have swelled
soybean and competing oil imports this year, mostly from Canada. South American
producers are expecting a record-setting crop, offering brisk competition. U.S. soybean
exports have been adjusted downward to 590 million bushels, nearly 25% less than in
1992/93. Contact: Mark Ash (202) 219-0840.

SUNFLOWER ACRES -- U.S. farmers indicate that they plan to plant 3.24 million acres to
sunflowers this year, up nearly 17 percent from a year ago. About 80 percent will be oil-
type sunflowers, and 20 percent confectionary. The sunflower acreage for confectionary
use is 21 percent higher than year ago figures. If the oil-type acreage is realized it will be
the highest on record. Behind the increase is historically high sunflower prices, a very tight
stock situation, and high early season contract prices. As a result, sunflower plantings
appear more attractive relative to wheat and barley. Contact: George Douvelis (202) 219-
0840.

PEANUT PLANTINGS -- Peanut growers intend to plant 1.6 million acres this year, 4 percent
below last season. But growers in Oklahoma and New Mexico indicated that they intend to
increase plantings about 5 percent above last year's plantings. The largest acreage is in the
southeast at 1 million acres, down about 4 percent. USDA's next report on peanut acreage
will be released on June 30. Prospects for U.S. peanut exports are down. Larger crops in
India, China, and an expected larger crop in Argentina, are reducing U.S. peanut export
potential. Scott Sanford (202) 219-0840.

DAIRY -- Farm milk prices may post some recovery this autumn. Prices in 1994 are
projected to average slightly above 1993 for the whole year. Retail dairy prices will rise in
the coming months, finishing the year at 2-3 percent above 1993 figures. During the
remainder of this year declines in milk cow numbers are expected to ease while milk per cow
increases. For the year, cow numbers are expected to average about 2 percent below 1993.
Contact: James Miller (202) 219-0770.


3








COTTON ACREAGE -- The significant rally in cotton prices since December may lead to more
upland cotton produced outside the government program. Producers intend to plant nearly
14 million acres this year. Upland acreage will increase 409,000 acres from a year ago
despite an increase in the 1994 acreage reduction program requirement. Under the cotton
program producers are required to idle 11 percent of the upland cotton base to be eligible
for program benefits this season. Weak prices for extra long staple cotton have likely
affected acreage, expected to be down 7 percent from last year and the lowest since 1987.
Contact: Robert Skinner (202) 219-0841.

BOLLWEEVIL BAIT TUBE -- USDA scientists and 20 cotton growers are testing a new bait
tube to determine if it can replace insecticide sprays on all 8,000 acres planted to cotton in
Noxubee County, Mississippi. The bait tube, now on the market, uses only five to ten
percent as much insecticide as typical sprays. Placed about 100 feet apart around the
perimeter of a field, boll weevils are lured to a thin insecticide coating on the tube by a
synthetic version of the pest's own sex attractant, or pheromone. The tubes don't attract
beneficial insects, and are a safe alternative to spraying near environmentally sensitive areas.
In earlier tests the bait tubes reduced spring emergence of weevils by more than 90 percent.
The cotton acreage in Noxube County, Mississippi is isolated from other cotton-growing
areas, reducing migration of weevils during the season and helping scientists get more
precise information on the tube's effectiveness. If the test succeeds it could serve as a
model for use in an eradication program in other cotton-growing areas. Contact: Gerald
McKibben (601) 323-2230.

BLACK FLY CONTROL -- Black flies can cause millions in economic damage when they
emerge from rivers and streams to attack farm animals. Pestered by the flies calves may
lose weight, and during the cattle breeding season the calf crop may decrease 40 percent.
Papermills are also interested in reducing black fly numbers because the flies find their way
into paper-making machines. Bodies of the flies leave black specks on paper, and can ruin
paper worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Scientists have tested a bacterial organism
that is placed on water which kills black fly larvae but is harmless to all mammals, fish, and
adult insects. Bacillus thuringensis israelensis was applied to 42 miles of the Sulphur River
in Texas and achieved nearly 100 percent control at a cost of $20,000. Contact James
Robinson (903) 834-6191.

ISABELA IS BURNING -- USDA's Forest Service has sent two fire managers to the Galapagos
Islands, off the western shore of Ecuador, South America. They are assessing the serious
wildland fire that is burning out of control. The fire, on the island of Isabela, may threaten
native, high-value wildlife and plant communities. The Forest Service is working in tandem
with the Ecuadorian government, the Charles Darwin Foundation, U.S. AID, and other
organizations to control the fire. Contact: Carole Florman (202) 720-7173.

PUTTING VITAMIN A IN THE DIET -- Vitamin A helps to keep skin smooth and clear, and is
needed for normal growth. Good sources of vitman A include liver, milk, and green or yellow
vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, carrots,.sweet potatoes and cantaloupe. Contact: Dan
Rahn (912) 681-5189.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944
b ---i^^ --- --BB-- ^ ----- -- -^^^ ---g^Ag-^ewsFAX(202)690^^^^-394








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1925 -- John Snyder reports on the future for one of the fastest
growing areas of farming, aquaculture. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1406 -- Food safety reforms proposed; playing safe with eggs;
mosquito munchers; vitamin C and cholesterol; a recycled house. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1917 -- Crops at risk?; rangeland reform proposals; pesticide
reform proposed; yellow flowered alfalfa; screwworm "fatal attraction"; dairy update; rice
update. (Weekly reel of features.)

***NOTE THE FOLLOWING CHANGE***

Beginning in May major crop reports will be released at 8:30 AM. On crop report days USDA Radio
will produce stories on the production and supply/demand reports and have them available on the
Radio Newsline at 10:30 AM Eastern Time. Cotton and citrus reports will be released at 3:00 PM
and those stories plus other information will be available on the 5:00 PM Newsline, along with a
repeat of the information offered at 10:30 that day.

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, May 10, at 10:30 AM, crop
production report, world ag supply and demand, at 5:00 PM a repeat of 10:30 feed plus:
citrus update, cotton, crop and weather update. Wednesday, May 11, cattle and sheep
outlook, poultry outlook, world grain situation, world cotton situation, world oilseed
situation; Friday, May 13, milk production; Tuesday, May 17, crop & weather update, farm
labor. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on non-destructive testing of wood; Pat O'Leary reports
on searching for vitamin A; and Pat examines clutter stress.


ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski on weather and crops; USDA economist
James Miller on the dairy outlook.


Available on Satellite Galaxy 4, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30- 7:45 p.m., EDT; Saturdays 10:00 a.m., EDT; Mondays 8:00
a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4gll
OFFMIKE
LAKES...in central Minnesota contained ice, but planting was underway anyway, says Earl Hunter
(WKTY, La Crosse, WI). Mid-April soil temperatures were warm enough to put seed in the
ground. Adequate rain in Earl's area is keeping soil moisture in excellent condition.

BIG INCREASE...in pork production during the last year and a half has moved North Carolina from
7th to 2nd place nationwide, says Johnnie Hood (Southern Farm Network, Raleigh, NC).
Corporate hog production is behind the advance. Iowa is the nation's #1 hog producer. Johnnie
says April has been a dry month, the soil is beginning to crack open. Its not an emergency
situation yet, but he notes there is no rain in the forecast.

DECEASED...Wally Ausley (WPTF, Raleigh, NC, retired). Wally moved to Holden Beach, became
active in local politics and was elected mayor. Wally died in office. Thanks to Johnnie Hood for
the information.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











CITY KIDS...learned about livestock and farm life in a Farm Fair, says Kevin Morse (WOC,
Davenport, IA). Sponsored by the Scott County Farm Bureau and covered by the station, 650
students at an elementary school saw and touched hogs, sheep, rabbits, chickens, goats and
cows brought to the school by local producers. Inside the school the children moved from
session to session visiting those who work and live on farms, and learning about the crops that
farmers produce. Kevin says feedback was positive, and the effort a good example of the farm
community reaching out to educate kids about farm life.

MOVED...Carey Martin, from KVOO Tulsa, OK, to Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City as associate
farm editor at the network.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Sally & Ed Kauhn on the birth of their baby boy, Paul Edward Kauhn.
Sally is the former farm director at the University of Wisconin's WRFW, River Falls, and now an
ag education instructor. Thank o Sue Marson (WRFW) for the information.

VIC POWELL
Office of Communications -




A ,-z : 2 /


Marston Sciencp

Farm B ..casters Letter lira


ridda
United States De 4ent' Aric fe fice of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2661 *May 6, 1994

FOREIGN EXPORT S Agricultural issues between Australia and the United
States were discuss ent Bilateral Trade Consultations conducted in Canberra,
Australia. The talks examined the potential for further cooperation in the transition to the
GATT agreement era, including establishment of the Committee on Agriculture of the new
World Trade Organization. There was ready agreement to continue close consultation on
farm policy issues in both countries, including Australian concerns on dairy, sugar, cotton
and beef, and U.S. concerns regarding poultry, pork and horticultural products. The talks
also covered agricultural trade access issues and Australia's ongoing concerns about the U.S.
Export Enhancement Program and the Dairy Export Incentive Program. A further round of
talks will take place later this year in Washington, D.C. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-
4623.

HUNGER FORUM -- Access to a healthful, nutritious diet was examined in Dayton, OH at the
final USDA Regional Hunger Forum series. Ellen Haas, assistant secretary for Food and
Consumer Services, said that USDA plans to increase access to the calories and nutrients
children need to grow, and increase availability to the nutritious diets that children need to
be healthy. Representative Tony Hall (D-OH), a congressional leader in the fight against
hunger, told the group that the hunger forums will help decision makers determine what new
directions to take. The dialogue on hunger began last June in Washington, D.C. at the
National Hunger Forum. Regional forums have been held in Burlington, VT; McAllen, TX;
and Kansas City, MO. Contact: Laura Trivers (202) 720-7711.

BROWN IN THE MIDDLE -- USDA has launched a food handling and cooking education
campaign to alert parents and children to the potential dangers accompanying picnics and
cookouts. Proper handling of food, and careful preparation and cooking can reduce the
opportunity for bacterial contamination. Thorough cooking of hamburger is being
emphasized, urging consumers to "Make it brown in the middle." Contact: Mary Dixon (202)
720-4623.

