Farm broadcasters letter - 1993

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Title:
Farm broadcasters letter - 1993
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Division
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Broadcasting and Film
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
-letter no. 2669 (July 1, 1994).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by: the Office of Communication, Radio and Television Service; 19 -<May 2, 1980>, Feb. 24, 1983-19 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division; <May 16, 1980>-Feb. 17, 1983 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Broadcasting and Film; <Apr. 27, 1990>-199 by: the Office of Public Affairs, Radio-TV Division; 199 -<1994> by: Office of Communications.
General Note:
Description based on: Letter no. 1882 (Nov. 3, 1978); title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34A

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02563831
lccn - sc 77000719
issn - 0364-5444
Classification:
lcc - S21 .A82
System ID:
AA00000580:00005

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Farm Broadcasters Le



United States Department of Agric Office of Public A r Radio-TV Division Washi taftfy2V5 otJ)J a 720-4330

Letter No. 2592 January 8, 1993

NUTRITION LABELING E ULATIONS -- A released final regulations requiring
nutrition labels on proc e eat an ry products by July 1994. "The new labels
will be an important tool to s select more healthful diets," said Dr. H.
Russell Cross, administrator of s Food Safety and Inspection Service. "We expect
the labels also will provide food companies with an incentive to improve the nutritional
quality of their products." The regulations closely parallel those of the Food and Drug
Administration for labels on foods other than meat and poultry. As a result, consumers
will see the same nutrition label format on virtually all processed foods. Contact: Jim
Greene (202) 720-0314.

MITE-RESISTANT BEES -- Researchers with USDA's Agricultural Research Service are
scheduled this spring to release honey bees from Yugoslavia that resist two mites now
threatening the supply of bees needed to pollinate crops. USDA will release a stock to
several bee breeders, and in turn, they will produce queens that will then be distributed
to beekeepers. This is the first time the agency has ever released an insect as breeding
stock. Researchers say the Yugoslavian bees have reliable resistance to varros and
tracheal mites. Domestic bees lack this defense against the two mites that have caused
extensive losses since they were discovered in the United States in the mid-1980s. The
mites are considered a serious agricultural threat because bees pollinate billions of dollars
worth of crops each year. Contact: Sean Adams (301) 504-9108.

FARM INCOMES INCREASE -- Record or near-record yields for many major U.S. field
crops, such as grains, soybeans and cotton, have raised estimates of 1992 incomes. For
1993, first indications point to net cash income approaching 1990's record. Cash
income and net farm income both increased in 1992, and calendar year 1993's net cash
income is projected very near or equal to 1990's record. This is due to just slightly lower
receipts, much higher Government payments and only slightly higher cash production
expenses. Prices for the rest of the 1992/93 marketing year are expected to be down for
all major field crops. Lower 1993 crop prices will likely offset the higher production that
will carry over for sale in calendar 1993. Contact: Charles Dodson (202) 219-0808.

TOBACCO SITUATION -- The U.S. tobacco crop is larger this year than last, and total
supplies are larger in 1992/93 because beginning stocks are also up. Average prices rose
in North Carolina and Virginia, however, excessive rain hurt tobacco quality in Georgia
and Florida. Total U.S. tobacco production this year is forecast up 1 percent from 1991
and the highest since 1984. Domestic use will likely decline but exports may gain a little
this year. U.S. cigarette consumption in calendar 1992 decreased about 2 percent,
however, an increase in exports will set a record of about 185 billion cigarettes. Use of
cigar and chewing tobacco continue to decline. Contact: Verner Grise (202) 219-0890.









SOUTHERN STATES GET HELP WITH BOLL WEEVIL -- Since 1983, USDA's Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service has worked with growers and agriculture officials in
Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina to help states eradicate the boll weevil, a pest
in the cotton belt. In 1987 the program expanded into Georgia, Florida and portions of
Alabama. The pest was eradicated in Virginia in 1983 and in North Carolina in 1988.
And now, for the first time since the early 1900s, South Carolina cotton farmers did not
have to apply pesticide to protect their crop from the boll weevil. "This is a major victory
in the expanding battle to eradicate the boll weevil from infested areas of the cotton
belt," said B. Glen Lee, deputy administrator for APHIS's Plant Protection and Quarantine
program. Boll weevils were first discovered in the United States in 1892 and cause an
estimated $200 million in crop losses annually. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-7799.

WORLD SUGAR -- World 1992/93 sugar production is estimated up from the September
forecast, but down slightly from the 1991/92 record crop. Global consumption is
estimated up 1.5 percent from 1991/92. Global production is forecast to exceed
consumption for the fourth straight year in 1992/93. World sugar exports in 1992/93
are forecast slightly higher than last season. USDA forecasts fiscal 1993 sugar
production at record levels, up 4.4 percent from last year's outturn. Contact: Peter
Buzzanell (202) 219-0886.

COTTON UPDATE -- As the 1992 U.S. cotton harvest draws to a close, dry conditions
are still needed in both the Southwest and Southeast. In the Southwest, the percentage
of cotton harvested remains above 1991, but trails the 5-year average. In the Southeast
wet conditions have delayed the harvest. Contact: Bob Skinner (202) 219-0840.

DISEASE THREATENS HAZELNUT TREES -- Researchers with USDA's Agricultural
Research Service are trying to find ways to eradicate a slow-moving blight that threatens
European hazelnut trees in Oregon, where nearly all the U.S. crop is grown. The disease
showed up in southwestern Washington about 20 years ago. Since then, it has
destroyed most commercial orchards in the state and has spread to about 6 percent of
Oregon's hazelnut orchards. Although the nuts are not affected by the disease, the trees
can die after 7 or 8 years. Contact: John Pinkerton (503) 750-8784.

NEW PLANT VARIETY PROTECTION -- USDA issued certificates of protection to
developers of 24 new varieties of seed-reproduced plants including Kentucky bluegrass,
corn, lettuce, pea, sorghum and soybean. Developers of the new varieties will have the
exclusive right to reproduce, sell, import and export their products in the U.S. for 18
years. Certificates of protection are granted after a review of the breeders' records and
claims that each variety is novel, uniform and stable. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202)
720-8998.


Editor: Carol Childers
R-TV Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1857 -- Jim Henry reports on studies indicating the quality of our
"golden" years may relate directly to the nutritional quality of our diet. (Weekly reel --
13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1339 -- Investing in the Russian Far East; mushrooms and the
environment; weight loss advice; desserts going strong; and learning to care. (Weekly
reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1849 -- USDA news highlights; soybeans on flex acres;
U.S. hog inventory; a new/old farm crisis; and farm finance future. (Weekly reel of news
features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1602 -- Addiction to inactivity; a little bit helps; boosting
metabolism; darkside of dieting; and reducing health care costs. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, January 15, livestock and poultry
situation, vegetables; Tuesday, January 19, U.S. ag trade update, crop/weather update;
Thursday, January 21, oil crops situation, catfish processing; Friday, January 22,
livestock/poultry update, dairy outlook. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on a livestock video judging contest; Lynn Wyvill
reports on teaching children about food safety; Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's consumer
quiz; Artis Ford, Mississippi State University, reports on rural health concerns; and Dave
Luciani, Michigan State University, reports on the war against bugs.

ACTUALITIES -- Agriculture Secretary Edward Madigan on USDA restructuring; USDA
meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; and USDA economist Bob
McElroy on agricultural income and finance.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety using slow cookers; Pat
O'Leary reports on changing farm numbers; and DeBoria Janifer reports on nutrition
labeling regulations.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka.
Five minutes of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., ET, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., ET, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., ET.







OFFMIKE 3 1262 0l 655 0

SPRING...will be a scramble for producers in Minnesota, says Roger Strom (WCCO, Minneapolis).
The wet conditions caused a spread-out harvest, some corn remained in the fields through
Christmas, offering little opportunity for field work preparation. Farmers will need an early spring.
Roger says winter has been mild so far. While that's good for heating costs, it has prompted
producers to keep a close watch for the development of mold in their bins. Much of the grain
was stored with high moisture content. Congratulations to Roger. The Minnesota Farm Bureau
presented to him their Communicator of the Year award.

LOOKING FORWARD...to a more normal year in 1993 is Matt Westergaard (KMIT, Mitchell, SD).
Matt says the corn harvest continues in the southern portion of the state where producers needed
firm ground to get into the fields. There is also concern about mold developing in their grain bins.
Matt broadcast live from the Dakota Farm Show, in Vermillion, SD, January 5-7. Matt says it
gave him an opportunity to meet his audience. The Farm Show draws producers from four
states.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













MOST OF THE HARVEST...has been completed; what Missouri producers are looking for is better
prices, says Gene Millard (KFEQ, St. Joseph). Excellent yields and adequate drying have bins full
and in good condition. Gene will join Gary Wergin in broadcasting live from the Empire Farm
Show, January 29-30, in St. Joseph, MO. Gene will be traveling to Phoenix, AZ, to cover the
upcoming National Cattlemen's Association convention. Congratulations to Gene. The Missouri
Farm Bureau presented to him their highest recognition, the Outstanding Service to Agriculture
award. It recognizes his 28 years of maintaining a focus on agriculture at KFEQ.

COMPLETE...the information requested and return ihe postage paid card if you are among those
broadcasters receiving our weekly cassette service. The card was included in the mailing dated
January 5, 1993. We are updating our list, please return the card if you want to continue
receiving the cassette. If a card was not in the cassette envelope, please call to let us know.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States De' At of Agricultuur f a e of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330
APR 1 5 1993
Letter No 9"3f R 15? January 15, 1993
VA Universi
MADIGA DA10 S RADIO
CONFEREN C&_, Jan y
12, Secretary 0 A Yuq u
Edward Madigan held an
open-topic radio conference
with farm broadcasters. This
was the last that Madigan will
make with broadcasters before
leaving office. Among the
many issues Madigan discussed
were GA TT, NAFTA and the
reorganization of USDA.
(See photo A).



MADIGAN ADDRESSES USDA RESTRUCTURING -- On January 7, Secretary of
Agriculture held a press conference to address preliminary plans to restructure USDA field
offices. "The current USDA field office structure is comparable to that which existed
when 20 percent of the U.S. population lived on farms and was without modern
communication. Today, less than 1 percent of the U.S. population lives on farms and
has all of the modern transportation and telecommunication services available to them."
Madigan made reference to the number of field offices in relation to the number of
farmers, and stressed that restructuring is not going to effect the quality of USDA
services. "This is not about reducing service to the farmers," Madigan said. "It is about
being able to afford to improve our services to farmers in a manner that respects the role
of the American taxpayer." Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.

NEW ENTRIES IN FARMER-OWNED RESERVE -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan
announced that producers may enter 1992-crop corn, grain sorghum and barley in the
Farmer-Owned Reserve. "I am making this announcement now so producers can plan
their marketing and price support activities," Madigan said. Total quantity of corn, grain
sorghum and barley in the FOR may not exceed 600 million bushels. Madigan also
emphasized producers may not obtain a FOR loan until the expiration of a nine-month
regular, nonrecourse price support loan. FOR loan collateral must meet all quality
requirements for feed grains that are pledged as collateral for a nonrecourse price support
loan. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.


Aa~.-~,L)::j~3C!








SOYBEANS ON OPTIONAL FLEXIBLE ACRES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan
announced that soybeans may be planted on optional flexible acreage as allowed by the
1993 price support and production adjustment programs. Deficiency payments will not
be made to optional flexible acreage planted to a crop other than the crop for which
acreage base has been established. However, producers who plant program crops or
oilseeds on optional flexible acres may receive price support. Contact: Robert Feist
(202) 720-6789.

NEW CORN RESISTANT TO PESTS -- A new corn, designated GT-FAWCC (C5), that
reduces fall armyworm leaf damage by 25 percent has been released to plant breeders.
The new germplasm will be particularly helpful in the South, where armyworm causes the
most problems. Scientists estimate the armyworm causes $25 to $30 million in damage
to crops in the southeastern states each year. Scientists with USDA's Agricultural
Research Service developed the corn germplasm by screening several thousand plants
from Mexico, the Caribbean and Brazil. Contact: Sean Adams (301) 504-9108.

ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY -- The world's first calves of predetermined sex produced
from sorted sperm and in vitro fertilization of cows' eggs have been born in Cambridge,
England. The sperm sorting technology was developed by a USDA scientist. USDA has
patented the technology and issued a non-exclusive license to Animal Biotechnology
Cambridge Ltd. of Cambridge, England. In developing the sperm-sorting technology at
the Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Md., researchers have obtained live births
of predetermined sex in swine, sheep and rabbits. Researchers said 75 to 90 percent of
the offspring were of the predicted sex. Contact: Sandy Miller Hays (301)
504-9089.

SOIL QUALITY TEST NEEDED -- A global network to monitor soil health is urgently
needed, according to scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service. Currently,
there is nothing available that can measure and predict farming's effects on all the key
aspects of soil quality, such as soil productivity, environmental quality, food safety and
quality, and human health. Scientists say it is no longer just a question of measuring the
traditional physical and chemical properties to predict crop yields. Contact: Don Comis
(301) 504-9073.

LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY UPDATE -- Slaughter levels continue to be held down by
current feedlots and a series of winter storms which slowed weight gains. Brisk beef
sales following Thanksgiving resulted in increased orders at retail levels. Tight beef
supplies and beef import restraints in December, and concern for supplies of lean
processing beef, caused prices to fluctuate for 90 percent lean beef. Contact: Ron
Gustafson (202) 219-1285.


Editor: Carol Childers
R-TV Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1858 -- John Snyder looks at changes in the mushroom industry that
could affect how farmers do business and how much we pay for the tasty fungus. (Weekly reel
-- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1340 -- Reflections of an outgoing ag secretary; food safety update; frozen
pies; curbs on wood burning?; deicers and your lawn. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1850 -- USDA news highlights; a first look at new ag
secretary designate; feed grains into the reserve after all; agriculture cruisin' 63; and ag finance
outlook. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1603 -- Dry country legume; landscaping with globemallow; breeding
resistant pecans; new pecan disease; and strength training vs. aerobics. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, January 21, catfish processing; Friday,
January 22, oil crops outlook, livestock and poultry update, dairy outlook; Monday, January 25,
crop values summary; Tuesday, January 26, crop/weather update; Thursday, January 28,
poultry production, world tobacco situation; Friday, January 29, ag prices, cattle on feed, sheep
and lambs on feed (first report of a new USDA series). These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for giving and receiving mail order food
gifts and Pat O'Leary reports on real Christmas trees.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan on USDA's reorganization and
Russia's default on debt; Excerpts from confirmation hearing of Representative Mike Espy (D-
Miss.), Secretary of Agriculture nominee; USDA World Board Chairman James Donald on
outlook for wheat, corn and soybean crops and USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on
crop progress and the drought in the West.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on nutrition labeling for meat and poultry; Pat
O'Leary has a three-part series on the changing number of U.S. farms; Lynn Wyvill reports on
USDA soy oil diesel research and Brian Norris reports on rural health care information.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. Five
minutes of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., ET, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., ET, and Mondays from
8 8:30 a.m., ET.






4 31262 08300 660 0

OFFMIKE

BAD WEATHER...wouldn't be a bad deal. That's the way Larry Burchfield (KWCK, Searcy, AR)
put it when talking about Ag Expo '93 in Searcy, Jan. 15-16. Larry says inclement weather
increases attendance. Exhibit space has sold out. Larry says there are more feed and livestock
companies participating this year, exhibiting to the region's row crop and livestock producers.
Larry will be broadcasting live from the new exhibit hall at the fair grounds.

NO-TILL...may get a boost due to the lack of opportunity for fall tillage work, says Gary Kinnett
(WIAI, Danville, IL). Many corn and bean producers were harvesting during December due to wet
fields. But the yields were terrific, some corn coming in at 236 bushels per acre.

FARM ISSUES...have been assigned to Karl Fruendt (KTKA-TV, Topeka, KS). Karl also covers the
state capital.




Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










TEN-DAY...tour of Israel was covered in December by Don Green (AgDay, Lafayette, IN). Among
the many activities sampled by the group of 31 AgDay viewers was life on a collective farm. Al
Pell, who hosted the tour and conducted several interviews for his daily syndicated program, says
Israel is a world leader in irrigation and greenhouse technology.

FARM BROADCASTER...Public Affairs Specialist position is open at USDA Radio. For information
about how to apply, contact Norita Fortune (202) 720-4802, USDA Office of Personnel, Room
12-W Administration Bldg., 14th & Independence Ave. SW, Washington D.C. 20250. Ask for
information about announcement 13-3-54. Closing date is January 27, 1993.

CORRECTION...Kathleen Erickson (KLSN, Jefferson, IA) reports that her husband's first name is
Bruce, not Scott, a state in the December 24, 1992 issue. Our apologies.

VIC POWELL Ri TD
Chief, Radio & TV Division







Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2594 Marston Science January 22, 1993

APR 1 6 19

Mike Espy, former Member o1 ,rtI-rfis
Congress (D-2nd MS), is the
25th U.S. secretary of
agriculture. At his Senate
confirmation hearings Espy
said among the actions he
plans for the Departefodt -
are: placing major
on expanding e
improving r velopment
efforts; an reading
farm inco 40
Photo by n Schun er.



FOOD A REAL- BA po3Aly' Food prices in 1993 are expected to increase at a slower rate
than inflation. "The Consumer Price Index for all food is expected to increase two to four
percent above last year's levels," says Bill Thomas, an Extension Service economist at
the University of Georgia. The cost of processing and distributing food increased two
percent in 1992, while the farm value of food declined 2.4 percent. Consumer demand
for ready-to-serve food items declined last year. "Instead of buying ready prepared
foods, consumers have been buying more basic ingredients to prepare meals at home,"
Thomas says. Contact: Bill Thomas (706) 542-9081.

PILOT WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM -- USDA has tentatively accepted 49,888 acres
into the Pilot Wetlands Reserve Program. The pilot program is being conducted in nine
states, and can accept only 50,000 acres at a total cost of $46.4 million. Farmers and
ranchers had submitted 466,000 acres. The producers are selling permanent easements
to USDA's Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service to restore land to
productive wetland habitat. USDA will pay landowners for the acreage covered by the
easement and up to 75 percent of the needed restoration costs to ensure that wetland
conditions prevail. States in the pilot program are California, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota,
Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.

WINTER VEGETABLE ACREAGE -- 1993 winter crop fresh market vegetable acreage is
estimated at 187,900 acres, up 2 percent from a year ago. More acres were planted to
snap beans, carrots, cauliflower, sweet corn bell peppers, and tomatoes. Contact: Arvin
Budge (202) 720-4285.








COSTS DECLINE -- Now there's a headline. Under a formula set by Congress the grazing
fee for Western public lands administered by USDA's Forest Service, and the Department
of Interior's Bureau of Land Management, will decline by six cents. The new fee is $1.86
per animal unit, down from $1.92. An animal unit month is the amount of forage needed
per month to sustain one cow and her calf, one horse, or five sheep and goats. The
annually adjusted fee goes into effect March 1, 1993. Contact: Pamela Finney (202)
205-1584.




Proposed restructuring of USDA was
announced by Secretary Madigan at
a news conference on January 19, 1993.
The proposal includes eliminating 1, 19 1 United States Department of Agricuture
field offices, and reorganizing the
USDA headquarters management structure
by reducing 26 operating agencies to 13,
and reducing 14 subcabinet officials to ff
4 undersecretaries.
USDA photo by Byron Schumaker.




PREDICTING SOIL EROSION -- The formula used by USDA to predict soil loss has been
revised. The universal soil loss equation, the primary tool used in conservation planning
worldwide will now use more specific information than the old version on rainfall,
seasonal changes, and factors such as crop growth, crop residue cover, surface
roughness, and soil moisture. The revision makes the equation more accurate, and will
help conservation agencies and farmers control soil erosion. Contact: Kenneth Renard
(602) 670-6481.

OREGON FREE OF BOVINE BRUCELLOSIS -- Oregon now joins 31 other states that have
eradicated bovine brucellosis. The infectious and contagious bacterial disease affects
cattle and bison. Humans can get the disease by drinking unpasteurized milk from
infected animals or by handling infected animals. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301)

WHAT CHOLESTEROL? -- People who are 100 years old or older are twice as likely as
other elderly consumers to drink whole milk and eat real butter and ice cream. A recent
study by the College of Agriculture at the University of Georgia shows that centenarians
are more likely to have low body weight than a problem with being overweight. Further
studies are planned to determine the predictors and barriers to dairy food consumption by
the elderly. Contact: Mary Ann Johnson (706) 542-2292.

LOSE WEIGHT AND KEEP IT OFF -- It can be done, says Beth Reames, Extension Service
nutritionist with the Louisiana State University. "Overweight people may be better
thought of as under-exercisers rather than overeaters," says Reames. Physical activity is
the best predictor of long-term weight maintenance. Reames notes that those who diet
but do not exercise lose both fat and lean tissue, but dieters who also exercise lose
weight mostly as fat. Contact: Beth Reames (504) 388-4141.








USDA RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1859 -- Fruit and vegetable growers across the nation are reducing
their use of pesticides. On this edition Brenda Curtis reviews the innovative methods
three farmers are using to cut back chemical use. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1341 -- Programs for nonchemical pest control; be happy with you;
an instant community; rural survey; fast food nutrition. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1851 -- USDA news highlights; reorganizing USDA; IPM
in the orange groves; U.S. cigarette exports; making money on U.S. agricultural exports.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1604 -- Hormone sterilizes mosquito; microbial mosquito control;
mite resistant bees; low input annual medics; insect resistant alfalfa. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, Feb. 1, catfish production,
horticultural exports; Tuesday, Feb. 2, cotton and wool update, weekly weather and
crop update; Friday, Feb. 5, cattle numbers. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in
this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


USDA TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports in a three-part series on farm numbers, and in a feature
on the census of agriculture; DeBoria Janifer reports on new nutritional labeling of foods;
and Brian Norris reports on rural health care information.

ACTUALITIES -- Agriculture Secretary Edward Madigan on the closing of USDA field
offices, and a proposed reorganization of USDA's management structure in Washington.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill on USDA ethanol research; DeBoria Janifer on farm
labor; Pat O'Leary on agricultural biotechnology; and Chris Larson on USDA crop residue
management seminars.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka.
4:30 minutes of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE

77th STATE FARM SHOW...this month in Harrisburg, PA was covered live by Martin Grey
(WSBA, York, PA). 4-H and FFA were active participants. Martin says 500,000 people visited
the 60 acre show. 14 acres are under roof. Producers had time to attend. Martin says weather
has slowed the harvest, there's lots of corn and soybeans in the fields.

NEW VOICE...at WYCM/WBCG, Murfreesboro, NC is farm director Bill Coleman. Bill replaces
Sammy Doughtie who has transferred to sales.

UPDATE...on Herb Plambeck (WMT, Cedar Rapids, KRNT Des Moines, IA). Herb was involved in
an auto accident last November. He is recuperating in a wheel chair and plans to get back on his
feet again. Herb's wife, Laura, has been producing his programs. He says listeners tell him she's
much better than he is. He plans to be behind the microphone sometime this month. In the
meantime he's been busy writing magazine articles.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













LIVE COVERAGE...of the Colorado Farm Show in Greeley, CO will be provided by Tom Ritter
(KFKA, Greeley). Tom says over 200 exhibitors are scheduled for the Jan. 26-28 show.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Todd Gleason (WILL, Urbana, IL) who won the top radio award in the
32nd annual Oscars in Agriculture, administered by the University of Illinois. The award
recognizes his program on the impact of foreclosure on a farm family. ...to Brenda Curtis (USDA
radio), selected as one of seven public address system announcers along the inaugual parade
route on Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C. ...to Al Pell (AgDay, South Bend, IN) whose
picture of a TV interview being conducted serves to illustrate the public relations portion of the
annual report of the National Corn Growers/National Corn Development Foundation. It serves to
show the importance of farm broadcasting in getting agriculture's message to America.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture lj of Public Affairs DV Diviso ,. Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2595 M 99 5 )IAY 4 1993 January 29, 1993

S university of Florida
NUTRITION EDUCATION -- U Food a rition Service (FNS) is conducting
research that will be used to de *nWiti education for food stamp participants.
Grants will be used to fund research develops and tests the best methods to inform
participants about nutrition and community education programs. To encourage state
food stamp agencies to provide nutrition education, FNS reimburses 50 percent of the
cost. Currently, nutrition education is an element in the plans of seven states. Contact:
Wini Scheffler (202) 305-2294.

CHOOSE WISELY WHEN EATING OUT -- Eat fast foods as meals, not snacks. A 600-
calorie lunch is reasonable; a 600-calorie snack is not. Choose roasted, baked, grilled or
broiled menu items. They tend to have only half the calories of fried. If only fried items
are available, remove the crust. At the salad bar pass by the regular salad dressings,
bacon bits, Chinese noodles, and syrupy canned fruits. Pile on raw fruits and vegetables,
hard-cooked eggs, and cottage cheese. It'll help remove the extra pounds gained during
the holidays. Contact: Connie Crawley (706) 542-8860.

IMPORTS -- Canada and Mexico provided 25 per cent of all agricultural imports to the
United States in 1992. Imports from Canada were up 22 percent, reaching $3.9 billion.
Most imports were animal and meat products, grains and feeds. Imports from Mexico fell
10 percent totaling $2.3 billion. Declines in cattle, coffee and tomato shipments
accounted for much of Mexico's drop. Third-place agricultural importer to the U.S. is
Brazil at $1.3 billion. Contact: Thomas Warden (202) 219-0822.

HEAVY SUPPLIES WILL HOLD DOWN PRICES -- Red meat and poultry supplies are
expected to be record high this year due to a continuing expansion in pork and poultry.
Prices will be dampened by the large supplies, but should be supported by a recovering
economy and continued strong export markets. Overall, prices are expected to be about
the same in 1993 as last year. Feed costs are expected to be lower due to large crops of
feed grains and soybeans. Contact: Leland Southard (202) 219-0767.

NATURAL ENEMY OF THE BOLL WEEVIL -- A tiny wasp, Catolaccus grandis, has been
proven to be effective against the boll weevil, one of cotton's worst pests. During a test
of the insect at USDA's Subtropical Agricultural Research Laboratory, Weslaco, Texas, it
eliminated 96 percent of the pests in a two-acre field. Adult boll weevils lay their eggs in
cotton flower buds which drop to the ground. Catolaccus grandis seeks those buds and
lays its eggs inside them. Relying on wasps, instead of insecticides, spares other
beneficial insects that help to hold down populations of other insects. The next challenge
confronting USDA scientists is perfecting a cost effective method of mass-reproducing
the wasps. Contact: Edgar King (210) 565-2423.












COTTON EXPORTS -- Cotton was the only major export commodity to decline last year.
Export volume fell 6 percent to 1.4 million tons as record foreign production reduced the
U.S. share of world trade. Global cotton stocks rose faster than consumption, lowering
prices. Contact: Stephen MacDonald (202) 219-0822.

