Farm broadcasters letter - 1992

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Title:
Farm broadcasters letter - 1992
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Division
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Broadcasting and Film
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
-letter no. 2669 (July 1, 1994).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by: the Office of Communication, Radio and Television Service; 19 -<May 2, 1980>, Feb. 24, 1983-19 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division; <May 16, 1980>-Feb. 17, 1983 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Broadcasting and Film; <Apr. 27, 1990>-199 by: the Office of Public Affairs, Radio-TV Division; 199 -<1994> by: Office of Communications.
General Note:
Description based on: Letter no. 1882 (Nov. 3, 1978); title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34A

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02563831
lccn - sc 77000719
issn - 0364-5444
Classification:
lcc - S21 .A82
System ID:
AA00000580:00004

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Broadcasters letter

Full Text





Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)720-4330

Letter No. 2539 Jan. 3, 1992




Agriculture Secretary Edward
Madigan and Radio Division
Deputy Chief Brenda Curtis
share a light hearted moment
shortly before the Secretary
begins his year-end review of
American agriculture with farm
broad 12/31. (USDA Photo










U.S. FOOD CONSUMPTION has changed dramatically in the last 20 years, says USDA
economist Judith Jones Putnam. Americans are eating more food, on the whole, than ever.
And, diets have shifted away from meat or animal products as the main entree to a mixture of
animal products, vegetables, fruits, nuts and grains. For example, Putnam says, we're eating
more breakfast cereals, pizza, pasta entrees, stir-fried meat and vegetables served on rice,
salad entrees, tacos, burritos, enchiladas and fajitas. Contact: Judith Jones Putnam
(202) 219-0870.


MORE RICE -- Americans are eating more rice than ever. Both total domestic and per
capital consumption have risen steadily over the past decade. Moreover, Americans are
eating a wider variety of rice dishes. "But even though consumption of rice has increased, it
remains much lower than that of most other popular side dishes," says USDA economist
Nathan Childs. New uses for rice in processed foods, together with greater consumption of
certain specialty rices, account for much of the recent gains, Childs says. Contact: Nathan
Childs (202) 219-0840.








NEW MEXICAN ECONOMIC POLICIES -- Mexico is shaking off the economic strategies of
the past and embracing the free market model, say two USDA economists. "The dramatic
changes in Mexico's economic policies have shown that its government is prepared to alter
the course of the Mexican economy to keep pace with new global realities," says USDA
economist Matthew Shane. Shane and fellow economist David Stallings recently examined
the new policies at work in Mexico and what they maydnean for the future. Contact:
Matthew Shane (202) 219-0700 or David Stallings (202) 219-0705.


BAKERY EXPORTS ON THE RISE -- Consumers in most countries have a sweet tooth
when it comes to bakery products -- whether it's a doughnut, a steamed bun filled with
sweetened soybean paste, gingerbread cookies or a fruit-topped torte. International trade
statistics suggest in recent years there has been an increase in export trade in these
products. Exports of U.S. bakery products may exceed $250 million by mid-decade.
Contact: Thomas St. Clair (202) 720-6821.


WOMEN LEASE MORE FARMLAND than men, but exert less control, USDA economists
say. Female landlords who lease U.S. farmland outnumber their male counterparts by more
than 140,000. At 650,000 strong, female landlords also lease much more land -- 105 million
acres -- than male landlords -- 82.5 million acres. Women are less involved in the control of
leased farmland. "Even when everything else is taken into consideration, such as age,
location and occupation, men still participate more in management of rented land," says
USDA economist Denise Rogers. Contact: Denise Rogers (202) 219-0422.


VEGETABLE REPORT -- U.S. vegetable production, including potatoes, sweetpotatoes and
dry beans, rose slightly in 1991 from the previous year. Although summer acreage of
vegetables was up 5 percent, declines of 8 percent in winter acreage and 6 percent in spring
acreage left the total fresh vegetable acreage down 3 percent for the year. Domestic per
capital use of 26 selected vegetables and melons rose slightly to 392 pounds in 1990. For
1991, per capital use of all vegetables remained near that of 1990. Reduced production of
fresh vegetables and sweetpotatoes was offset by higher potato and dry bean use. Contact:
Gary Lucier (202) 219-0884.


GOOD, BAD NEWS ABOUT DIETING -- Is dieting beneficial or harmful? Is it better never to
try to lose weight if you're only going to gain it all back? The weight loss industry in the U.S.
is big business, worth $33 billion a year, says nutritionist Beth Reames. "Effects of weight
control programs can have a tremendous impact on the lives of many people," says Reames.
One very serious concern is that repeated dieting followed by weight gain -- yo-yo dieting --
may be more hazardous to your health than maintaining excessive weight. Contact: Beth
Reames (504) 388-4141.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1804 -- Rural America is trying a number of different innovative
methods to overcome some serious economic problems. On this edition of AGRICULTURE
USA, John Snyder takes a look at how some areas are trying to attack the problem through
school based businesses. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1286 -- From headlines to harvest; doing anything about it; home
buying facts; irradiating food; nutrition: How much do we know? (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1795 -- USDA News Highlights; Former Soviet Republics
eligible for credit guarantees; soyoil refining; global warming; fruit and vegetable exports
expected to continue strong. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1501 -- Bovine breathalizer; eating bugs; counting bugs; telltale
bugs; identifying bugs. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., Jan. 8, vegetable production; Fri., Jan.
10, U.S. crop production, farm labor, winter wheat seedings; Mon., Jan. 13, annual crop
production, grain and rice stocks, world ag. supply and demand; Tues., Jan. 14,
crop/weather update, world grain/crop outlook, world oilseed situation, world cotton
situation; Thurs., Jan. 16, milk production; Fri., Jan. 17, livestock and poultry situation;
noncitrus fruits and nuts; Mon., Jan., 20, holiday. (These are the USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on a sustainable agriculture center; Lynn Wyvill reports
on how weather information can help farmers manage their crops better; Will Pemble
reports on the boll weevil bait stick; Tyson Gair reports on a new machine that will change
rice harvesting and Mike Thomas reports on the demand for more skilled professionals in
agriculture. Excerpts from video coverage of Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan's
year-end radio news conference.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's wild potato hunters; DeBoria
Janifer reports on nutritional labeling proposals; Lynn Wyvill reports on the National
Arboretum's bonsai collection.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 517 4