URBAN GREENING AND PUBLIC SAFETY -- USDA is helping to support community service
work in Chicago that involves tree planting, creating urban gardens, renovating playgrounds,
and patrolling the areas to reduce crime. Staff from three USDA agencies, the Agricultural
Stabilization and Conservation Service, Forest Service, and Soil Conservation Service will
work with the Chicago High School of Agricultural Sciences in the "Summer of Safety"
program. Technical assistance will be provided by the U.S. Department of Justice. Fifty
participants in the program will earn a small living allowance and a $1,000 educational
award in exchange for their service to the community. The program is funded by a grant
from the Corporation for National and Community Service. Contact: Joel Berg (202) 720-
6350.







REDUCING WIND EROSION -- Wind tunnel tests show that crop stalks left standing after
harvest protect soil from wind erosion seven times better than stalks lying flat on the
ground. Tests by USDA researchers have led to improved prediction of erosion protection
offered by a range of soil covers. Mathmatical equations resulting from the wind tunnel
tests will be used to recommend farm practices that will better control wind erosion.
Contact: J.D. Bilbro (915) 263-0293.

THE GRAYING OF NONMETRO AREAS -- The U.S. will have a favorable balance.of people
within income-producing age groups well. into the next century. However, because of
migration that consists primarily of young adults and their children, metro areas capture a
much higher percentage of this population segment. The higher percentage of working age
adults in metro areas has been a persistent pattern for most of this century, but never higher
than at present. Retirement migration to nonmetro areas places a higher proportion of older
people in nonmetro areas. The percentage of nonmetro population over age 65 was 15
percent in 1990, compared to 12 percent in metro areas. Such changes can affect rural
development plans. Contact: John Cromartie (202) 219-0534.

PROPERTY TAX -- A USDA study has found that owners of higher valued holdings of
farmland pay lower taxes per $100 than do those with lesser valued holdings. The
Agricultural Economics and Land Ownership Survey produced figures showing that owners
of U.S. farmland holdings valued at $5 million or more paid 47 cents per $100 of market
value, whereas owners of holdings valued at less than $70,000 paid $1.45 per $100 of
value. Taxes per acre follow the same pattern. One plausible explanation for the relatively
light taxation of large landholdings may be what the International Association of Assessing
Officers terms "assessment bias," the systematic underappraisal of high-valued properties
and overappraisal of low-valued properties. Contact: Gene Wunderlich (202) 219-0425.

WHAT THE FOOD DOLLAR PAYS FOR -- The marketing bill is the difference between the
amount farmers receive for food and the amount consumers spend for consumption. USDA
studies show that between 1982 and 1992 the marketing bill grew at over twice the rate
of the farm value. The marketing bill now accounts for 78 percent of the cost of food.
Causes underlying the growth in marketing costs include increased labor costs, more value
added processing and packaging, and a higher percentage of food sold through restaurants
and fast food outlets. Rising labor costs account for nearly half the increase in the marketing
bill over the last decade. Contact: Howard Elitzak (202) 219-0868.

OSTEOPOROSIS -- Half of American women over age 50, and three-quarters over age 75
have significant bone loss. The cost is large in terms of bone fractures and loss of
independence. The current estimate is $10 billion annually. Research findings are indicating
that one of the best methods to guard against osteoporosis is by building strong bones
during childhood. Most bone forming activity occurs between the ages of 8 and 11, by age
15 there is little bone being formed. These early years also represent the time when milk
consumption among young girls often decreases. Milk is a good, but not the only, source
of calcium. Four 8-ounce glasses of milk provide about 1,200 milligrams of calcium. The
research indicates that young girls can guard against osteoporosis later in life by increasing
calcium intake between ages 5 and 15. Contact: Steven Abrams (713) 798-7000.

On May 5 USDA-TV began distributing its programming on a different satellite, Galaxy 7, and
on a new schedule. The Saturday feed is discontinued. See item at the bottom of page 3.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:

AGRICULTURE USA #1926 -- Gary Crawford reports on new adventures in food shopping.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1407 -- New food labels; postcard campaign on cooking meat safely;
low maintenance lawn care; picnic food safety; a perfect or practical lawn. (Weekly reel
of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1918 -- Crop progress report; rice outlook; 30-90 day forecast;
more U.S. wheat to China; dairy farmers get refunds. (Weekly reel of features.)


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE:
Wednesday, May 18, agricultural outlook; Thursday, May 19, catfish processing, former
USSR update; Friday, May 20, cattle on feed, wheat; Monday, May 23, trade update;
Tuesday, May 24, weekly weather and crop report. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions; Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy and acting assistant secretary Patricia Jensen
on food safety education program for children and parents regarding the importance of
cooking hamburgers thoroughly.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on guayule rubber; Eric Parsons reports on
ASCS dairy refunds.

TV SATELLITE CHANGES

In response to your requests, USDA TV News Service has made changes to the satellite
schedule. We believe the new times will be more convenient. The new transmission
schedule:
Thursday 3:45 4:00 PM ET
Saturday Service is discontinued
Monday 11:00 11:15 AM ET

In addition, the satellite has changed. USDA TV programming is now available on C-Band
Satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz. Questions? Contact Lynn Wyvill (202) 720-9951.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 0
A BIG SNOW...late in April is a rarity, says Charlie Kampa (KBRF, Fergus Falls, MN). The 7 1/2
inches covered small grain crops recently planted. Charles immediately had an Extension agent
on the air who said that if the snow melts quickly damage would likely be minor. Charlie says 30
mph winds hit the region every day during the last two weeks of April.

TEN INCHES OF SNOW...this late in the year is a record, says Emery Kleven (KMNS, Sioux City,
IA). Producers farming river bottom land made sure that they planted their corn early in case a
weather problem developed. Last year floods kept them out which resulted in deficiency payment
troubles for some producers. But the plants hadn't emerged yet and the snow added useful
moisture. Emery takes his morning farm program on the road once a week, says its getting good
response. Another attractant is the $15,000 pickup he's giving away this season.

LONG DAYS...in the field can prompt taking shortcuts to save time. Shortcutting safety is an
invitation to trouble. Help make sure they're at work tomorrow. Talk safety.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












WEAK AREAS...in the levees are allowing seepage of Mississippi River water onto fields, says
Chris Kimbell (KNOE, Monroe, LA). Around-the-clock efforts are being made to reinforce the
earthen structures, some of which are 100 yards wide at the base and several stories high. The
river remains at a high level. Chris notes its a case of having too much water or not enough, the
area generally is dry and needs rain.

MANY PRODUCERS...served by David Lee (KHMO, Hannibal, MO) are counting on good
production this year. Dave says the outcome for many will determine whether they have an
auction or put the place up for sale. Last year's floods drained cash reserves, but the attitude pot
remains full. Planting in late April was at a standstill due to wet conditions, although forecasters
do not expect flooding. The outlook calls for above normal precipitation and below normal
temperatures. Dave says his producers could use a break.

LETS HELP CONSUMERS...sta as a fiddle. Make it brown in the middle. (See story on page 1)

VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




A 21. '--' i L


Farm Br, cas


United States


Asters Letter 1



of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

May 13, 1994


DEFINING HEALTH' VWC~F-f'U.S. Department of Agriculture has joined with the
Department of Health ai Service's Food and Drug Administration in determining
when the word "healthy" can be used on food labels. To qualify, the new rules specify that
the food products must meet low levels of fat and saturated fat. The amount of cholesterol
and sodium is restricted. The foods must contain at least 10 percent of the daily value of
either vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, calcium, protein or fiber. The term "healthy" can also be
used on raw meat and poultry products that meet USDA's definition for "extra lean."
Processors have until November 1995 to reformulate products and labels to meet the
definition. The Food and Drug administration, which regulates all foods other than meat and
poultry, has set January 1996 as its compliance date for pre-existing products. The rules
are in response to the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 to ensure that claims
used on food are truthful and not misleading. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

REPORT CHANGES -- The format of USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand
Estimates has been changed. Certain reports and tables are now located in other sections
of the main report, some reports are presented in a new format, and others discontinued.
The changes coincide with a new release time of 8:30 a.m. ET, part of a one-year trial of
releasing certain market-sensitive reports in the morning hour. The information will be
available on USDA's Computerized Information Delivery System (CIDS). The cotton report,
however, is held until the full report is release at the usual 3:00 p.m. time. USDA's Crop
Production Report will also have format changes and be released at 8:30 a.m. on CIDS. The
full report will be available at 3:00 p.m. on the reporting day. Contact: Raymond Bridge
(202) 720-5447.

HELPING MINORITY FARMERS -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy is taking steps designed
to stop discrimination and reverse past trends of declining farm ownership by African-
Americans and socially disadvantaged farmers. Local offices of Farmer's Home
Administration (FmHA) have been directed to use 100 percent of operating and ownership
loans targeted to socially disadvantaged farmers, and increase the percentage of farms sold
or leased to the group. FmHA will also report to the Secretary its outreach activities and
accomplishments. Espy has worked closely with Congress to ensure funding for assistance
to socially disadvantaged farmers. More than $495 million has been appropriated to minority
farmer programs. Espy says he is working to enforce the strongest Equal Opportunity and
Civil Rights policy in the history of USDA. Contact: Leslie Parker (202) 720-2798.

MARKET PROMOTION -- USDA Market Promotion Program funds of $100 million have been
allocated to 59 commodity groups and regional trade organizations for fiscal year 1994. The
funds provide priority assistance to small businesses and offset unfair trading practices.
Later this year opportunities will be announced for U.S. firms to participate in USDA's Export
Incentive Program. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.








WILDERNESS RESEARCH INSTITUTE -- Dr. David Parsons has been appointed as director
of the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, in Missoula, Montana. He assumes the
post on May 16. Parsons was a research scientist with the National Biological Survey in
Three Rivers, California. The Institute is an interagency research organization. It conducts
research into use and management of wilderness; coordinates research efforts among
government agencies, schools and private organizations; and provides technical assistance
on international wilderness-related issues. Contact: John Denne (202) 205-0974.