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE -- An information packet on global climate change is
available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Library. The
packet updates material originally offered in 1991. It includes reprints of articles
supporting and rejecting the global change issue, a guide to information resources, and a
directory of organizations involved with the issue. For a free copy of the Global Change
Information Packet, send a request with a self-addressed mailing label to: Reference
Section, Room 111, National Agricultural Library, 10301 Baltimore Blvd., Beltsville, MD
20705-2351. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.


SPECIALS -- February is traditionally a month of price specials for canned vegetables.
Canned peas are in heavy supply. Good supplies prevail for other major canned
vegetables. Grocers often advertise their specials, offering an opportunity to consumers
to stock their pantry. Contact: Donna Montgomery (504) 388-4141.


fl =


U.S. Secretaries of Agriculture


Norman Jay Coleman
Jeremiah McLain Rusk
Julius Sterling Morton
James Wilson
David Franklin Houston
Edwin Thomas Meredith
Henry Cantwell Wallace
Howard Mason Gore
William Marion Jardine
Arthur Mastick Hyde
Henry Agard Wallace
Claude Raymond Wickard
Clinton Presbe Anderson
Charles Franklin Brannan
Ezra Taft Benson
Orville Lothrop Freeman
Clifford Morris Hardin
Earl Lauer Butz
John Albert Knebel
Bob Bergland
John Rusling Block
Richard Edmund Lyng
Clayton Yeutter
Edward Madigan
Mike Espy


Feb. 15,
March 6,
March 7,
March 6,
March 6,
Feb. 2,
March 5,
Nov. 22,
March 5,
March 6,
March 4,
Sept. 5,
June 30,
June 2,
Jan. 21,
Jan. 21,
Jan. 21,
Dec. 2,
Nov. 4,
Jan. 23,
Jan. 23,
March 7,
Feb. 16,
Mar. 12,
Jan. 22,


1889
1889
1893
1897
1913
1920
1921
1924
1925
1929
1933
1940
1945
1948
1953
1961
1969
1971
1976
1977
1981
1986
1989
1991
1993


March 6,
March 6,
March 5,
March 5,
Feb. 2,
March 4,
Oct. 25,
March 4,
March 4,
March 4,
Sept. 4,
June 29,
May 10,
Jan. 20.
Jan. 20,
Jan. 20,
Nov. 17,
Oct. 4,
Jan. 20,
Jan. 20,
Feb. 14,
Jan. 21,
March 1,
Jan. 20,


1889
1893
1897
1913
1920
1921
1924
1925
1929
1933
1940
1945
1948
1953
1961
1969
1971
1976
1977
1981
1986
1989
1991
1993


Missouri
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Iowa
Missouri
Iowa
Iowa
West Va.
Kansas
Missouri
Iowa
Indiana
N. Mexico
Colorado
Utah
Minnesota
Nebraska
Indiana
Virginia
Minnesota
Illinois
Calif.
Nebraska
Illinois
Mississippi









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1860 -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy, in an interview with
Brenda Curtis, discusses a wide range of issues, from headquarters reorganization to
international trade. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1342 -- Shooting in the snow; cold and your camera; diet and death;
food price outlook; new markets for U.S. foods. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1852 -- USDA news highlights; profile of the new
Secretary of Agriculture; dairy outlook; a rice surprise; the "barter' system; alternative
uses for CRP land. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1605 -- Fat loss equation; metabolic mystery; multiple-benefit
research; "peanuts" from corn?; insect breeding stock. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, Feb. 9, crop & weather update;
Wednesday, Feb. 10, U.S. crop production, world ag supply & demand; Thursday, Feb.
11, world ag/grain situation, world cotton situation, world oilseed situation; Friday, Feb.
12, ag resources. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't
let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on nutrition labeling of meat and poultry; Dave
Luciani, Michigan State University, takes a look at the soybeans of today and tomorrow.

ACTUALITIES -- Sec. of Agriculture Mike Espy at his first news conference in Yazoo City,
MS; Jill Hollingsworth, FSIS, on the outbreak of food poisoning in Washington State;
USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the weather and crop situation; Joel
Greene, ERS, on agricultural trade; Leland Southard, ERS, on livestock and poultry.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the benefits of the purslane weed,
and Lynn Wyvill reports on the national parasite collection.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka.
4:30 of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 111111111 1111 l 11111 II 111111
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 670 9

A NEW NETWORK...is on the air. Gary Wulf (KZEN, Central City, NE) is providing programming
on the Farm and Ranch Market Network. Delivered by satellite, the network offers 20 farm
program segments a day using computer technology for broadcast of local spots. Also, Gary
says that after several warm winters upper midwest producers are again learning to live with
winter. 12 inches of snow on the ground is triple the usual amount.

PRODUCER MEETINGS...are providing a lot of programming material, says Jerry Urdahl
(WWIB/WOGO, Chippewa Falls, WI). National directors of a farmers organization gathered in
Chippewa Falls under the theme "Profit for Agriculture." The Extension Service conducted a two-
day seminar in late January for dairy producers. Its theme was "Maintaining Profitability." Jerry
says his AM station (country formatted WOGO) recently added farm programming to its schedule
for the first time. Its good to see 1993 begin with expansions in farm broadcasting.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












PANCAKES...from 8:30 to 10:00 a.m. Jan. 22 were a surefire lead-in to a no-till meeting hosted
by the station, says Jim Thoreson (KWAT, Watertown, SD). Jim says about 600 farmers
attended, any higher they would have had to thin the batter. 20 percent of the corn crop
remaining in the field will stay there until spring. 12 inches of soft snow on the ground, and the
poor quality of the crop, will keep producers out of the fields through winter.

FINAL CORN HARVESTING...was underway in January, says Don Walters (KGRE, Greeley, CO).
Freezing temperatures ended the mud problem.

20th ANNIVERSARY...of National Agriculture Week is March 14-20, 1993. National Agriculture
Day is March 20, the first day of spring. The annual observance is designed to help consumers
understand that they have a stake in agriculture's future. Let us know if your station is planning
special programming or ev nts.

VIC POWELL ydo
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs ifadif-TY fT Daf Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2596 nversty of FlordaFebruary 5, 1993
University of Florida
CHILD NUTRITION CONFERENCE -- USDA is hosting a conference on "Promoting Healthy
Eating Habits for Children." The event will be held March 7-10 in Baltimore, MD.
Sponsored by USDA's Nutrition Education and Training Program, the national conference
will feature strategies for teaching children proper nutrition practices. Contact: Phil
Shanholtzer (703) 305-2286.

SCHOOL LUNCH STUDY -- 90,000 schools across the nation serve lunches to 25 million
children every school day in The National School Lunch Program. USDA's Food and
Nutrition Service is conducting a dietary assessment of school meals. To be released this
spring, the results can help child nutrition programs offer meals consistent with the
Dietary Guidelines. The Guidelines recommend a diet that has a variety of foods, is low
in fat and cholesterol, has several vegetables and products of fruit and grain, and is low in
sugars and sodium. Contact: Wini Scheffler (703) 305-2294

WATER QUALITY RESEARCH -- Cotton production, compared with other crops, is less
likely to cause erosion-induced water-quality problems because cotton acreage is not the
major source of erosion in most regions. A recent study by USDA's Economic Research
Service, "Cotton Production and Water Quality," highlights the importance of targeting
pollution-prevention programs to attain the most cost-effective environmental protection
strategies. The study shows that restricting the use of chemicals on all cotton acreage
could reduce overall potential for water-quality impairment, but could raise cotton prices
by as much as 31 percent. Specific chemical use restrictions, targeted to acreage
considered at greatest water-quality risk, could achieve nearly the same level of
environmental protection. Contact: Marc Ribaudo (202) 219-0444.

LESS GIN -- There were a total of 1,500 active cotton gins operating in the primary
cotton-producing States during 1991/92, down 33 from the previous season. The
largest decline occurred in Texas, where 22 fewer gins operated. Gin numbers increased
in both North Carolina and South Carolina. Sharply larger cotton crops the past few
seasons have helped moderate the long-term decline in gin numbers. Contact: Edward
Glade (202) 219-0840.

RECORD SOYBEAN YIELDS -- Fifteen states set yield records with the 1992/93 soybean
crop. A record average U.S. soybean yield of 37.6 bushels per acre was reached, a 10
percent increase over the previous high yield. A cool summer delayed crop development,
but when an early frost failed to materialize the result was a 2.197 billion-bushel soybean
crop, the second largest on record. Soybean crush is projected at a record 1.2 billion
bushels. Exports should total 745 million bushels. Prices at $5.30 to $5.50 per bushel
will be somewhat lower than last season's $5.60 per bushel. Contact: Roger Hoskin
(202) 219-0840.









PEANUT PRODUCTION -- The 4.2 billion pound 1992/93 peanut crop is the third largest
on record. Domestic food use of peanuts is projected to expand to 2.2 billion pounds,
the second consecutive year of growth. Exports, forecast at 975 million pounds, are
down slightly from last year. Prices are expected to average 28 to 32 cents per pound,
compared to 28.2 cents average in 1991/92. Contact: lan McCormick (202) 219-0840.

DAIRY OUTPUT & PRICES -- Milk production this year is expected to remain near the
1992 level of 152 billion pounds. Dairy markets are expected to be tight, with prices
staying above support levels. Any slack in domestic markets is expected to be taken up
by the Dairy Export Incentive Program. Average farm milk prices are projected to decline
3 to 5 percent from 1992's level of $13.11 per hundred weight. Contact: Sara Short
(202) 219-0770.

A delegation of Russian journalists
recently visited USDA Radio & TV to
learn how agricultural market news is
disseminated in the U.S. through
broadcasting. Igor B. Abakumov, left,
is editor-in-chief of the "Farmer's
News Weekly," published in Moscow, and
is a farm broadcaster on Radio Moscow.
Vic Powell, center, USDA chief, reviewed
for the group USDA radio & TV broadcast
operations. The interpreter, right.

TOBACCO EXPORTS & IMPORTS HIGHER -- U.S. exports of unmanufactured tobacco
from January through November 1992 totaled 234,983 tons, valued at $1.5 billion. This
is an increase of 17 percent in quantity and 18 percent in value over the same period in
1991. The top two markets were Japan and Germany. U.S. unmanufactured tobacco
imports during January to November last year totaled 370,785 tons, valued at $1.27
billion. Imports were up 72 percent in volume and 80 percent in value compared to the
same period in 1991. The import surge is due to the U.S. granting duty-free access for
oriental tobacco from certain countries. Contact: Kenneth Howland (202) 720-9524.

COMPOSTING STARTS AND ENDS ON THE FARM -- Early results show that composting
offers a safe and acceptable alternative to landfill disposal used by many municipalities.
Studies performed by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station find that the compost
of municipal wastes is a stable form of organic matter that improves water holding,
filtration capacity and fertility of soil. Agriculture could create a realistic market for the
economical use of large quantities of this compost as a soil amendment. Edward
Dunigan, head of the department of agronomy at the Ag Center, oversees four scientists
working on the farm-based disposal of municipal waste. "Food and fiber are produced in
the country," Dunigan says, "while the products of the farm are consumed mostly in
towns. By returning composted wastes to the land where they originate, we can reduce
potential pollution problems and enhance productivity of our farmland at the same time."
Contact: Dr. Edward Dunigan (504) 388-2110.

Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1861 -- Maria Bynum explores the booming world of farm exports
and what they mean for farmers and the economy. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1343 -- My groundhog, right or wrong!; new agriculture secretary
concerned with many non-farm programs; teenage obesity; new age supermarkets;
questions about food irradiation? (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1853 -- USDA News Highlights; Sec. Espy's views on
GATT and NAFTA; a farmer environmental poll; 1993 rice acreage reduction program;
poultry producers on the alert. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1606 -- Disease resistant elms; gender-selected calves; insect
resistant corn; predicting weight gain; exercise and overeating. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, Feb. 10, U.S. crop production,
world ag supply and demand; Thursday, Feb. 11, world ag/grain situation, world cotton
situation, world oilseed situation; Friday, Feb. 12, ag resources (inputs); Monday, Feb. 15
(Holiday); Tuesday, Feb. 16 crop/weather update, milk production; Wednesday, Feb. 17,
Ag income/finance outlook, farm labor. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for consumers handling ground
beef, and Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's meat inspection review.

ACTUALITIES -- Dr. Jill Hollingsworth, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, on
E. Coli bacteria in ground beef; USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on Western
drought relief, weather and crop progress; USDA economist Jim Miller on dairy
production outlook; USDA economist Scott Sanford on soybean production and markets.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on community food banks; Pat O'Leary
on reclaiming abandoned strip mines; Lynn Wyvill on food safety tips for slow cookers.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka.
4:30 of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 675 8

THE DANGER...at this time of year is that if I lose my planning calendar I've lost everything, says
Gary Wergin (KFEQ, St. Joseph, MO). The station is involved in a corn growers meeting with city
officials seeking the use of ethanol in city automobiles, and with the economic development
committee to have an ethanol production facility located in St. Joseph. Gary covered the Midland
Empire farm trade show in late January, and is planning two weeks of special programming
leading up to National FFA Week, Feb. 20-27. He'll be interviewing chapter leaders in his area.

FARM TOY SHOW...in Roseville, IL, Jan. 24, was covered by Thomas Peterson (WRAM/WMOI,
Monmouth, IL). Tom says the antique tractors, equipment and collectibles were an incredible
sight. He says a 1939 Packard pedal car was priced at $9,000. Tom is also producing programs
about the city's recycling center that is providing animal bedding from old newspapers.

MOVED...Don Baker from KFRM, Great Bend, KS to KSNC-TV, Great Bend.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











COVERAGE...of the National Cattlemen's Association meeting in Phoenix, AZ, was provided to
listeners in the Lubbock, TX area by Jim Stewart (KFYO, Lubbock). Jim fed material from the
convention to Johnny May who was producing farm broadcast programming during Jim's trip.

THE FEEDLOT BELT...is turning into the mudlot belt, says Steve Bugbee (KXXX/KQLS, Colby,
KS). Snow and mud have increased costs to producers. Steve covered the National Western
Stock Show, in Denver, CO, Jan. 12-24, where he reported that both sales and attendance were
higher, and he visited Dave Mehlhaff (National Cattlemen's Association, Englewood, CO).

CONGRATULATIONS...to Dean Thurow (KCJB/KXMC-TV, Minot, ND). He received an award at
the planning meeting of the North Dakota Winter Show recognizing his contributions to the
success of the event. The show will be held in Valley City, ND, March 4-14. Dean says producer
attendance has be high at Extension and SCS meetings.

VIC POWELL /
Chief, Radio & TV Division




Ip, 2 \.S I;2


Farm Broadcasters Letter


fairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

February 12, 1993


United States Department culture Office of
APR Vi
Letter No. 2597


In testimony to the Se e
on Agriculture Research, Csecvtfn,
Forestry and General Legislation,
Secretary Mike Espy said the strategy
USDA has developed to ensure the safety
of meat and poultry products includes
improvements in education, regulations,
testing, enforcement, and research.
USDA photo by Byron Schumaker.


TWO TRACK APPROACH -- Dr. H. Russell Cross, administrator of USDA's Food Safety and
Inspection Service, has presented to Secretary Espy a strategy to develop a new model for
meat and poultry safety reform. The first track is designed to improve the current inspection
system under present laws and regulations. In testimony to the Senate agriculture
subcommittee on February 5, Cross said science, labor relations, and agency structure will
be centerpieces of the Track I program. The second track is to develop a food safety
program for the future. A Meat and Poultry Safety Sunmitt has been proposed as a method
of bringing together all parties interested in food safety to begin getting input for the content
of Track II. Contact: Dr. Jill Hollingsworth (202) 720-8911.

TOP FIVE CO-OP STATES -- California, with $8 billion in net sales, leads all States in volume
of business handled by farmer cooperatives. The latest figures, released by USDA's
Agricultural Cooperative Service, are for .1991. Wisconsin is second with $6 billion in sales;
followed by Minnesota, $5.9 billion; Iowa, $5.8 billion; and Illinois, $4 billion. The five
States account for 39% of the net business volume handled by all cooperatives. Minnesota
has 422 cooperatives headquartered in the state, the largest number in any state. Contact:
Charles Kraenzle (202) 720-3189.

GRAB THOSE LOW PRICES -- Consumers can take advantage of low prices in February on
fresh grapefruit, oranges, tangerines, and frozen ready-to-drink orange and grapefruit juices.
The citrus harvest has been bountiful. The fresh crop increased about 25 percent compared
to last year's levels because Texas groves returned to production after the 1989 freeze.
Juice has hit the lowest price in five years. Other cold-weather specials are canned and
frozen vegetables as processors try to reduce inventories in preparation for spring crops.
Contact: Richard Edwards (409) 845-8694.

CATFISH SALES HIGHER -- Catfish growers had sales of $316 million during 1992, up 11
percent from a year earlier. But the number of catfish operations in 15 selected States was
down 12 percent to 1,527. 151,860 water surface acres are in production, and an
additional 1,010 acres are under construction. Contact: Robert Little (202) 720-6147.






2


LONG RANGE WEATHER OUTLOOK -- The outlook for precipitation through April calls for
dry conditions in Washington, Oregon, and the northern portions of California, Idaho and
Montana. Wet conditions will likely prevail in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and the northern
half of Florida. Other regions of the nation should have near normal rainfall patterns.
Temperature outlook through April calls for warm across the northern tier of states from
Washington to Wisconsin. Colder temperatures are expected in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana
and Mississippi. Contact: Ray Motha (202) 720-9807.

BE A TRAIL BOSS -- TRAIL Boss teaches volunteer leaders the specialized skills for training
and leading volunteer crews involved in conservation projects. Teaching Resources And
Individual Leadership (TRAIL) is a program of USDA's Soil Conservation Service open to
adults from youth, conservation or volunteer organizations. It offers courses in
administration, volunteer recruitment, program promotion, and hands-on skills development
that improves the capabilities of volunteer leaders to organize conservation programs for
organizations. Contact: Thomas Levermann (202) 720-6475.

WHOLE LOT OF POPPIN GOING ON -- Americans consume 16.5 billion quarts of popped
popcorn annually, according to the Popcorn Institute. 70 percent of popcorn is eaten at
home. Popcorn is no johnny-come-lately. Archaeologists have found ears of popcorn in New
Mexico that date back 5,600 years. Varieties of popcorn have silks that are toxic to
earworms. USDA's Agricultural Research Service is studying the resistance to corn
earworm, and transferring it to other varieties of corn. It's a goal that could produce
beneficial results as more pesticides are taken off the market. Contact: Richard Wilson (515)
294-8583.

WHEN NOT TO REACH FOR THE BUG SPRAY -- "Never spray the woodpile," says Mike
Merchant, an entomologist with the Extension Service in Dallas, TX. "The chemical can
remain on the surface of the wood and produce a toxic vapor when burned, which could be
irritating to the eyes and sinuses." To prevent bringing insects into the home in firewood,
Merchant suggests stacking wood off the ground outside the home, keeping the woodpile
dry, and storing firewood away from the house. Contact: Mike Merchant (214) 231-5362.

FOOD SAFETY -- Salmonellosis is one of the most common foodborne illnesses, causing
nausea, vomiting, fever, diarrhea. It can be fatal to those with weakened immune systems.
To combat it USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service recommends that raw meat be
promptly refrigerated and stored for no more than 3 to 5 days; wash hands thoroughly
before and after handling raw meat; use a plastic dishwaher-safe cutting board, not one of
wood; wash with hot soapy water all utensils and surfaces that have come in contact with
raw meat; don't place raw meat on the same plate later used for cooked meat; don't let
juices from raw meat drip on other foods; and cook pork and beef to an internal temperature
of 160 degrees, and poultry to 185 degrees. For more information on food handling, call
USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-800-535-4555. Contact: Susan Conley 720-7390.


R- TV Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (2021 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1862 -- Following the recent food poisoning outbreak in the Pacific
Northwest, industry and government officials plan to upgrade the way meat is produced,
sold and prepared. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1344 -- Diet and death; extending the shelf life of brown rice; phone
phonies; reclaiming abandoned mines; farmers and IPM. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1854 -- USDA News Highlights; 1993 deficiency
payments; avian flu update; U.S. cattle inventory; calves of predetermined gender. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1607 -- Creating a backward gene; virus-proof crops?; computer
cotton; restoring the American elm; needle in a haystack. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, Feb. 18, ag income/finance, farm
labor report; Friday, Feb. 19, ag outlook, cattle on feed, honey production; Monday, Feb. 22,
livestock and poultry update, ag trade update, catfish processing; Tuesday, Feb. 23, weekly
weather and crop, livestock and poultry outlook; Wednesday, Feb. 24, cotton and wool
outlook. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on a USDA program to reclaim abandoned strip mines;
Lynn Wyvill reports on slow cooker safety, and on USDA's latest dairy production report.

ACTUALITIES -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy talks with reporters at a news briefing in
Washington, D.C.; James Donald, USDA outlook chairman, sums up the latest crop report;
Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with a crop and weather update.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA Extension activities at urban food
banks; Lynn Wyvill on ethanol and soy diesel research at USDA laboratories in Peoria, IL; and
Pat O'Leary on biotechnology and tomatoes.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.





OF FLOIDA
ii1111111 I 11 oI l


OFFMIKE
THE GRANDADDY OF ALL FARM SHOWS...is the way Jack Crowner (Kentucky Agrinet, Louisville)
termed the 28th annual National Farm Machinery Show, February 10-13 in Louisville. Jack and Allen
Aldridge covered the event for their listeners. About 400,000 attendees from across the nation
attended. They also covered the Tobacco Expo held last month. Jack says tobacco is a billion dollar
industry in the state, and is alive and well.

A SHIFT IN WEATHER PATTERNS...has been forecast for the Northwest, says Wey Simpson (KAQQ,
Spokane, WA). A meteorologist he interviewed says there are indications the weather could return
to that experienced in the '40s and '50s of wetter, cooler conditions. Wey says although there is
snow cover the region remains deficient in moisture.

CORN CLASSIC...February 21-23 in San Antonio, TX will be covered by Gary Truitt (AgriAmerica
Net, Indianapolis, IN). Gary will be bringing his folding display to broadcast from the site, and a farm
family that won an all expense paid trip in a recent contest on the network.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











POTATO CROP...is marketing well, says Bob Burtenshaw (KUPI, Idaho Falls, ID). A smaller crop this
season helped prices. Idaho has a major impact on prices, one-third of the annual crop is produced
in Bob's area. While the region has received the best snowfall in years, Bob notes that it remains in
a moisture deficit. They hope for continued storms this winter.

OHIO PORK EXPO...February 19-20 will be covered live in broadcasts from the event in Dayton, says
Chip Nelson (WKFI, Wilmington, OH).

-NAMA...and the NAFB Southeast region meeting will fit nicely into travil:schedules, says Gary
Cooper (Southeast Agrinet, Ocala, FL). Gary is the Southeast VP and says the regional meeting will
be in Destin, FL, Apr. 15-17, and NAMA in nearby Orlando, AApril 19. He extends a biginvite to you.
Gary says early February is the peak of the fruit and vegetable season in Florida, keeping him busy.

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division -;
D CO --
:'7' ii .7:
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Farm Brd


dcasters Letter



' Pu affairs R 'FebuDivision Washington, D.C. 20250 202) 720-4330
19,1, IFebruary 19, 1993


At a news briefing in '
D.C., Secretary Mike Espoy ,iMd
the agricultural elements of
President Clinton's economic
package. He noted that agriculture's
spending is only 1/6 of 1 percent of
the federal budget, and that
agriculture therefore does not have
deep pockets to cut. Espy said the
majority of farm programs will
continue, with some changes in
discretionary and entitlement funding.,
USDA photo by Byron Schumaker.


FARMER HEALTH RESEARCH -- The National Cancer Institute, Environmental Protection
Agency, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences will track for ten years
the health of 100,000 farm families in Iowa and North Carolina. They will study personal
lifestyle characteristics such as how much time is spent outdoors, pesticide and chemical
use, family health history, eating and smoking habits, and how these items relate to cancer.
The study will be the largest such examination of American farm families. Contact: Michael
Alavanja (301) 496-1611.

FOOD STAMP BENEFITS STUDY -- Providing checks instead of food stamps reduces costs
with little evidence of an increase in acute food shortages for the receiving households. The
finding comes from demonstration projects in San Diego, CA, and 12 counties in Alabama.
The studies showed some reduction in food expenditures for households receiving the
checks. Money not spent on food was spent on transportation, shelter or medical expenses.
Most households that received the checks preferred them to food stamp coupons. A second
report, due later this year, will look at the effect on food program participation and on food
retailers of providing checks to recipients. Contact: Phil Shanholtzer (703) 305-2286.

AGRIBUSINESS MISSION TO HUNGARY -- USDA is looking for representatives of United
States agribusiness firms to participate in a May 3-7 mission to Hungary. USDA's Office of
International Cooperation and Development acting administrator John Miranda says the goals
are to identify joint ventures between the U.S. and Hungarian entrepreneurs that result in
U.S. investment in Hungarian agribusiness, and increase opportunities for trade between the
U.S. and Hungary. Through business linkages with Hungarian companies, American firms
can be in a better position to gain access to the EC and compete for Eastern European and
former Soviet markets. Contact: Maria Nemeth-Ek (202) 690-1983.









HURRY-UP GENE -- Traditional plant breeding to obtain resistance against virus diseases
requires growing the plants for years, and the effort can require decades. USDA scientists
have used an antisense gene to produce resistance to bean yellow mosaic virus. It could
protect crops such as beans, peas, forage legumes, and ornamental flowers from virus
enemies. Antisense technology is a form of genetic engineering where cells are instructed
to do the opposite of what one of their genes is telling them to do. The genetic material
binds to an invading virus and prevents the virus from reproducing and harming the plant.
The antisense gene may be ready for use in two years. Contact: Hank Becker (301) 504-
8547.

SOYBEAN CRUSH -- The third consecutive season of record soybean crush is projected in
1992/93, at 1.2 billion bushels. Soybean exports are projected at 745 million bushels, the
third consecutive season of increased exports and the highest since 1987/88. Soybean
prices are projected to decline this season. The average price received by farmers is
expected to range between $5.30 to $5.50 per bushel, compared to last season's $5.60 per
bushel average. Contact: Scott Sanford (202) 219-0840.

I'LL HAVE A LARGE ORANGE -- Orange production is forecast at 11.3 million tons, 27
percent more than last season's crop. The primary reason for the rise is a significant
increase in the size of the Florida orange crop. Grapefruit production is predicted at 2.5
million tons, 26 percent more than last season, primarily due to a much larger grapefruit crop
in Florida. Contact: Jim Brewster (202) 720-7688.