COTTON PRODUCERS...are planning to get the crop in by early February to reduce
possible whitefly damage says Jim Hearn (KURV, Edinburg, Texas). The state estimates
that last year the pest caused an estimated $100 million in damage to Texas agricultural
production and cost 4,800 jobs. Jim says the station's second annual Farm and Ranch
Show will be held January 17-18 in Mercedes, Texas. Former Secretary of Agriculture Earl
Butz is a featured speaker.

DIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE...in central Arkansas will be shown at Ag Expo 92 says
Larry Burchfield (KWCK, Searcy, Ark.). The station is sponsoring its first farm show
January 16-17 at the White County Fairgrounds. More than 50 exhibitors are scheduled.
Larry is the new farm director at the station.

STATE REGULATIONS...for wetlands went into effect January 1, says Tom Rothman
(MAGNET Radio, St. Paul, Minn.). Tom plans follow-up programming to help eliminate
confusion about the rules.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300 :.











DUPONT ENVIRONMENTAL RESPECT AWARD...wonfby Jim Coyle (KRES, Moberly, Mo.)
at the NAFB conference last year has an update. In recognition of his environmental
reporting, Jim received a trophy, $1,000 for himself and $1,000 for donation to a charity. He
selected the Missouri FFA organization. FFA reports the funds will be used to help the group
establish an environmental program. Jim says the station is preparing for its 15th annual
KRES Farm Show, January 9-10 inMoberly. Eighty-five exhibitors and 1,000 people are
expected to attend.

21st KOEL AG EXPO...is scheduled for March 6 says Von Ketelsen (KOEL, Oelwein, Iowa).
Von says one of the events at the Expo is a panel featuring the Iowa presidents of the
Farmers Organization, Farm Bureau and the Farmers Union. Von says one of the highlights
of 1991 was his first skydiving jump. He calls it a great way to get an overall view of the
crops


VIC PO LL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)720-4330
Letter No. 2540 Jan. 10,1992

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS FOR EXPORTERS -- The January 1992 issue of AgExporter
magazine has developed a list of ten New Year's resolutions for export-oriente
Some of the resolutions include: create a marketing plan; tailor your produ
develop personal relationships and be responsive to inquiries. Contact: pencer
(202) 720-1533.
MAR 11 99
HOG INVENTORIES UP -- The inventory of hogs and pigs as of Dec. 1, million head -
up 5 percent from last year and 6 percent above two years ago. The bree V ~-entory
7.22 million head, was up 5 percent from both last year and the year before. d '. e .
hog inventory at 49.8 million head, is up 5 percent from last year and 6 percent a two
years ago. Contact: Doyle Fuchs (202) 720-3106.


SOY OIL WASTES RECYCLE -- A procedure used to decaffeinate coffee can be adapted to
clean and recycle wastes from vegetable oil refining, USDA scientists say. The procedure
can also reduce fire hazards from the oil-soaked wastes, which are prone to spontaneous
combustion on hot summer days. An average soybean oil refinery generates about 5,000
pounds of spent bleaching clay every day. That clay absorbs substances from the raw oil
that a refinery doesn't want in the end product. At the same time, the clay soaks in some of
the oil. Contact: Jerry King (309) 685-4011.


FRESH GREEN CHILE -- Those who enjoy fresh green chile, but don't live where they can
buy it easily, may be in luck. Horticulture researchers at New Mexico State University are
looking at ways to package fresh green chile. Marisa Wall, assistant professor of
horticulture and post-harvest physiology, says a combination of packaging and biological
control techniques of post-harvest diseases is being tested to see if fresh green chile can be
packaged effectively. Contact: Marisa Wall (505) 646-1914.


NATURAL INSECTICIDES -- USDA scientists have found natural insecticides that kill aphids
in fungus-infected tall fescue grass. Chemists Richard J. Petroski and Richard G. Powell
say the compounds, called "N-acyl loline" derivatives or lolines, offer potential as
environmentally-friendly insecticides against aphids and other pests in gardens and
houseplants. Contact: Richard J. Petroski and Richard G. Powell (309) 685-4011.


BUTTER PRODUCTION DOWN -- Butter production in November was 108 million pounds --
down 1 percent from a year earlier, but 3 percent above the previous month. Contact:
Daniel Buckner (202) 720-4448.








HORTICULTURAL EXPORTS -- The U.S. exported a record $577.1 million of horticultural
products to all countries in October. This figure is nearly 8 percent above the same month a
year ago. Most product categories showed increases in October, including significant gains
for fruit and vegetable juices, apples and dried fruit. The sharpest increases occurred in
juices for Canada and apples and dried fruit for the European Community. Declines included
tree nuts, fresh vegetables and fresh citrus. Contact: Frank J. Piason (202) 720-6590.


CRANBERRY REFERENDUM -- Cranberry producers and processors in Massachusetts,
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon,
Washington and New York will vote Jan 13 31 on proposed amendments to the federal
marketing order for cranberries. Daniel D. Haley, administrator of USDA's Agricultural
Marketing Service, says the amendments are intended to improve the administration,
operation and functioning of the cranberry marketing order program. Contact: Rebecca
Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.