TREE ASSISTANCE SIGNUP -- Nursery owners have an opportunity to sign up for 1993
losses of nursery inventory under the Tree Assistance Program. The signup will be held
through July 29, 1994. Under the program the Commodity Credit Corporation will reimburse
eligible small and medium scale commercial growers up to 65 percent of costs for weather-
related loss of annual and perennials that exceeds an adjusted amount. Application and
payments will be made through county offices of USDA's Agricultural Stabilization and
Conservation Service. Payments for losses cannot exceed $25,000 per person. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

REDUCING COSTS -- USDA has examined its dairy product laboratory procedures and
applied new efficiencies in administering product tests. The payoff is a proposed reduction
in charges. Certain procedures can now be conducted in half the time previously required.
USDA can charge less for those tests. Under the law the USDA dairy product testing
program must be self supporting. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-6179.

HELPFUL NEMATODES -- A new nematode species found in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas
is being used to control citrus root weevil. Orange, grapefruit, lemon and lime growers lose
millions of dollars annually in crop damage caused by the weevil. In greenhouse tests the
newly found nematode killed 80 percent of weevil larvae, compared to 60 percent killed by
current nematode species. Contact: William Schroeder (407) 897-7379.

FARMWORKER EARNINGS -- The national economy ended 1993 on a high note, with
increases in rural and urban employment. Rural unemployment dropped in the fouth quarter
of 1993, but remained higher than before the recession. But latest figures show that the
weekly earnings of full-time hired farmworkers in 1992 averaged $240, about half of the
$446 earned by other wage and salary workers. Only private household workers averaged
lower weekly earnings than farmworkers. Contact: Linda Ghelfi (202) 219-0520.

WATCH THE CALORIES -- It is very difficult to conduct food restriction studies on people,
therefore scientists conduct tests on animals whose systems similarly use nutrients. When
rats are fed a copper-deficient diet containing high levels of sugar, the rats suffer damage
to the heart and pancreas, become anemic and die prematurely. By reducing the food intake
to amounts normally consumed, USDA scientists significantly reduced the symptoms of
copper deficiency and the rats lived throughout the 10-week study. Using test animals has
provided important findings. Studies in test animals have resulted in prevention of cancer
and age-related diseases as well as doubled the animals' life span. Contact: Sam Bhathena
(301) 504-8422.

Complaint or comment? Use these numbers:
Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:
AGRICULTURE USA #1927 -- Mosquitoes still pose a threat to public health around the
world, but some people say the current methods of controlling the pests pose a similar
threat. Jim Henry talks with experts about new environmentally friendly methods of control.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1408 -- Pollution and your lawn mower; tips for growing great roses;
getting started with "birding"; more seafood from farms; kenaf products gaining ground.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1919 -- First grain estimates for the new year; big opportunities for
U.S. cotton; outlook good for aquaculture; low input forage; stubborn forage plant; fungus
protects potatoes; tree assistance program. (Weekly reel of features.)


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE:
During the period May 16-23 we expect to have statements from Secretary Espy's trip to
South America. Days of the feeds and content are unknown at the time of FBL deadline.
Check the newsline every day of that week.
Wednesday, May 18, ag outlook summary; Thursday, May 19, catfish processing, outlook
for former Soviet Union; Friday, May 20, cattle on feed, livestock and dairy outlook, wheat
outlook; Monday, May 23, trade update; Tuesday, May 24- crop & weather update, feed
outlook; Thursday, May 26, cotton & wool outlook; Friday, May 27, ag export outlook.
Monday, May 30, HOLIDAY. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let
the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on safe use of cutting boards, with information about
USDA's meat and poultry hotline. 2:00. Additional soundbites by Susan Conley, USDA
meat and poultry hotline manager, on the safe use of cutting boards (with B-roll). 4:00.
Patrick O'Leary reports on National Public Service Recognition week ceremonies in
Washington, D.C. Government agencies such as USDA observed the occasion to educate
the public about the diversity of its missions. 1:53.
Eric Parsons reports on ASCS 1993 dairy refunds to producers that totaled more than $80
million. 2:00.
Joe Courson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service, reports on a strawberry
grower whose niche farming enterprise is unique, growing strawberries on plastic. 1:30.

On Satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz.: Thursdays from 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08 34 044 9
OFFMIKE
GROWING CONDITIONS...have been quite cool this spring, says Don Wick (KWOA, Worthington,
MN). Recent snows did not hurt crops, and added needed moisture. The soils are in great shape,
what's needed are warmer temperatures. Don is chairing an Idea Exchange at the NAFB North
Central region meeting in Yankton, June 2-4 on ways to improve the ag broadcasting business.
Don is also chairing NAFB's professional improvement effort. He's planning a seminar on The
Future of Farm Broadcasting, looking down the road 5-10 years.

A GOOD SUMMER...is needed, says Von Ketelsen (KOEL, Oelwein, IA). Spring has been quite
variable, highs near 80 degrees, and wind chills to 14. He reports producer attitudes as one of
cautious optimism. Von is CHATS editor. He recently drove to Illinois to meet with NAFB
historian Art Sechrest (WJBC, Bloomington) to review early ag broadcaster photos in the
collection at the University of Illinois. Von has been producing the NAFB REFLECTIONS section in
the CHATS newsletter. Von says we'll be seeing the results of his trip.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












A COMPUTER CONTROLLED...digital audio system has been installed to activate automated
playback systems and improve recording quality, says Max Armstrong (WGN/Tribune Radio
Network, Chicago). Automatic re-feeds of one-minute market reports and the Midwest Market
Close are also featured. The network's Midwest Livestock Report has been moved from 11:47
a.m. to Noon.

MILD WINTER CONDITIONS...were apparently nice to insects, says Hap Larson (KBUF, Garden
City, KS). The wheat crop is looking good, but producers are concerned about an outbreak of
Russian wheat aphids. If pest problems remain small the crop could come in above average. In
Garden City next month Hap and his station will be covering the 26th annual Beef on Fridays
cattle judging contest. Congratulations to Hap. The Kansas Association of County Agricultural
Agents prese ted him an award honoring his outstanding support of county agents.


VIC POWELL
Office of Communications




A;!,. sr:266~3


Farm Broa casters.4 L
I MWAO -,.


United States Departn


of Communications


Washington, DC 20250-1340


Letter No. 2663 \ May 20, 1994

DELINQUENT LOANS ,f ae authority to collect large, delinquent loans made by
the Farmers Home Admi among provisions of the Farmers Home Administration
Improvement Act, signed into law by Pregident Clinton, is the ability to use private attorneys
in collection and foreclosure actions of farm program loans. Expenses will be paid from the
delinquent loans collected. Savings to the Federal-government is expected due to the
accelerated collection. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

EATING THOSE VEGGIES -- Processors expect to contract 1.5 million acres of the five major
vegetable crops in the U.S., 12 percent more than last year. All five crops have increased
acreage this year. Green peas lead the increase with a gain of 34 percent, due to last year's
poor crop and declining inventories. Both sweet corn and tomato acreage are up 9 percent.
Snap bean acreage is up 5 percent, and cucumbers up 1 percent. Contact: David Mueller
(202) 720-2157.

BROILER EXPORTS -- The United States will remain the world's largest exporter of broiler
meat in 1994. Export sales will take a record 10 percent of production this year, totaling
an estimated $1.4 billion. First-quarter exports are estimated at 30 percent above a year
earlier, led by increased sales to Russia, the Pacific Rim, Eastern Europe, and Mexico.
Exports to Russia jumped from 3.8 million pounds a year ago to 100 million pounds. Russian
poultry meat production continues to decline, and inexpensive protein imports are in great
demand. Contact: Larry Witucki (202) 219-0766.

CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA -- U.S. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy met with his
counterparts in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico during a series of meetings conducted in those
countries, May 13-19. He discussed agricultural trade and financial matters. Contact: Tom
Amontree (202) 720-4623.

PREVENTING FARMLAND CONVERSION -- Action is being taken to assure that Vermont's
farm economy will be preserved by allowing the State's farmers to realize the economic
value of their land. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says USDA will guarantee a $6.6 million
dollar loan to help keep farmland in Vermont from being converted to nonfarm purposes.
The funds are used by the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board to purchase
development rights. Contact: Joe O'Neill (202) 720-4323.

BUTTER TO UKRAINE -- USDA will donate 800 metric tons of butter for use in the Ukraine.
A private U.S. voluntary organization will distribute the butter to aid dietary needs of people
in hospitals and mental institutions, old-age homes, schools and orphanages. The $1.4
million donation will be made under authority granted by the 1949 farm bill to distribute
surplus commodities owned by USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation to developing
countries. Contact: James Keefer (202) 720-5263.


-. -Vn juience
Library
JUN 2 7 1994


I









WHEAT -- Winter wheat production is forecast down 6 percent from a year earlier. Area for
ahrvest is expected to decline 4 percent, and yields down one bushels to 39.3 bushels per
acre. Spring wheat will decline about 2 percent. Feed and residual use should decline 17
percent. Wheat prices are projected to average $2.75-$3.35, unchanged from 1993/94.
Ed Allen (202) 219-0841.

CORN -- The U.S. corn crop is projected at 8.7 billion bushels, up 38 percent from last year's
weather affected level. The 78 million acres is about 7 percent higher than a year earlier.
Feed and residual use is forecast to increase nearly 8 percent. Farm price range for corn is
projected at $2.10-$2.50 per bushel, down from $2.50-$2.60 this year. Contact: Thomas
Tice (202) 219-0840.

SOYBEANS -- Soybean acreage is expected to rise 3 percent and yields to increase 3 bushels
per acre to 35 bushels, boosting soybean production 16 percent above 1993/94 levels.
Slow growth in foreign demand and expanding foreign oilseed production are expected to
result in little increase in U.S. soybean exports. Prices for 48 percent soybean meal at
Decatur are expected to decline to $150-$180 per ton, down from $192.50 this year.
Contact: Mark Ash (202) 219-0840.