DAIRY PRODUCTION OUTLOOK -- Lower milk prices will likely accelerate dairy farm exits
through the winter farm auction season. Farm exits are not expected to reach the rates of
1991 and 1992. Milk prices should not drop to the low levels of 1991. Expansion of some
farms is expected to offset the loss of covws from exiting farms. Expected milk-feed price
ratios are unlikely to encourage large increases in concentrate feeding. Without such boosts
gains in milk per cow will moderate during the first half of this year. Even so, milk per cow
is projected to rise about 2 percent in the first half of 1993. Contact: Sara Short (202)
219-0770.

FARMER'S SHARE OF FOOD PRICES -- The farm-value of food purchased in grocery stores,
the proportion of a retail price that farmers receive, decreased from 30 percent in 1990 to
27 percent in 1991, the most recent year for the statistics. Lower farm prices and the
downturn in the economy resulted in retail food prices increasing 2.9 percent, the smallest
amount since 1985. Contact: Ralph Parlett (202) 219-0870.

AG INPUTS -- Fertilizer use in 1992/93 is expected to decrease 4 percent from a year earlier,
with fertilizer prices flat. Pesticide use on the 10 major crops is projected at 472 million
pounds of active ingredients in 1993, down 3 percent from 1992. Herbicide use is expected
to decrease about 14 million pounds, primarily because of reduced corn acreage. Insecticide
and fungicide use is expected to remain stable. Energy prices this year are expected to be
above 1992 prices. Contact: Stan Daberkow (202) 219-0456.


Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1863 -- This is the time of year when we like to dream about our
gardens while flipping through pages of seed catalogs. On this edition Brenda Curtis talks
with home and garden specialist Denise Sharp about this year's gardening plans. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1345 -- Gardening by the fire; pruning tips; summer food program;
weed barriers for new trees; new sweeteners on the way. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1855 --USDA News Highlights; USDA budget review; farm
input update; U.S. sheep and lamb inventory; corn resists armyworm. (Weekly reel of news
features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1608 -- Rust rangers; research on the road; catfish medicine; fish
diseases; catfish, a low-fat protein source. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, Feb. 25, ag export outlook, world
tobacco situation; Friday, Feb. 26, feed yearbook, ag prices; Monday, March 1, horticultural
exports; Tuesday, March 2, weekly weather and crop update. These are the USDA reports
we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on soy oil diesel fuel; Pat O'Leary looks at naturally fertile
fields; and Will Pemble reports on training beneficial bees.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; Billy
Johnson, deputy administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, on the
avian flu virus; and USDA economist Leland Southard on livestock and poultry.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on conserving water at home; Lynn Wyvill on
the national parasitic collection; and DeBoria Janifer on community food banks.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 3 01 685 7

OFFMIKE

FINAL PLANS...are being made for the March 9 annual Ag Outlook Meeting, says Todd Gleason
(WILL, Urbana IL). Todd's station is hosting the event at the Beef House in Covington, IN. Major
topics include market analysis, weather, and agriculture and the environment.

THOUGHTS OF SPRING...are in the air, says Lou Hansen (RFD Radio Network, Bloomington, IL),
even while producers in the northern area of the state continue harvesting. The region has dried
out, allowing machinery to move into the fields again. Lou says spring can't get here too quickly.

27 RADIO STATIONS...are involved in the selection of Wisconsin Farm Wife of the Year, says
Jerry Urdahl (WWIB, Chippewa Falls, WI). Jerry's station serves as flagship for the effort.
Selection will be held in April at the banquet of the Colby, Wisconsin Chamber of Commerce.




Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










ARKANSAS FARM SHOW...in Little Rock was covered by Gordon Barnes (KSSN, Little Rock, AR).
Attendance was larger than last year, and the number of exhibitors was up 25%. Gordon says a
coalition of producers, Farmers Are Environmentalists Too, introduced a bill in the state legislature
and got it passed. It establishes workable regulations for improved disposal and use of animal
wastes.

GOVERNOR'S AGRICULTURAL CONFERENCE..., March 4, in Carney, NE, will be covered live,
says Rich Hawkins (KRVN, Lexington, NE). Rich took the opportunity to stop by USDA during his
coverage of the Feed Grains Council meeting in Washington, D.C. in early February.

THE PHILOSOPHER...who said that wise men talk because they have something to say, and fools
because they have to say something, never had to fill until sign off.


ViC POWER
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio- division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330
JUN 7 193
Letter No. 2599 February 26, 1993
University of Florida
WILL IT HOLD? -- Good crop conditions exist in most winter wheat growing areas in the
United States. If the favorable conditions continue in the coming months, winter wheat
yields are likely to be above a year earlier. 1993 yields will be crucial for improving
prospective 1993/94 wheat supplies. In China weather conditions have been favorable for
winter grains. Changes in the EC's Common Agriculture Policy have lead to declines in area
for soft wheat and durum. In the former Soviet Union winter grain planting was reduced
about 10 percent. Wet weather last fall delayed harvest until it was too late to plant winter
crops. Contact: Ed Allen (202) 219-0840.

CREDIT OUTLOOK -- Lower net farm income in 1993 and modest asset growth are expected
to result in minimal increases in borrowing. Total farm debt at the beginning of this year is
estimated at $140 billion, up less than 1 percent from a year earlier. Farm debt is expected
to increase only 1 to 2 percent this year, making farm loans a competitive environment for
lenders. Farm banks are now among the strongest institutions in the banking system, and
there is substantial excess capacity among agricultural lenders. Credit will remain tight for
beginning and high risk farmers. Contact: Jerome Stam (202) 219-0892.

MACHINERY SALES -- Several factors indicate an encouraging forecast for machinery
purchases this year. Farm income was higher last year, and the value of farm equity is
forecast to increase in 1993. Also, interest rates are low. Farm tractor sales last year
totaled 52,800 units, 9 percent below 1991. Combine sales were 7,700 which was 2,000
less than in 1991. Both tractor and combine unit sales are forecast to be up 1 to 2 percent
this year. U.S. farm machinery exports are estimated at $3.3 billion this year. Farm
machinery imports, forecast at $1.8 billion in 1993, are expected to decline for the third
consecutive year. Farm machinery exports have exceeded imports for the last four years.
Contact: Stan Daberkow (202) 219-0456.

MORE WITH LESS -- Herbicide mixed with paraffinic oil, which is similar to mineral oil,
improves the control of johnsongrass and barnyardgrass in soybeans when applied at 1
gallon per acre than it does when mixed with water and applied at 20 gallon per acre. USDA
researchers at the Application Technology Research Center at Stoneville, Mississippi, have
developed an application system using a special nozzle and compressed air that atomizes the
herbicide. The more concentrated droplets of the mixture are more toxic to weeds than the
larger less concentrated droplets dispersed in water by conventional sprayers. Reduced
herbicide use and water hauling can improve both the farmer's bottom line and the
environment. Farmers can construct their own sprayer, but at this time the low application
rates are not approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. Chemical industry officials
say they plan to request registration at low application levels as new products come on the
market. Contact: Chester McWhorter (601) 686-5221.










RURAL AREAS AND THE ECONOMY -- Overall conditions in rural areas are forecast to
improve this year if the modest expansion in employment and income experienced at the
close of 1992 is sustained. Research has shown that declines in the national unemployment
rate are generally matched by declines in rural unemployment rates. However, employment
and production in rural areas tend to depend more on exports. The uncertain export outlook,
due to economic slowdowns in Japan and Germany, suggests that conditions may improve
somewhat more slowly in rural areas than in the overall economy this year. Contact:
Jennifer Beattie (202) 219-0782.

HIGH-VALUE EXPORTS -- U.S. exports of consumer-oriented high-value products could set
a record in 1993. Gains during 1992 were registered in dairy products, snack foods,
breakfast foods, wine and beer. Declines were noted in fresh fruit, tree nuts and nursery
products. Most recent statistics show that as of the end of November last year, high-value
exports totaled $2.7 billion, 17 percent ahead of the same period a year earlier and indicating
a strong trend into 1993. Contact: Thomas St. Clair (202) 720-6821.

DEFENSE CUTS AND RURAL COMMUNITIES -- Off-farm income is important to many farm
families. The fiscal year 1993 budget for the Department of Defense (DoD) calls for a 20
percent reduction in spending during 1992-1997. The economic health of rural communities
near military bases can depend on retail sales to military personnel, and on civilian jobs on
the bases. To help mitigate the impact of base closures, DoD's Office of Economic
Adjustment provides assistance to the affected communities. It arranges for the vacated
base, including buildings and equipment, to be released to the community for redevelopment.
Rural counties have been successful in converting vacant bases to alternate uses, such as
for schools, local government buildings, recreation areas, airports, or prisons. Contact:
Karen Hamrick (202) 219-0782.

NEW USE FOR PEPPERMINT -- Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service have
found that extracts from peppermint and other plants will deter northern fowl mites from
feeding on chickens. The mites cause $80 million in reduced U.S. egg production. Contact:
John Carroll (301) 504-9017.

COMPARING PRICES -- A 15-item basket of food that costs $47 in Washington, D.C. will
set you back $158 in Tokyo. In a recent comparison of food prices in capitals around the
world, Tokyo led the list. Second place went to Bern, Switzerland at $123. Paris was 6th
at $73, and Rome was 9th at $65. The least expensive was Brasilia, Brazil at $25. As a
share of weekly per capital income, the cost of the 15-item food basket is greatest in Seoul
at 75 percent. The burden on income for the food basket was lowest in Washington, D.C.
at 11 percent. Contact: Thomas St. Clair (202) 720-6821.

AMENDING FEDERAL MILK ORDERS -- If approved by dairy farmers, USDA will amend all
federal milk marketing orders to make a three-class pricing system standard, and provide a
mechanism for pricing at bulk fluid rates reconstituted milk that is used for drinking
purposes. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.



1 Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1864 -- Pat O'Leary explores how a special program is reclaiming land
that was once abandoned to strip coal mines. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1346 -- Stopping a pesky fruit fly; it's almost "turf time"; environmental
landscaping; transplanting on time; speciality coffees for beginners. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1856 -- USDA News Highlights; winter jolts livestock
industry; new policy for corn loans eliminates "double discount"; mechanized grain sniffers;
computerized cotton ginning. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1609 -- Beef flavor booster; gene shuffling; tomatoes in space;
eggplant in Oklahoma; navy bean alternative. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, Mar. 9, crop and weather update;
Wednesday, Mar. 10, U.S. crop production, world ag supply and demand; Thursday, Mar.
11, world ag & grain situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Friday, Mar.
12, sugar outlook; Monday, Mar. 15, milk production. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA ethanol research.

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, on the latest weather and
crop progress; USDA economist Ron Gustafson on cattle inventory and prices; USDA
economist Joel Greene on the ag trade surplus; and USDA economist Jerome Stam on farm
credit.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on food stamp cash-out projects; Pat
O'Leary visits Delaware's We C.A.R.E. conservation team; and Lynn Wyvill reports on the
USDA National Parasite Collection.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.





4UNIVEISITOF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3
12th ANNUAL...WIBW Farm Profit Conference was attended by 450 farmers, says Kelly Lenz
(WIBW/Kansas Ag Network, Topeka, KS). The program featured six speakers, including Congressman
Dan Glickman (D-4th KS), and USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen. Kelly says there is good
news regarding the nation's first Pesticide Management Area being conducted in his region. The goal of
the project is to monitor and reduce pesticide runoff into surface water by using voluntary compliance.
Results so far show that the program is working, and could help set standards nationwide. Kelly says
they conducted a survey at the conference that included state and national issues. 71 % of those
participating said they would support cuts in spending for USDA offices and services. 60% want the
Conservation Reserve Program to continue. And 47%, the largest percentage, were in favor of the
North American Free Trade Agreement.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Orion Samuelson (WGN/Tribune Radio Network, Chicago, IL), selected by
House Agriculture Committee Chairman KiKa de la Garza (D-15th TX) to serve as moderator at the
retreat of Committee members in early February. Orion lead the discussions on long-term farm policy.


Farm Broadcasters Letter / 2 /. 3 -/ 2S 5c/


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300 DO-

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300 ,.










CONGRATULATIONS...to Ken Tanner (WRAL-TV/Tobacco Radio Network, Raleigh, NC). Ken received
the Media Award from the Virginia Soybean Association for his outstanding coverage of soybean issues.
Ken says the award has sentimental value too because its from his home state. He's also received
Media Awards from the North Carolina and South Carolina soybean associations.

LEAVING BROADCASTING...is Ron Hendren (WTAD, Quincy, IL). Ron concludes a 17 year
farm broadcasting career to pursue career opportunities with the Prudential Company. Ron will
remain in the New London, MO area.

NATIONAL AGRICULTURE WEEK...is March 14-20. National Agriculture Day in March 20.
Does your station have plans to observe the event? The annual observance is created to help
consumers understand that they have a stake in agriculture's future.

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division







Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agricultur ice of Public Afr adio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2604 April 2, 1993

FOODS STAMPS AND T 0COWMY -- US food stamp program has reached a record
level of participation. 26 in American Sr receiving food stamps, the highest level of
participation since the prog !-a Nearly two million people were added to the
roles last year and the list con tigw, 213,000 were added in January. Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy says the need for food assistance has risen so rapidly that one in ten
Americans are receiving food stamps, proving the need to take steps to stimulate the
economy. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

RURAL HOUSING LOANS -- USDA will release ahead of schedule $455 million for rural
housing loans to help meet demand and boost the economy. Originally scheduled for use
in the third and fourth quarters of this fiscal year, the early release will take advantage of the
coming construction season. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says the funds will provide
modest homes for more than 30,000 people, and give the rural economy a lift. The money
represents the remainder of $1.3 billion appropriated for USDA's Farmers Home
Administration in 1993 for its single-family housing direct loan program.

COLD TOLERANT OATS -- 20 years of research by scientists with USDA's Agricultural
Research Service has resulted in a new line of oats that have a much improved chance of
surviving winter freezing. Severe winter cold often kills young oat seedlings planted in the
fall, and summer heat and drought can reduce the yield of spring-planted oats. The new
breeding line, Pennline 40, survives winter freezing and can be ready to harvest before the
summer drought. Commercial varieties using Pennline 40 could be available in five years.
Contact: David Livingston (814) 865-1141.

PRESCRIPTION FARMING -- Scientists at USDA's Agricultural Research Service have
developed sensors that identify parts of fields that need less herbicide. The sensor reads
light reflected by soil. Areas with the least amount of organic matter reflect more light and
need less herbicide. Another sensor helps to accurately determine the amount of nitrogen
fertilizer for crops by measuring the amount of chlorophyll in plants. The sensor research
is part of USDA's national water quality initiative. USDA is working with a private firm to
prepare sensors for commercial use. Contact: Dale Bucks (301) 504-7034.

VEGETABLE IMPORTS HIGHER -- The word to eat more vegetables to maintain health is
apparently catching on. Recent figures for seasonal import of vegetables in January show
an increase of 27 percent over December figures to $270 million. All agricultural imports
during January were three percent higher than in December, at $2.1 billion. U.S. agricultural
exports dropped 3 percent in January to $3.7 billion, giving the U.S. an agricultural trade
surplus of $1.6 billion, ten percent less than in December. Contact: Steve MacDonald (202)
219-0822.









NATURAL PESTICIDES -- Certain natural plant chemicals impair an insect's ability to digest
and assimilate nutrients. Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service have
discovered that one of these chemicals, precocene II, prevents the corn earworm larvae from
developing normally. Scientists are studying plant compounds that might serve as models for
manufacturing natural pesticides. One strategy could be to genetically engineer crop plants
to produce biopesticides harmful to marauding insects such as the corn earworm. Contact:
Bradley Binder (515) 294-6948.

BUYING DOWN -- As incomes are squeezed, consumers are steering away from highly
processed, premium-priced foods. Sales of prepared foods, such as entrees for microwaving
and other "heat and serve" foods, were down 40 percent for some items last year. In 1993
expected stronger economic conditions are forecast to influence a two to four percent
increase in food prices. Contact: Ralph Parlett (202) 219-0870.

FOOD AID -- The United States is the leader in world food aid, providing about 60 percent
of total world cereal aid shipments. In comparison the European Community provides about
20 percent, Canada 10 percent, Japan about 4 percent, and Australia about 3 percent. The
U.S. provides a variety of commodities for food aid programs, ranging from bulk unprocessed
items to foods easily used in relief camps. The two largest donated commodities in terms
of value are grains, about 60 percent, and vegetable oil, accounting for 20 percent of U.S.
food aid value. Contact: Mark Smith (202) 219-0820.

CROP ROTATION CONTROLS WEEDS -- Jointed goatgrass is a weed that has infested three
million acres of winter wheat in the midwest and Pacific northwest, and has cut yields as
much as 25 percent in badly infested fields. USDA studies in Colorado show that switching
from winter wheat to corn, sorghum or sunflower for two years reduced the number of
goatgrass weeds by 80 percent. Alex Ogg, a plant physiologist with the Agricultural
Research Service, says three spring-planted crops are needed where wheat fields have
severe goatgrass infestations. He recommends growers plant spring wheat, barley, canola,
peas, or lentils in rotation with winter wheat. Contact: Alex Ogg (509) 355-1551.

THE FEW -- Latest statistics show that farm production employment, which includes farm
owners and hired farmworkers, provides 3.2 million jobs. The figures are contained in a
recently released USDA publication "U.S. Farm and Farm-Related Employment in 1989."
Farm and farm-related industries provided 23 million jobs, about 17 percent of U.S.
employment. But most of the employment, about 80 percent, is in farm-related wholesale
and retail trade industries -- such as grocery stores and restaurants -- and located in metro
counties. Three million people are employed in agricultural processing and marketing. The
publication shows that the employment of many depends on the production of a few.
Contact: Alexander Majchrowicz (202) 219-0525.

STATES WHERE HIGHEST PERCENT OF JOBS ARE FARM AND FARM RELATED

STATE % STATE % STATE % STATE %
Iowa 27.2 Arkansas 23.6 Montana 21.8 SCarolina 20.2
SDakota 26.7 NCarolina 23.1 Tennessee 21.7 Georgia 19.6
NDakota 26.4 Kentucky 22.8 Alabama 21.1 Oregon 19.5
Nebraska 25.0 Mississippi 22.3 Maine 20.8 Minnesota 19.3
Idaho 24.8 Wisconsin 22.0 Kansas 20.7 Missouri 18.9
Claude Giffor









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1869 -- In this edition a review of the road, rail and air transportation
that delivers the nation's produce to market. Brenda Curtis talks with experts in the
transportation industry. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1351 -- Springtime food safety; five a day; bird is the word; homeless
children; fool's gold. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1861 -- USDA News Highlights; staying eligible for USDA
programs; prospective plantings; helping beginning farmers; a new artichoke variety.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1614 -- Soil sensor cuts herbicide use; satellites & tractors; cold-
hardy oats; fooling fruit flies; crop rotation plan stifles goat weed. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday. Apr. 12, U.S. crop production, world
ag supply & demand; Tuesday, Apr. 13, world ag/grain production; world oilseed situation,
world cotton situation, weekly weather & crop outlook; Thursday, Apr. 15, milk production;
Friday, Apr. 16, vegetable production. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on Easter egg supplies; Chris Larson reviews the results
of conservation compliance.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the weather and crop outlook;
USDA economist Diane Bertelsen on fruit outlook; USDA economist Cathy Greene on the
agricultural outlook; USDA economist David Harvey on aquaculture.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on the national parasite collection; Pat O'Leary
covers the tomato "killers"; DeBoria Janifer reviews diet and cholesterol.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.

Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 Ulll11lll11111 iUii
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 677 4
OFFMIKE

WHITEFLY NUMBERS...are 20-times higher than last year, says Jim Hearn (KURV, Edinburg, TX), and if
producers don't get rain in April to reduce the count there will be trouble in May. Whiteflies migrate during
the growing season from cabbage to melons to cotton, exploding in numbers. Jim says there were 2,000
per leaf in 1991 when the pest cost growers $170,000,000.

THERE'S NO ENTHUSIASM...to get back into the fields, says Randy Rasmussen (KMA, Shenandoah, IA),
because farmers just got out. Corn was being harvested in January and February. Randy is busy working
as chairman of NAFB's Washington Ag Watch program, May 15-18, lining up a series of speakers at USDA
and Capitol Hill.

PRODUCERS...are telling Bill Ray (Agrinet Farm Radio Network, Elizabeth City, NC) that a method to improve
the farm economy would be an investment tax credit for new equipment. Congratulations to Bill, his
company has purchased 100,000 watt WCXL-FM, in Kill Devil Hills, NC.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











EXPANSION OF LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION...is scheduled for Ohio, says Joe Comely (WRFD, Columbus,
OH). A packing plant task force says the state will look favorably on the growth. Expansion of the packing
plant is underway. Joe says producers are itching to plant, but dry weather is needed.

WATER IS FLOWING...over the spillways at the state's two biggest reservoirs, says Roy Isom (KMJ, Fresno,
CA), a major change from conditions for the past six years. Plans are being discussed about what to do with
the excess water, such as pumping it back into the ground to raise the water tables. Roy says there
continues to be talk about cutting back water to farmers in order to save nonnative fish. Congratulations
to Roy. His local newspaper, the FRESNO BEE, produced a profile on Roy and his farm broadcasting career.

ITS TOO WET...to plant spring wheat, but the delay also means irrigation pumps will be turn on later in the
year, says Kelly Klaas (KEZJ-AM-FM, Twin Falls, ID). Kelly's company bought KLIX AM-FM in Twin Falls,
and will transfer KEZJ-AM programming to the more powerful KLIX-AM. FCC duopoly rules require that one
AM station be sold. Kelly says KEZJ will go dark until sold.

VIC POWELL /60-iL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




k-N C, > 7~iK2 ~&-6C


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of A Ofjritte ffc affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330
Letter No. 2605 3 f FJlr;.-
Letter No. 2605 April 9, 1993


IMPROVING GOVERNMENT was the them of
a meeting conducted h emplo s
by Agriculture Secretary'
President Al Gore. The exc- s ss to
make government more responsive to the
American public, and to improve the efficiency
and effectiveness of government programs,
was aided by comments from USDA employees
communicated live via satellite from cities
across the nation.
USDA photo by Bob Nichols.


NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT -- USDA will be working closely with the Departments
of Commerce and Interior, and the Environmental Protection Agency, to coordinate programs
designed to maximize plant and animal diversity while maintaining ecological resilience and
stability. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy testified to members of the House Committee on
Merchant Marine and Fisheries that, "While we can no sooner abandon farming and
commodity production than stop breathing, our programs can be designed to maintain
biodiversity as well as produce such things as timber, crops and livestock." Espy said that
nature does not recognize political or jurisdictional boundaries, and is a reason why it is
important to have the various federal agencies singing from the same hymn book. Contact:
Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

RURAL JOB TRAINING -- Job training programs perform better in rural areas. Conventional
wisdom suggests that higher unemployment and poverty levels, and less diversified
economies of nonmetro areas would hinder success of job training programs. But data
indicates that training results, costs, and availability of funds are more favorable in the
typical rural than in the typical metro program. The potential of new technologies, job
training and placement assistance programs can provide additional opportunities for
nonmetro participants. Contact: John Redman (202) 219-0544.

FIRE ANT CONTROL -- A recent discovery in genetic studies of fire ants offers a promising
method to control fire ants and halt the spread of the pests. Scientists at the University of
Georgia have discovered that a single gene controls reproduction in fire ants. Efforts are
now underway to learn what chemical the gene produces and whether it can be synthesized
for use in controlling the ants. Fire ants first arrived in the U.S. at Mobile, Alamaba in the
1930s as stowaways on a ship from South America. There are few natural predators of fire
ants in the U.S. The stinging pest has swept across the country thriving in open, sun-lit
areas where the soil has been disturbed. Contact: Helen Fosgate (706) 542-0809.









DUTY-FREE IMPORTS -- The government of Poland is granting unlimited duty-free imports
of wheat and coarse grains until June 30, 1993. The action is taken to increase imports of
basic grains, and thus stabilize internal grain prices which have risen significantly this year
as the result of drought-reduced production in 1992. The government of Bulgaria has
banned grain exports until October of this year because sales have depleted grain reserves.
Bulgaria is now considering importing grain. Contact: Randy Hager (202) 690-4200.

THE FEW ARE GETTING FEWER -- The U.S. is depending on a fewer number of people to
produce agricultural products. Latest figures show that in 1990 67 million people lived in
rural areas, about 27 percent of the U.S. population. But only 4.6 million people resided on
farms, about 2 percent of the population. One-half of farm residents lived in the Midwest,
but they constituted only four percent of that region's population. Thirty percent of farm
residents lived in the South. Figures show that the farm resident population declined by 24
percent in the 1980s, and 25 percent in the 1970s. While the rural population is increasing,
the farm population is declining. Contact: Joan Courtless (301) 436-8461.

SOILS NEWSLETTER -- A newsletter on soil fertility, tillage, soil testing and other crop-
related topics is published by the University of Minnesota Extension Service. "Soil
Samplings" is printed seven times a year for farmers, consultants and others in production
agriculture. Recent articles have included information on tillage options, research on
chemicals and ground water quality, and changes in corn fertilizer recommendations.
Contact: George Rehm (612) 625-6210.

NATURAL PESTICIDE -- A natural pesticide against the sweet potato whitefly and aphids has
been extracted from a wild species of tobacco. Scientists at the University of Georgia's
Coastal Experiment Station have discovered that sugar based fatty acids in the tobacco
resist insects but are not toxic to the environment. Because wild tobacco is difficult to
grow, the scientists are reviewing other tobacco plants for the natural compounds. Contact:
Gary Herzog (912) 386-3374.

TOBACCO ACREAGE -- U.S. tobacco growers plan to reduce this year's plantings about
three percent to 750,700 acres. Assuming average yields, the U.S. tobacco crop this year
would decline about four percent from 1992's 1.68 billion pounds. Price support for flue-
cured will rise 1.7 cents a pound, and burley at least 3.4 cents per pound. With an expected
increase in leaf exports, total use of U.S.-grown tobacco in 1992/93 may increase from a
year earlier. Annual consumption is down about 3 percent to 2,629 cigarettes per adult.
The decrease is expected to continue this year. Contact: Verner Grise (202) 219-0890.

PROSPECTIVE PLANTINGS -- This year growers intend to plant 76 million acres of corn,
down four percent from last year. Soybean plantings are estimated at 59 million acres,
unchanged from 1992 levels. Spring wheat should total 19 million acres, up one percent
from last year and the highest level since 1953. Cotton plantings are expected to total 13
million acres, one percent above last year. Cotton acreage in the Southeast will be seven
percent above the 1992 level. Contact: John Witzig (202) 720-2127.



Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1870 -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's efforts to organize community
groups to take action on environmental and economic problems. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1352 -- Transporting produce to you; credit rating repair ripoffs; drive
through, delivery and take-out; brewing that coffee; specialty crops for you. (Weekly reel
of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1862 -- USDA News Highlights; USDA budget revealed;
foreign "army" to attack whiteflies; produce transport in transition; payment limitations.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1615 -- Cotton's hidden costs; wasp whacks weevils; kenaf rivals
alfalfa; controlling weeds with sheep; hammocks smooth out bumps for produce. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, Apr. 15, milk production; Friday, Apr.
16, vegetable production; Monday, Apr. 19, ag outlook; Tuesday, Apr. 20, crop & weather
update, U.S. trade update, ag resources (land values) outlook; Wednesday, Apr. 21, dairy
outlook; Thursday, Apr. 22, rice outlook, catfish processing; Friday, Apr. 23, oil crops
outlook, livestock/poultry update, cattle on feed. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on the status of agriculture in South Dade County, Florida
seven months after Hurricane Andrew. Features include housing for migrant farm workers
and rebuilding the vegetable packing plants, nursery and tropical fruit industries.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crop progress,
and USDA budget director Stephen Dewhurst on USDA's budget.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on purslane research; Pat O'Leary reports
on proper handling of tomatoes; Lynn Wyvill reports on the status of Florida's tropical fish
business after the impact of Hurricane Andrew.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 11
OFFMIKE
ALMOST FREE LUNCH...was the centerpiece of Ag Week and Ag Day in Iowa. Von Ketelsen
(KOEL, Oelwein, IA) served as master of ceremonies at an event serving nearly 1,000 people who
paid only 66 cents each. Members of the Iowa chapter of the National Agricultural Marketing
Association and the Iowa Farm Commodity Association served the lunch that consisted of Iowa
produced products. The program emphasized that the American farmer receives only a small
fraction of every food dollar spent by consumers. All proceeds were given to the local food bank.
Thanks to Herb Plambeck (Living History Farms, Des Moines) for the information.

POLAND...is on the itinerary of Ed Slusarczyk (Ag Radio Network, Utica, NY). Ed will join a 14
member group, representing businesses in the United States, on the Trade and Investment
Program of the Office of International Trade and Development. They will meet in Poland with
food exporters April 25 to May 1 to provide information about how to increase agricultural
exports to the U.S. On May 14 Ed and Jeff Stewart, of the network, will be in Poland and
Germany for two weeks to boost U.S. exports in West and East Europe.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











CONGRATULATIONS...to Lynn Ketelsen (Linder Farm Network, Willmar, MN), selected to receive
Mid-Am's Salute Award at the 25th annual delegates meeting. Lynn is the 19th farm broadcaster
to be recognized by the organization during the 23-year history of the award. Herb Plambeck,
mentioned above, was the first broadcaster recognized when the award began in 1970. ...to
Walt Shaw (KRAK, Sacramento, CA) for the four-column coverage in the March 1993 issue of
Mid-Am Reporter of Walt and his farm broadcasting career.

RECENT VISITORS...to USDA Radio & TV include Dennis Morrice (KICD, Spencer, IA), Bob
Ziegler, (WIMA, Lima, OH), Joe Hardin (WBZI, Xenia, OH), Chip Nelson (WKFI, Wilmington, OH),
Mitsuhiro Yokoyama (Embassy of Japan), Ichiro Honda and Masanori Sato (public relations office
of the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries).

LETS TALK SAFTY...to help producers get safely through another planting season.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division







Farm Bradcasters Letter



United States Departm f Agriculture Office of ub4 Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D. C. 20250 1202) 720-4330

Letter No. 260 :"April 16, 1993

USDA 1994 BU E -Farm ms maintain their current structure in the fiscal year
1994 budget for the .0 an nt of Agriculture, but one aspect of reform is the creation
of the Farmer Service Agency. It will provide one-stop shopping for farmers participating in
USDA programs, cutting red tape for the farmer while cutting costs to the American
taxpayer. The budget contains Department-wide savings of $900 million dollars. There is
an $800 million increase for rural housing, $375 million for health, fire and rescue services,
$370 million for water and sewer services, $200 million for small business investment, and
a $350 million increase is directed at the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women,
Infants and Children, enabling it to serve an additional 400,000 participants. "The budget
proposals treats farmers and rural America fairly," Secretary Espy says. "And it holds out
hope to some of the neediest in our country." Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

1993 COTTON CROP -- Planting of the cotton crop for this year is underway in many
sections of the nation. Wet conditions have delayed progress in Texas, Arizona, and
California. Replantings have already occurred in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Producers
intend to plant 13.4 million acres of cotton this year. Upland acreage is projected at 13.2
million acres, up one percent from last year, and extra-long-staple at only 205,000, down
22 percent. Low prices and an expansion in the acreage reduction program requirement led
to the reduction. Contact: Bob Skinner (202) 219-0840.

FARMER HEALTH RESEARCH -- The National Cancer Institute, Environmental Protection
Agency, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences will track for ten years
the health of 100,000 farm families in Iowa and North Carolina. They will study personal
lifestyle characteristics such as how much time is spent outdoors, pesticide and chemical
use, family health history, eating and smoking habits, and how these items relate to cancer.
The study will be largest such examination of American farm families. Contact: Michael
Alavanja (301) 496-1611.

GOOD BUY -- Current supplies of all the best known apple varieties are higher than last
year's levels. Wholesale prices for apples are down in the major growing areas. Consumers
should find the abundance of apples reflected in lower retail prices, making "an apple a day"
a good buy. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

ASSISTANCE FOR CORN PRODUCERS -- Low test weight, foreign material, damaged
kernels, and excessive moisture were some of the factors reducing the value of corn in some
states. Drying charges and discounts often exceeded the value of the corn. Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy has announced new assistance for producers who suffered losses from
reduced quality caused by damaging weather or related conditions. Producers should
contact their county ASCS office to see if they qualify. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-
4623.







2

BATTLING THE CORN EARWORM -- Corn earworm and fall armyworm moths migrate from
Texas and Mexico in early summer to attack corn, cotton, soybeans, tomatoes and other
crops in five states. A female earworm can lay as many as 1,000 eggs on crop plants,
costing U.S. producers $2 billion a year in lost production and insecticide application. Field
tests show that a nematode, a tiny wormlike organism, can kill the pests in the soil before
they become adult moths. The nematode Steinernema riobravis is known to infect only crop
pests such as earworms and armyworms, and kills 90 to 100 percent of the pests in 48
hours. Outdoor tests have begun in Arizona, California, Georgia, and in Mexico. If
successful, farmers will have a new nonchemical way to protect their crops and reduce the
pests' migrations. Contact: Jimmy Raulston (210) 969-4807.

MEAT IMPORTS -- Australia and New Zealand have signed voluntary restraint agreements
to limit their shipments of meat items during the year. The U.S. Meat Import Act places a
limit of 1.2 billion pounds for 1993. Imports are expected to total just 100,000 pounds less
than that amount, preventing an import quota from being imposed. Australia and New
Zealand are the two largest foreign suppliers of fresh beef to the U.S. market, supplying 90
percent of imports subject to the Meat Import Act. Contact: Jim Fowler (202) 720-1352.

BEEF PRICES AND CONSUMPTION SLIP -- U.S. cattle inventory is forecast to continue a
modest herd expansion that began in 1989. Slow rebuilding of inventory will result in small
increases in beef production. Nevertheless the growth will not offset population increases
and export demand for beef, therefore per capital beef consumption will slip slightly. As
weather conditions improve, fed cattle marketing will increase, and with supplies of pork
and poultry growing, cattle prices are likely to decline in the second and third quarters of this
year. Contact: Peter Downing (202) 720-7285.

CELL RESEARCH -- Cells that produce components of milk are now being grown in the
laboratory. Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service say studying cells from
cow mammary glands could lead to new insights on methods for stopping bacterial
infections that cause mastitis. The infection costs U.S. dairy farmers $2 billion annually in
lost production and treatment. Using culture cells in research instead of cows is economical,
and scientists can directly witness the cells' response to medications or other treatments.
That is not possible in studies of live animals. Contact: Eduardo Cifrian (301) 504-8330.

FARMLINE MAGAZINE -- USDA has stopped publishing "Farmline" magazine. "Farmline"
was distributed monthly for 14 years, reporting agricultural economics research in a feature
style for a general audience. USDA is reviewing methods to disseminate the information
more economically. Contact: Jack Harrison (202) 219-0494.

NEW DIRECTORY -- USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service has produced two new
directories of export elevators and grain export firms. The Export Elevator Directory lists
major elevators from which U.S. grain is exported and where official grain inspection and
weighing services are provided. The Directory of Firms Registered to Export Grain includes
companies or individuals who buy, handle, weigh, or transport grain in excess of 15,000
metric tons for sale in foreign commerce. Copies are available by calling (202) 720-8262.
Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1871 -- Gary Crawford reports on the Administration's proposed
budget for Fiscal Year 1994. Its a look at what the new numbers mean for producers and
consumers. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1353 -- From yucca to cactus; weight loss or money loss; the diet
dilemma; you're never too old to exercise; in school and homeless. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1863 -- USDA News Highlights; U.S. farmers feed the
world; irrigation and water quality; killer sweet potatoes; we C.A.R.E. about farm resources.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1616 -- Nematode controls corn earworm; mass-producing
nematodes; new and improved G.R.I.N.; stand-alone germplasm info; donations aid museum
completion. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, Apr. 21, dairy outlook; Thursday,
Apr. 22, oil crops outlook, livestock & poultry update, cattle on feed; Tuesday, Apr. 27, crop
& weather update, vegetable outlook; Thursday, Apr. 29, catfish production, world tobacco
situation; Friday, Apr. 30, ag prices. These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on the national parasite collection, and reports from Florida
on after the hurricane: tropical fish farming; DeBoria Janifer looks at diet and cholesterol; Pat
O'Leary reports on the tomato killers.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the weather and crop
situation; USDA world board chairman James Donald on crop production estimates; USDA
economist Cathy Greene on the agricultural outlook; USDA economist Dave Harvey on
aquaculture.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer on new high-tech rice; Lynn Wyvill on exercise and
aging, and food safety for children and the elderly.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

43 1262 08300 662 6
OFFMIKE
THE WHEAT LOVES IT...but cattle producers are having a difficult time, says John Morris (KSAL,
Salina, KS). The region has received nearly half again as much rain as normal, producing deep
mud for feed lot operators. John says weather conditions during the winter caused an increase in
calfing losses, estimated at $6 million in a two county area he serves. Corn and milo producers
are considering fast maturing varieties because of the likely delay in getting into the fields.

NO DELIVERY...of seed is being accepted in the area served by Jim Fleming (WDZ, Decatur, IL).
Producers are holding off until the weather situation is more clear. Cool, wet weather has
delayed field work 3 weeks. Producers may shift their seed orders to fast growing varieties. Jim
says conditions favor a boost in no-till acreage.

LOOKING...for an ag reporter with strong TV producing abilities, interviewing skills, and on-
camera experience, says Larry Lyle (AgDay, South Bend, IN). Send resume and tape to Larry at
P.O. Box 1062, zip code 46624-0062.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











30,000...people attended the Farm Show in Green Bay, WI last month, says Michael Austin
(WGEE, Green Bay). However, a 5-inch snowfall with 50 mph winds at the close of the show
reduced attendance and closed the local schools. Michael has been covering the water quality
issue in Wisconsin. He says producers have established a watershed in his region by working
with state and USDA personnel. It covers such issues as manure storage, distribution and
monitoring water quality.

A NEW NETWORK...is being created in Texas. Carl Shearer (KVRP, Haskell, TX) says his
station's farm programs will be heard twice a day on a station in the western portion of the state,
and that there are plans to add two more stations in a few weeks. Carl says producers indicate
they are planting more upland cotton this year, and fewer acres to corn and sorghum.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE...is now available with Comrex encoding for improved audio quality. Its
available 24A ours a day on (202) 720-2545.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture e of P c Affairs Radi Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2607 J* i 9 -April 23, 1993

FILLING IN THE FORMS -- Duri a sitto a U o-located field :office in Lapcaster, Ohio,
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy ~ e process farmers go through in working
with the Department. Espy visited t r field County Agriculture Center which houses
offices for USDA's Cooperative Extension Service, Farmers Home Administration, Soil
Conservation Service, and the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. Secretary
Espy met USDA employees and visited with farmers conducting business at the office. The
Secretary was in Ohio to attend Senator John Glenn's (D-Ohio) Economic Conference, held
in Athens. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

VEGETABLE ACREAGE -- Spring fresh vegetable acreage is expected to be down 3 percent
at 252,900 acres. Head lettuce, sweet corn and tomatoes had the largest acreage decline.
Processed vegetable acreage is forecast to be 5 percent less than last year, at nearly 1.4
million acres. Green peas led the decline with a drop of 26 percent. Contact: David Mueller
(202) 720-6054.

CITRUS PRODUCTION -- The forecast for citrus production this season is 15 million tons,
a 24 percent increase over last season primarily due to the large increase in Florida orange
production. Grapefruit production is up 21 percent from last season at 2.7 million tons. The
increase is largely due to a much larger grapefruit crop in Florida. The large supply will affect
prices. Contact: Jim Brewster (202) 720-7688.

RURAL ENTERPRISE ZONES -- Agriculture-dependent areas are only a small part of the total
rural economy, but they stand to benefit from successful rural enterprise zones. The zones
apply tax incentives and other economic inducements to encourage business growth and
investment in target areas. There are various proposals providing for multi-community
collaboration and wider geographic areas than state programs, changes that could enhance
business opportunities in rural communities. Research suggests that rural zones may be
even more successful than their urban counterparts in creating jobs. Contact: Richard
Reeder (202) 219-0542.

GETTING OFF WELFARE -- A new publication by USDA's Economic Research Service, "The
Family Support Act Will it Work in Rural Areas," examines how the Act can help rural
families escape from the welfare rolls. The book notes, however, that the Family Support
Act is not a cure for poverty or welfare. The Act's ultimate success in rural areas depends
largely on how well States and local officials can implement the legislation. Areas differ in
their ability to take advantage of the Act, some rural areas may lack employment for
participants who complete the JOBS program, and some States may have difficulties
meeting matching requirements for Federal funding. Copies are available for $15 plus
shipping, by dialing 1-800-999-6779. Contact: Sara Mazie (202) 219-0530.









DAIRY REFERENDUM -- U.S. dairy farmers will conduct a referendum in August to determine
whether to Continue the national dairy promotion and research program. All dairy farmers
producing milk for commercial use during April 1993 will be eligible to vote. A majority of
those voting can continue the program. Dairy farmers finance the promotion and research
program with a 15-cent per hundredweight assessment on all milk produced and marketed
in the 48 contiguous states. The program is administered by a 36-member board appointed
by the secretary of agriculture, and was last approved by dairy producers in 1985. The
period between April and August will be used to issue notices to dairy farmers prior to the
voting. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-6179.

U.S. COTTON IS CLEAN -- In response to interest expressed by cotton traders and the
cotton processing industry, the Bremen Cotton Exchange initiated a study to determine the
amount of herbicide, insecticide and fungicide residues on raw cotton imported from several
nations. The cotton was examined for a total of 228 substances that might be present.
Results showed that the highest residue values found in any of the samples tested were well
below the permitted levels for vegetable foodstuffs in the Threshold Limiting Value
regulations. Tests of U.S. cotton indicated only a barely detectable trace of residue levels.
Contact: Robert Lerman (202) 720-9510.

CHILDREN AND OBESITY -- Obesity among children in the United States aged 6 to 11 has
increased by 54 percent over the last 15 years, and extreme obesity has increased by 98
percent. Twenty-seven percent of children and 21 percent of adolescents in the U.S. are
obese. Obesity in children leads to adult health problems. Dr. Beth Reames, Extension
nutritionist with the Lousiana State University Agricultural Center, says that six factors
appear to contribute to obesity in children: genetics, lifestyle, emotional overeating,
indulgence, neglect and medical factors. "Some nutrition experts suggest that obesity in
children has increased as a result of lack of support for children and families in our society,"
Reames says. "Many children turn to food and television for comfort to compensate for lack
of parental and family involvement." Contact: Beth Reames (504) 388-4141.

CATFISH DOWN, PRICES UP -- U.S. catfish production is expected to fall this year, while
farm and processor prices will continue to increase. Most of the contraction is forecast in
the second half of the year. Catfish production last declined in 1975, and since that time
has increased over 2,700 percent. Inventories of food-size fish and stockers are each down
10 percent. Farm prices are forecast to continue gaining strength this year. Contact: David
Harvey (202) 219-0085.

KENAF AS LIVESTOCK FEED -- Leaves from kenaf, a bamboo-like tropical plant, can rival
alfalfa as a high-protein livestock feed and provide farmers with a second crop on winter
wheat acres from Kansas to the South. In tests, kenaf harvested 60 to 80 days after
planting in central Oklahoma yielded about three tons of dry matter per acre. The leaves
contained 30 percent crude protein, compared with 20 percent for alfalfa. Scientists with
USDA's Agricultural Research Service say that if a producer's winter wheat is planted for
grazing, kenaf can go on the same ground in May; if the wheat is harvest for grain the kenaf
planting can be delayed until late June. The wheat-kenaf rotation does well on non-irrigated
land. Contact: William Phillips (405) 262-5291.

COLOR SLIDE of Secretary Espy in horizontal TV format is available. TV broadcasters only
please. Contact: Vic Powell (202) 720-4330.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1872 -- Brenda Curtis is in California reviewing the expanding world
of fresh fruits and vegetables. Growers and retailers give a description of the more exotic
varieties that are increasing in popularity. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1354 -- Tightening meat safety; yes, we have lots of bananas; getting
started with "birding"; the changing produce counter; food safety at home. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1864 -- USDA News Highlights; corn disaster payments;
cotton outlook; cattle troughs from old tires; a new weapon against parasitic mites. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1617 -- Environmentally-friendly food testing; fieldside chemical
extraction; cold country research; tracking the frost line; four new sugarcane varieties.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, May 3, horticultural exports; Tuesday,
May 4, weekly weather and crop update; cotton and wool update; Tuesday, May 11, U.S.
crop production, world ag supply and demand. These are the USDA reports we know about
in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food assistance after hurricane Andrew, and USDA's
national parasite collection; DeBoria Janifer looks at Washington, D.C.'s cherry blossoms and
importing cherry trees;

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the weather and crop
outlook; USDA world board chairman James Donald on beef and pork production; USDA
economist Cathy Green on the agricultural outlook; and USDA economist Dave Harvey on
aquaculture.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the nutritional value of purslane; Pat
O'Leary examines the Palmer Drought Index.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE 3 126208300 6675
OFFMIKE
FIELDS HAVE BEEN SATURATED...since last October, and every storm just adds to the mud,
says Rich Balvanz (WMT Cedar Rapids, IA). Rich says a listener called in to say that producers
shouldn't get upset about the delay in getting into the fields, he just got his 1992 crop out.

FIELD PONDS...are keeping producers out of the fields, says Maria Behrends (WKAN, Kankakee,
IL), and its beginning to affect attitudes because they want to get planting underway. More than
60 counties in the state have approved an Extension Referendum that places a tax on farms to
raise funds supporting Extension Service county offices. Maria says the Kankakee County board
voted approval by a 58 to 42 percent margin.

BROUGHT BACK A LOAD OF INTERVIEWS...says Ron Hays (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City),
from his two-week tour of Australia. Ron says there are a number of common issues among
Australian and United States producers, such as food safety and animal protection, but he says
Australian grain producers expressed major concerns regarding the U.S. export bonus program.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











VIDEO COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY...will be used later this year to reach cable companies and
home satellite dishes, says Patrick Gottsch (RFD-TV, Fort Worth, TX). Pat says that on October
1 this year his agricultural broadcasting service to rural America is planning to expand operations
to 24-hour, seven-day a week programming.

ITS SPRING...but we're continuing to get winter storm watches, says Shelly Beyer (Linder Farm
Network, Willmar, MN). She says producers need a week of warm windy weather. Corn planting
is late, but Extension is advising not to rush just yet to fast growing varieties and their lower
yields. Shelly says she's busy planning the North Central NAFB regional meeting, May 20-22 in
Alexandria, MN. Events include tours of aquaculture and elk farms, and an opportunity to taste
roast elk.

LATE PLANTING...in many areas will likely mean 16-hour days for producers. Fatigue in the
dangerous occupation of pro auction agriculture leads to accidents. Keep 'em safe, talk safety.

VIC POWELL Rd s
Chief, Radio & TV Divisi n








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture f of Public Aff i o-V Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2609 May 7, 1993

FOOD FOR PROGRESS -- etary of AgriCdl Mike Espy has returned from meetings in
Europe that included GATTi generall Agr nt on Tariffs and Trade. While in Brussels,
Belgium, Secretary Espy an i modity mix contained in $700 million for
agricultural aid extended by the s to Russia. The commodity breakdown is $227
million for corn, $105 million for soybean meal, $66 million for butter, $56 million for wheat,
$40 million for high-value products, and $5 million for sugar. 75 percent of the commodities
will be shipped on U.S. flag vessels. The United States and Russia will share the $200
million in transportation costs. Secretary Espy said, "As President Clinton stated when
announcing this package in Vancouver last month, this aid will benefit not only Russian
consumers during their difficult time of economic restructuring, but also U.S. farmers and
agribusinesses..." Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

EXPORT PRODUCTS HIT RECORDS -- Foreign demand for certain U.S. agricultural exports
have reached record highs. Recent statistics show U.S. yogurt exports continued to grow
briskly in 1992, outpacing the previous year by 62 percent at $14 million. Mexico accounts
for one-half of total U.S. yogurt exports. U.S. herbal tea exports reached $55 million, a
record level. Two-thirds of herbal tea exports go to the EC. U.S. pasta exports jumped 44
percent to a new high of $65 million. Canada is the top market, accounting for 80 percent
of U.S. export pasta sales. And pistachio exports jumped 100 percent in 1992 to $94
million. Overseas purchases now account for 40 percent of the domestic crop. Hong Kong
was the leading importer at $20 million. Contact: Diane Dolinsky (202) 690-1886.

ANTI-HUNGER LEGISLATION -- The Mickey Leland Hunger Prevention Act reforms the food
stamp program to promote self sufficiency of recipients, makes food assistance more readily
available to poor families with children, and enhances program integrity and savings. In
testimony to the House Agriculture Committee, Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy said the
legislation is an investment in the future of the nation. The bill provides incentives for
education and training that would lead to decreased dependence on food stamps and other
public assistance programs. The Act also includes provisions to promote savings by
expending recovery efforts of food stamp overpayment and reduce street trafficking.
Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

WEIGHT LOSS AND BLOOD PRESSURE -- Weight reduction is effective in lowering blood
pressure, and could replace the need for drugs in some mildly hypertensive patients. One
in 4 Americans has high blood pressure, and many are trying to reduce sodium intake rather
than lose weight. Dr. Beth Reames, Extension nutritionist with the Louisiana State
University Agricultural Center, says studies show that better control of blood pressure was
achieved with weight control than with sodium reduction. Reames says weight loss
enhanced the effectiveness of blood pressure medications. Contact: Beth Reames (504)
388-4141.









VEGETABLE ACREAGE UP SLIGHTLY -- The 1993 annual fresh-market harvested vegetable
acreage is forecast at 1.8 million acres, about one percent more than last year. Total farm
value is forecast at $6.3 to $6.5 billion, about 2 to 6 percent higher than in 1992. Grower
and retail prices for fresh-market vegetables are expected to decline. The highs experienced
in April resulted from weather-related supply gaps from Florida and California, which will be
filled as the spring production season gets underway. Contact Gary Lucier (202) 219-0884.

INDUSTRIAL USES OF AG -- In response to the growing importance of nonfood uses of
agricultural crops and materials, USDA's Economic Research Service is introducing a new
situation and outlook report that will examine how agricultural materials are used by industry.
"Industrial Uses of Agricultural Materials" is designed for people involved in the research,
development, production, processing, marketing and policy issues surrounding agriculturally
based industrial products. Thesemiannual report will be available in July and December for
$16 a year. Call 1-800-99-6779 to subscribe. Contact: Greg Gajewski (202) 219-0888.

FOOD STAMP ACCURACY PROJECTS -- USDA has awarded $370 million in federal grants
to Illinois and Maryland to start pilot projects aimed at issuing food stamp benefits more
accurately. The grants will assist the states in finding innovative ways of handling heavier
caseloads while achieving high payment accuracy. The projects are scheduled to last 18
months. Contact: Phil Shanholtzer (703) 305-2286.

WHOLE LOT OF PUFFING -- U.S. smokers consumed an estimated 498 billion cigarettes last
year, about 2 percent less than a year earlier, for an annual consumption per adult of 2,629
cigarettes. While domestic use declined, exports increased boosting cigarette output about
2.5 percent last year. U.S. smokers used 2.2 billion large cigars, and 1.3 billion small cigars,
both down 2 percent. The fall in domestic consumption is expected to continue due to
higher prices, increasing restrictions on smoking, adverse publicity, and declining social
acceptance. Cigarette exports rose 15 percent to 206 billion cigarettes. The value of all
tobacco exports exceeded imports by $4.8 billion, up one percent from a year earlier and the
second highest level ever achieved. Contact: Verner Grise (202) 219-0890.

ALTERNATIVE PEST-CONTROL METHODS -- USDA's new Pesticide Data Program shows
that vegetable producers are using a variety of practices to control pests. Innovative
methods include a tractor mounted sweeper to vacuum bugs off the crop, cultural methods
such as crop rotation; biological methods such as releasing beneficial insects which prey on
insect pests, and placing pheromone traps. These practices complement or can reduce the
use of chemical pesticides. Contact: Ann Vandeman (202) 219-0405.