EXTENSION GRANT -- The Cooperative Extension System and National 4-H Council have
received a $3.5 million grant from the DeWitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund to assist in
planning, implementing and evaluating programs over a four-year period for USDA's National
Youth at Risk Initiative. One goal of the initiative is to.expand USDA's outreach to more
youth, particularly those who are most vulnerable because of poverty, lack of parental and
community support and negative peer pressure. Contact: Tom Willis (202) 720-2047.


SAVINGS TRENDS -- How people are saving their assets has changed over the past 40
years. Private pensions along with government insurance and pensions represented 6
percent of individuals' assets in 1950, but this share had risen to 25 percent by 1990.
From the perspective of the family, saving represents deferred consumption, says Joan C.
Courtless, a USDA family economist. Courtless says the economic factors that may affect
personal saving include: inflation, interest rates, tax reform, IRA's and Social Security.
Contact: Joan C. Courtless (301) 436-8461.


U.S. FARMLAND is held by fewer owners now than at any other time in this century, ERS
economists say. Nearly half of all U.S. farmland is held by about 4 percent of all farmland
owners. Over 40 percent of the 833 million acres of private farmland is held by owners or
organizations who do not themselves operate farms. Increases in the ratio of owners to
operators, currently about three to two, imply a larger percentage of landowners who are
less involved in farm operating and marketing decisions, a spreading of risk between farmers
and landlords, and greater concentration of agricultural production in fewer farm managers.
Contact: Gene Wunderlich (202) 219-0425.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1805 -- Brenda Curtis presents a review of 1991 using comments
of Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1287 -- Putting in a wood stove; nutrition and mortality; foods,
cholesterol and cancer; a food cost outlook for 1992; cutting sugar and sodium. (Weekly
reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1796 -- USDA News Highlights; the U.S.-Japan rice
debate; water supply impacts on pig growth; high-value product exports. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1502 -- Seniors and vitamin B12, calcium absorption, chromium
and blood sugar, diet and cholesterol levels, flax -- new health food. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thurs., Jan. 16, milk production; Fri., Jan. 17,
livestock and poultry outlook; Mon., Jan. 20, Holiday; Tues., Jan. 21, U.S. trade update;
Wed., Jan. 22, crop/weather update, dairy outlook; Thurs., Jan. 23, oil crops outlook, catfish
production. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the
lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's wild potato hunters; Will Pemble reports on
miniature lettuce developed by USDA scientists; Dave Luciani of Michigan State University
and Artis Ford of Mississippi State University on recycling Christmas trees; Scott Huffman
of Mississippi State on year-round poinsettia care.

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen, USDA meteorologist, with a crop and weather update;
USDA economist Bob Dubman with a farm income and finance forecast; William Richards,
USDA Soil Conservation Service chief, on progress of farmers' conservation compliance and
enforcement efforts in 1992; USDA economist Bob Skinner on U.S. cotton production and
prices.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's Soil Tilth Lab in Ames, Iowa;
DeBoria Janifer has a three-part series on food nutrition labeling; Lynn Wyvill reports on
the National Arboretum's bonsai collection.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08134 461 5
OFFMIKE

HOT NEWS ITEM...for Louisiana rice producers is President George Bush's effort to open
Japan's rice market to imports. Don Molino (Louisiana Agri-News Network, Baton Rouge,
La.) says their reports on the President's Asian trip were of major interest to rice producers in
the state.

EXPANSION...of programming is underway, says Miles Carter (KMZU, Carrollton, Mo.). A
new 30-minute program at 6 a.m. weekdays examines one subject in detail with Q & A's from
listeners. Recent programs included state plans to cut funding of University Extension
Service operations, and comments from a Russian farmer who spent a week with an Iowa
farm family. Some listeners questioned whether the U.S. should be exporting its agricultural
technology to Russia, while others favored the farmer exchange. The station is also
expanding its reach. It has bought four FM stations in the state and is programming them
with KMZU's signal.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT...and its effects on farmers and ranchers
in Texas is being covered by Lee McCoy (Texas Agri-Business Network, Dallas, Texas). Lee
says to better serve listeners the network is broadcasting both pro and con views of the
agreement as it progresses.

YEAR-END WRAP UP...program produced by Kathleen Longergan (Agriculture Radio
Network, Des Moines, Iowa) featured interviews with commodity leaders. Kathleen says all
leaders say environmental issues, wetlands and animal rights will be important items during
1992.

DECEASED...Sonny Slater (KSAL, Salina, Kan., retired) on Dec. 9, 1991, in a farm accident.
The farm tractor he was standing near crushed him against a tree. He was a 45-year veteran
of farm broadcasting.


-IC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)720-4330
Letter No. 2541 Jan. 17, 1992

SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE Edward Madigan told members of the American Farm
Bureau Federation meeting in Kansas City that USDA is going to make a positive difference
for farmers. Madigan says the defining issues for American agriculture's future are: letting
farmers be farmers; exploring new ways to use farm products which will create new domestic
markets as well as expanding foreign ones; reaping the potential for environmental benefits
from ag; and empowering consumers with the information they need to eat smart. Contact:
Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


SHINING STAR FOR EXPORTERS -- Asia is still the shining star for U.S. exporters. Asian
markets continue to be hotbeds of opportunity. In 1991, five of the top ten market prospects
selected by USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service were Asian countries, says Mike Dwyer,
chief of FAS' Trade and Marketing Analysis Branch. "By the mid-1990's, if current trends
continue," Dwyer says, "U.S. agricultural exports to the four Asian tigers -- Korea, Hong
Kong, Singapore and Taiwan -- will eclipse exports to all 12 members of the European
Community." Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 720-7938.


FEED AID IN 53 TEXAS COUNTIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has
authorized Emergency Feed Program help to eligible livestock producers suffering from
flooding in 53 Texas counties. Eligible livestock producers may get up to 50 percent of the
cost of feed bought to replace that which was lost due to flooding. Livestock producers
seeking help should contact their county USDA Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service offices for details. Contact: Robert Feist (202) 720-6789.