IN SPANISH -- A catalog of consumer publications available in Spanish is now available from
the Consumer Information Center. The free 19-page booklet, "Lista de Publicaciones
Federales en Espanol para el Consumidor," is a catalog of 200 government publications, all
written in Spanish. The publications listed in the catalog are also free. To get a copy send
your name and address to the Consumer Information Center, Department 588A, Pueblo, CO
81009. Contact: Michael Clark (202) 501-1794.


Warmer weather is bringing more
produce to market, and consumers
are seeing more specials on fresh
fruits and vegetables. Many
fruits, vegetables and grains are
among the naturally fiber-bearing
foods. Among the benefits of
soluable fiber is its apparent
usefulness in lowering serum
cholesterol in the blood, which
in turn lowers the risk of heart
disease. The table shows the
amount of fiber in various foods.


Fiber's foothold in a healthy diet
The average consumer eats only 12 grams of dietary fiber per
day, far less than the 25-35 grams recommended by nutritionists.
Fiber-filled foods, rather than fiber supplements, should be the
source of dietary fiber. Breads, cereals, fruits and vegetables
are good sources of fiber.

food item & dietary fiber in grams
apple-1 small 3.4
banana---1 medium 1.8
corn kemels-2/3 cup 4.2
dry grits--1/2 cup 11.8
graham crackers-14 10.5
kidney beans-1 1/3 cup 4.8
orange- medium 2.0
parsnip-1 3/4 cup 5.0
peach-1 medium 2.3
pear-1 medium 2.3
peas-1 3/4 cup 5.0
potato, cooked--3/4 cup 3.5
rolled oats, dry-1 cup 9.0
shredded wheat-4 biscuits 12.2
spinach-4 leaves 3.6
strawberries-1/2 cup 2.1
whole wheat bread-1 slice 2.4
Source: Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas Agricultural Extension Service
Graphic: Agricultural Communications, The Texas A&M University System








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1928 -- Summer often means outdoor eating, which can sometimes
mean food poisoning. Lori Spiczka talks with the director of USDA's Meat and Poultry
Hotline about preventing foodborne illnesses when preparing a picnic or an outdoor barbecue.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1409 -- New meat handling labels; higher coffee prices on the way?;
controlling black spot on roses; grilling for safety; individual mosquito control. (Weekly reel
of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1920 -- 30-day weather forecast; poultry outlook for '94 and
beyond; conservation plans on track; summer means hailstorms; selling biotechnology;
baiting the boll weevil. (Weekly reel of features.)

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, May 31, weekly weather and crops; ag prices;
Thursday, June 2, ag income and finance. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on protecting exterior wood. Pat O'Leary looks at new
products from cotton. Brian Norris reports on rural health information.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops. USDA
economist James Miller on the dairy outlook.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on safe meat handling food labels (five-part
series). Pat O'Leary reports on guayule. NOTE: USDA TV News will transmit an additional
15-minutes on May 26 (4-4:15 p.m. ET) and May 30 (11:15-11:30 a.m.) to include a five-
part series on safe meat handling.

On satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz.: Thursdays from 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.

FOOD SAFETY TAPE -- Severe storms will be striking many sections of the nation this
season. In response, USDA TV News has produced an 18:30 tape for broadcasters to use
in developing stories addressing viewer concerns about food safety following power failures
and natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, earthquakes and fires. The tape
includes soundbites of Susan Conley, director of USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline, and B-roll
of food handling tips. For a copy contact Wanda Sullivan (202) 720-5604.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
i1111111llllllllll1i11f111111111ll111111
4 31262 08134 049 8
OFFMIKE
RICE AND SOYBEANS...are off to their best start in several years, says James Guthrie (KFIN,
Jonesboro, AR). Cotton is in and doing well, and prices are already coming down. James says
there is real concern among tobacco farmers in his area. They tell him they believe that activists
are attempting to put the tobacco farmer out of business. They ask which group of farmers will
next feel the focus of activists, those who produce red meat or products containing cholesterol?

WORLD PORK EXPO...will be covered by Dave Koffee (WIBC, Indianapolis, IN) when it covenes in
town next month. Dave says everything relating to growing and processing pork will be
available, from diet to packing to health, also a trade show and equipment exhibits. The expo is
open to the public.

LOOKING...is Max Molleston (formerly of WKBF/WPXR, Rock Island, IL). Max is keeping up to
date on agricultural issues by serving on the agribusiness committee of the chamber of
commerce, and writing for the local horticulture society. Call him at (319) 359-1057.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









PERFECT SPRING WEATHER...has planting ahead of last year's rate, says Al Heinz (KGLO, Mason
City, IA). Corn and beans are in and beginning to emerge. Al took part in a half-hour program
observing the 40th anniversary of KIMT-TV, Mason City. When the station signed on in 1954, Al
served as its first farm broadcaster. Following a brief career in other areas, he also served as the
station's last farm broadcaster in 1978 when programming changes were made. Al and other
employees recalled the challenges of programming without film or tape.

SPRING HAS BEEN WET...delaying getting into the fields, says Jeff Nalley (WOMI/WBKR,
Owensboro, KY). Jeff says several tobacco producers in his area report that they have tried
growing alternative crops, but have found none that equals the income generated by tobacco.
Producers are telling Jeff they want the right to grow tobacco, even if it is entirely exported.
Congratulations to Jeff. He is serving on the Kentucky Partnership for Farm Family Health and
Safety. Associated with the University of Kentucky, and Western Kentucky University, the
project is aimed at how the farm wife can help to protect her family.

VIC POWELL c l.
Office of Communications








Farm Broadcasters Letter"



United States Department of Agriculture e of actions Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2664 I May 27, 1994
JUN 23 1994
FORMER USSR -- U.S. agriculture ports to the nati of the former USSR are forecast
at $1.3 billion, down 17 percent e 1993, and d 50 percent from 1992. Barring a
significant crop shortfall this year, to the gi are likely to continue at a low level
for the foreseeable future. Even win 'Sgf p in grain imports, the former USSR
remains among the world's largest grain bu Economic restructuring, reduced grain use
caused by declines in livestock inventories, high debt, and large budget deficits have left
former USSR governments less able to import agricultural commodities. However, high-value
agricultural imports are beginning to increase and are likely to grow as market reforms
increase productivity and economic recovery begins. Contact: Christian Foster (202) 219-
0620.

WHEAT EXPORTS -- U.S. wheat exports during the 1994/95 season are forecast to decline
1 million tons to 32 million tons as a result of stagnant global demand and intense
competition on the world market. Canada's wheat exports are forecast to rebound to 19
million tons as larger supplies of better quality wheat and ample supplies of durum boost
Canada's marketing program. World wheat trade is projected at 97.6 million tons, about the
same level as the 1993/94 season. Contact: Sara Schwartz (202) 219-0824.

COARSE GRAIN EXPORTS -- U.S. coarse grain exports in 1994/95 are expected to increase
by 3 million tons to nearly 40 million tons. The increase is expected to come mostly from
the corn export forecast of 34 million tons. U.S. coarse grain production is forecast to
rebound to 249 million tons, 61.6 million more than last year's weather reduced crop.
Foreign coarse grain production is expected to remain unchanged at 597 million tons.
Contact: Peter Riley (202) 219-0824.

POTATO EXPORTS -- U.S. exports of potatoes and potato products have more than doubled
in value over the last five years, reaching a record $402 million in fiscal 1993. The biggest
markets are Japan, mainly french fries, and Canada, the primary market for fresh potatoes.
Exports last year to the former Soviet Union grew 20-fold. The largest product category is
frozen french fries, increasing 62 percent in five years to a record high of $149 million last
year. The fastest growing product category is potato chips, with U.S. exports up 500
percent since 1989 to a record $118 million. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade
will open more markets for U.S. potato producers. Contact: Gary Lucier (202) 219-0884.

REDUCING MUD -- A plastic grid, originally designed to reinforce weak soil in the
construction of roads, can improve muddy conditions around feed and water troughs and at
cattle gates. Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that the grid keeps gravel
from sinking into the mud, maintaining the ground drier and firmer, and the cattle cleaner.
The grid costs about $270 for a roll 9.8 feet by 168 feet. Contact: Joe Garner (706) 485-
6015.









NEW POTATOES -- The fungus that caused the Irish potato famine in the 1840's has been
found in the United States. Late blight, the most destructive disease of potatoes worldwide,
can destroy a potato crop in only a few weeks time. Producers have been controlling the
fungus with chemicals, but the version discovered in the U.S. is a more aggressive strain.
USDA scientists have developed potato breeding lines that resist the fungus. Using genetic
engineering, leaf cells from wild potato species were fused with cells from a cultivated
potato. The lines will be used to develop commercial potato varieties. John Helgeson (608)
264-5276.

BOOSTING ALFALFA YIELDS -- Farmers in eight states will be conducting field trials of an
alfalfa seed containing a genetically altered bacteria. Plants such as alfalfa use bacteria that
convert nitrogen into a form the plant can use. The new seed bacteria was engineered to
have additional copies of its own genes, increasing its ability to convert atmospheric nitrogen
and thereby increase yields. The seeds have been tested in greenhouses for six years, and
another four years outdoors. The feed trials in California, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana,
Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin have been approved by the
Environmental Protection Agency. Contact: David Giamporcaro (202) 260-6362.

FOREIGN OWNERSHIP -- About one percent of the 1.3 billion acres of privately owned farm
and forest land in the United States is owned by foreign persons, an increase of 140,141
acres during 1993. Forest land accounts for nearly half of all foreign-owned acreage,
cropland about 17 percent, pasture and other agricultural land about 32 percent.
Corporations own 71 percent of the foreign owned acreage. U.S. corporations in which
foreign persons have a significant interest or substantial control report owning half the
foreign-held acreage. The largest number of acres owned by foreign persons is in Maine,
totalling about 13 percent of the state's privately owned land. 35 percent of the acreage
is in the west, and 34 percent in the south. Foreign persons are not taking purchased
agricultural land out of production. Contact: Peter DeBraal (202) 219-0425.