FOOLING PESTS WITH WHITEWASH -- When adult pecan weevils emerge from the soil this
August and September there will be a surprise for them in many orchards. USDA scientists
with the Agricultural Research Service have constructed a masonite trap shaped like a
pyramid about 21 inches wide and 48 inches tall, painted brown to resemble a tree trunk.
When the insects emerge from the ground they crawl or fly to the dark trunk of a pecan tree.
But by whitewashing the tree trunks the costly pests are diverted to the brown-painted trap
from which they cannot escape. Ten to 15 traps per 100 acres are sufficient, placed 10 feet
from the tree trunk in July. The method reduces the need to spray for the insects and can
serve to more accurately pinpoint outbreaks. Contact: Louis Tedders (912) 956-5656.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1874 -- Household insects driving you buggy? Brenda Curtis talks
with a University of Maryland entomologist about the latest and most effective methods of
controlling roaches, fleas, silverfish, and spiders. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1356 -- Alcohol and the risk of breast cancer; flea control; new national
yogurt labeling campaign; "pro-active' lawn mowing; mulching mowers. (Weekly reel of 2-
1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1866 -- USDA News Highlights; Russian aid package
finalized; dairy farmer refunds; no-till caution; high-tech peaches. (Weekly reel of news
features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1619 -- Alcohol & breast cancer; sugars kill flies; fungi kill pear
pests; sustainable feed crop; "new" health food grain. (Weekly reel of research features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, May 14, livestock outlook, milk
production; Tuesday, May 18, former USSR outlook, weather & crop update, farm labor;
Wednesday, May 19, U.S. ag outlook; Thursday, May 20, wheat outlook, U.S. trade update,
catfish processing; Friday, May 21, livestock/poultry update, cattle on feed; Monday, May
24, feed outlook. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack
of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on exercise and aging; Dave Luciani of Michigan State
University on dry ice cream and other value-added dairy products; Joe Courson of University
of Georgia Extension on a chemical cure for blueberry pollination.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen with a crop and weather
update for U.S. farming regions, including analysis of the El Nino weather pattern; USDA
economist Gary Lucier on vegetable production.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on biotechnology and tomatoes; Lynn Wyvill
on a Virginia Extension program to help immigrants adapt to life in the U.S.; DeBoria Janifer
on the alternative food crop, purslane.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
11111 IIIIII IIIIII 1
4 3 1262 08300 657 6

OFFMIKE
COTTON FARMERS...in west Texas have had to replant so often they don't put seed in the
hoppers until the third trip, says Curt Lancaster (VSA Radio Network, San Angelo, TX). This year
its dry. East Texas is wet, but Curt notes the grass has little nutritional value. Curt says the
south central NAFB meeting in San Angelo was well attended.,-Cong'atulations to Curt and
Roddy Peeples (VSA Network), at the meeting they were both made honorary Texas agriculture
commissioners by Rick Perry, the Texas Commissionerof Agriculture.

WE'RE WATCHING IDLE TRACTORS...says Bob Bosold (CANN/WAXX, Eau Claire, WI). More
snow fell in April than any other time of winter, keeping the ground wet and further delaying
planting. Bob's also covering the cryptosporidium outbreak in Milwaukee's water supply. Bob
says it has been in the system for the last five years, but had been successfully filtered out. A
filtration failure released it into the water system. Bob says there is no proof the cryptosporidium
came from dairy farms, that it exists in all mammals, but agriculture took the early rap.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












A BUMPER HARD RED WHEAT CROP...is developing, says Mike Dain (Mid America Ag Network,
Wichita, KS). Development is two to three weeks behind. Mike says there is limited disease
problems at this time, but producers in western Kansas are experiencing snow mold on sections
that had 50-60 inches of snow during the winter.

WE NEED WATER WINGS...says Skip Davis (WASK Lafayette, IN), and about 5 days of dry warm
breeze. Skip says the outlook is for a normal spring. Most producers in his area can get their
crop in the ground in about 10 days.

ABOVE NORMAL...precipitation for the past six months, and double the normal amount for April,
has producers waiting for fields to dry out, says Gary Digiuseppe (KWMT, Ft. Dodge, IA). Gary
says attendance was strong at the Farm Show, held last month at the Webster County
fairgrounds, and the date has been set for next year's event to be held the third weekend in
March.

VIC POWELL / --
Chief, Radio & TV Division




A)l i '.' i



Farm Br asters Letter



United States Department o r cult L Of opl /ic frs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2610 May 14, 1993

GATT AND MARKET ical discussions between the United States and the
European Community wil soon on the subject of market access in the General
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. During a tour to meet with his European counterparts,
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said that substantial discussions on market access must be
resolved before the GATT signing. The basic aim of GATT is to liberalize world trade and
place it on a more secure basis, contributing to economic growth and development. No
previous round of GATT talks has been as important to U.S. agriculture, or as difficult to
negotiate. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

TAKING OFFICE -- Swearing-in ceremonies were held May 12, 1993 for five individuals
assuming office at USDA: Richard Rominger as deputy secretary of agriculture; Bob Nash
as under secretary for small community and rural development; Eugene Branstool as
assistant secretary for marketing and inspection services; James Lyons as assistant secretary
for natural resources and environment; and Wardell Townsend as assistant secretary for
administration. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

FARM VALUES HIGHER -- For the sixth consecutive year the per acre value of U.S. farm real
estate is higher than the previous year. From a low of $599 per acre in 1987, the average
value is now $700, increasing 2 percent last year. Values increased in all regions except the
Pacific. Strongest gains, 4 percent, occurred in the Lake States, Appalachia, and Delta
States. The Corn Belt and Northern Plains areas each reported a 3 percent rise. The
Southern Plains averaged 2 percent higher, the first increase since 1985. Contact: Roger
Hexem (202) 219-0423.

BOLL WEEVIL POPULATION -- Trap results indicate that the boll weevil population will be
high this year. One of the major factors is the mild winter in most sections of boll weevil
infestation. Higher counts have been found in fields where stalks had not been cut last fall.
While the early weevils will not survive to infest squaring cotton in June, early high counts
indicate that even higher counts are on the way and can be a real danger to the cotton crop.
Contact: Jack Baldwin (504) 388-2180.

CANADA STREAMLINES WHEAT EXPORTS -- The Canadian Wheat Board is now permitting
licensed agents to market grain directly to U.S. buyers, allowing buyer and seller to set price
privately without Board intervention or negotiations. The objective for opening direct sales
is to maximize sales to existing and new markets. While the Canadian Wheat Board
continues to make direct sales to individual buyers in the United States, it has taken the
action to minimize disruption of volume. The new procedure does away with exported
wheat being unloaded at Board terminals, repurchased at export prices and reloaded for final
shipment. These physical transactions now take place on paper. The Board maintains
control over volume and data collection. Contact: Jack Rower (202) 690-4130.









SUNFLOWERS -- Sunflowerseed commanded a higher price in 1992/93 and farmers are
expected to plant more acres to sunflowers this year, totalling 2.4 million acres, up 7 percent
from a year ago. For the 1992/93 marketing year crushers will process 2.3 billion pounds
of sunflowerseed to meet the growing demand for export of sunflower oil. The increased
crush will result in substantial reduction of stocks, and a 12 percent boost in prices.
Contact: Scott Sanford (202) 219-0840.

DRY EDIBLE BEANS -- This coming season, U.S. producers of dry edible beans intend to
plant 6 percent more acres this year for a total of 1.7 million acres. The small increase can
be attributed to continued high stocks and soft prices for many classes of beans, and
reduced export demand. Exports of dry beans were down 34 percent last year. Contact:
Shannon Hamm (202) 219-0886.

MORE WHEAT AND ORANGES -- Winter wheat is expected to have an average yield of 40
bushels per acre, up 2.5 bushels from last year. Production is forecast at 1.8 billion bushels,
up 13 percent. Area for harvest as grain is forecast at 44 million acres, up 6 percent.
Conditions are generally good but the crop is late in its development. Orange production is
forecast at 11.2 million tons, up 25 percent from last season. Florida is expected to produce
184 million boxes, up 32 percent from last season. California's orange forecast is 74 million
boxes, 10 percent more than last year. Contact: Rich Allen (202) 720-4333.

PESTICIDE RECORDKEEPING -- USDA says that certified applicators using restricted use
pesticides must meet new recordkeeping requirements. The applicator must record the
location and size of the treated area, the crop or stored product, the brand of the pesticide
and its EPA registration number, amount and date of application, and the applicator's name.
USDA and eligible state agencies will use the information to form a data base for
environmental surveys and reports to Congress. Violators can be fined up to $1,000.
Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-8998.

EXTENDED SHELF LIFE -- New developments in packaging are extending the shelf life of
foods. An example is shrink-wrapping, it reduces the amount of oxygen available to foods.
Modified atmosphere storage, a breathable plastic patch in shrink wrapping regulates the rate
at which oxygen and carbon dioxide enter and leave packaged fruit and vegetables, more
than doubling their shelf life. Irradiation also extends shelf life, but is somewhat more
expensive than shrink wrapping. Irradiation offers benefits to foods that other methods
cannot match or must use chemicals to achieve results, such as killing insects in grain,
inhibiting sprouting of potatoes, and eliminating micro-organisms than can contaminate
meats. Contact: Rosanna Morrison (202) 219-0313.

BABY BOOMERS AND MIDDLE AGE -- The greatest challenge in population profile during the
1990s will be the advent of middle age for almost all of the baby boom generation, those
born between 1946 and 1962, -and the diminished share of younger workers in the non
metro population. A study by USDA's Economic Research Service reveals that the median
age (34.1 years) of nonmetro people has risen, but that it is not greatly above that of metro
residents. Nonmetro counties have a higher percentage of people at retirement age and a
higher share of children ages 5 to 19. Contact: Calvin Beale (202) 219-0535.

Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1875 -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy talks about his first 100 days
in the top job at USDA, as well as his goal for a "new attitude" at the Agriculture
Department. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1357 -- Food safety research; yogurt cultures and health; a coffee flavor
explosion; from mushrooms to charamoyas; spider control. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1867 -- USDA News Highlights; the first 100 days; crop
reporting; some emergency pesticide uses being revoked; crop options for Oklahoma.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1620 -- Fungi kill pear pests; new threat to grapes; making grapes
virus free; grape biodiversity; dousing Africanized bees. (Weekly research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, May 21, livestock/poultry update, cattle
on feed; Monday, May 24, feed outlook; Tuesday, May 25, weekly weather and crop
update; Wednesday, May 26, cotton/wool outlook; Thursday, May 27, export outlook, world
tobacco situation; Friday, May 28, ag income outlook, ag prices. These are the USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are
not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on agricultural biotechnology and the Flavr Savr tomato;
Will Pemble reports on the new Flame grapefruit; Dave Luciani of Michigan State University
reports on preventing rural road accidents during the busy planting season.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA outlook chairman James Donald analyzes the latest crop report, and
the world ag supply and demand estimates; USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen
provides a U.S. crop and weather update; B-roll of swearing-in ceremony of five USDA
assistant secretaries.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on a Virginia Extension project to help
immigrants adapt; DeBoria Janifer reports on the experimental food crop purslane; Pat
O'Leary reports on a USDA CD-ROM computer project that helps you landscape your lawn.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from
8 8:30 a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3.1262 08300 642 8

OFFMIKE
SCHOOL FUNDING...is a hot issue in Iowa. Tom Beavers (KMA, Shenandoah, IA) says county
governments are trying to provide increased funding to make up for the reduction in state funds.
The state legislature is working on proposals to change the school funding formula from total
reliance on property taxes to include sales tax receipts as well. Tom says many counties that are
also trying to pass bond issues to improve schools are experiencing voter resistance.

WE'RE DOING VERY WELL...says Miles Carter (KMZU/KOAL, Carrollton, MO). Northwest
Missouri is probably the only non-muddy region in the state, soil temperatures have increased,
and producers are busy planting. There has been a big jump in the use of no-till. Miles says
many producers are using it on 20 percent of their land, and that it has helped in the fast
progress of planting. Attitudes are terrific, producers have had 2 good years and are hoping for a
third good season.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











90-MINUTE SATELLITE FEED...on marketing loans for wheat and feed grains will be conducted on
May 17, 7:30 p.m. CT, says Sam Knipp (Kansas Farm Bureau, Manhatten). The transmission will
originate from the Bureau and will be available on C-band G-6, transponder 19, and Ku band, G-
Star 2, Transponder 12.

AUSTRALIA...is on the travel agenda of Orion Samuelson (WGN/Tribune Radio Network,
Chicago). He returns May 18 from a 12-day look at that nation's agricultural economy.

BIG EXPANSION...is underway for the network voice of farmers in the nation's Northeast. Ed
Slusarczyk (Ag Radio Network, Utica, NY) has purchased the Agri-Broadcasting Network of
Pennsylvania. The Ag Radio Network will now broadcast on 108 stations. Ed says it will cover
80% of the dairy, grain, fruit and vegetable farmers in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. Jeff
Stewart, gener I manager of the network will administer the combined operation.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Iture OfficeofPublicA Afrs. Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250-1340 {202)720-4330

Letter No. 2611

The nation's fist state tem for isstem o
food stamp benefits electron Zen
card is observed by Agricultur e
Espy. At a ceremony in Laurel, Maryland,
Secretary Espy said that the Electronic Benefits
Transfer (EBT) program streamlines the food
stamp and other benefits systems, and helps to
reduce fraud. Espy noted EBT's advantages
include bringing participants into the economic
mainstream by providing them more control over
their benefit accounts, and simplifies the
accounting process for retailers, bankers and the
federal government. USDA photo by Byron
Schumaker.


MEAT INSPECTION HEARINGS -- A series of hearings will be held to receive public
comments on a new regulatory system for meat and poultry inspection. The hearings will
be held nationwide and are scheduled for Dallas, TX, May 21; Seattle, WA, June 1; Des
Moines, IA, June 4; Oakland, CA, June 9; Atlanta, GA, June 11; and Philadelphia, PA, June
18. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy encourages interested individuals and groups to give
feedback on USDA efforts to modernize and reform the federal meat and poultry inspection
system. Contact: Steve Lombardi (202) 720-9113.

FOREST HEALTH -- A new report calls for an updated approach to planning, implementing
restoration efforts and maintenance of East-side forests in Oregon and Washington. The
forests in eastern Oregon and Washington have high levels of insect infestation, disease, and
fire losses. A panel of 112 scientists from universities, federal and state agencies, and
private companies produced the five-volume publication that examines past management
practices in the forests, suggests areas where more research is needed, and ways to apply
the knowledge. USDA Forest Service chief Dale Robertson says the report will be used in
reviewing forest management policies and decision making. Contact: John Denne (202)
205-0974.

NATIONAL SCHOLARS -- Forty-three high school students from across the nation will
receive full funding for a four-year college program at the 1890 land-grant institutions. The
1890/USDA National Scholars Program will provide the students with full tuition, fees,
books, equipment, and employment for each year while pursuing a bachelor's degree in
agriculture, food or natural resource sciences. The 43 winners were selected from more
than 2.7 million students expected to graduate from high school in 1993, and is the highest
federal honor bestowed upon graduating high school seniors. It is the largest undergraduate
scholarship program in USDA's history. Contact: Cheryl Greaux (202) 720-6905.








The 4th annual Washington Ag Watch of the
National Association of Farm Broadcasters
was held May 16-18. Farm broadcasters from
across the nation met with Secretary Espy
and members of his new sub-cabinet team,
Members of Congress, and foreign trade
officials. With NAFB president Ken Tanner
(WRAL/Tobacco Radio Network, Raleigh, NC)
the events were assembled by Ag Watch
chairman Randy Rasmussen (KMA, Shenan-
doah, IA). USDA photo by Ken Hammond.

PROTECTING THE SOIL -- The Conservation Reserve Program, now in its eighth year, has
temporarily retired from production over 36 million acres of highly erodible and sensitive
cropland, 90 percent of the program's goal. Meanwhile, under the conservation compliance
provisions of the 1985 farm bill, approved conservation plans have been fully applied on 86
million acres of highly erodible cropland, 58 percent of the total erodible acreage. Another
55 million acres have USDA approved plans that are in the process of implementation and
certification. Contact: Stan Daberkow (202) 219-0464.

BUY NOW -- Farm interest rates are expected to continue their downward trend in the first
half of 1993 before heading slightly upward in the second half and rising modestly in 1994.
With interest rates expected to increase, farmers may benefit by financing purchases now
rather than later. Farmers considering expanding their operations should note that farmland
prices generally move in the opposite direction of interest rates because future income that
can be earned is discounted by higher interest rates. Contact: Ted Covey (202) 219-0892.

FARMLAND VALUE -- How much is your land worth per acre? It depends on where you live.
Average farm real estate values last year ranged from $138 per acre in Wyoming to $4,774
per acre in New Jersey. The value of U.S. farmland has increased by an average of 2.4
percent per year for the last five years. The area in farmland has fallen each year, from 1.2
billion acres in 1950 to 0.9 billion in 1992. The number of farms has also declined each
year, from 5.6 million in 1950 to 2.1 million last year. These and other statistics are
available in a new USDA publication "Farm Real Estate." $12 per copy. Order by phone,
1-800-999-6779. Contact: John Jones (202) 219-0428.

DIET RESULTS -- Substituting stick margarine for corn oil increased the amount of saturated
fat in test diets more than 20 percent, and resulted in a 10-fold increase in trans fatty acids.
The study conducted at USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts
University in Boston, MA, shows that the semisolid, hydrogenated fats found in stick
margin are less friendly to the heart than the oils from which they are produced. Contact:
Alice Lichtenstein (617) 556-3127.

HUMAN NUTRITION SYMPOSIUM -- A symposium to identify priority needs and
opportunities for the future, and an examination of the progress of human nutrition programs
conducted by USDA, will be held in Washington, D.C., June 2-4. Cosponsored by USDA,
the International Life Sciences Institute, and the American Institute of Nutrition, the event
will feature 40 experts from federal government and academia at the W.O. Atwater
Centennial Celebration Symposium. 1994 marks the 100th year of USDA food studies.
Contact: Diane Dalisera (202) 659-0789.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1876 -- USDA is not only revamping its meat inspection system to
assure a safer product, but is also going to expand its food safety reach from the farm all
the way to our tables. Gary Crawford looks at the plans for a new food safety system.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1358 -- A new food safety system; controlling pests on citrus trees;
picnic safety; the art of eating artichokes; be kind to your tomato. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to
3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1868 -- USDA News Highlights; cotton payments; how
much farmland is owned by foreigners; viruses threaten California grapes; a different way
of tracking farm income. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1621 -- Chinese wasp kills aphids; viral vectors threaten citrus;
variform virus; fantastic fungus; redefining biocontrol. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, May 26, cotton/wool outlook;
Thursday, May 27, export outlook, world tobacco situation; Friday, May 28, ag income
outlook, ag prices. DUE TO MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY THE NEWSLINE WILL NOT CHANGE
UNTIL 5:00 p.m. TUESDAY, JUNE 1. Tuesday, June 1, horticultural exports, world sugar
situation; Wednesday, June 2, crop/weather update; Thursday, June 3, Western hemisphere
outlook. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on Secretary Espy's meeting at USDA headquarters with
farm broadcasters. Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for grilling meat and poultry.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy on NAFTA, and USDA's farm income
measurement; USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crop progress;
USDA economist Leland Southard on the latest livestock and poultry statistics.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the experimental food crop purslane;
Pat O'Leary reports about the Mississippi River Project on water quality; and Lynn Wyvill
reports on beta carotene and health.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

A available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08300 647 7
4

OFFMIKE
WE WERE QUACKING LIKE DUCKS...until the weather broke, says Al Carstens (KATE, Albert
Lea, MN). Farmers rushed into the fields to get planting underway. Al says they used 12 and
16-row planters to put corn in the ground without first running anhydrous. Producers plan to
sidedress later. Conditions exist for the crop to have a great start.

SOIL STEWARDSHIP WEEK...April 25 to May 1, was observed with a special half-hour program
says Bob Cockrum (Texas Agribusiness Network, Dallas). It included a look back to 1933 at the
height of the dust bowl days, then reviewed projects, federal programs and research to control
loss of soil. Interviews with Extension specialists and scientists at a wind research laboratory
were also featured. The network fed the program several times for stations to record and air.
Bob notes that producers finally got on schedule with planting after delays caused by wetness
and cool temperatures. The only producers behind are rice growers along the coast.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division.
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










NEWSLETTER AND TV REPORTS...on farm safety targeted to producers are available from Judy
Oskam (Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension, Stillwater, FAX 405-744-6059). The
effort has received funding from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. An
item in the spring newsletter, Health & Safety, notes that agriculture is one of the nation's most
hazardous occupations, having 50 deaths per 100,000 workers compared to an annual rate of 11
for all industries combined, nearly five times the rate for industry. The materials show that small
steps a producer can take will enhance safety, can add up and thereby improve the rate.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Shelly Beyer (Linder Farm Network, Willmar, MN). She won a
fellowship sponsored by the National Press Foundation to attend a seminar on the environment to
be held in Washington, D.C., May 23-26. Shelly was one of only 15 journalists selected
nationwide to attend this first seminar. The group will hear from environmental experts, industry
and government representatives on subjects such as hazardous waste, pesticides, food safety,
water pollution, endangered species, and the clean air act.

VIC POWELL { -4 &
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter


irs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 2250-1340 (202) 720-4330

May 28, 1993


Letter No. 2612


HUNGER FORUM -, SDA will condu t hunger forum, June 17, in Washington, D.C. to
establish an agenda the Depart e tto help end hunger in America. Participants will
include persons aff'q Jy 3k h farmers, food industry executives, policy experts,
academics, government ipty leaders. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says, "We
will discuss all aspects of hunger, including the need to reform our current welfare and
nutrition programs." The hunger forum is one of seven issue forums that Espy will conduct
around the country. The other topics are food safety/meat and poultry inspection, farm
income and program simplification, rural America/its protection and development, agricultural
trade and exports, and the environment. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

WIC WORKS -- A USDA study shows that infant mortality is one-quarter to two-thirds lower
among medicaid beneficiaries who participated in the the Special Supplemental Food Program
for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program than among those Medicaid beneficiaries
who did not participate in WIC. The study results are consistent with earlier reports on
WIC's impact on the Medicaid population, namely higher average birthweights, and a greater
probability of receiving adequate prenatal care. "These findings further underscore the need
for full-funding of the WIC program," says Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy. "President
Clinton and I are both committed to ensuring every eligible woman, infant and child receives
these invaluable benefits by 1996." Contact: Phil Shanholtzer (703) 305-2286.

DIET CAUTION -- A recent study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks,
ND reveals that diets high in the sugar fructose significantly increased cholesterol levels,
especially the "bad" LDL cholesterol. Study participants also tended to have higher blood
glucose levels while consuming nearly twice the level of fructose found in the average diet.
If the findings are repeated in larger studies, it raises questions about the growing
consumption of sugar, which is half fructose, and high-fructose corn syrups regularly added
to processed foods and soft drinks. Contact: Forrest Nielsen (701) 795-8456.

FIRE ANTS -- New non-chemical methods are being studied to more effectively control fire
ants, a human and agricultural pest in the southern states and Puerto Rico. USDA
Agricultural Research Service scientists will work to improve a natural control called
diatomaceous earth, the skeletal remains of tiny organism called diatoms. It kills fire ants
by damaging their protective skins. The scientists will conduct tests on attractants to add
to a mixture that will lure fire ants to a bait. Contact: Robert Vander Meer (904) 374-5918.

USING NATURE TO CONTROL WHITEFLIES -- Tests are being conducted this summer in
seven states on a naturally occurring fungus that kills sweetpotato whitefly and boll weevils.
These insects cost U.S. growers hundreds of millions of dollars a year in crop losses. The
fungus, Beauveria bassiana, is sprayed on infested plants. Agricultural Research Service
tests show that it is not harmful to humans. Contact: James Wright (210) 969-4876.


-








NEW PUBLICATION -- In July USDA's Economic Research Service will produce a new
publication, "Industrial Uses of Agricultural Materials," in response to the need for
information and analysis of the developing markets for farm-based industrial products. Plant
and animal-based materials are being developed as inputs for manufacturing fuels, plastics,
paper, newsprint, chemicals, and medicines. The publication will review the increased
demand for environmentally friendly materials that is increasing investment in farm-based
industrial products, and the new technologies that are lowering their costs. Contact: Robert
Dismukes (202) 219-0313.

FARM WORKER NUMBERS -- Latest statistics show there were 2.8 million people working
on farms and ranches in mid-April, an increase of about 10,000 during the same period a
year ago. Self-employed farm operators totaled 1.4 million, there were 828,000 hired
workers, 364,000 unpaid workers, and 224,000 agricultural service employees on farms and
ranches. Farm operators paid hired workers an average wage of $6.37 per hour, up 32
cents from a year earlier. Field workers received an average wage of $6.04 per hour, up 36
cents, and livestock workers earned $5.65 per hour, up 13 cents from year-ago figures.
Benefits such as housing and meals were paid to 44 percent of hired workers, compared to
41 percent in April of 1992. Contact: Dan Ledbury (202) 720-1790.

FOREIGN OWNERSHIP OF U.S. AG LAND -- Foreign interests owned 14.5 million acres of
privately owned agricultural land in the United States as of the close of last year, down two
percent from a year earlier. Foreign holdings account for about 1 percent of privately owned
U.S. agricultural land. The percentage has remained about the same since 1981. Forest
land accounts for nearly half of all foreign owned acreage, most of it in Maine. Canadian
investors are the largest group of foreign owners, at 25 percent. Japanese investors total
only 3 percent of the foreign-held acreage. Contact: Peter DeBraal (202) 219-0425.

HELPING FAMILIES BECOME HOMEOWNERS -- 2,600 empty dwellings in 9 states held in
inventory by USDA's Farmers Home Administration will be made available to inadequately
housed families. The homes will be offered to housing authorities, nonprofit comunity-based
organizations, or rented by the Farmers Home Administration. Families may apply to buy the
house at any time during the lease. The program will eliminate the cost to taxpayers of
maintaining the empty houses. USDA Secretary Mike Espy says he advocates allowing
public housing tenants to buy their residences, noting homeownership fosters independence
and pride. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4026.

CHEAPER ETHANOL -- New technologies are delivering less expensive ethanol and other
plant-based alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. In inflation-adjusted terms, the cost of
producing ethanol derived from corn has dropped 34 percent between 1980 and 1992,
through the adoption of energy-saving innovations. Despite the lowering of production
costs, the production of ethanol remains largely dependent on Federal support. The use of
ethanol as a transportation fuel in the U.S. grew to nearly 900 million gallons in 1991. Over
the longer term, production of ethanol on a large enough scale to substitute for gasoline is
likely to come only from forms of organic material other than corn, such as municipal solid
wastes, yard and wood wastes, recycled newspapers, and crops grown expressly for energy
content. Contact: Cathy Greene (202) 219-0313.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1877 -- John Snyder reviews the growing popularity of beans and why
some experts think that beans should be more popular. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1359 -- "Green" advertising claims; new roach control; confused about
nutrition?; turkey on the grill; outdoor grill safety. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1869 -- USDA News Highlights; farm export update; wheat
outlook; breeding for salt tolerance; viruses threaten California grapes. (Weekly reel of news
features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1622 -- Salty tomatoes; marginal guayule; opus tracks pesticides;
fungus catalog; fungal pharmaceuticals. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, June 3, western hemisphere outlook;
Tuesday, June 8, crop & weather update; Thursday, June 10, U.S. crop production, world
ag supply & demand; Friday, June 11, tobacco outlook, world ag production, world grain
production, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation. These are the USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on a Mississippi River water quality project; DeBoria Janifer
on the first statewide program for Electronic Benefits Transfer; Will Pemble on biopesticides;
Dave Luciani of Michigan State University on a heroic plant doctor.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen has the U.S. crop and weather
update; USDA economist Ed Allen on wheat; USDA economist Joel Greene on U.S.
agricultural trade; USDA analyst Bill Liefert on agriculture in the former USSR.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on shoreline erosion control; Lynn Wyvill on
at-risk food safety; DeBoria Janifer on the experimental food crop Purslane.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4II I lll I III1 11111
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 652 7
MICHIGAN CHERRIES...are doing gang busters in Japan, says Owen Davis (Michigan Farm Radio
Network, Lansing). Owen worked with the Cherry Marketing Institute to help capitalize on the TV
program "Twin Peaks," in which the actors often visited a restaurant to have a cup of coffee and
a piece of cherry pie. The program is being shown in Japan, and sales indicate the Japanese
think cherries are neat, anything made with them is an instant craze. Also, Pat Driscoll at the
network is working with drivers and personnel at the Indianapolis 500 to have a car entered into
next year's race that is powered by ethanol.