FRESH CORN STANDARDS -- USDA is going to update the U.S. standards for grades of
sweet corn to reflect the way the vegetable is harvested and marketed. "U.S. grades apply
only to sweet corn in husks, but much corn that is now retailed is already husked, trimmed
and wrapped in plastic packages," says Daniel D. Haley, administrator of USDA's
Agricultural Marketing Service. "Two sweet corn industry groups requested updating the
standards, which have not been changed since 1954." Contact: Rebecca Unkenholz
(202) 720-8998.


NEW APPOINTMENT -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has named R. Randall
Green as deputy undersecretary of agriculture for international affairs and commodity
programs. He succeeds John B. Campbell, who took a job in private industry. Green is a
native of Gorman, Texas. He graduated from Texas A&M University in 1982 with a degree in
agricultural journalism. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.







U.S.-CANADIAN FREE TRADE PACT -- The U.S.-Canadian Free Trade Agreement, which
went into effect Jan. 1, 1989, will remove all tariff and some non-tariff barriers to ag trade
between the two countries by Jan. 1, 1998. For agriculture, eliminating trade restraints
means producers in both countries have the opportunity to be more competitive and meet
the demand for ag goods. Canada is the U.S.' second largest market for ag commodities.
During 1991, Canada imported $4.4 billion worth of ag products from the U.S., up 19 percent
from $4.2 billion the previous fiscal year. The U.S. imported $3.2 billion worth of ag products
from Canada. Contact: Fred Kessel (202) 720-1335.


USER FEES FOR EXPORTS -- USDA will begin collecting user fees for many certification,
inspection and testing services on Feb. 9. "These and previously implemented APHIS user
fees will save taxpayers $119 million annually," says Robert B. Melland, administrator of
USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The fees will help USDA recover costs
for several additional inspection and supervision services, including importing animals and
birds; inspecting international commercial aircraft; and issuing certificates for plants and
animals being exported. Contact: Doug Hendrix (301) 436-7253.


PET FOOD EXPORTS -- Overseas sales are making U.S. pet food exporters top dog, says
James Johnson, with USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service. International sales are the
fastest growing component of the U.S. pet food industry, USDA figures show. Beginning in
1987, U.S. pet food exports began increasing dramatically, rising 40 percent per year.
Before 1990, the U.S. surpassed the EC as the world's largest exporter of pet food. U.S.
exports have grown four times faster than EC exports of pet food to non-EC counties. While
pet food exports have raced ahead, domestic sales growth is on a shorter leash, limited by
the slow growth rate of new households in the U.S. and the limited expansion of the
percentage of households with pets. Contact: James Johnson (202) 720-2922.


NEWSPAPERS TO FERTILIZER -- A USDA scientist is using newspapers to turn hard-
packed dirt into crumbly, nutrient-rich soil. Soil Scientist James H. Edwards, with USDA's
Agricultural Research Service in Auburn, Ala., is growing cotton, corn and soybeans on a
bed of shredded newspaper and chicken litter mixed with soil. "You have an ideal
environment for root growth," Edwards says. His mixture has 40 percent shredded
newspaper, 50 percent soils and 10 to 15 percent chicken litter. Contact: James H.
Edwards, Jr. (205) 844-3979.


SWINE SURVEY -- USDA has finished the first comprehensive, nationwide survey of swine
health and productivity. The survey found 15 percent of live-born piglets died before
weaning; 43 percent of the piglets were crushed by the sow; 78 percent of swine producers
vaccinated in the farrowing house to prevent illness in sows and gilts; other frequent
preventive practices included deworming, mange/lice treatment and antibiotics for adult
swine; and more than 80 percent of the surveyed farms maintained at least one totally
confined farrowing facility. Contact: Alan Zagier (301) 436-7255.

Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1806 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Doug Wakefield, along
with Gary Crawford and Maria Bynum, bring you viewpoints of experts inside and outside
USDA on the ag prospects for 1992. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1287 -- Food labels for kids; hidden hazards of shift work; loans for
home buyers; home ownership; preventing chimney fires. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1797 -- USDA News Highlights; new price outlook; diary
price changes; gypsy moth update; global warming. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1503 -- Weekend warriors; "sunshine" vitamin; heat-tolerant cattle;
more nutritious grains; downside of high-grain diets. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thurs., Jan. 30, world tobacco situation; Fri.,
Jan. 31, ag prices, cattle on feed, world poultry situation; Mon., Feb. 3, catfish production,
horticultural products review. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance.
Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please
don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the proposed nutrition labeling changes (three
parts).

ACTUALITIES -- USDA crop analyst Jim Donald on U.S. wheat, soybean and cotton crops;
USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on latest weather and crop conditions and FmHA
administrator La Verne Ausman on crop insurance, FmHA emergency loans and 1992
housing loans for rural families.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on new varieties of hollies; Pat O'Leary
reports on lawn landscaping and Lynn Wyvill reports on teaching your children about food
safety and nutrition.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.







OFFMIKE 3 12
MEETING SEASON...is underway in North Dakota, says Larry Ristvedt (KFGO,
Fargo, N.D.) and turnout has been good for sessions about conservation tillage,
wetlands and marketing. Larry says he's been keeping track of the new co-op
organization in North Dakota for durum producers. The Dakota Pasta Growers
Company is holding meetings across the state on its plan to build a $43 million pasta
production facility. The new plant would eliminate the need to ship the group's durum
wheat out of state for processing. Next month Larry will be hosting a trip for farmers
to New Zealand and Australia.

EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS...at the Ft. Wayne Farm Show & Conservation Expo, Jan.
14-16 in Indianapolis, were hosted by David Russell (Tribune Radio Network,
Indianapolis, Ind.). Commodity marketing strategies, 1992 farm programs and making
crop residue work for farmers were among the topics covered. Dave says the farm
show is one of the largest in the nation.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS /
Penalty for Private Use $300

!,/









SIGN-UP ENDS MID-YEAR...for rigf~ts t6 pump groundwater in Georgia, says Jay
Oliver (videographer, Extension Sertice at U. of Ga.). .The state wants to know how
much groundwater is being withdrawn and is using this method to determine the
amount. Jay says about half the farmers in the state had signed by Jan. 1.

MOVED...Cindy Cunningham (KICD, Spencer, lowa) t. National Pork Producers
Council, Des Moines, Iowa. Dennis Morrice (KM 1,JGrand Island, Neb.) to KICD.
Welcome back to Doug Wakefield who .has.rejoJind USDA radio staff. For the past
seven years Doug operated a firm that made talking computers available to the blind.

PROGRAMMING CHANGE...at WRDJ, Daleville, Ala. Wyatt Cox (WRDJ general
manager and farm director) says the station is now broadcasting news, talk and ag
programming. The station also plans to join the Alabama Radio Network and will soon
change its call letters.


Chief, Radio & TV Division









Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)720-4330
Letter No. 2542 Jan. 24, 1992

GATT AGREEMENT -- GATT Director-General Arthur Dunkel's proposed compromise
agreement provides a framework for finalizing the GATT Uruguay Round, says U.S.
Ambassador Rufus H. Yerxa. The U.S. believes further changes to the draft are not needed
unless they will strengthen the disciplines or lead to greater market liberalization, according to
Yerxa. What if the GATT talks fail? If no agreement is reached by June 30, the 1990 Farm
Act requires the secretary of agriculture to increase the EEP by $1 million. Under this law,
marketing loans for wheat and feed grains also would be triggered. Contact: Roger
Runningen (202) 720-4623.


SWINE EXPORTS TO MEXICO -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan says swine
from the U.S. destined for slaughter or breeding purposes can once again be exported to
Mexico. Mexico had temporarily banned live hog imports since Dec. 15. "The removal of the
temporary ban will allow pork producers and others to resume extensive agricultural trading
with Mexico, one of our largest trading partners," Madigan said. In 1991, U.S. farmers
exported more than 195,000 swine to Mexico. Contact: Isabelle Ferrera (301) 436-7255.


GREAT PLAINS WIND EROSION DOWN -- Wind erosion was down significantly on Great
Plains cropland and rangeland during November and December, compared to the same
period a year earlier, says William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service.
Richards says the agency's survey of wind erosion for the past season shows about 1.59
million acres of Great Plains cropland and rangeland were damaged -- some 250,000 acres
less than in 1990. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 720-5776.


MODEL FARM IN RUSSIA -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has sent a team of
American farm experts to Russia to explore opportunities for developing a model farm near
St. Petersburg. "American farmers lead the world in efficient food and fiber production,"
Madigan said. "If achieved, this demonstration farm could demonstrate our farming expertise
to Russian farmers. If we are successful, this effort can be of great value to the Russian
people as they progress toward a market-based economy. Contact: Roger Runningen
(202) 720-4623.


THE MORE THAN 20 MILLION men and women who provide the food and fiber Americans
use every day will be honored March 20 during National Agriculture Day and March 19 on
National Women in Agriculture Day. National Agricultural Week will be March 15 21. Both
producers and consumers have a responsibility to help the public understand the challenges
the ag industry faces in continuing to meet and fulfill our food and fiber needs. Contact:
Margaret Speich (202) 682-9200.








READ MEAT AND POULTRY SUPPLIES HIGH -- Red meat and poultry supplies are
expected to be at an all time high in 1992 due to continued expansion in pork and poultry.
Livestock and poultry prices will be damped by the large supplies and the continuing
recession. However, the economy is expected to begin recovering in the next few months
and supply increases will taper off, especially in the second half of 1992. Contact: Leland
Southard (202) 219-0767.


FOOD COSTS -- The farmer's share of farm to retail 1990 market basket food prices paid by
consumers averaged 30 percent, unchanged in the last four years. However, how much of
the consumer's grocery dollar winds up in the farmer's pocket is dictated by the commodity
or product produced. Contact: Denis F. Dunham (202) 219-0870.


NEW ANIMAL INSPECTION CENTER -- USDA has added Santa Teresa, N.M., to the list of
approved U.S.-Mexican border ports for the entry of cattle and other ruminants from Mexico.
The Santa Teresa facility will replace the nearest border port entry station, which is now
located ten miles away at El Paso, Texas, says Lonnie King, deputy administrator for
veterinary services with USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Contact: Alan
Zagier (301) 436-7799.


POTATO STOCKS UP -- Potato stocks on Jan. 1 were 211 million hundred-weight, up 8
percent from last year and 22 percent higher than two years ago. USDA surveys producers
in the 15 major potato-producing states: California, Colorado, Idaho, Maine, Michigan,
Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania,
Washington and Wisconsin. The potato types are: 79 percent russet potatoes, 18 percent
white and 3 percent red. Contact: Arvin Budge (202) 720-4285.


USDA TO AID TREE FARMERS -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has
implemented a program to help tree growers whose trees were lost due to disasters. Under
the Tree Assistance Program, USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation will reimburse eligible
small- and medium-scale commercial tree growers for a portion of losses caused by natural
disasters occurring in 1990 and 1991. "By implementing the Tree Assistance Program we will
provide much needed relief to growers in those parts of the country who have suffered
severe losses to orchards and tree stands because of drought, freeze or earthquake,"
Madigan said. Contact: Robert Feist (202) 720-6789.