EROSION REDUCTION -- Erosion on highly erodible lands will be reduced two-thirds from the
amounts of 10 years ago when conservation plans are fully implemented on erodible
cropland. Erosion from highly erodible cropland totalled an estimated 17.5 tons per acre in
1985. By the end of this year erosion will be reduced to 6 tons per acre. About 92 percent
of the conservation plans on the affected land are being carried out on schedule. Paul
Johnson, chief of USDA's Soil COnservation Service, says that agriculture is well on its way
in carrying out the most intensive conservation effort ever undertaken on private lands.
Contact: Diana Morse (202) 720-4772.

BLUEBERRIES INFO -- Blueberries can be an important income producer, grossing $5,000 per
acre. USDA's Office for Small-Scale Agriculture has produced an information sheet about
growing blueberries. It includes topics such as site considerations, plant selection, field
layout, planting, mulch and irrigation, crop management and marketing the crop. For a free
copy of the information sheet "Blueberries" write to: Office of Small-Scale Agriculture,
USDA, Ag Box 2244, Washington, D.C. 20250. Contact: Bud Kerr (202) 401-1805.


Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

WEEKLY CASSETTE:

AGRICULTURE USA #1929 -- Information from a top expert on keeping your lawn green and
beautiful this summer. Brenda Curtis talks with University of Maryland turf specialist Tom
Turner about environmentally correct lawn care. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1410 -- Talking turkey; landscaping adds value to your home; ag-based
stain removers; supermarket innovations; grass clippings. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1921 -- FSU grain imports down significantly; creating a market for
kenaf; powdery mildew resistant kenaf; the "industrial farmer"; artificial diet put to test.
(Weekly reel of features.)


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE:

Tuesday, June 7, weekly weather and crop outlook; Thursday, June 9, U.S. crop
production report, world ag supply and demand; Friday, June 10, world ag production,
world oilseed trade, world grain trade, world cotton trade, world tobacco trade, cotton
& wool update. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack
of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.




FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill has a five-part series explaining the new safe handling labels for
meat.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on guayule rubber. Lynn Wyvill reports on
food safety at the beach.


On satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz.: Thursdays from 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

434059
OFFMIKE
MOSQUITO...swarms are so thick that they clog radiators and blacken headlights, says Ole Olson
(KSJB, Jamestown, ND). Standing water from storms last year, and warm temperatures during
the spring, have boosted the pest's population. Planted crops are looking good, and in late May
producers are getting in row crops.

BUYING CATTLE...and checking genetic programs were the main agenda of 40 Brazilian ranchers
and agribusinessmen that toured the area, says Dewey Nelson (KRVN, Lexington, NE). The group
also visited Wyoming, Kansas and Wusconsin. Dewey's station is covering the Gateway Farm
Expo, in Kearney, NE. Exhibits of new equipment and technology, and shows for cattle, hogs and
sheep are featured. Dewey says the area could use some rain. Strong winds have dried the
topsoil, but subsoil remains adequate.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Gene Williams (WNAX, Yankton, SD). He received the Mid-Am Salute
Award for his coverage of agricultural news.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









FARMERS...voiced their displeasure at a proposal to permanently remove two million acres of the
state from production, says Dan Molino (Louisiana Agri-News Network, Baton Rouge, LA). The
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to declare the acreage as critical habitat to preserve the
Louisiana black bear. Don says sugar cane has recovered from the double whammy of a freeze
three years ago and the hurricane of two years ago. The crop looks good this year.

IT'S COSTING PRODUCERS...to raise cattle these days, says Kelly Lenz (WIBW, Topeka, KS).
Cow-calf producers have major concerns about profitability resulting from large numbers, delayed
demand, and negative psychology of the market. Kelly says the combines should be rolling in
June. The wheat crop looks good, acreage is up, and development is on schedule. Here's
another example of a farm broadcaster serving their audience. Kelly is working on a video slide
program for the Kansas FFA convention. It tells the story of seven Star farmers in the state.

SKIN CANCER...can result from damage to the skin caused by overlong exposure to the sun.
Wear a hat with a broad brij o protect ears and neck. Baseball caps don't cover those areas.
VIC POWELL L.
Office of Communications




~ ~3 C(. \ '2(efc5
'tson Scien:e



Farm Broadcasters Letter L07?



United States Department o'griculture O ff Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2665 i; June 3, 1994

USDA SURVEY -- The I survey onpo', stocks, and livestock inventories is now being
conducted. About 125, e m -n ranchers will provide information needed to make
State, regional and national f crop acreage, grain in storage, and cattle and hog
inventories. Local interviewers trained by USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service are
conducting the survey through personal or telephone interviews. The survey is particularly
important this year because it will provide the first clear indications on crop supplies and
livestock marketing following last year's floods in the Midwest and drought in the
Southeast. Contact: Priscilla Glynn (202) 690-2146.

SERVICE FEES -- USDA is proposing to increase service fees for certain voluntary inspection,
grading and certification of processed fruits and vegetables. The proposal raises the basic
hourly rate from $37 to $39.50. For users with term contracts the charges would be $22
per hour for in-plant sampling, up $2. In-plant yearly full-time rate would be $34 per hour,
up $2. In-plant services of less than a year duration would be raised to $39.50, an increase
of $2.50 per hour. A major factor contributing to the changes are congressionally mandated
salary increases for the Federal inspectors. The fees are to cover the cost of rendering
services. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

IMPORTED PORK ASSESSMENTS -- USDA is proposing to increase assessments on imported
pork and pork products. The assessments are established by formula each year, based on
U.S. market prices for hogs, and fund research and promotional activities designed to
strengthen the position of pork in the marketplace. The proposed increase is two-hundreths
of a cent per pound, and reflects a seven percent increase in hog prices paid at major U.S.
markets last year. The rate of assessment, 0.35 of one percent of market price, remains
unchanged. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

REDUCING TUBERCULOSIS -- In an effort to reduce importation of tuberculosis-infected
cattle, USDA has placed a ban on importing from Mexico all Holstein steers and spayed
heifers. There has been a higher incidence of tuberculosis in the Holstein breed from Mexico
compared to other imported cattle. More than half of all cattle found to be infected with
tuberculosis at U.S. slaughter plants were originally imported from Mexico. The level of TB
infection of Holsteins at Mexican dairies is higher than 20 percent according to reports from
Mexican cattle associations. Humans can contract bovine tuberculosis through consumption
of unpasteurized milk from infected animals. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

REDUCING PAPERWORK -- USDA is reducing the paperwork burden for a cottonseed
sampler's license. The revision eliminates the bonding requirement and application fees, and
extends the period of new and renewed licenses from one to five years. The changes
become effective July 1. The procedures for cottonseed sampler's license are now
consistent with those for cotton samplers. Contact: Alicia Ford (202) 720-8998.








2

FOOD STAMP PLASTIC CARD -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy has called for all states to
develop plans for implementation in 1996 of the Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) system.
A one-year study of the statewide system in Maryland which provides food stamps and other
benefits shows that the EBT system is saving money compared to the coupon distribution
method, and is winning praise from program participants. Maryland began using the plastic
card system on a pilot basis in 1989. More than 30 states have initiated EBT projects or are
in various stages of planning for the system. Contact: Neal Flieger (703) 305-2039.

REFLECTING CHANGES IN AGRICULTURE -- Agriculture is no longer the dominant industry
in many rural areas. To meet the changing times the Farm Credit System is seeking to
expand its lending authority into financing rural nonfarm enterprises. Currently the Farm
Credit System lends to agricultural producers and cooperatives, farm-related businesses,
buyers of moderate-priced homes in rural communities, export customers, and certain rural
utilities. Expansion of lending opportunities could dilute farmer's control over the System
and its focus on production agriculture. An alternative would be removal by Congress of
barriers to competition in agricultural credit markets. The System was created in 1916 to
correct deficiencies in agricultural credit markets. Contact: Audrae Erickson (202) 219-
0719.

CENSUS OF AG -- Initial published statistics from the 1992 Census of Agriculture indicate
that farm numbers and farm size are in line with long-term trends. Each of 10 states that
completed reports had fewer farms in 1992 than in 1987 when the previous census was
taken. All 10 states had less farmland, and average farm size increased except in Oregon.
The ten states are Deleware, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Virginia,
Washington, and Wisconsin. The trend toward fewer larger farms is likely to continue into
the next century but at a slower rate than in previous years. Contact: Dan Ledbury (202)
720-1790.

BIOTECHNOLOGY -- Agricultural biotechnology offers important advantages to producers
and consumers. It can increase crop production, lower farming costs, improve food quality
and safety, and enhance environmental quality. Why wouldn't everyone favor that? There
are public concerns that negative effects might outweigh potential benefits. USDA has
produced a report, "Agricultural Biotechnology, An Economic Perspective," that describes
how social, economic, and policy factors will influence the development, consumer
acceptance, and producer adoption of agricultural biotechnology. Cost is $9.00. To order
a copy dial 1-800-999-6779. Contact: Margriet Caswell (202) 219-0434.

ECONOMIC STATUS OF RETIRED PEOPLE -- Latest research by USDA shows that elderly
households, age 65 or over, had a median income of $24,805 in 1991. Social Security
provided 30 percent of the total in multiperson families, and 44 percent for elderly living
alone. Only 40 percent of the elderly living alone received pension benefits. The majority
of the elderly own their home without a mortgage. During the 1980's there was a 16
percent increase in the population age 65-74, and 31 percent increase in the number of
people age 75 and older. With Americans living longer and retiring younger, policymakers,
financial planners, and educators need to consider the expanded retirement period in planning
for individuals and creating national policy. Contact Nancy Schwenk (301) 436-8461.

Radio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1930 -- The very first consumer food product created by genetic
engineering is finally on the market. It's a new tomato that is causing a lot of controversy.
Gary Crawford talks with researchers, marketers and government officials about this new
development. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1411 -- A new tomato; vitamins and milk; grilling turkey; plastic
benefits; biodegradable news inks. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1922 -- Wheat acreage reduction set at zero; a new tomato hits the
horticultural scene; midwest flood repair report; what Most Favored Trade states for China
means for U.S. farmers; a challenging weather outlook for crops. (Weekly reel of features.)