WE'RE HOPING FOR DRY WEATHER...says Von Ketelsen (KOEL, Oelwein, IA) so producers can
complete their planting. Von says 40,000 people attended a Farm Aid concert in Ames. It raised
$1 million. Von also covered live in Ames, IA a Congressional subcommittee conducting hearings
on rural advocacy. Farm broadcasters advocate healthy exercise. On July 10 in Iowa City, Von
will be providing live reports of the bicycle Heart Ride sponsored by the National Heart
Association and the National Meet Board.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300




; ,






WE NEED MORE MOISTURE...says Bill Dalquist (KSIR/Colorado Farm-Ranch Network, Brush).
Corn and bean planting is nearly completed, but producers need rain to assure the crop has a
good start. Bill says beef producers in his area experienced above average winter kill of calves
due to cold and damp conditions.

NO ONE SWITCHED...to early varieties of corn in the region served by Peggy Kaye Fish
(WCUS/WFMB, Springfield, IL). Producers took advantage of a break in wet weather to put corn
in the ground. But Peggy says many producers in southern Illinois remain behind schedule due to
wetness and have planted their acres to beans.

WE MUST BE LIVING RIGHT...because planting was on .schedule, no diseases have developed,
and ground moisture is good, says Col. Dink Embry (WHOP, Hopkinsville, KY). Dink is observing
his 48th year WHOP. Number 49 arrives next January.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of A Jirf re Office of Publicffs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250-1340 {202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2613 June 4, 1993
June 4, 1993

EXPORTS AND IMP HIGHER -- Fi Year 1993 U.S. exports are forecast at $42.5
billion. Volume is expd to total j million metric tons, with gains in wheat, corn, rice
and soybeans. The value is expected to fall slightly. Increases in high value
products are expected to o decline in bulk exports. FY 1993 imports are forecast
at $25 billion, $700 million higher than FY 1992. Growth in livestock and vegetable imports
account for much of the gain. The U.S. ag trade surplus is expected to decrease to $17.5
billion. Contact: Steve MacDonald (202) 219-0822

LESS CORN -- U.S. corn production is expected to decline nearly one billion bushels in the
1993/94 season, as compared to last year's record output of 9.4 billion bushels. Corn
producers intend to plant 76.5 million acres, down 4.6 percent from last year. The higher
set-aside requirement is largely responsible for the lower planting intentions. U.S. feed grain
production is projected to decline 30 million tons to 245 million tons. Higher carry-in stocks
will offset lower production this year. Contact: Tom Tice (202) 219-0840.

MORE WHEAT -- U.S. wheat production this year is projected at 2.5 billion bushels, up 2
percent from last year. Wheat acreage is unchanged. Exports are projected at 1.2 billion
bushels, down slightly from last year and offsetting increased domestic use. Increased
supply will lower prices. Contact: Ed Allen (202) 219-0840.

AND MORE COTTON -- U.S. cotton production in 1993/94 is forecast at 17.5 million bales,
1.3 million above 1992/93 production. Mill use of 1992/93 production is estimated at 9.9
million bales, up 3 percent. World supplies and aggressive foreign pricing will lower U.S.
exports by 1 million to 5.7 million bales. Contact: Robert Skinner (202) 219-0840.

BRINGING RESEARCH RESULTS TO MARKET -- A new class of insecticides discovered by
USDA Agricultural Research Service scientists is being licensed to two firms that produce
commercial products. The insecticides, called fluorosulfonates, control cockroaches, ants
and other insect pests that live in colonies. Worker insects bring the bait back to the nest
where insects eat it and die. Products containing fluorosulfonates will be marketed in the
next two years. Contact: Robert Vander Meer (904) 374-5918.

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS -- The world's largest foreign investor in agribusiness is the United
States, totaling nearly $46 billion. The European Community is the largest host region for
U.S. agribusiness, at $12 billion. The leading countries for U.S. global agribusiness are
Canada, $4.4 billion, and lesser amounts in the United Kingdom, Netherlands, Japan,
Australia, Brazil, and Mexico at $1 billion. A current trend in U.S. agribusiness investment
abroad is the rapid expansion of U.S. fast-food chains. One company expects to open 1,000
new restaurants in foreign countries next year. Foreign investment in U.S. agribusiness, not
including land, is $39 billion. Chris Boiling (202) 219-0668.








AG INFO BY COMPUTER -- USDA's National Agricultural Library is now capable of receiving
computer requests for reference services. The library will accept reference requests by
computer over the Internet telecommunications system. The Internet address to reach the
library is "agref@nalusda.gov". Call (301) 504-5204 for additional information. The
National Agricultural Library is one of three national libraries of the United States. The other
two are the Library of Congress and the National Library of Medicine. Contact: Brian Norris
(301) 504-6778.

OVERWEIGHT TEENAGERS -- USDA studies show that overweight teenagers are twice as
likely to be diagnosed with coronary heart disease when reaching old age than their leaner
peers. Those overweight are three times more likely to have gout, six times more likely to
have colon cancer, and seven times more likely to have atherosclerosis by age 73. The
study by the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging emphasizes that successful
treatment of excess weight in adolescence may prevent a significant proportion of adult
disease. Contact: Aviva Must (617) 556-3325.

RURAL POPULATION DECLINE -- A USDA study shows that less than half of all rural youth
remain in nonmetro areas. Migration rates peak during the late teens and early twenties
when people reach milestones that often require changes of residence, such as choosing
careers, going to college, or starting families. Young adults in low-income families have less
chance to take advantage of job markets through migration. Low-income families have a
shorter supply of two resources needed, information about job and housing opportunities in
other locations and money to cover travel costs. The study also indicates there is a high
potential for increased return migration in the future when the migrants reach their late
twenties and early thirties. Contact: John Cromartie (202) 219-0535.

RETURN OF THE ELM TREE -- Through techniques such as cross pollination and seedling
selection, researchers with USDA's Agricultural Research Service have produced a hybrid elm
tree that shows high resistance to the Dutch elm fungus and elm leaf beetles. Tested in five
states, the hybrids resemble American elms but have the insect and disease resistance of
Asian and European varieties. Several wholesale nurseries are growing the hybrids for the
retail market in 1994. The widespread adaptability of the elm tree appeals to city and urban
landscapers. Contact: Laurance Schreiber (614) 363-1129.

CUT AND SAVE AGNEWSFAX INFO -- USDA radio and television programming information
and the Farm Broadcasters Letter can be obtained on facsimile machine by using USDA's
AgNewsFAX. Use the telephone connected to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944.
At the voice prompts press 1, press 4, to receive:
Farm Broadcasters Letter --- .press 9200
Radio Newsline contents --- press 9250
TV contents billboard --- press 9260
TV scripts --- press 9270
then press #, press 3, and press the start button on your FAX machine.


S Radio-TV FAX (202) 690-2165 AgNewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1878 -- June is turkey lovers month. On this edition Brenda Curtis
talks with two experts about turkey production, turkey fixins' and the many ways to enjoy
this nutritious product. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1360 -- NAFTA and U.S. agriculture; meat inspection in the '90s; turkey
is not just for Thanksgiving; recycling garden supplies; lawn mower safety. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1870 --USDA News Highlights; 1994 wheat program; U.S.
cotton production estimates; keeping cows cool; turkey lovers month. (Weekly reel of news
features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1623 -- Switching Bt; overcoming resistance with Refugia;
Appalachian water quality; caving for research; no more pepper seeds. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, June 15, weekly weather and crop
update, milk production outlook; Wednesday, June 16, sugar yearbook; Thursday, June 17,
Africa/Mideast outlook, cherry production; Friday, June 18, ag outlook, cattle on feed.
These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on Electronic Benefits Transfer, statewide in Maryland.
Will Pemble looks at biodegradable products made from corn starch.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the weather and crop situation;
USDA economist Tom Tice on feed production; USDA economist Cathy Greene on the
agricultural outlook.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for camping; DeBoria
Janifer reports on purslane research; Pat O'Leary reports on computer landscaping.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


4 3126208300 696 4
OFFMIKE
FARMER APPRECIATION DAY...program series has Jim Coyle (KRES, Moberly, MO) on the road
from mid-May to July. Jim is scheduled to visit 30 farms in 17 counties in his listening area,
taping a 15-minute interview program on issues confronting the farmer and practices used to
boost production. Jim says he's finding that farmers are responding to wet field conditions by
increasing the use of no-till. He says the series does double duty by informing nonfarm listeners
about the actions involved in producing the food that is put on the table.

WHEAT HARVEST...will get underway in early June, says Larry DeSha (KGNC, Amarillo, TX).
Producers with irrigated wheat should do well. Most of the dryland crop has already been plowed
under. Snow protected the wheat during winter months, but there was only one-inch of rain
between December and mid-May. Rain finally arrived in late May, helping the corn and cotton
crops. Congratulations to Larry and to Bob Givens, KGNC will host the 1994 NAFB South Central
region meeting in Amarillo June 10-13. Larry says the previous meeting in Amarillo was in 1976.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













IT WAS LATE...but corn finally went in the ground, says Roger Flemmer (KFAB, Omaha, NE).
Cool temperatures and wet conditions- kept producers Out of the fields. No switching to early
varieties or to soybeans was reported, Roger says producers are expressing concern about the
energy tax proposals, EPA's delayed decisionon the role of ethanol in gasoline, and the agency's
proposal for emission control for farm tractors.

LONDON...is on the travel schedule of Colleen Callahan (WMBD-AM-TV, Peoria, IL). She'll serve
as a TV anchor for a special program aimed at dealers attending a meeting on July 7-11 of
Pioneer Hybrid International.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Taylor Brown and Rick Haines (Northern Ag Network, Billings, MT).
This summer the network will begin feeding its stations via SATCOM C-5 satellite. The uplink for
a regional radio network is the first of its kind in Montana and Wyoming.

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter


gnt of Agriculture Of


Public Affaii


Letter No. Q54

Secretary of Iture Mike p nd
Alexander Zav u e minister
of the Russian Fe a Food for
Progress agreement under which the United
States will provide $700 million in agricultural
assistance to Russia. At the ceremony Espy
said the agreement shows our nation's
commitment to the Russian people as they
restructure their economy, and it shows the
Administration's commitment to help U.S.
farmers and agribusiness maintain the U.S.
position in the market. USDA photo by Byron
Schumaker.


s Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250-1340 (202) 720-4330

June 11, 1993


NATIONAL SERVICE -- In testimony to the Senate Committee on Labor and Human
Resources, Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy unveiled three proposals being developed at
USDA in anticipation of Congressional passage of the National Service Trust Act. The
proposals are a National Empowerment and Anti-Hunger Corps, a National Environmental
Youth Corps, and the National Rural Development Corps. The National Service Trust Act
would create a domestic Peace Corps to tackle pressing national problems while bridging
racial and social gaps in the United States. Participants would earn income for educational
use in return for two years of service. If the programs are funded they would begin in the
fall of 1994. "The President's goal is nothing short of creating a national service program
so successful that it will become a permanent fixture of American society," Espy told the
Committee. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

UPGRADING INSPECTIONS -- USDA is undertaking five initiatives to improve meat
inspection. They include: continuation of special in-plant reviews and a quarterly report to
USDA headquarters on corrective actions ordered by the Food Safety and Inspection Service;
publication in the Federal Register of criteria for rapid microbiological tests in processing
plants; publication of regulations mandating installation of a hazard analysis critical point
system; and a proposal for needed changes in meat inspection laws. Regional hearings have
received proposed changes in the laws to improve meat inspections. The final hearing is
scheduled for June 18 in Philadelphia. Contact: Pat Wagner (202) 720-9113.

NATIONAL HUNGER FORUM -- Former secretaries of agriculture Bob Bergland and John
Block will join Secretary Mike Espy at USDA's National Hunger Forum, June 17, 9 a.m. to
5 p.m., at the Andrew Mellon auditorium on Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C.
Seventy participants will be divided into four panels to examine the extent and consequences
of hunger, access to a healthy diet, empowerment and self sufficiency, and priorities for
change. They will review the government's role, and public-private partnerships, in
addressing the problem of hunger. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.


LLC


__T__Qr








BROILER EXPORTS -- The United States is the world's largest exporter of broiler meat.
Exports this year are expected to total 1.6 billion pounds, about seven percent of domestic
production, compared to 1.5 billion pounds in 1992. The export value of poultry meat and
eggs has increased 74 percent since 1989, to an estimated $865 million in 1993. The U.S.
poultry industry is experiencing favorable economic conditions. Feed costs are lower, and
strong demand is keeping prices higher. Contact: Leland Southard (202) 219-0767.

REDUCING SALMONELLA -- USDA engineers have successfully tested a high-pressure air
and water scrubbing system on a chicken processing line where much of the Salmonella
contamination occurs. Tests show that the forced-air water bath cut contaminated
carcasses by 90 percent compared to the plain water bath currently used. The technology
produced by USDA's Agricultural Research Service is now ready for full-scale testing by the
poultry industry. Contact: James Dickens (706) 546-3205.

RESISTING BREAKAGE -- USDA scientists have produced a corn hybrid that has harder
kernels for livestock feed and are less likely to break before reaching export markets. The
hybrid is a cross between Argentinean and United States lines. Agricultural Research Service
scientists added a greater proportion of the U.S. variety to improve yield without sacrificing
quality. The hybrids at harvest contain less moisture, reducing the'need for artificial drying
that can increase breakage. 640,000 tons of broken kernels and foreign matter, worth only
half as much as whole kernels, were removed from corn exported from the U.S. to foreign
markets last year. Contact: Linda Pollak (505) 294-7831.

HELPING THE HARDWOOD INDUSTRY REMAIN COMPETITIVE -- USDA's National
Agricultural Library has four reports to help the hardwood industry overcome problems with
harvesting and milling. The subjects of the four reports are: detecting wetwood in trees,
logs and boards; alternatives to petroleum-based products to protect lumber; detecting
defects to improve milling; and new cutting technologies. Hardwood lumber produced in
1990 was valued at $3.5 billion. The industry employs 700,000 workers. Copies of the
reports are available by calling (301) 504-5204. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

YO-YO DIETS AND OSTEOPOROSIS -- USDA researchers have found that people who lose
and gain weight in a yo-yo fashion could be at higher risk for osteoporosis. A study group
of obese young women averaged a two to three percent loss of bone during a five-month
weight loss program, even though they exercised regularly and got ample dietary calcium.
Tests also showed that they had a lower rate of bone formation and a higher rate of bone
breakdown during the diet program. Bone loss needs to be replaced when weight is regained
or the risk for osteoporosis could be higher. Contact: Henry Lukaski (701) 795-8429.

KEEPING SUMMER FOOD SAFE -- Warm summer temperatures increase the possibility of
food poisoning during picnics and camping trips. USDA offers six tips for keeping your
summer food safe: Use a cooler containing ice cubes to keep food cold; Pack foods in
reverse order of use, first foods packed directly from the refrigerator are the last to be used,
and raw meat or fish are wrapped so that juices do not leak onto other foods; Protect your
cooler from the sun; Keep hands and utensils clean when handling the food; Thoroughly
cook raw meat and poultry until the pink is gone and juices run clear, cook fish until it
"flakes" with a fork and; Put leftovers back on ice, perishable foods left out of refrigeration
for one hour when the day is above 90 degrees are unsafe and should be discarded. If you
have a question about food safety or nutrition call USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-800-
535-4555. Contact: Susan Conley (202) 690-0351.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1879 -- Brenda Curtis takes you on a tour of one of the world's largest
herb farms. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1361 -- Food from ethanol?; turkey products galore; growing great
herbs; moving houseplants outdoors; repotting time for houseplants. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1871 -- USDA News Highlights; Russian aid package
details; meat exports growing; high tech peaches; a new way to promote ethanol. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1624 -- Centenarian seeds; long term apple storage; bee breeders
selected; grow your own herbicides; sheep genes linked to fat. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, June 15, crop and weather update,
farm income projection, milk production; Wednesday, June 16, sugar update; Thursday,
June 17, Africa/Mideast outlook, cherry production; Friday, June 18, ag outlook, cattle on
feed; Monday, June 21, U.S. trade update; Tuesday, June 22, ag resources (land values),
crop and weather update, catfish processing; Wednesday, June 23, dairy outlook.
These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for very young children and the elderly;
DeBoria Janifer reports in purslane research; Patrick O'Leary reports on marsh grass to
control shoreline erosion.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy signs a memorandum with the Hispanic
Association of Colleges and Universities to help increase employment opportunities in USDA
for Hispanic students; USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crop
progress.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on a new program to deliver produce to
food banks; Pat O'Leary reports on computer landscaping; Lynn Wyvill reports on vitamin
E and immunity in the elderly.

EVERY OTHER WEEK-- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
II IIIIII III fill I II III
4 3 1262 08300 686 5
OFFMIKE
WASHINGTON AG WATCH...was a success, says Randy Rasmussen (KMA, Shenandoah, IA). In
addition to meeting and recording Secretary Espy and Congressional leaders, it provided an
opportunity for a first look at new members of the Clinton administration including several sub-
cabinet members at USDA. Randy says NAFB is looking forward to conducting the program next
year.

ITS A BUSY TIME...says Dan Gordon (Tennessee Agrinet, Nashville). Planting is on schedule
after falling behind early in the season. Dan says producers have expressed concern about the
federal energy tax proposals. He's closely following developments on the issue.

MOISTURE...arrived just in time, says Bruce Gaarder (KNEB, Scottsbluff, NE), irrigation was
already underway in many areas. Bruce says his producers have developed a major interest in
NAFTA. They're hoping for a change in the language regarding sugar and dry beans, the two
major crops in his area, so that they are not adversely impacted by the agreement.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










ITS BEEN SO DRY...that producers stopped planting cotton and peanuts, says Everett Griner
(Southeast Agrinet, Moultrie, GA). There was no rain in his region during the months of April and
May. Recent showers got farmers back in the fields, but planting is behind the curve. Everett
says the dryness didn't hurt the peach crop however. Harvesting is underway on a good crop.

FARM BROADCAST PROGRAMMING...will begin July 6 on KCLL Lompoc, CA. Morning reports
will air at 5:30 and on the hour and half-hour until 8 a.m. A noon hour program will be hosted by
De Wayne Holmdahl, a Lompoc Valley rancher and former Santa Barbara County supervisor.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Artis Ford (Information Service, Mississippi State University, MS). The
international Agricultural Communicators in Education presented him its Pioneer ACE award for
his contributions to agricultural communications. ...and to Tyson Gair (Mississippi State) for
winning first place in TV news from the College Public Relations Association of Mississippi.

VIC POWELL 6, 4-
Chief, Radio & TV Division




~K)!. <-I: ~


Farm Broadcasters Le er



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D. 0-4330

Letter No. 2615 June 18, 1993

Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy and
Assistant Secretary for Food and Consumer
Services Ellen Haas visited two sites in .
West Virginia to better understand
government programs from a participant's
perspective. They reviewed the application
process for food stamps, and visited senior
citizens where they discussed hunger i
issues. USDA photo by Byron Schumaker. i.|.


RURAL-URBAN CONDITIONS -- Rural unemployment, income, and poverty rates have been
relatively stable while urban conditions have dipped. Although urban declines narrowed
rural-urban gaps, they did not improve the status of rural residents because they were closed
by falling urban conditions. National indicators for 1993 suggest modest rural growth.
Investments in manufacturing are becoming increasingly important for rural America because
manufacturing now constitutes a larger proportion of the rural economy than urban.
Contact: Linda Ghelfi (202) 219-0520.

THE TREND TOWARD MARKET ORIENTATION -- Agricultural production in the U.S. that is
covered by government income support payments has declined during the span of the last
two five-year farm acts. Nongovernmental supply and demand factors are becoming more
important in influencing farmers' production decisions for corn, wheat, rice and upland
cotton. The role of government commodity programs in influencing farmers' production
decisions has declined. The share of U.S. cropland has increased on which market signals
determine planting decisions, a trend toward market orientation that began with the 1985
farm act and continued with 1990 farm bill. Contact: Paul Westcott (202) 219-0313.

WESTERN HEMISPHERE TRADE -- U.S. trade to the Western Hemisphere nations continues
to recover from increased competition, world recession, a stronger dollar, and the debt crisis
in Latin American countries. In 1992 the U.S. imported $12 billion in agricultural goods and
exported nearly an equal value to the region. U.S. farm exports and imports in the
Hemisphere are expected to increase slightly in 1993 as regional economies improve,
keeping the trade balance steady. Contact: Miriam Stuart (202) 219-0667.

FORMER USSR WHEAT IMPORTS -- Wheat production for the former Soviet Union is
projected to be 78.5 million tons, about 10 million tons lower than the 1992/93 estimate.
Projected wheat imports for 1993/94 are 18 million tons, 1.5 million tons higher than last
year due largely to the expected decline in wheat production. Continued dryness in Eastern
Europe has affected production expectations throughout the region. Poland's projected
import level is up one million tons. Contact: William Liefert (202) 219-0620.








NEAR RECORD EXPECTED -- U.S. winter wheat production is forecast at 1.8 billion bushels,
up 14 percent from the 1992 crop. Yields are expected to average 41.2 bushels per acre,
second only to the 1983 record high of 41.8 bushels per acre. Contact: Ed Allen (202) 219-
0840.

U.S. TOBACCO PRODUCTION DOWN -- Supplies of U.S. grown leaf are expected to decline
in 1993/94 because of lower production. 1993 production will fall about 5 percent from
1992's 1.72 billion pounds. Despite higher price supports, 1993/94 auction prices may
show only a slight increase from last season because of greater use of imported leaf in
manufacturing cigarettes and large world supplies of leaf. U.S. leaf exports may decline, but
the drop will be cushioned by the shift to American blended cigarettes in a number of
countries. Higher cigarette exports will more than offset lower domestic consumption.
Contact: Verner Grise (202) 219-0890.

NONCHEMICAL CONTROL -- Nearly every peach orchard in Georgia and South Carolina is
infested with ring nematode, a tiny underground worm that feeds on and destroys peach tree
roots. In South Carolina alone, 1.5 million trees died of the nematodes between 1980 and
1990. Chemical control is available, but the nematicides are expensive and may not be
available much longer because of environmental concerns. USDA scientists have found that
planting a variety of wheat known as Stacy can significantly reduce the number of
nematodes on sites previously planted to peaches and heavily infested with the pest. Test
plots showed the wheat having a level of control equal to fumigation. Contact: Andrew
Nyczepir (912) 956-5656.

IRRADIATION COULD EXPAND POULTRY EXPORTS -- Indonesia is enforcing a zero-
tolerance standard for Salmonella on poultry, which has largely excluded U.S. exports to that
growing market. Greece has also insisted that chicken be free of Salmonella. Swedish
companies are selling chicken with "Salmonella free" labels. France is using high-energy
electrons to reduce Salmonella in poultry products. U.S. researchers have found that
irradiating chicken kills 93 percent of Salmonella on chicken. Irradiation kills other pathogens
that sometimes contaminate chicken, such as Listeria and Campylobacter. The ability of
U.S. producers to offer irradiated poultry could open new markets. Contact: Tanya Roberts
(202) 219-0864.

CORN SEED IMPORTS -- USDA is proposing to allow seed of Indian corn from New Zealand
into the United States from New Zealand. "Seed corn imports from New Zealand would
provide U.S. industries with a winter generation of corn seed for research and development
purposes," says Glen Lee, deputy administrator of plant protection and quarantine with
USDA's Animal and Plant Health Protection Service. USDA studies indicate that injurious
diseases of corn are either not present in New Zealand or would not be spread by corn seed.
Contact: Roberta McCorckle (301) 436-7280.

QUESTION -- Which is highest in calories and which is next highest: sugar, potatoes, butter
or alcohol? A recent survey showed that only 1 in 10 respondents could correctly identify
butter as having the most calories, with alcohol next. Many people associate starchy foods
as being fattening. Beth Reames, Extension nutritionist at Louisiana State University
Agricultural Center recommends building a lower-fat diet around carbohydrate foods such
as breads, rice, cereals, pastas, fruits and vegetables. Reames says eating variety of foods
in moderation, cutting fat intake and increasing exercise are changes that will lead to a
healthier weight. Contact: Beath Reames (504) 388-6701.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1880 -- Jim Henry talks with a real life "Medicine Man" who is
committed to preserving the vast pharmacological storehouse called the rain forest. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1362 -- Retirement and estate planning; breakfast and kids; caving for
research; quality herbs; the cutting board controversy. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1872 -- USDA News Highlights; 1993 signup results; new
data on farm income; saving a blueberry crop; aquaculture & hydroponics -- a marriage of
convenience. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1625 -- Preserving the rain forest; cataloging the rain forest;
threatened medicinal plants; renewable taxol; worm-killing wheat. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, June 23, dairy outlook; Friday, June
25, livestock/poultry update, ag chemical use; Monday, June 28, industrial use of ag
materials outlook; Tuesday, June 29, crop/weather update, ag prices; Wednesday, June 30,
acreage planted, grain stocks, China outlook, world coffee, world tobacco, world dairy
situation. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on Vitamin C and health; Patrick O'Leary reports on a new
marsh grass to control shoreline erosion.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy participates at the National Hunger
Forum in Washington, D.C.; USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski on U.S. weather and crop
conditions; USDA economist Bob McElroy on agricultural income; USDA outlook chairman
James Donald on crop production estimates.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on summertime food safety tips; DeBoria
Janifer reports on "hi-tech" rice; Patrick O'Leary reports on the top ten farm exporting
states.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 o.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.
OFFMIKE




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


4 3 1262 08300 691 5

ALFALFA CROP LOSS...is putting pressure on hay prices, says John Everly (KDTH, Dubuque, IA).
Wet, heavy snow followed by freezing temperatures last winter killed much of the alfalfa crop in
the tri-corner area of Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois. John says there is concern whether the region
will have enough high quality hay reserves for dairy farmers. During the month of June he is
broadcasting live from number of Dairy Breakfasts held through his area.

MAJOR DAMAGE...resilted from tornadoes hitting south central Nebraska, says Joe Gangwish
(KMMJ, Grand Island, NE). Early'estimates total one million dollars to homes in cities. In rural
areas buildings (Aw're destroyed, cattle killed and crops damaged. Corn was just emerging, and
the hail and extensive flooding caused losses.