PLEASE SEND OR FAX CHANGES in your address or personnel to us as soon as possible.
Our goal is to keep our mailing lists current for the Farm Broadcasters Letter and our other
services. Mail or FAX (202) 690-2165 your changes to Mocile Trotter, USDA Broadcasting,
Rm. 410-A, Washington, D.C. 20250.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1807 -- Cutting fat intake, looking for sugar substitutes and more are
covered on this week's edition of Agriculture USA, as Maria Bynum and several experts
look at future foods and fads. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1289 -- Hunting for firewood; future foods; a winter weather forecast;
telephone scams; eat those plates and forks. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS AND FEATURES #1798 -- USDA News Highlights; 1992 common
program provisions; a trade update; future for canola; the El Nino strikes.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1504 -- High vitamin A tomatoes; Galapagos tomatoes; pasta
versus weeds; sugar, copper and hearth disease; high-amylose foods. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., Jan. 29, stories from the USDA News
Briefing on the Fiscal Year 1993 budget; Thurs., Jan. 30, world tobacco situation; Fri., Jan.
31, world poultry situation, ag prices, cattle on feed; Mon., Feb. 3, catfish production,
horticultural exports; Tues., Feb. 4, crop/weather update; Fri., Feb. 7, cattle numbers.
(These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on conservation compliance; Will Pemble takes a look at
enzymes for insect control.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; USDA
economist Steve MacDonald on ag trade; FmHA administrator LaVerne Ausman on FmHA
emergency loans; USDA World Board chairman James Donald on U.S. cotton; USDA soil
scientist Jeri Berc on wind erosion.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on holly varieties; Pat O'Leary takes a
look at lawn landscaping; Lynn Wyvill reports on the National Arboretum's Bonsai Collection.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE I II 11 11 IIII 1 III1III
3 1262 08134 471 4
FARMERS...from all over the midwest attended the Illinois Specialty Growers
Association conference, Jan. 12-14 in St. Charles, Ill., says Maria Behrends (WKAN,
Kankakee). The conference had 125 booths and 80 educational sessions, which
provided information about new ways to earn money on the farm. Maria, who
broadcast her noon farm show live from the site, says an increased number of
commodity crop growers attended the conference. At the Corn Growers convention,
Feb. 23-26 in Orlando, Fla., Maria will serve as M.C. with Ken Root (National
Agrichemical Retailers Association, Washington, D.C.).

MAJOR STORY...affecting farmers in the Peoria, Ill., area is a large grain elevator
surrendering its license to operate, says Colleen Callahan (WMBD-TV, Peoria). She
says her interviews with the new manager revealed the firm overbuilt its storage
capacity just when crops were getting smaller due to drought and other factors. Many
patrons will get 85 to 100 percent of the first $100,000 from the state grain insurance
fund.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington. D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS UJ
Penalty for Private Use $300











EXPORT MARKET DEVELOPMENTS...are important news items to farmers watching
the reports of Wade Wagner (KGAN-TV, Cedar Rapids, Iowa). He says they're
especially interested in export credits to the Commonwealth of Independent States and
opening Japan's markets. Wade plans to host a farm tour to Austria this fall.

NEW FEATURE...that has generated viewer response is the Farm Dog of the Week,
says Brian Baxter (Morning Ag Report, Indianapolis, Ind.). He says the pictures and
stories sent in are fun and show that dogs can be an important part of the farm family.
Brian says equipment sales indicate no-till is being used by more farmers. Many
dealers report back orders for drills.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




AXr.sr t aSLr3


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2543 Jan. 31, 1992


DAIRY OUTLOOK UNCHANGED FROM LAST YEAR -- Milk production and prices in 1992
will probably be unchanged from 1991, USDA economists say. The 148.5 billion pounds of
milk produced in 1991 was also about equal with 1990. Some dairy producers are leaving
because of low returns; others are expanding cautiously. Their debt loads are down and
interest rates are lower. Commercial milk use 2 to 3 percent in 1992. Retail
dairy prices fell about 1 percent in 1991, th r ret' in nearly 30 years. Contact:
Jim Miller (202) 219-0770. -


INTERNATIONAL POULTRY TRENDS |otal'joultry meat r duction in the world shows
an increase of 4.1 percent from 1991 ov 90, and similar gr wth is anticipated in 1992,
USDA analysts say. During 1992, Mexic expected to j se poultry meat production
about 18 percent; poultry meat production t fpfet Union is declining; Thai broiler
meat output is projected to increase about 10 apan's poultry meat production
continues to decline; and world egg production is expected to grow about 2.5 percent again.
Contact: Norman R. Kallemeyn (202) 720-8031.


DISTINGUISHED SCIENTIST -- USDA's Agricultural Research Service will honor John R.
Gorham, a USDA veterinarian in Pullman, Wash., as it's "Distinguished Scientist of the Year."
Gorham advanced the basic understanding of many viral and genetic diseases of animals
and humans, says ARS administrator R. Dean Plowman. Gorham's innovative research has
helped fight important diseases that weaken or kill cattle, sheep, goats, horses, swine and
mink. Gorham has been a USDA researcher since 1946 and has been research leader at the
ARS Animal Disease Research Unit in Pullman since 1948. He will receive a $7,000 cash
award, a plaque and $40,000 in additional funds for his research. Contact: John R.
Gorham (509) 335-6029.


MARKET POTENTIAL FOR FLORIDA LIMES -- Tahiti limes -- a Florida product -- have
been found to be free of the Caribbean fruit fly in USDA and University of Florida tests,
expanding domestic and export market potential for this juicy, seedless Florida fruit. "Right
now this variety of limes can't be exported to Japan because it was reputed to be naturally
infested with the Caribbean fruit fly," says Michael K. Hennessey, a USDA entomologist in
Miami. California and some other states also have banned Tahiti limes because of the fly.
Contact: Michael K. Hennessey (305) 254-3627.