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- *Special Note Thursday, June 9, USDA releases its new crop
production and supply/demand reports at 8:30 a.m. EDT. We will have stories from the
reports on the line at 10:30 a.m. EDT. We will also add new stories at 5:00 p.m. EDT.
Friday, June 10, cotton update, world oilseed situation, world grain/crop production;
Monday, June 13, feed update; Tuesday, June 14, tobacco outlook, crop & weather
update, and possible coverage of Congressional hearings on the Administration's pesticide
reform package; Wednesday, June 15, milk production, update on industrial uses of ag
products, outlook for western hemisphere ag; Thursday, June 16, sugar outlook; Friday,
June 17, cattle on feed, ag outlook summary. These are the USDA reports we know about
in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on new cotton products developed by scientists with
USDA's Agricultural Research Service, (1:54). Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA research
to make the native shrub Guayule (why-oolie) a commercial source of domestic rubber,
(1:57). Joe Courson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service, reports on night
testing of florescent pesticides to ensure proper spreading of chemicals in farm fields,
(1:12). Joe Courson, U-GA, reports on a Georgia farmer's use of inter-cropping to let
beneficial insects control damaging pests, (1:25)

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, gives the June outlook for
U.S. crop and weather conditions, (1:20). Strommen gives the 90-day outlook, which calls
for a duplication of conditions experienced in the summer of 1992, (1:30). Strommen says
there is no El Nino or other unusual weather maker in the cards for 1994, (1:13).

On satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz.: Thursdays from 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

'IIA Illll "''l!IU a
4 3 1262 08 34 054 8
4
OFFMIKE
IT'S SO DIFFERENT FROM LAST YEAR...says Dennis Morrice (KICD, Spencer, IA). In 1993
farmers had no crop and flooded fields. This year planting was two weeks early, crops have
emerged, and its dry. Al Grigg has joined the farm department after 28 years in the farm
equipment business. He says hot sellers are conservation tillage implements and planters, either
new or used. Manufacturers are building for retail sales, not inventory. Spring optimism and
increased sales have producers, dealers and manufacturers smiling.

THE AUCTION BUSINESS...is doing well, says Cliff Mitchell, (KASM, ALbany, MN). Sales of
good used machinery have increased. Producers are bringing in the first hay crop. There has
been little winter kill. Protein is about 24%. Soil temperatures are increasing and if some rain
visits the area the corn crop will have a good start.

NAFB...1994 membership directory is scheduled to be delivered in June.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












PRIVATE PROPERTY RIGHTS...issues were addressed by the Missouri and Kansas legislatures
this year, says Mike Railsback (WDAF, Kansas City, MO). Missouri passed a bill requiring state
agencies to determine if their regulations will constitute a taking of property rights. It is a
compromise bill. The governor vetoed it last year, but is expected to sign it this time. Kansas did
not pass a property rights bill this year. Mike says he's heard of a producer who is making
money from last year's flood that covered fields with sand. The farmer is selling the sand to a
construction company.

PASTURE...in the western part of the state is a little short, says Lee McCoy (Texas Agribusiness
Network, Dallas), but rain is finally arriving. Lee says the network is moving from the John
Carpenter Freeway in Dallas to new facilities in Arlington. They'll be situated over deep center
field in the Arlinton ballpark. Wow!


VIC POWELL
Office of Communications








Farm Broadcasters Letter 2 19
_ida


United States Department of Agricultuf .t Office of Comm tions Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter No. 2666 June 10, 1994

FARM INCOME -- As crop and live' roducti eases, gross farm income is forecast
to rise this year. Anticipated high "" i-'kely incentive for increasing acreage
planted to cotton and rice. All major c except wheat are expected to have larger
acreages. Net cash income from farming is forecast to be similar to the annual average of
$57 billion during the past five years. Income of farm operator households are expected to
increase. Contact: Bob McElroy (202) 219-0800.

FARM EXPENSES -- Interest expenses will rise this year as interest rates climb from their low
levels in 1993. Rising petroleum prices will likely increase expenditures for petroleum-based
farm inputs. Increase, in planted acres will boost purchases of inputs associated with crop
production. Most farm input items are expected to show increases this year. Contact: Norm
Bennett (202) 690-3229.

SCHOOL MEAL STANDARDS -- USDA is proposing that by the 1998 school meals meet the
recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The proposal includes replacing
the rigid "meal pattern" with a more flexible system, increasing customer appeal through
nutrition education for students, training for school food service professionals, getting the
best value for the nutrition dollar, and streamlining program administration. Contact: Neal
Flieger (703) 305-2039.

SAFE SOYBEAN -- A genetically engineered soybean line has completed field trials and has
passed tests for plant pest risk. USDA says the glyphosate-tolerant soybean does not
present a plant pest risk, and therefore will no longer be regulated. The soybean has been
modified to tolerate the herbicide glyphosate. National Environmental Policy Act regulations
and guidelines were used to assess potential environmental impact. Contact: Cynthia Eck
(301) 436-5931.

EGG PRODUCTION -- Total egg production this year is expected to be a record, about 6
billion dozen, up one percent from 1993. Wholesale and retail prices are expected to
average lower than a year-earlier. Producer returns during 1994 will be much lower,
averaging 2-3 cents per dozen. U.S. egg and egg product exports are expected to rise
slightly to 160 million dozen. With Mexico's import restrictions eased, U.S. egg product
exports to Mexico are growing. Contact: Lee Christensen (202) 219-0714.

COTTON IMPORTS -- The U.S. has boosted by 404 million pounds the amount of cotton to
be imported. The additional amount is called for under the Agricultural Act of 1949 that
requires the U.S. Department of Agriculture to observe cotton prices and allow imports when
U.S. prices remain above certain levels. The allowed imported amount is equal to 21 days
of domestic mill consumption, and is in addition to the 20 million pound import quota in
effect. Contact: Robert Feist (202) 720-6789.









INTERNATIONAL ISSUES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy attended the 1994 Bilderberg
Conference in Helsinke, Finland, June 3-4. The meeting brought together leading Europeans
and Americans to consider issues affecting the Atlantic community. Topics included GATT,
Russia, and the Atlantic communities in a time of change. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202)
720-4623.

WHITEFLIES -- The whitefly, a pest that has afflicted American agriculture since 1986, is
apparently dispersing in other parts of the world. It is found in Asia and has been located
for the first time in Spain, Egypt, Cyprus, and Pakistan. The pest transmits plant diseases,
feeds on crops, and contaminates them with sticky sugars. Annual income loss is estimated
at $200 million on crops in Arizona, California, Florida, and Texas. Research may produce
some relief. The sticky sugars deposited on cotton causes ginning and textile machinery to
become clogged. USDA scientists have reduced stickiness by 82 percent by spraying
before harvest a mix of enzymes. Researchers have found that an electrostatic spray
charging system designed for aircraft places more insecticide on the lower surfaces where
whiteflies gather reducing the pest's population. Contact: Robert Faust (301) 504-6918.

CHANGES IN WHAT WE'RE EATING -- Overall, Americans are eating fewer animal products
and more crop products. Consumption of grains, fruits, and vegetables has been increasing
steadily, while consumption of whole milk, eggs, and red meat has been declining. The
consumption of dark green vegetables has increased by 30 percent. The USDA study
compared information from the Nationwide Food Consumption Surveys of 1977-78 and
1987-88. The highest income households had the biggest decrease in red meat
consumption, 31 percent. Lowest income households decreased their consumption of
breakfast cereals by 9 percent, making them the lowest per person consumers of breakfast
cereals. Contact: Joan Courtless (301) 436-8461.

FIT WITH LESS FAT -- Learning to decrease fat in foods may be the most important diet
change a person can make. Decreasing fat intake helps treat heart disease, diabetes,
hypertension, and obesity. Exercise is important to all age groups, but especially to older
people. People who exercise build muscle strength, improve their balance and are less likely
to fall and hurt themselves. Contact: Dan Rahn (912) 681-5189.

A MORE HEALTHY MOZZARELLA -- A new mozzarella cheese has been produced that has
half the fat and salt of the commercially available cheeses. The all-natural mozzarella is
superior in flavor, melting qualities and texture compared to commercial products. Only 30
percent of the calories come from fat, compared to 57 percent for reduced-fat products
made with part skim milk. The cheese bakes, tastes and feels like the full-fat product.
USDA's Food and Nutrition Service is evaluating the new product in Philadelphia public
schools as part of USDA's effort to provide school children nutritious, good-tasting meals
with less fat, salt and calories. Contact: Edyth Malin (215) 233-6444.

BLOCKING OUT UV -- Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun can cause premature aging of
the skin and has a role in skin cancer. A ceramics-blended polymer fiber is being added to
polyster fiber to block UV radiation. It creates a new breed of synthetic sun-protective
fabrics that may eventually offer new choices for outdoor wear. Currently available are
tightly woven nylon fabrics that can block over 90 percent of UV rays. Contact: Charlotte
Coffman (607) 255-2009.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1931 -- Brenda Curtis discusses with an expert turkey products and
preparation. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1412 -- School lunches go on a diet; fields of green; pollution free
lawn mowing; beneficial bugs; new test to measure zinc and copper. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1923 -- Farm income prospects; reinforcing rural health care issues;
a new way of doing business for Russia; corn producers await ethanol announcement;
attacking bovine tuberculosis. (Weekly reel of features.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, June 17, cattle on feed, agriculture
outlook; Tuesday, June 21, weekly weather and crops, catfish processing, dairy outlook;
Thursday, June 23, ag trade update. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA's proposal to cut fat from the National School
Meals Program and make other nutritional and administrative improvements. It's the most
significant changes to the program since it was launched in 1946. 1:38.

ADDITIONAL SOUNDBITES -- At a news conference in USDA headquarters, June 8,
agriculture secretary Mike Espy and USDA assistant secretary for Food & Consumer Service,
Ellen Haas, speak about the new school meals initiative. 6 cuts, various lengths.

B-ROLL -- School lunch footage. 2:30.

FEATURE -- Eric Parsons reports on USDA's 1995 wheat support programs provisions, and
the acreage reduction program (ARP) details. 1:30.

FEATURE -- Repeat of above feature without narration track. 1:30.