THE GREELEY NDEPENDENCE .SAMPEDE...is the world's largest 4th of July Rodeo, says Tom
Riter (KFKA, Gr' ley, CO). Tom' will broadcast live from the event, June 23 to July 4. Tom says
the moisture condition is excellent for vegetable growers, little irrigation will be needed this year.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs DO CL
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS 4
Penalty for Private Use $300 V











HIGH LEVEL...of the Mississippi River has caused seepage through the dikes and onto fields,
delaying cotton planting in many areas, says Chris Kimbell (KNOE Radio-TV, Monroe, LA).
Congratulations to Chris. The TV station doubled his morning airtime, and in a recent survey
asking farmers where they got their agricultural news, 83 percent said Chris' TV program.

RETIRED...Eddie Gale (WGIL/WAAG, Galesburg. IL).

CONGRATULATIONS...to Gary Crawford (USDA Radio, Washington, D.C.). He won a silver
medal in the educational category at the New York Festivals International Radio Competition for
his program "Pickles Are Funny," a feature produced for the Consumer Time series in our weekly
cassette service. ...and to Pat O'Leary (USDA TV, Washington, D.C.). His program "Managing
Our National Forests," produced for USDA's Forest Service, won second prize in the informative
and prestige films category at the 20th annual International Ecofilm Festival in Ostrava, Czech
Republic. ,

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




/1 /;. 7 Z


Farm Broadcasters LetteM *0



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250-1340

Letter No. 2616 June 25, 1993

USDA's National Hunger Forum, held in
Washington, D.C., June 17, was designed to help
the Department develop a strategy to address
the issue. Secretary of Agriculture Mike
Espy, and Ellen Haas, assistant secretary for
Food and Consumer Services, heard from
more than 70 panelists. Espy said the
R government must look for links with the
private sector in fighting hunger through
Economic development, health care, food
They assistance programs, nutrition education, and
h welfare reform. USDA photo by Byron
Schumaker.

INCREASING FARM INCOME -- Commercialization of farm-based industrial products has the
potential to increase market-driven demand for agricultural materials and improve the farm
income picture. Vegetable oils, livestock by-products and starch crops, primarily corn, wheat
and potatoes, are among the renewable agricultural materials that are currently turned into
industrial products. Industrial uses of farm products are making a comeback as public
concern about pollution and the environment has intensified and new technologies for
processing agricultural material have become available. USDA has established over 350
agreements with private companies to develop discoveries made by government researchers
and bring the results to market. Contact: Doug Beach (202) 219-0085.

FARM HOUSEHOLD INCOME -- Recent studies show that 25 percent of all farms in the U.S.
produce 75 percent of all agricultural products. The studies also show that income earned
away from the farm is very important to the economic well-being of these farm households.
They earned only one-half of their total income from farming, an average of $22,700 of the
household income of $43,600. For all farms the average total household income in 1991
was $36,500 compared to the U.S. average household income of $37,900. The average
household income in 1991 from farm sources was $4,000, down $1,742 from 1990 totals.
The figures show that successful rural economic development is key to the economic well-
being of rural households. Contact: Bob McElroy (202) 219-0800.

MIDDLE EAST OIL PRICES & AG IMPORTS -- The close correlation between petroleum
earnings in the Middle East and agricultural imports of the region has diminished sharply,
and the central role of oil and gas prices is unlikely to regain its prominence. Revenues in
the region have fluctuated, but food imports have continued an upward trend. U.S.
exporters dominate the market for bulk commodities, while the EC is the leader in high-value
products to the area. Last year U.S. exports increased 12 percent to $3.2 billion. In the
first quarter of 1993 U.S. agricultural exports to the region are 34 percent higher than the
same period a year ago. Intense competition to U.S. exports comes from the EC, Canada,
Southeast Asia, and Turkey. Contact: Michael Kurtzig (202) 219-0632.








DAIRY SUMMIT -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy and Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT),
chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, conducted the nation's first dairy summit,
June 17 in York, PA, to produce a national milk marketing strategy. Items discussed
included the current situation facing dairy farmers and the industry, federal milk marketing
orders, deregulation, exports, and the two-tier pricing plan. Contact: Tom Amontree (202)
720-4623.

FOOD PRICES UP SLIGHTLY -- During the first four months of 1993 the food component of
the Consumer Price Index increased 1.7 percent, less than half the increase for all other
goods and services. The Consumer Price Index for all food is expected to rise two to three
percent in 1993. Much of the increase has already occurred due to weather-related supply
disruptions in beef and vegetables in the first portion of the year. Contact: Cathy Greene
(202) 219-0313.

READING FOOD LABELS -- The new label on food, required by the Nutrition Labeling and
Education Act, can be a powerful tool to promote healthy eating. Teaching consumers how
to read and use the new food label can empower consumers to make healthful choices.
USDA has established the Food Labeling Education Information Center at the National
Agricultural Library in Beltsville, MD. It encourages an exchange of information between
public and private sectors on their food labeling education activities. Contact: Brian Norris
(301) 344-3778.

OPTIONS STUDY -- One thousand farmers in three states have enrolled 20.5 million bushels
of 1993 crop corn, wheat and soybeans in the Options Pilot Program. Producers in three
counties in each of three states, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa, are learning about purchasing
options contracts for their crops. The program is also studying the benefits that can be
received from the contracts as compared to federal income and price supports for the
commodities. Producer participation in the program exceeded expectations. In those
counties where producers did not enroll maximum allocated quantities, the unused allocation
was reallocated to other counties. The producers could enroll up to 50,000 bushels of corn
and 15,000 bushels each of wheat and soybeans. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

WHEAT PRICES DOWN -- The 1993 wheat crop is expected to be the second largest since
1984. Supply is likely to increase and total use is expected to decrease, pushing prices
down. Less wheat is likely to be exported, and more will be used for domestic feed instead
of food. For the fourth time in 14 years, wheat prices for the 1993/94 crop year are
expected to drop below $3 per bushel. The low prices will encourage many producers to
use the government's 9-month price-support loan program. If the market price trigger is
met, the Secretary of Agriculture has the discretion- to open the Farmer-Owned Reserve
storage program. Contact: Robert Dismukes (202) 219-0313.

HELPING TO DIVERSIFY -- Twenty-three rural communities in 15 states will receive federal
grants to study ways to diversify their economies. The funds, ranging from $8,000 to
$30,000 each, are granted through USDA's Forest Service, and will go to communities
whose economies depend solely on forest resources. The studies help communities find
economic alternatives so they can have less dependence on a single resource such as timber
harvesting, and identify the best option to expand their economic base. Contact: Linda
Feldman (2202) 205-1668.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1881 -- Gary Crawford presents and overview of the recent National
Hunger Forum. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1363 -- Free trade and your fruit supply; be smart about finances; saving
tomorrow's medicines; computerized landscaping; cookout costs. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to
3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1873 -- USDA News Highlights; growing taxol; recycling
sludge; the top ten hit parade of export states; time capsule seeds. (Weekly reel of news
features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1626 -- New gene protects plants; parsley packs a punch; cutting
the cost of growing rice; dieting and metabolism; marvelous mayapple. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, June 30, planted acreage, grain
stocks, China outlook, world coffee outlook, world tobacco outlook; Thursday, July 1,
horticultural exports; Tuesday, July 6, ag prices annual summary, crop & weather update,
cotton/wool update; Monday, July 12, U.S. crop production, world ag supply & demand.
These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety, on the beach and at the campground; Pat
O'Leary reports on 1992's top ten farm export states; Will Pemble reports on biodegradable
products produced from cornstarch.

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with the weekly weather and
crop update; USDA economist Verner Grise on U.S. tobacco production.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on farm broadcasting in Russia; Lynn Wyvill
reports on vitamin E and the elderly; DeBoria Janifer reports on fresh produce in food banks.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.








OFFMIKE
HEAVY FROST...in mid-June hit the potato crop hard, says Bill Whittom (Idaho Farm Times,
Rupert, ID). Yield and' quality will likely be affected at harvest. Dry beans are late getting in the
ground because of cool temperatures and wetness. Producers are at the tail end of the window
for planting. Bill says the opposite side of the moisture situation is that irrigation reservoirs are
nearly full, ranchers are no longer hauling water to cattle, and the wildflowers are blooming again.

EXCELLENT CONDITIONS...for small grains development are reported by Al Gustin (KFYR,
Bismarck, ND). If the situation continues big crops are expected. Al has been doing several
stories on NAFTA and the experiences resulting from the U.S.- Canadian Free Trade Agreement.
Producers in his state are expressing concern that problems could be magnified under NAFTA. Al
is operating under "controlled chaos," his station's newsroom is being relocated in the building.

ALL WE NEED...is a good price and some rain, says James Guthrie (KFIN, Jonesboro, AR).
Producers are busy combining wheat and planting beans.



Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division QV
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300 A 4 993

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300



I U






MID-YEAR MEETING...in Bozeman of the Montana Stock Growers Association was covered by
Rick Haines (Northern Ag Network, Billings, MT). Rick says the group was setting policy
positions to be considered at the national level on hot issues such as endangered species, land
use and taxes. As NAFB western region VP, Rick is looking forward to greeting the 150
attendees registered for the regional meeting the last weekend in June at Red Lodge, MT.
Meanwhile, Taylor Brown, was covering for the network the 30 competitors in the World
Livestock Auctioneering Championships being conducted in Billings.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Max Molleston (WKBF, Rock Island, IL). He won the Writer of the Year
award presented by the Quad-City Writers Club. The award recognizes local authors who have
helped writers in the Quad-City area. Max also writes poetry, and is president of Quint-City
Poets.

TALK SAFETY...Lets help t them through the season whole and healthy.

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio &4V Division




Aa, 2- I fI


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States'Department of Agriculture O i f Public Affairs division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2601 March 12, 1993

RURAL HOUSING PROGRAM testimo the Subcommittee on Housing and
Community Development of the seu on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs,
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy saiat A plans to continue and strengthen the rural
housing programs of the Department's Farmers Home Administration. Funding will be
expanded for single-family self-help home loans. Espy urged increased funding for home
repair loans and grants, housing preservation grants, and flexibility in use of funds for rural
multi-family housing and rental assistance. Contact: Joe O'Neill (202) 720-4323.

WIND EROSION -- Great Plains States suffered substantially less wind erosion during
November and December compared to the same period a year earlier. While 1.2 million acres
of cropland and rangeland were damaged, the figure is down almost 350,000 acres. Of the
total damaged by wind erosion, 91 percent was cropland, 9 percent was primarily rangeland.
Galen Bridge, acting chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service, attributes the decrease to
good soil moisture, the Great Plains Conservation Programs and implementation of
conservation plans under the 1990 Farm Bill. Contact: Brad Fisher (202) 720-4024.

WHITEFLY ENEMIES -- 17 different species that are enemies of sweetpotato whiteflies have
been collected in six countries, and will be made available to USDA scientists. Richard
Soper, at USDA's Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, MD, says this gives researchers
the most diverse pool to date of natural candidates for controlling whiteflies, improving the
odds that a match can be made with a specific natural enemy to do the best job against the
pest. Whiteflies have caused million of dollars damage to growers in California, Arizona,
Texas, and Florida. Contact: Jim De Quattro (301) 504-8648.

FRUIT FLY -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy has transferred $16 million in emergency
funds for USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to continue its cooperative
effort to eradicate the Mediterranean fruit fly in California. Federal and state employees have
been regulating the movement of vegetables and fruits in the Los Angeles and San Jose
County areas, applying ground sprays, and releasing sterile flies in the effort to eradicate the
pest. The fly attacks more than 200 kinds of fruits and vegetables, and can cause complete
loss of crops. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-7799.

CARBOHYDRATES AND STRENGTH -- Eating more carbohydrates did not improve the
endurance or strength of men who exercise moderately, unlike the payoffs for athletes who
train long and hard. Researchers at USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center, Beltsville,
MD, found that volunteers could not significantly exercise longer after three weeks of getting
62 percent of their calories as carbohydrates than when they received 42 percent
carbohydrates. The findings underscore that eating carbohydrates probably won't improve
performance during moderate exercise, but it reduces fat intake and that's beneficial.
Contact: Joan Conway (301) 504-8977.









OFFICIALS NOMINATED -- Seven senior officials have been nominated by President Clinton
for positions at USDA. Eugene Moos, president of Gene Moos & Associates, a Washington,
D.C. lobbying firm, has been nominated for Undersecretary for International Affairs and
Commodity Programs; Richard Rominger, former director of the California Department of
Food and Agriculture, 1977 to 1982, for Deputy Secretary; Wardell Townsend, Jr., former
administrative assistant to Congressman Espy, for Assistant Secretary for Administration;
Francis Vacca, president of Vacca and Associates, a private consulting firm in Washington,
D.C., for Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations; James Gilliland, an attorney with
experience in agricultural commodities, for General Counsel; James Lyons, former staff
director of the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Forests, Family Farms, and Energy, for
Assistant Secretary of Natural Resources and the Environment; and Bob Nash, president of
the Arkansas Development Finance Authority, for Under Secretary for Small Community and
Rural Development.

HAY -- While corn and sorghum silage production increased last season, boosting total
roughage supplies by one percent over 1991/92 figures, cattle numbers are up from last year
and severe weather this winter has sharply increased the need for supplemental feeding.
Hay production declined 3 percent last year, and as a result end-of-season hay stocks are
likely to be below a year earlier. Those having to purchase will notice a difference in prices.
Contact: Tom Tice (202) 219-0840.

FOOD ASSISTANCE -- Latest figures show that the federal government spent a record $28.9
billion in fiscal year 1991 for domestic food and nutrition programs, 16 percent above the
$25 billion spent in 1990. The increase was almost entirely due to higher participation and
costs of the Food Stamp Program, the largest federal food assistance program. Expenditures
for the National School Lunch, School Breakfast, Special Milk, Child and Adult Care Food,
and Summer Food Service Programs totaled $6 billion, an 11 percent increase over 1990.
The National School Lunch Program served 24 million children in 91,000 participating
schools. The fastest growing food assistance program is the Child and Adult Care Food
Program, serving 1 billion meals in fiscal 1991. Contact Masao Matsumoto (202) 219-0864.

IMPROVING POOR SOILS -- Phosphorus is a major nutrient limitation to successful forage
production, but many farmers can't afford the commercial fertilizer and lime additions
generally recommended for pasture improvement. Scientists with USDA's Agricultural
Research Service have found rock phosphate can be added to highly acid soils because the
acidity causes the rock to dissolve into a form that roots can absorb. Rock phosphate in soil
raises pH slightly, increases the availability of calcium and phosphorus to roots, while
decreasing the toxicity of aluminum. The result is better root growth, and improved water
and nutrient use in infertile acid soils such as that found in Appalachia. Contact: V.C. Baligar
(304) 252-6426.

AT HOME AND ABROAD -- U.S. agricultural commodities will find expanded markets at
home, and stronger demand abroad this year. Domestic use of crops is expected to rise 4
to 5 percent, led by a 5 percent gain in feed use to support expansion in animal numbers and
generally lower prices. Food use of crops and demand for animal products will increase with
population growth and continued economic recovery. Ag exports will continue to be a
growth market for U.S. farmers, rising in response to reforms in trade policies and worldwide
economic growth. Contact: James Donald (202) 720-6030.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1866 -- In this edition Maria Bynum talks with farmers about why
farm numbers are declining across the nation. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1348 -- Bloomin' bushes; project harmony; more nutritious rice; the
researcher's apprentice; medfly project update. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1858 -- USDA news highlights; top crops; 1992 corn and
sorghum deficiency payments; low input farming research; U.S. farm census. (Weekly reel
of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1611 -- Asian Beetle in Brazil; promising whitefly pathogen; secrets
of the "mummies"; future fall Armyworm control; sweetpotatoes as a weapon. (Weekly reel
of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, Mar. 22, U.S. trade update, livestock
& poultry update, catfish processing; Tuesday, Mar. 23, crop & weather update;
Wednesday, Mar. 24, aquaculture outlook; Friday, Mar. 26, hog & pig numbers; Monday,
Mar. 29, world cocoa situation. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance.
Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't
let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the Extension Service super pantry program; and
Pat O'Leary takes a look at top crops.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the weather and crop situation;
USDA economist Gary Lucier on Arizona flood damage to vegetables; John Werner, USDA
Soil Conservation Service, on wind erosion damage in the Great Plains; USDA economist
Tom Tice on feed outlook; USDA analyst Steve MacDonald on agricultural trade; and USDA
historian Doug Bowers on National Agriculture Day.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on nutrition and pregnancy; Lynn Wyvill
reports on USDA's national parasite collection; and Pat O'Leary on the dry edible bean.

EVERY OTHER WEEK-- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




4UNIESITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE 3 126208300692 3
PEOPLE PULLED TOGETHER...to help those devastated by the Gila River flood, says George
Gatley (Western Agri-Radio Networks, Yuma, AZ). The National Guard and pickup truck owners
helped to move cattle and household items to higher ground. People donated to food banks and
other organizations helping families and farm workers. George covered it all for his audience.
20,000 acres are under water, about 1/3 of the county's growing area. There will be no planting
in the flooded area this year. George says irrigation ditches must be cleared and repaired, fields
leveled and leeched salt removed. And work will likely be delayed because temperatures are
warming, melting the mountain snow and maintaining a high rate of water flow through the river.
George says the flood's impact will be long-lasting on affected farms and migrant workers.

THANKS...for the letter from Jim Rodenburg, executive secretary of the Omaha Livestock
Exchange, and associate member of NAFB, who also writes a column for the "Council Bluffs
(Iowa) Nonpareil," and other newspapers. Jim sent a copy of a column he wrote about spring
weather conditions based on an item he saw in the Farm Broadcasters Letter.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












MEETINGS...of the major national associations kept Mike Adams (WLDS, Jacksonville, IL) on the
road this winter. Mike says he hears members saying that Sec. Espy has made a good first
impression at the national meetings. Mike notes there is optimism about spring growing
conditions, but a wait and see attitude on what the budget will do to farm programs. Planting in
Mike's area will get underway in about two weeks. Producers say they need dry weather to
complete their field work.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Warren Nielson (KMTV, Omaha, NB). This month marks his 50th
continuous year in broadcasting, 40 of those years in farm broadcasting. Warren served 43 years
in radio, starting at KSCJ in Sioux City, Iowa in March 1943. He was on the air 25 years at
KMA, Shenandoah, IA, and broadcast for 16 years at KFAB, Omaha. He became farm director at
KMTV in 1962. He says his 40 years in farm broadcasting have provided the opportunity to
travel and make friends everywhere.

VIC POWELL & T
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm B adcasters Letter



United States Depa t of Agricultre K e bali/c AffairsJ i DWashington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 26 of Florida March 19, 1993

RECORD SUGC domestic sugar production in fiscal year 1993 is forecast
at a record 7.7 mi 6 percent from 1992. Beet sugar will contribute more than
half of production, at 4.3 million tons, and cane sugar at 3.4 million tons. Domestic sugar
deliveries are forecast at 9 million tons, higher than any year since 1982. U.S. per capital
sugar consumption in fiscal 1993 for food and beverage use is forecast at 64 pounds, nearly
5 pounds higher than in the mid-1980s. Contact: Peter Buzzanell (202) 219-0886.

HIGH-VALUE EXPORTS -- Since the first half of the 19th century bulk commodities have
dominated U.S. exports, until 1992. High-value exports exceeded bulk exports for the first
time that year, reaching a record $20 billion dollars. Expansion is expected to continue due
to favorable exchange rates, growth in industrialized countries, and U.S. marketing efforts.
High-value products are agricultural production that receives specialized handling, has been
processed, or serves a niche market. They are generally products other than raw grains,
oilseeds, cotton, and tobacco. High-value products accounted for 54 percent of all U.S.
agricultural export value in 1992. Western Europe is the largest market for high-value
products. Contact: Stephen MacDonald (202) 219-0822.

A REALLY BIG SHOW -- The largest exhibition of U.S. food and beverage products ever held
outside the United States will be conducted in Mexico City in August. USDA's Foreign
Agricultural Service is now recruiting U.S. exporters to exhibit at U.S. Food Festival '93.
170 booths are available to exporters of dairy products, beef, poultry, eggs, deciduous fruits,
frozen foods, breakfast cereals, seafood, ethnic foods, and alcoholic beverages. Contact:
Maureen Quinn (202) 720-9444.

COMPETITION FOR U.S. WHEAT -- The European Community could have record exportable
supplies of wheat in 1993/94. Planting reports indicate only a four percent decline in EC
winter wheat acreage, which accounts for 95 percent of all EC wheat. This is less than the
15 percent set-aside target under the Common Agricultural Policy reform. U.S. winter wheat
seedings are up one percent from 1992. Contact: Geraldine Schumacher (202) 720-7115.

MEAT PRODUCTION RATINGS -- The world's largest producer of red meat in 1993 is
forecast to be China, with 25% of all red meat production. Second is the European
Community, at 19 percent. The United States is third at 15 percent. The former Soviet
Union is expected to produce 10 percent of world red meat production this year. Contact:
Linda Bailey (202) 219-1286.

FOOD SUPPLY & PRICES -- No foods are anticipated to be in short supply this year,
indicating that farm prices will likely be near last year's levels for most commodities. The
probable lower farm value of food will not contribute to retail cost, which is expected to
increase 2 to 4 percent this year. Contact: Ronald Babula (202) 219-0785.









ROSE CLOVER -- Field tests of rose clover show that this forage legume could become a
favorite with livestock producers. Rose clover survives the summer drought in Western
states where it must compete with grasses for water. It provides grazing early in the
season, produces seed and is out of the way before warm-season grasses emerge.
Intolerance of cold has kept it out of Midwestern states, but varieties from Spain have
survived winter tests in Oklahoma of minus 12 degrees. Research shows that rose clover
does not bloat grazing animals and is nutritious. Contact: Daniel Mowrey (405) 262-5291.

NEW MARKET FOR DESERT SHRUB -- Tests conducted by medical researchers show that
the natural rubber of the guayule (why-YOU-lee) plant appears to be free of allergy-causing
proteins found in latex gloves. The finding could open a new market for the shrub that
grows wild- in Arizona and New Mexico, presenting an opportunity for farmers in the
southwest to produce a new high-value crop. As many as a half-million Americans may be
allergic to proteins in rubber from the tropical rubber tree. Many are health care
professionals who wear rubber gloves every day at work. USDA Agricultural Research
Service scientists are locating superior guayule plants in efforts to boost the shrub's potential
as a domestic source of natural rubber. Contact: Katrina Cornish (510) 559-5950.

MAKE A LIST -- The majority of farm women outlive their husbands. Spouse, family or
friends will need information if something happens to the farm operator. All the information
needed should be documented and kept in one location. Some of the major items include
listing the identifying numbers in your billfold. Your personal papers such as birth certificate,
marriage license, military records, life-health-accident-farm insurance policies and premium
notices should be gathered in one place so that survivors can contact the insurance
companies. Gather income tax returns and supporting documents, investment contacts, list
of debts, your will, and funeral wishes so that your estate can be settled according to your
wishes. Keep the list where it is safe, at home, in your bank box, or with your lawyer. Your
local Cooperative Extension office can help. Contact: Ann Elword (301) 590-9638.

CANCER TREATMENT -- Beta carotene is being successfully used in cancer treatment
programs here and abroad. Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service have found
that beta carotene is changed into retinoic acid and other compounds of vitamin A, which
the body can use, by the cells in lungs, liver, kidney, intestines, and fat tissues. This
suggests that levels of retinoic acid in body fluids and tissues can be raised by eating more
foods high in beta carotene. Orange and yellow fruits and vegetables, and dark green leafy
vegetables, are rich in beta carotene. Contact: Xiang-Dong Wang (617) 556-3313.

CUTTING BOARDS -- Scientists have found that bacteria survive better on plastic cutting
boards than on wood. Previously, experts said that wood boards were more difficult to
clean therefore less safe than plastic. Connie Crawley, with the University of Georgia
Extension Service, says the important point is to avoid cross-contamination between raw
meat and other foods cut on the boards. Its best to have a separate cutting board for meat.
Wash with soap and water everything that comes in contact with raw meat immediately
after use and before preparing other foods. Contact: Connie Crawley (706) 542-8860.

FOOD COSTS -- Latest studies for costs of food at home for a week show that the range
is $50.20 to $97.60 for a family of two, and $83.70 to $162.00 for a family of four with
elementary schoolchildren. Contact: Dianne Odland (301) 436-8617.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1867 -- Brenda Curtis talks with a nutrition expert about the latest
findings regarding diet and health. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1349 -- The "Pyramid" food chart; antioxidants in foods -- what they
mean to you; specialty coffees percolating; the popular potato; tomato "trek." (Weekly reel
of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1859 -- USDA News Highlights; boosting feed efficiency;
U.S. food sales to south China; mechanized grain sniffer; trade agreement update. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1612 -- Non-allergenic rubber; latex allergies; guayule market niche;
oil/herbicide mix saves money; insect-resistant popcorn. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, Mar. 24, aquaculture update;
Friday, Mar. 26, hog/pig numbers; Monday, Mar. 29, world cocoa situation; Tuesday, Mar.
30, crop & weather update, ag prices; Wednesday, Mar. 31, prospective plantings report,
grain stocks; Thursday, Apr. 1, horticultural exports. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the farm census.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA World Agriculture Outlook Board chairman Jim Donald on the latest
world supply and demand estimates; USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski on weather and
crop progress; and USDA economist Tom Tice on feed grains.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports about research on purslane weed; Pat
O'Leary reports on conserving water at home; and Lynn Wyvill reports on beta carotene's
role in health.

EVERY OTHER WEEK-- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08300 697 2
OFFMIKE

AUSTRALIA...is on the schedule of Ron Hays (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City). Ron says he's
traveling to the continent March 29 to April 10 and will interview producers of cattle and wheat to
provide his audience with another perspective of production and world trade issues.,.

POLICIES...for rural development and agricultural production could be going in different directions,
says Neal Anderson (WLLR, Davenport, IA). Speaking to the Quad-Cities Rotary Club during
Agriculture Week, Neal said that in many regions what is regarded as a rural area may not necessarily
be an agricultural production area, and care is needed to assure that a policy designed for one does
not adversely impact the other. Neal also says that lack of'long-term credit for beginning farmers is
a major concern to older farmers ready to retire.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Al Pell (Ag Day, South Bend, IN) who served as master of ceremonies at
the Washington, D.C. National Agriculture Week reception in the U.S. Senate office building.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













A LARGE INCREASE...in greenhouse tobacco plants has been noticed by Allen Aldridge (Kentucky
Agrinet, Louisville, KY). He says nearly one-third of the plants this year will be produced by the
greenhouse or float system. Producers are telling Allen that they are holding off buying new
equipment until they have a better understanding of whether such purchases will be favorably treated
under the new tax bill. Allen noted that last year there were record yields in the state of corn, beans
and wheat. With a chuckle in his voice he said that even good results this year could be a bit
dissapointing.