CATFISH PROCESSING UP -- Farm-raised catfish processed during December totaled 30.2
million pounds, up 18 percent from a year ago. Net pounds of processed fish sold during
December totaled 15.3 million pounds, an increase of 24 percent from the same month last
year. Sales of whole fish represented 33 percent of the total and fillets accounted for 47
percent. Contact: Ron Sitzman (202) 720-3244.


IMPACT STATEMENT AVAILABLE -- USDA's Forest Service has released its final
environmental impact statement on five alternative plans for managing the habitat of the
northern spotted owl on national forests in Washington, Oregon and California. Copies of the
full statement and a summary are available from USDA. Contact: Jim Sanders (202) 205-
1772.


MORE BROILER EGGS SET -- During the week ending Jan. 11, commercial hatcheries set
142 million eggs -- 5 percent more than the 134 million eggs set a year ago. USDA surveys
commercial hatcheries in 15 states -- Alabama, Arizona, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,
Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia,
California, Tennessee and West Virginia. Contact: Tom Kruchten (202) 690-4870.


ORGANIC BOARD NAMED -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has announced 14
appointments to the initial National Organic Standards Board, a group recently established to
help develop standards for production and processing of ag products to be marketed as
"organic." The board, which will be made up of four farmer/growers, two
handlers/processors, one retailer, one scientist, three consumer/public interest advocates
and three environmentalists, is being formed in compliance with the Organic Food Production
Act of 1990 and under the 1990 Farm Bill. Contact: Rebecca Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.


AFLATOXIN TESTING -- Beginning Feb. 21, USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service will
require all corn exported from the United States be tested for aflatoxin before shipment,
unless the purchasing contract stipulates that testing isn't needed. At the same time, USDA
will begin providing aflatoxin testing services for all grain, including corn. These actions are
needed to implement 1990 Farm Bill requirements, says FSIS administrator John C. Foltz.
Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.


LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER -- Commercial red meat production for the U.S. during December
was 3.28 billion pounds, which is 7 percent above last year. Beef production was 1.78 billion
pounds, up 6 percent from a year earlier. Veal production was 27 million pounds,
unchanged from last year; pork production was 1.44 billion pounds -- up 8 percent; lamb and
mutton production was 31 million pounds -- up 4 percent from a year earlier. Contact:
Linda Simpson (202) 720-3578.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1808 -- The focus on cleaning up the nation's water supply has
switched over the years from clean surface water to groundwater. On this edition of
Agriculture USA, Gary Crawford explores efforts over the past decades, as well as current
and future efforts, to clean up the nation's water supply. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1290 -- Finances and divorce; California's white fly problem; the
infamous automatic debit scam; canola's future; food irradiation update. (Weekly reel of 2-
1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1799 -- USDA News Highlights; wheat storage payments
stop; costs and returns survey; livestock and poultry prices; a rural health care swap.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1505 -- Lowering feed costs; bacterial boon for blueberries; new
pepper is "hot stuff;" "Carbo loading;" virus factories. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., Feb. 11, weekly weather and crop
update, U.S. crop production, world ag supply and demand; Wed., Feb. 12, world ag/grain
situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Thurs., Feb. 13, ag resources
(inputs); Fri., Feb. 14, milk production. (These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill takes a look at the Arboretum bonsai collection; Gary Beaumont
reports on a new recycling effort.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; USDA
budget director Stephen Dewhurst on USDA 1993 budget plans; USDA economist Jim
Miller on the dairy outlook; USDA economist Leland Southard on livestock and poultry.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on new swine health survey; Pat
O'Leary takes a look at lawn landscaping.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.






4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 476 3

LOOKING TOWARD SPRING...is what John Weir (KBUR, Burlington, Iowa) hears from
farmers in his region. He says producers tell him they plan to plant more corn this year.
John says he's also heard farmers express long-range concern about farmers of the Ukraine
region in the former Soviet Union using modern technology to increase production and the
region once again becoming "the breadbasket of the world."

CORN GROWERS...in DeKalb County, Ill., have published a list of gas stations in their
county that offer ethanol, says Robert Brown (WLBK/WDZK, DeKalb, III.).

TIME TO CUT BACK...says Charlie Rankin (KURV, Edinburg, Texas). Entering his 38th
year of broadcasting, Charlie has reduced his schedule by limiting himself to one early
morning daily agricultural weather program. He says it reduces the shock of total withdrawal.
All other ag programming is being produced by Jim Hearn.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











CONGRATULATIONS...to Rick Haines (Northern Ag Network, Billings, Mont.) for winning
the top radio award in the 31st annual Oscars in Agriculture, administered by the University
of Illinois. Rick's Oscar recognized his five-part series "The West Cries Wolf, Does Anyone
Listen?" ...to Curt Lancaster (VSA, San Angelo, Texas) who won two NAFB Silver Star
awards for creative programming. Curt won in the 30-second radio under $1,500 -
Agronomy, and in Services categories. Curt says he used interesting music and punchy
delivery in the spots. Next year he plans to work closely with clients for opportunities to
increase radio production. ...to Bob Ziegler (WIMA/WIMT, Lima, Ohio) for winning a Silver
Star award in the 60-second radio under $1,500 Other category. The awards were
presented at the NAFB conference. ...to former Secretary of Agriculture John Block
(National-American Wholesale Grocers' Association, Falls Church, Va.), one of ten people
who received the 1992 Horatio Alger award at its 44th annual January presentation. The
Horatio Alger Association says the award encourages people to realize that the free
enterprise system offers opportunity to all.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330
Letter No. 2544 Feb. 7, 1992


GROWTH AGENDA TO HELP FARMERS -- President George Bush's growth agenda will
benefit American farmers, says Roger Runningen, press secretary to Secretary of
Agriculture Edward Madigan. A number of the proposals will raise farmers' after-tax income.
Strengthening the economy boosts the demand for farm products, Runningen says. Farm
gross receipts the first year will likely rise by $600 million, raising net farm income by half that
amount, he says. And, he says, tax changes in Bush's proposals will leave more money in
people's pockets. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.