On satellite Galaxy 7, transponder, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz.: Thursdays from 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


4 3 1262 08134 064 7

OFFMIKE
WORLD PORK EXPO...came to town, says Jim Riggs (WILO/WSHW, Frankfort, IN). Jim and
crew provided extensive coverage for listeners. He serves the largest hog production area in the
state. Jim says dryness has caused plants to exhibit dormant growth. Little rain is in the
forecast.

COTTON ACREAGE...is larger in the state, says Gene Ragan (WTVY, Dothan, AL), and Georgia
expects to produce one million more bales this year. A number of reasons are behind the
increase, including good prices, the boll weevil eradication program, and producers diversifying
their output beyond peanuts and cattle. Congratulations to Gene. His 70th birthday was
recognized by the station's staff during his noontime program. Gene is in his 36th consecutive
year of farm programming at the TV station, and his 41st year in farm radio.

UPDATE...on Bob Middendorf, formerly with CANN Network, Wisconsin. Bob remains in the
media, moving to advertising sales for Country Today weekly newspaper in Eau Claire, WI.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











A FUND RAISING RALLY...was held in Bakersfield for an immigrant farmer from Taiwan, says
Roy Isom (KMJ, Fresno, CA). The farmer is charged with killing an endangered species, either a
kangaroo rat or a bluntnosed lizard, while plowing his field. His $30,000 tractor was confiscated.
He faces one-year in jail and a $300,000 fine if convicted. Another area farmer had 160 acres of
land taken and was fined for destroying endangered species habitat. Roy says the Endangered
Species Act and its enforcement are hot issues in his region.

NEW VOICE...on the Linder Farm Network, Willmar, MN, is Keith Lundberg who has worked in
radio and farm broadcasting in Iowa and Minnesota. He fills an opening left by Shelly Beyer who
moved to the Minnesota Farm Bureau, in St. Paul, to serve as director of communications.

MAJOR EXPANSION...of business scope is underway, says Orion Samuelson (WGN, Tribune
Radio Networks, Chicago). Tribune has agreed to acquire Farm Journal Inc., publisher of Farm
Journal magazine. Orion says the cross pollination of coverage and combined resources will
provide expanded reach fo-adertisers and service to producers.

VIC POWELL m c-tin
Office of Communications




A2 iL ': Q(i7


Farm Bro


casters better
casters Letter


United States


ice of Communications


Washington, DC 20250-1340


Letter No. 2667 \ / June 17, 1994

U.S. EXPORT DEM Jnitl$n.ttis farm exports are expected to set records this year
in the top three U.S. a ~ ts, Japan, Canada, and Mexico. U.S. exports to Japan
are forecast up 8 percent from 1993 levels to $9.1 billion, with a 35 percent gain in fruit,
nut and vegetable exports. Exports to Canada are forecast at $5.4 billion, up 4 percent.
NAFTA is increasing trade between the countries. Exports to Mexico are expected up 7
percent to $3.9 billion. NAFTA's elimination of high tariffs have boosted trade across the
southern border. U.S. exports to the European Union are forecast down 3 percent, and
down 16 percent to the nations of the former Soviet Union. Joel Greene (202) 219-0822.

RURAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE -- A conference on rural development and
telecommunications will be held by USDA in St. Louis, MO, July 11-15. The conference will
feature information about how to participate in rural economic development programs of the
Rural Electrification Administration (REA), and advanced telecommunications networks for
rural schools and hospitals. REA officials will also discuss lending programs for business and
industry, water and sewer development programs, the Empowerment Zone and Enterprise
Community Program. Conducted in St. Louis at the Adam's Mark Hotel, registration is $150
for all sessions. REA staff will help with registration by calling (202) 690-3594. Contact:
Eileen McMahon (202) 720-1255.

TOBACCO CONTENT RULE -- USDA has issued a rule requiring cigarettes manufactured in
the U.S. to contain at least 75 percent domestic tobacco. Beginning this year U.S. cigarette
manufacturers will be required to pay an assessment and make tobacco purchases if
domestic tobacco content falls below 75 percent. The rule applies to U.S. cigarette
manufacturers who produce and sell more than one percent of cigarettes sold in the U.S.
Contact: Robert Feist (202) 720-6789.

BIOLOGICAL CONTROL IS WORKING -- In some years, hordes of crickets have devoured
crop and rangeland plants inflicting millions of dollars in damage before being stopped by
costly insecticides. A team of USDA and university scientists developed a method to mix
a one-celled microbe with wheat bran into cricket bait. The protozoa consume fat in
crickets, killing the pests. Infected female crickets lay fewer eggs, which also become
infected. The protozoa now infect up to 90 percent of crickets in parts of Idaho and
Montana. Contact: Jerome Onsager (406) 994-3344.

LEAFY SPURGE -- Bacteria that live in the roots of leafy spurge could be a significant enemy
of this deep-rooted rangeland weed. Leafy spurge infests about 2.5 million acres in the
northern Great Plains, and costs $35 million annually in crop losses and chemical controls.
USDA scientists have found two beneficial bacteria that harm the weed. In greenhouse tests
seedling emergence and root length were reduced by one-half. Agricultural Research Service
scientists are conducting field tests this season to evaluate effects of the bacteria on leafy
spurge. Contact: Robert Kremer (314) 882-6408.


epujoy \o f4s!3IUR








COMMUTING TO WORK -- Latest statistics from the census show that the average commute
to work in nonmetro areas is 19 minutes, compared to 23 minutes for workers in metro
areas. There has been a large jump, 46 percent, of people taking longer than 30 minutes
to get to work, reflecting an increase in residents adjacent to large metro areas. A decrease
in the number of jobs in rural areas without a corresponding decline in population appears
to have forced a higher proportion of farming-dependent county residents to work at jobs
outside their home counties. Nearly one-quarter of rural workers have jobs outside their
home county. Contact: Linda Ghelfi (202) 219-0520.

AG TAXES -- Over two-thirds of farmland owners identify their principal occupation as other
than farming. More than half, 53 percent, of real property taxes are paid by these owners.
A USDA report, Taxing Farmland in the United States, states that Agriculture draws on the
resources of, and pays out income to, a much larger community than farm operators. It
shows that income flows from the farm communities to other areas and States where land
owners work and reside, and investments and real property taxes flow from non-operator
land owners to the communities where the farmland is located. Thus, the fluctuations in
farm income and value of farm assets may be reflected or absorbed in other sectors of the
economy. Contact: Gene Wunderlich (202) 219-0425.

FEWER FARMS PRODUCING MORE -- In 1935 there were 6.8 million farms in the U.S. In
1990 the number had dropped over two-thirds (69%) to 2.1 million farms. In the 1990's
farming accounts for 2.3 percent of all U.S. jobs, about 9 million people, and produces 1.4
percent of the gross domestic product. Despite these modest statistics, agriculture is vital
to the U.S. economy. The smaller number of farms fed an expanding nation and in one year,
1990, produced enough for export valued at $390 billion, generating a trade surplus in ag
products of $16.6 billion. But a USDA publication, Family Economics Review, shows that
only half (56%) of U.S. farm operators claim farming as their major occupation. Most of the
income of the average farm operator household is from off-farm wage and salary jobs.
Contact: Joan Courtless (301) 436-8461.

IRRADIATION -- Recent studies have shown that when consumers learn more about the
benefits and safety of irradiation, they're more willing to buy irradiated products. The
irradiation process does not make the food radioactive, rather it kills 99 percent of
Salmonella organisms in the food. Listeria, Campylobacter, and E. coli have similar
sensitivies. Although the irradiation process is enough to reduce problems from these
pathogens, it's not high enough to sterilize the product. Refrigeration is required. Irradiation
may be regarded as a precaution to lessen the risk of bacterial illnesses. Contact: Judy
Harrison (706) 542-8860.

COOKING HAZARD -- Burning charcoal produces carbon monoxide, which has no odor and
cannot be seen. Each year about 25 people die and hundreds suffer from carbon monoxide
poisoning when they burn charcoal in enclosed areas such as their homes or inside tents
when camping. Opening a window or door may not reduce the gas to a safe level. If it rains
this summer on your backyard charcoal barbecue, keep the charcoal fire outside. Contact:
Betty Sulvach (804) 371-0866.


SRadio-TV (202) 720-4330 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1932 -- School lunches are being placed on a diet, and are expected
to be leaner and even more nutritious. Lori Spiczka reports. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1413 -- New fabric products; dangerous blades; spider control; what's
in your living room; FDA proposed seafood safety system. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1924 -- A new military market for farmers; U.S. apples on the way
to China; fire ant Achilles heel; drug prevents cryptosporidiosis; attacking bovine
tuberculosis.


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, June 23, agricultural trade update;
Friday, June 24, livestock slaughter; Monday, June 27, ag chemical usage; Tuesday, June
28, weekly weather and crop situation; Wednesday, June 29, ag prices. (Weekly reel of
features.) These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.






FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the 25th anniversary of the Expanded Food & Nutrition
Education Program (EFNEP).

ACTUALITIES -- USDA assistant secretary Jim Lyons on a design guide to make public lands
more accessible to more people. Soil Conservation Service chief Paul Johnson on the
progress of conservation plans for highly erodible cropland. USDA chief meteorologist
Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the exchange of rare plant species between
U.S. and Russian scientists. Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for the beach and
camping.


On satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6. 8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz.: Thursdays from 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08134 069 6
OFFMIKE
ALFALFA QUALITY...has been the best since 1991, says Susan Risinger (WJAG, Norfolk, NE).
Corn and beans are developing well, with few insect problems. Susan says their Saturday
morning call-in program with an Extension educator from the University of Nebraska has revealed
that the dry conditions this past spring allowed weeds to get a foothold in fields. Weeds give
producers another management challenge in allocating resources.

COTTON...is developing well, says Jim Stewart (KFYO, Lubbock, TX). Rangeland is getting dry
and needs moisture. Rains so far have been spotty.

STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS...has become visible in the wheat growing region of Montana, says
Brent Stanghelle (KMON, Great Falls). Extent of infestation won't be known until mid-July. Brent
says producers tell him there has been a doubling of cattle being brought across the boarder from
Canada. He says producers believe the increase may be in preparation for large contracts coming
due next month.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










ARMY AND CUT WORM...infestation has been heavy, forcing some producers to replant corn,
says Kevin Jay (WINU, Highland, IL). Aerial applicators have been doing a brisk business. Kevin
says fields are dry and no rain in the forecast through the end of the month. New equipment
sales were higher this spring. Dealers could barely keep product on the lot. Kevin says a local
dealer told him that when he goes to the coffee shop now he receives harsh looks. The
producers need rain to help pay the equipment loans.

MOVED...Dave Sparks to Dodge City School District public affairs, from KGNO, Dodge City, KS.
Steve Stein is the new farm director. Julie Russell, news director at the stations says hail storms
have hit the region. Damage has been spotty.

LONG HOURS...in hot conditions can push a producer to become less vigilant about safety, but
the dangers of oper tiet near farm equipment last all day long. Talk safety. Keep 'em safe.



Office of Communications








Farm oadcasters Letter



United S Depart en& gict ure Office of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1340

Letter 2668 June 24, 1994

ETHANO -- ifit city for ethanol is forecast to expand. The Environmental
Protection A acted to announce soon a 30 percent market share for reformulated
gasoline. The announcement will require oxygenates such as ethanol to be used in 9
mandated areas and 86 areas that may decide to be included. In addition, ethanol would
continue to be used to reduce carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles in certain areas
during the winter months. Ethanol production for fuel use in 1993/94 is expected to use
475 million bushels of corn, an increase of 49 million bushels over the previous year.
Contact: Roger Conway (202) 219-1941.

FEED DEMAND -- Animal numbers indicate relatively strong demand for feed grains. Dairy
producers are feeding additional concentrates to increase milk production per cow. Feed
needs for hogs will remain fairly high, but feed demand for cattle in the remainder of the
marketing year is expected to remain about the same as last year. Poultry sector feed
demand is expected to remain strong because of an increase in broiler production. Domestic
demand for broiler meat is strong, especially in the fast food sector that is adding roasted
chicken to the menu. Export demand for dark meat is strong. Broiler producers are
responding by building additional facilities, keeping feed demand strong in 1994/95. Contact:
Charles Van Lahr (202) 720-7369.

CORN EXPORTS DOWN -- This summer will see the lowest U.S. corn exports since
1985/86. Weak world demand and sharp competition from China, Argentina, and South
Africa will account for much of the decline. But it is a different picture with Mexico where
corn shipments have been up sharply, and are likely to pick up again for U.S. exporters this
summer under the North American Free Trade Agreement. Contact: Steve MacDonald (202)
219-0822.

TRANSPORTATION -- Slow export demand for U.S. grains is reflecting back to slack demand
for transportation. Rail and barge shipments are at the lowest level so far in the 1990's.
Rail shipments of grain averaged about 26,000 cars per week in the first seven months of
this fiscal year, 11 percent below a year earlier. The largest reduction was at Mississippi
River ports. Rail grain shipments were down at other ports also. Barge shipments on the
Mississippi and Illinois River systems remain lackluster. Shipments in April were down 13
percent from year earlier figures. Contact: T.Q. Hutchinson (202) 219-0840.

PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE LIFTED -- USDA has removed Louisiana and Mississippi
from the pink bollworm quarantine list. The action removes restrictions on the movement
of certain items from regulated areas. Pink bollworm is one of the world's most destructive
pests of cotton. The insect spread to the United States from Mexico in 1917. Extensive
research by USDA, in cooperation with state departments of agriculture, developed a variety
of methods to eliminate the pest. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1933 -- John Snyder reviews the seafood safety system being
proposed by USDA. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1414 -- What is "fresh" chicken?; homemade low fat desserts;
universal access; wanted, 1200 workers eager for jobs and education; cryptic
cryptosporidiosis. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1925 -- GATT update; Congress grappling with pesticide reform;
bright outlook for cotton; farmland values; tobacco outlook. (Weekly reel of features.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, June 30, tobacco exports, tropical
products report, grain stocks report, hogs and pigs report, acreage report; Friday, July 1,
dairy report, world horticultural trade, U.S. export opportunities; Monday, July 4, HOLIDAY;
Tuesday, July 5, weekly weather and crop report. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE
FEATURES --

Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety at the beach, with tips from USDA's meat and poultry
hotline on packing coolers. (Rerun from 6/93, 2:11). Additional B-roll on food safety at the
beach, :53 seconds.

Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety at the campground, with grilling tips from USDA's meat
& poultry hotline. (Rerun from 6/93, 2:35). Additional B-roll on food safety at the
campground, :66 seconds.

Tyson Gair, of Mississippi State University, reports on USDA research on insect resistant
cotton plants, genetically engineered to contain BT, an environmentally-friendly bacteria.
The cotton has done well in field tests and could be available to growers within a year.

Patrick O'Leary reports on the exchange of rare plant germplasm between U.S. and former
Soviet scientists to help preserve plant biodiversity in agriculture. (Rerun from 12/93, 2:00).

On satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880
MHz.: Thursdays from 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.

COMPLAINT, COMMENT, FEEDBACK regarding USDA broadcast services?
Call Larry Quinn (202) 720-6072









FARMLAND VALUES -- U.S. farmland values this year are forecast to increase 3 to 4 percent
above last year's level. It marks the 8th consecutive rise in value since 1987. The average
value for farmland and buildings is $744 per acre. Contact: Cathy Greene (202) 219-0313.

NATIONAL SERVICE -- USDA will operate the largest federal agency component of the
National Service initiative. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says USDA will operate 42
AmeriCorps projects designed to fight hunger, improve nutrition, preserve national forests,
improve environmental quality, promote rural development, increase rural water delivery, and
boost flood-relief efforts in the Midwest. Beginning this September USDA will place 1,200
AmeriCorps national service participants in the projects located in 32 states. The
participants earn college or vocational scholarships while performing the service in President
Clinton's national service initiative. Contact: Joel Berg (202) 720-6350.

JOB GROWTH -- Not all jobs in agriculture are located on the farm or ranch. One of the
fastest growing segments of agriculture is retail food establishments, a 62 percent increase
in jobs since 1975. Grocery stores provided over 89 percent of all retail food employment.
The 181,000 retail food stores provide 3.5 million jobs, about 2.5 percent of total U.S.
employment. Over three-quarters of retail food jobs are in metro counties. Some states
more than doubled their retail food jobs during the 1975-1990 period. Nevada increased
161 percent, Alaska 141 percent, Florida 121 percent, and Vermont had a 115 percent
increase in retail food jobs. The job growth reflects the increase in new residents in these
states. The workers complete the linkage between farmers, processors, and consumers.
Contact: Alex Majchrowicz (202) 219-0525.

FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID -- A committee of nutrition and health experts is being established
to review research and recommend revisions for the 1995 edition of the Dietary Guidelines
for Americans. USDA's Food Guide Pyramid puts the Guidelines into action by illustrating
and defining the amounts and types of foods to eat daily. The Guidelines and Pyramid
provide the basis for consumer education programs carried out by USDA. The Guidelines
reflect a consensus of dietary recommendations updated every five years to reflect current
scientific research. Contact: Jim Loftus (202) 720-4623.

KEEPING CARROTS -- Carrots are an excellent source of betacarotene, which the body
converts into vitamin A. Unlike many nutrients, carotenoids do not dissolve in water, and
can be cooked without a reduction in nutritional value. When storing carrots keep them
cool, away from heat and light, in circulating air, and separate from apples and other fruits
that produce ethylene gas. The gas encourages development of compounds that make
carrots taste bitter. Contact: Gail Hanula (706) 542-8866.

HEART DISEASE AND STROKE -- USDA research shows that to protect against heart disease
and stroke, older people may need more of three B vitamins than they now consume. The
amino acid homocysteine is known to contribute to blocked arteries in the heart and brain.
The studies showed that those individuals with high homocysteine levels were below
average in at least one of three B vitamins: vitamin B6; vitamin B12; or folic acid. Too little
of these vitamins can cause a buildup of homosysteine. The needed amounts of B vitamins
can be obtained from foods. Liver and kidney are the richest sources of all three vitamins,
and dark green leafy vegetables are an excellent low-fat source of folic acid. Contact: Irwin
Rosenberg (617) 556-3330.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08134 074 6
OFFMIKE
FREE PORK...being offered at the World Pork Expo and good weather brought out the public, says
Gary Truitt (AgriAmerica Network, Indianapolis). As part of the network's coverage, Gary
conducted a live stage show at the event and hosted a reception for media personnel covering the
activities. County fair season has arrived. Gary plans to cover about 20 fairs in the coming
weeks.

GORGIOUS GREEN...plants as far as the eye can see, but things may not be quite as good as
they seem, says John Vigested (KCJB, Minot, ND). Too much rain is causing wheat spot, and
the outlook calls for more rain. John says the good news from the cool, wet weather is the
damage to grasshoppers. They're nonexistent this year. But the mosquito problem is another
matter.

CROP DEVELOPMENT...is ahead of previous years, but producers with slow draining land have
experienced flooding and ponding, says Bruce Lease (KQAD/KLQL, Luverne, MN).



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Communications
Room 528A
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











A LOT OF WESTERN ACREAGE...has been moving under the wings of Evan Slack's (Evan Slack
Network, Denver) airplane. In the past few weeks he's covered stock growers conventions in
Wyoming and Montana, and cattlemen's conventions in Nebraska, Colorado and Idaho. He
served as speaker at the recent Colorado Hay Days, and will cover in Idaho the National Dry Bean
Dealers convention. Evan says there is real concern among producers about the drastic drop in
the fed cattle market and what prices calves and yearlings will bring this fall.

TOO LITTLE RAIN...late freezes and blight have lowered the wheat forecast, says Carl Shearer
(KVRP, Haskell, TX). The local crop is forecast to be 27 percent below last year's totals.
Emergency haying and grazing is being conducted in certain counties he serves.

REDUCING EXPOSURE...to the sun can reduce the opportunity for development of skin cancer.
Cover the skin with a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, a wide brimmed hat, and sun screen lotion
on the back of hands and lowe face. A little time and cents now can save big dollars later.

VIC POWELL -_
Office of Comnunications