THANKS...to Bob Stobaugh (SCS, Jacksonville, MS) for the footage he shot of Sec. Espy's visits to
Jacksonville. Portions of the material were used in transmission of the TV satellite News Service,
and audio was u d for our radio service.


Chief, Radio & TV Division
Chief, Radio & TV Division








casters Letter



if Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330


ETHANOL EXEMPT -- President Clinton has exempted ethanol from the proposed BTU tax
to encourage use of alternative fuels. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy says the decision
is a victory for farmers, and will make the U.S. less dependent on foreign oil while
strengthening rural America. Studies show that for every 100 million bushels of corn used
in the production of ethanol the price of corn rises four to six cents a bushel. For every one-
cent increase in the price of corn the federal government saves $50 million in farm program
costs. Methanol was also exempted. Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

IMPROVING RESOURCE MANAGEMENT -- USDA will take an active role in promoting
conservation and stewardship of the forest, range and crop lands across the country.
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says USDA will work together with the Department of
Interior to solve resource management problems, instead of creating new ones. Speaking
in Washington, D.C. to the North American Wildlife & Natural Resources Conference, Espy
said that USDA must provide leadership so that the conservation record of American
agriculture will continue to improve. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

CREATING JOBS -- Creation of Federal enterprise zones to stimulate employment is of
particular interest to rural areas. Enterprize zones apply tax incentives and other economic
inducements to encourage business growth and investment in the target area. Research
suggests that rural Federal zones may be even more successful than their urban counterparts
in creating jobs. The zones can stimulate farm input, processing, and other agricultural
industries. Since most farm households are dependent on off-farm income, they will benefit
from job creation. Recent statistics indicate that income earned off the farm generated 85%
of the farm household's total income in 1991. Contact: Cathy Greene (202) 219-0313.

WHITEFLY ENEMY -- A fungus harmless to humans and animals that naturally occurs on
plants could be a promising way to control the sweetpotato whitefly. Scientists in Texas
noticed that the fuzzy white fungus, Paecilomyces farinosus, killed both nymphs and adult
whiteflies in farmers' fields. It occurs naturally in both Texas and California, states where
the insect has caused significant damage to crops. Experiments are being conducted to
determine the best conditions for the fungus to grow, the amount needed to kill whiteflies,
and whether it affects other insect species. Contact: Raymond Caruthers (210) 969-4852.

100 PERCENT ACCURACY -- For the past four years an experimental computerized system
has accurately predicted when Sclerotinia blight, a disease causing fungi, is first noticed in
peanut crops. In tests on Texas crops, the computer told of an impending blight outbreak
three weeks before the disease was evident in the plants, giving time to apply treatment to
prevent damage. The blight occurs when soil is wet and the soil temperature is less than
82 degrees. The computer system can help the farmer decide on the most efficient and
environmentally sound use of chemical fungicides. Contact: Chip Lee (817) 968-4147.








CATTLE HERDS EXPANDING -- More and heavier cattle on feed could put pressure on winter
prices. Fed cattle marketing could increase over half a million head this year to 22.6
million, the largest since 1989. Increased beef exports are expected to support higher
prices. Contact: Steve Reed (202) 219-1285.

DIET AND CANCER -- Research indicates that 35 percent of all cancers may be related to
diet. Food preparation is a key to lowering fat, a risk factor for many cancers. Avoid frying
meats, poultry and fish, it adds extra fat and calories. Use vegetable cooking sprays, or
bake, poach, steam, oven-broil, or stir fry meats, poultry and fish. Select lean cuts of meat,
trim away all visible fat, and remove the skin from poultry. To flavor meats and vegetables
use herbs and spices, onion, lemon or mustard instead of butter and fats. Eat several
helpings of vegetables every day, steamed vegetables should be cooked for a short time in
as little liquid as possible. Substitute skim milk for whole milk or sour cream. Choose
desserts made with milk or yogurt instead of those made with cream. Reducing fats and
adding fiber is the goal. Contact: Donnna Montgomery (504) 388-6701.

GETTING KIDS TO LISTEN -- "How To Talk So Kids Will Listen" is a program created by New
Mexico State University's Cooperative Extension Service that outlines better ways for
parents and teachers to communicate with children. The program uses a combination of
video tapes, group discussion, and written exercises to turn participants into better role
models for children. "What kids learn most is what they see and hear," says Diana
DelCampo, Extension family life specialist. "They model what they've seen their parents
do." Segments include traditional, counterproductive methods used by parents and reveals
more effective ways to communicate. Other topics include including children's autonomy,
praising children, and freeing children from role-playing. DelCampo says anyone can teach
it using the program leader's guide. Contact: Diana DelCampo (505) 646-6031.

CORN TO RUSSIA -- A $20 million donation of 210,000 metric tons of U.S. corn will be
shipped to the Russian Federation. The corn will be sold in Russia through private marketing
channels, supporting food assistance programs. Contact: James Keefer (202) 720-5263.

SPENDING COMPARISON -- The European Community has been outspending the United
States in export subsidies and farm support for the last five years. The table provides a
comparison of EC and U.S. agricultural spending in billions of dollars:

EC AND U.S. FARM SUPPORT SPENDING (in $Bil.)
EURO. COMM. 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992
Export Subsidies 7.2 10.4 11.4 10.7 9.7 12.3 13.7
Stock Deprec. 0.5 0.0 2.6 2.7 11.2 4.2 7.4
Domestic Support 13.7 15.6 18.2 14.5 12.2 24.3 25.7
EC TOTAL 21.4 26.0 32.2 27.9 33.1 40.9 46.7

UNITED STATES
Export Subsidies 0.1 1.0 1.5 0.4 0.4 1.4 2.6
Domestic Support 25.7 22.1 12.3 10.6 6.5 9.4 8.3
U.S. TOTAL 25.9 23.1 13.8 11.1 6.9 10.8 10.9
Claude Gifford








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1868 -- Watching and feeding wild birds is now America's fastest
growing hobby and is fueling the development of a billion dollar industry. Gary Crawford
presents a look at the hobby and some advice from experts on how to get started. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1350 -- Allergy-free rubber; better food through better technology;
beans bounce back; aquatic gardening; popcorn improvement. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1860 -- USDA News Highlights; farm price support
program update; ethanol update; South China links with U.S. exporters; farming in suburbia.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1613 -- Methyl bromide research; making exports insect free; Texas
fungus hits whiteflies; amaranthus, a health food grain; global change & ranchers. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, Apr. 1, horticultural exports; Friday,
Apr. 2, U.S. tobacco outlook, floriculture production; Monday, Apr. 5, cotton and wool
update; Tuesday, Apr. 6, weekly weather and crop update. These are the USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer provides information about USDA's wind erosion report.

ACTUALITIES -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy speaks to the Public Voice National Food
Policy Conference; USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski updates U.S. crop and weather
conditions; USDA economist Steve Reed on Easter egg and meat supplies; and USDA
economist Peter Buzzanell on sugar and sweeteners.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's parasite collection; Pat O'Leary
reports on the Easter egg business; and DeBoria Janifer reports on nutrition during
pregnancy.

EVERY OTHER WEEK-- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



OFFMIKE

ITS BEEN A LONG WINTER...and producers are waiting for spring to arrive, says Matt Westergaard
(KMIT, Mitchell, SD). Snow cover is gone, but single digit temperatures at night keep moisture frozen in
the ground. Matt says planting usually gets underway in mid-April in the Mitchell area. Matt's station
recently conducted its Farm Sweepstakes banquet featuring a steak dinner for winners from each
sponsor's business and a drawing from the group for the grand prize.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Jeff Stewart (Ag Radio Network, Utica, NY) who will graduate May 19 with
the 4th State Food and Agricultural Leadership Institute Class of Cornell University. Purpose of the two-
year program is to develop leaders who will be involved in public policy issues confronting the ag
industry and communities in New York. The 30-member class was recently in Washington, D.C.
meeting with USDA, embassy, and congressional leaders. Jeff says House Ag Committee chairman Kika
de la Garza (D-15th TX) spent over an hour with the group and got to tell his submarine story. Next
month the class tours Georgia and Florida agriculture industries.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











MODERATOR/INTERROGATOR...was the official title for Kelly Lenz (WIBW/Kansas Ag Network, Topeka)
who led a panel of the National Grain and Feed Association during its mid-March meeting in Washington,
D.C. Kelly says the panel considered the question, "The Future for U.S. Agriculture, Can it Grow
Again." They discussed lots of problems, but the bottom line answer was "Yes."

COUNTY ORDINANCES...on composting facilities will affect poultry industry operations, says Homer
Quann -WSVA, Harrisonburg, VA). Producer plans must reflect the input of a qualified engineer. Its part
of the effort to reduce pollution of the Chesapeake Bay. Deadline for compliance is July 1994. Homer
says his station uses some of USDA's radio material in non-ag programs, using the theme that
agricultural research benefits consumers too.

CONGRATULATIONS...to USDA Radio's Maria Bynum and her husband Nadab on the birth of their first
child, Ashley Morgan Bynum, born March 24 weighing six pounds seven ounces. Maria will be on
maternity leave for the nep three months. Jim Henry is serving on the radio staff during her absence.

VIC POWELL ,,L
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250-1340 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2617 July 2, 1993

FARM ASSET VALUES -- The relatively stable pattern of asset values is expected to continue
in 1993. Per acre value of farm real estate is forecast up 1 to 3 percent. Inventories of
crops and livestock will remain unchanged, with the values of financial assets increasing
slightly. Cash receipts for U.S. agricultural products are forecast up 1 to 2 percent in 1993.
Receipts from soybeans, fruits, vegetables and greenhouse products are expected to be
strong this year. Contact: Robert Dubman (202) 219-0809.

FARMLAND TRANSFERS -- Ninety-three percent of farmland sold last year is expected to
remain in agriculture over the next five years. Largest shifts to nonagricultural uses are
expected in East Coast regions where demand for nonagricultural uses is strongest. In 1992
owner-operators participated in 58 percent of farmland purchases. Nonfarmers made 30
percent of the purchases. Voluntary and estate sales accounted for 72 percent of all
farmland transfers. Family transfers totaled 18 percent. Foreclosures and other involuntary
transfers accounted for only seven percent in 1992. Contact: Roger Hexem (202) 219-
0423.

INDUSTRIAL DEMAND FOR AG PRODUCTS -- Projections for the next three years indicate
that the amount of plant matter used in industrial materials, excluding paper and natural
rubber, could increase by over five million tons, almost double the rate of 1990. Housing,
textiles, and fabricating materials are likely to show above-average use of agricultural
materials. Printing and publishing is expected to show sluggish growth. Production
increases in ethanol, adhesives and biopolymers will increase the industrial uses of starch
and sugar. In three years industrial uses of corn are expected to increase 140 million
bushels to 795 million bushels, about 8 percent a year. Contact: Lewrene Glaser (202) 219-
0085.

PESTICIDES AND SUSTAINABLE AG -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy says USDA will
intensify its effort to reduce the use of higher risk pesticides, and promote integrated pest
management and sustainable agricultural practices. In a joint statement issued with the Food
and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, Espy said the agencies
will help test and implement improved methods of pest management already used by many
farmers; will reform pesticide regulatory programs to encourage registration of safer
pesticides; and reduce risks associated with pesticides for all Americans. Espy says the food
supply is safe, but it is the responsibility of government to look at every opportunity to
improve the protection of public health, Contact: Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS -- The U.S. agricultural trade surplus for October 1992 to April
1993 totals $12.2 billion, unchanged from the level of a year earlier. Imports for the
October to April period total $14.6 billion, four percent higher than the same period last year.
Exports for fiscal year 1993 are projected at $42.5 billion, up $400 million. Imports are
forecast at $25 billion, up $2.8 billion over last year. Contact: Joel Greene (202) 219-0822.


***".








THE ASIAN FACTOR -- Asia now accounts for about 40 percent of U.S. farm exports, and
is the largest regional market for U.S. agricultural trade. There is opportunity for expanding
exports to the area. Economic growth has been faster than projected, and China is
experiencing a decline in exportable surpluses. There is increased demand in the region for
wheat, coarse grains, soybeans, cotton and meats. Market-oriented reforms, either
unilateral, or multilateral under GATT, are expected to lead to higher U.S. farm exports to
East Asian markets. Contact: Rip Landes (202) 219-0705.

BOOST FOR CANOLA -- The U.S. canola industry will likely benefit from new Federal
regulations for nutritional labeling of food which go into effect next May. To qualify for the
label "low in saturated fat," an oil can have no more than 1 gram of saturated fatty acid per
serving, and no more than 15 percent of its calories derived from saturated fat. Canola oil
is the only vegetable oil widely available that meets this standard. Consumer demand for
canola oil is expected to increase. Most canola oil currently is imported from Canada.
Contact: George Douvelis (202) 219-0840.

ENHANCING NATURAL RESISTANCE -- Plants can be protected by a gene that is switched
on when the plant is being eaten by insects. A scientist with USDA's Agricultural Research
Service, has placed a new on-off switch into the gene that makes a key plant hormone,
cytokinin, which produces a caterpillar-killing protein. The attacked plant overproduces the
hormone, up to 70 times greater, in the leaves. The system apparently simulate a plant's
natural defense response, and may use less of the plant's energy than other systems of
insect control. The gene could be helpful to plants such as tobacco, tomato, soybeans and
sugarbeets. Further research is underway. Contact: Ann Smigocki (301) 504-5848.

FOOD STAMPS -- One of every ten Americans uses food stamps. Recent figures show that
participation in the Food Stamp Program declined slightly in April, from a record 27.38
million people to 27.35 million, a decrease of 30,000 due to seasonal employment. Many
speakers at the recent Hunger Forum, conducted in Washington, D.C. by USDA, emphasized
the need for Congress to rectify shortcomings in the current food stamp program. Contact:
Phil Shanholtzer (202) 305-2286.

EXERCISE AND BLOOD SUGAR -- People who are at risk of developing diabetes can improve
their tolerance of blood sugar if they regularly exercise. A 12-week study of men and
women over age 50 at USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, at Tufts
University in Boston, shows that even if people don't lose weight in the process, exercise
improves the body's ability to respond to insulin so that glucose moves readily from the
blood into body cells where it can be used. The study also showed that weight loss
produces the greatest improvement to insulin response. The improved results came from
long-term regular exercise, not from a single session. Contact: Virginia Hughes (617) 556-
3079.

FACTSHEET -- The newest in a series of factsheets, "A Smail-Scale Agriculture Alternative -
Shiitake Mushrooms," is now available from the USDA Cooperative State Research Service
Office for Small-Scale Agriculture. The publication lists and discusses basic steps in
cultivating shiitake on logs, production scales, market prices and marketing points, and
economics. Single copies are available at no charge from Howard Kerr, OSSA Program
Director, Ag Box 2244, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-2244. Contact: George Holcomb
(202) 720-5746.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1882 -- Two-tier pricing, status quo or free market were some of the
options open for discussion at the nation's first dairy summit. On this edition Brenda Curtis
reviews the dairy story as told by industry leaders. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1364 -- Pesticide report; credit shopping; marsh grass controls erosion;
prevention ideas gaining ground; the electronic library. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1874 -- USDA News Highlights; 1993 conservation
recommendations; dairy summit results; rural hunger; pesticide report; dairy referendum
PSAs. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1627 -- Exercise and glucose tolerance; corn earworm discovery;
agriculture & environmentalism; new use for jojoba; blight-resistant hazelnuts. (Weekly reel
of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, July 12, U.S. crop production report,
world ag supply & demand; Tuesday, July 13, weekly weather and crop update, world ag
& grain production, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Thursday, July 15, milk
production; Friday, July 16, livestock & poultry outlook, vegetable production report.
These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on farm broadcasting in Russia. Lynn Wyvill reports on an
Extension bilingual program to help immigrants adjust to life in the U.S.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions; USDA economist James Miller on the dairy outlook; USDA economist Michael
Kurtzig on agricultural exports to North Africa and the Middle East; and USDA economist
Joel Greene on U.S. agricultural trade.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on high-lysine rice; Pat O'Leary reports on
computer landscaping; Lynn Wyvill reports on beta carotene and health.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from
7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 31 8300 676 6
OFFMIKE
THOUSANDS OF ACRES...are underwater and the crops lost, says Bart Bartholomew (KLNT,
Clinton, IA). The Mississippi River is at a 100-year flood level. Damage is expected to be
extensive to cropland. Secretary Espy inspected flooding in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and
South Dakota.

PRODUCERS...are wondering if the wet weather will generate a hike in prices, says Hal Hanna
(KXEL, Waterloo, IA). Corn and beans are about a month behind in Hal's area, placing them close
to the edge of the window at harvest. He says the only thing that is ahead is rainfall, its 8 inches
more than last year at this time.

WE'RE JUST BEGINNING...to breath more easily, says Karl Guenther (WKZO, Kalamazoo, MI).
The cold, wet spring caused fear that many crops would be lost. Weather apparently didn't
affect asparagus, a good crop was brought in. Hot weather finally arrived in late June. Karl says
you can almost hear the cucumbers and cabbage growing.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
-- AUG 11 199J
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











WHEAT HARVEST...is keeping us busy, says Ron Hays (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City).
Harvest is about two weeks late. Ron says the results are spotty, from crops suffering damaged
caused by hail, to weed infestation and resulting dockage, to producers with good yields. The
harvest in Kansas will be getting underway the first part of July.

APPLE GROWERS...are at the end of their patience regarding Japan's barriers to importing U.S>
apples, says Bob Hoff (Northwest Ag News Network, Spokane, WA). Bob says growers tell him
they aren't for trade retaliation, but action needs to be taken to solve the impasse. Bob says the
wheat crop looks really good, all that's needed is a good price.

YOUTH SAFETY DAY...was a big hit with the 500 kids and parents attending the event at the
county fairground, says Charlie Kampa (KBRF, Fergus Falls, MN). Implement dealers and the
dairy association sponsored prizes and lunch. Kids learned about safety relating to items such as
electricity, lawn mowers, gys, and other items. Charlie says it looks like an annual event.

VIC POWELL 6& TDivis-o
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter Us



United States Dep A u O f Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 20250-1340 202 720-433

Letter No. 261 July 16, 1993

DISASTER ASSIS eastern states have been named by Agriculture Secretary
Mike Espy as eligib le ncy loans because of crop losses due to heavy rains and
flooding. Loans from USDA's Farmers Home Administration will be available to farmers in
304 counties: sixty counties were named in Illinois; all 99 counties in Iowa; 29 counties in
Minnesota; 51 counties in Nebraska; 32 counties in South Dakota; and 33 counties in
Wisconsin. Farmers will have eight months to apply for the loans that will help cover part
of their actual losses. The loans are in addition to the flexibility changes made in farm
programs designed to help ease crop losses on producers in the upper midwest. Contact:
Steve Kinsella (202) 720-4623.

SINGLE-FAMILY HOME LOANS -- $247 million is now available for single-family guaranteed
home loans from USDA's Farmers Home Administration. The program ran out funds last
April when demandreached high levels. The funding, part of a supplemental appropriations
bill signed by President Clinton, will be allocated among the states on a formula that includes
original allocation and rate of use figures. Pending applications will received first priority.
The agency's direct loans for housing have continued without interruption. Contact: Joe
O'Neill (202) 720-4323.

RURAL EMPLOYMENT -- Latest statistics show that employment for rural women increased
2.3 percent compared to a 1.8 percent increase for men in 1992. Employment for rural
workers ages 35 to 54 grew by 3.4 percent, larger than for younger and older groups. The
proportion of the rural population with jobs was 58.9 percent in 1992, up slightly from a
yearearlier, and 0.7 percent below the peak in 1989. In urban areas, 62.1 percent of the
population was employed in 1992, down slightly from the previousyear. Contact: Timothy
Parker (202) 219-0541.

QUARANTINE LIFTED -- The Oriental fruit fly has been eradicated from southern California.
Restrictions on the interstate movement of regulated articles have been removed. The
infestation of the destructive pest of fruits, nuts and berries was brought under control in
a cooperative effort of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and the California
Department of Food and Agriculture. Oriental fruit flies are not known to exist anywhere in
the continental United States. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-7255.

QUARANTINE IMPOSED -- Cotton seed, cotton crops and associated production and
processing equipment in Missouri must be inspected and certified as free of pink bollworm
before they can leave the state. "The quarantine action is necessary to prevent the
interstate movement of pink bollworm into noninfested areas," says Glen Lee, deputy
administrator of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Contact: Ed Curlett
(301) 436-7255.









FARM REAL ESTATE OUTLOOK -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasts a one to
three percent increase in the per acre value of U.S. farm real estate this year, a range that
is just over the two percent rise recorded in 1992. This will mark the seventh consecutive
annual increase, bringing the January 1994 average value to $717, compared to the 1982
record high of $823. But with inflation exceeding increases in nominal values of farm real
estate in recent years, real values have trended lower since their record high in 1981. This
trend has flattened in recent years. A key factor in commodity prices and economic returns,
and therefore to farm real estate, will be the outcomes of current trade negotiations.
Contact: Roger Hexem (202) 219-0423.

SALMONELLA OUTBREAKS -- The warm and humid weather of summer increases the risk
of a Salmonella enteritidis outbreak. During the past three years 45 percent of all Salmonella
outbreaks occurred between June 1 and August 31. Although many types of food can
become contaminated with the bacteria, items that are particularly susceptible are meat,
poultry, eggs and milk. Of these items about 31 percent of the outbreaks were caused by
fresh eggs. Some food handling tips from USDA to help reduce the risk of foodborne illness
throughout the year: Don't leave food at room temperature for more than two hours; keep
hot foods hot and cold foods cold; use clean utensils and dishes to prepare foods; buy only
eggs that are refrigerated, clean and unbroken; and use pasteurized eggs in all recipes calling
for raw eggs. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

MEETING SOLID WASTE REGULATIONS -- Rural communities face major decisions and costs
in meeting new Federal solid waste regulations. Researchers at the University of Georgia
Cooperative Extension Service are evaluating solid waste programs such as recycling,
incineration, landfilling, and shipping to other states. New requirements for landfill
construction require increased expenditures. Sales of recycled material doesn't offset the
costs of collection, storage and delivery. Incinerators can cause air pollution and are
expensive to build. The Extension researchers are looking at the best mix of options
available to county governments to help them deal with the complicated issue of garbage
disposal. Contact: Andy Keeler (706) 542-0849.

REALISTIC DIETING GOALS -- Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service have
found that the amount of fatty acids circulating in the blood while dieters burn stored fat
during exercise is an indicator of how fast or slow dieters will lose fat. An equation has
been produced that is being tested on overweight and obese individuals of both sexes.
When ready, the equation could help dieters set realistic goals and assist in better tailoring
each individual's weight loss plan. Contact: Teresa Barbieri (415) 556-8821.

CROP PRODUCTION -- Winter wheat production is forecast at 1.8 billion bushels, 13 percent
above 1992 results. Average yield should be 41 bushels an acre. Spring wheat for 1993
is forecast at 699 million bushels, down 7 percent from last year's record level. Yield is
expected to be 39 bushels an acre, down 2 bushels per acre from last year. Durum wheat
is forecast at 81 million bushels, down 17 percent from last year. Oat production is forecast
at 263 million bushels, down 11 percent from last year. The 1993 apple crop is expected
to total 10.8 billion pounds, one percent higher than last year. U.S. production of peaches
is forecast at 2.8 billion pounds, nearly the same as last year. Production of pears should
reach 947,300 tons, two percent more than the 1992 crop. The grapefruit crop is forecast
at 2.7 million tons, up 26 percent from last season.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1884 -- Parenting skills are discussed with Billie Frazier, human
development specialist at the University of Maryland Extension Service. Brenda Curtis
reports. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1366 -- Truth in food advertising; Mississippi River project; saving the
kelp and urchins too; teenage parents; loans for rural housing. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1876 -- USDA News Highlights; floods lower crop outlook;
emergency loans for midwestern farmers; flooded cropland assistance; Africanized bees
reach Arizona. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1629 -- Cardiovascular danger signal; carotenoids & your health;
nutrient database; Africanized bees reach Arizona; TERRA tracks global change. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, July 27, crop & weather update,
vegetable outlook; Thursday, July 29, catfish production, farm numbers; Friday, July 30, ag
prices; Monday, August 2, horticultural exports; Tuesday, August 3, cotton/wool update,
crop & weather update. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let
the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359, COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on a new project in Maryland that provides fresh
vegetables to people in need; Pat O'Leary takes a look at computer landscaping.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA world board chairman James Donald on crop production estimates
and flood damage in the midwest; USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski on weather and crop
situation; USDA economist Lewrene Glaser on industrial uses of agricultural materials.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on a watermelon festival; Pat O'Leary
reports on beating the barnyard blues.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update with anchors Eric Parsons and Lori Spiczka. 4:30
of USDA farm program information in news desk format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:30 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:30 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
u l HIIIIEII[lI
4 3 1262 08300 671 7

OFFMIKE
GRAIN ELEVATORS...won't accept grain because they can't ship it until flood waters receed in
late July, says Kevin Morse (WOC, Davenport, IA. Elevator operators have stopped giving July
prices and are quoting only August grain. Kevin says many producers could not plant a crop this
year, and are seeking changes in the crop insurance program that will provide relief. Kevin says
the long-range forecast is for rain.

MANY PRODUCERS...in southeastern Minnesota will get a crop because much of the farmland is
high ridge, says Jerry Papenfuss (KAGE, Winona), but the hay crop is questionable.

THE THING THAT WORRIES ME...is the plummeting attitude, says Don Wick (KWOA,
Worthington, MN). There will be no crop this year due to flooding. Farmers marketed the 1992
crop early because of its low quality, and therefore have nothing to sell this year. Their bins are
empty. Don says its hitting the young guys hard.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











THE PEANUT CROP...was getting into trouble because of dryness, says Gene Ragan (WTVY,
Dothan, AL), but rain arrived in time. Much of the stressed corn crop was lost in his region.
Gene says the first Southeast-wide Quality Harvest Clinic will be held in Dothan, August featuring
an equipment display and providing farmers information about improving the quality of peanuts.

FARM PROGRAMMING...begins in mid-August on WHB, Kansas City. Lynn Watts, formerly of
WOC, Davenport, IA will be doing the honors. The station will be linking with Jay Truitt
(KMZU/KOAL/KTRX, Carrollton, MO).

COUNTY FAIR...season has arrived, says Rita Frazer (WSMI Litchfield, IL). She is broadcasting
live from the sites. Rita says the corn and beans went in late, but producers were able to plant.

MOVED...Valerie Parks from ABN Radio/TV, Columbus, OH to sales manager at WUCO,
Marysville, OH.

VIC POWELL ( 4
Chief, Radio & TV Division




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