EGG PRODUCTION UP -- December egg production was up 2 percent from a year earlier,
USDA statisticians report. U.S. hens produced 6.01 billion eggs during December. This
figure included 5.18 billion table eggs, 762 million broiler-type hatching eggs and 62 million
egg-type hatching eggs. During December, producers had 279 million layi ses, also up 2
percent from a year ago. Production per 100 layers was down slightly arier;
each 100 hens produced 2,153 eggs in 1991, compared with 2,156 i ember
Contact: Robert E. Little (202) 720-6147.


BUDGET BOOK AVAILABLE -- USDA's "1993 Budget Summary' s available to m
of the media. USDA's overall 1993 budget proposal calls for a pro level of $82. n,
a decrease of $1.2 billion from the 1992 current estimate of $83.8 bili .
emphasis for the 1992 budget include: new uses for ag commodities, bi on
education, food safety, America the Beautiful program, water quality national research
initiative and global change. Contact: Stephen Dewhurst (202) 720-3323. For a copy of
the "1993 Budget Summary," Contact: Marci Hilt (202) 720-6445. Sections of the
summary are available on Ag NewsFAX. Use your FAX phone to call (202) 690-3944 and
select category 2, Fact Sheets and then 1, to receive a list of what's available.


EXPORT DIRECTORY AVAILABLE -- USDA's National Agricultural Library now has copies
of a reference directory containing the addresses and telephone numbers of key contacts in
ag exporting and lists of selected exporting databases and publications. The publication,
"Directory of Export and Trade Assistance," is intended to help U.S. businesses involved in
exporting ag products. It is available free by sending a self-addressed mailing label to:
Agricultural Trade and Marketing Information Center, National Ag Library, Room 304, 10301
Baltimore Blvd., Beltsville, Md. 20705-2351. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.










DONATION HOTLINE -- The U.S. has established an Emergency Donation Hotline to help in
donation or sales of commodities or services to the newly independent states of the former
Soviet Union. The number is (703) 276-1914. The hotline is staffed from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Eastern time, Monday through Friday; taped messages can be left at other hours. Contact:
Sally Klusaritz (202) 720-3448.


FIELD TESTING PLANTS -- During November and December, USDA issued six permits to
commercial companies to field-test crop plants that were genetically engineered. USDA has
been issuing permits since 1987 for controlled field trials of certain genetically-engineered
crops. The permits covered tobacco plants in North Carolina; potato plants in Wisconsin;
tomato plants in Florida and California; corn in Illinois; and apple trees in California. Contact:
Amichai Heppner (301) 436-5222.


MEXICAN PORK -- USDA is proposing to permit fresh, chilled or frozen pork and pork
products from Sonora, Mexico, to move through the United States for export to other
countries. Shipping certain swine and pork from Mexico through the United States has been
banned because Mexico has hog cholera, but recently Mexican animal health officials have
recognized the state of Sonora as free of hog cholera, says Lonnie J. King, deputy
administrator of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The pork in transit
from Sonora must meet rigorous shipping and handling requirements. Contact: Alan
Zagier (301) 436-7255.


MOTH FAMILY PLANNING -- Female corn earworms assure their offspring will return each
growing season by delaying sex until the crops have produced the plant parts their offspring
will need to thrive. The moths do this, according to USDA scientist Ashok K. Raina, by
withholding their seductive pheromone, which males of the same species home in on to
locate a ready and willing mate. Thus, mating is timed to the pest's preference for eating
corn silks and kernels or tomatoes and cotton bolls, instead of the less-desirable plant
leaves. Contact: Autar K. Mattoo (301) 504-5103.


TAX DEDUCTIBLE ANIMALS? Farmers may be able to depreciate some of the livestock on
their farms. Livestock acquired for work, breeding or dairy purposes that aren't part of an
inventory account may be depreciated. For more details on livestock depreciation, see the
free IRS Publication 225, Farmer's Tax Guide. You can order it by calling 1-800-TAX-FORM.
Contact: Darlyn Robinson-Boyd (202) 535-6576.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1809 -- President George Bush recently released both his fiscal year
1993 budget proposal for USDA and his economic growth package. Both could have
impacts on the farming community. Brenda Curtis has a report. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1291 -- A Groundhog Day post-game show; USDA's school lunch; the
federal budget and consumer programs; high-tech foods; a safer chicken? (Weekly reel of 2-
1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1800 -- USDA News Highlights; USDA's proposed fiscal
year 1993 budget proposal, farmers and the economic growth package; poultry export
prospects; farm numbers still falling. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1506 -- Studying sterols; kinder, gentler pesticides; understanding
oysters; low-input legumes; breeding hairy alfalfa. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., Feb. 12, world ag/grain situation, world
oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Thurs., Feb. 13, ag resources outlook (inputs); Fri.,
Feb. 14, milk production; Mon., Feb. 17, Holiday; Tues., Feb. 18, farm labor, wheat update;
Wed., Feb. 19, crop/weather update, ag income/finance outlook; Thurs., Feb. 20, U.S. ag
outlook. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the
lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the farm costs and returns survey; Will Pemble
reports on irradiating grapefruit; Mike Thomas reports on gene mapping for corn and Dave
Luciani reports on potato plants that battle their enemies.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on latest weather and crop
conditions and novelist Dori Sanders on Black History Month.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on new varieties of hollies; Pat O'Leary
reports on lawn landscaping; Lynn Wyvill reports on teaching children about food safety and
nutrition.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.





OFFMIKE

EARLY WINTER...presented farmers the biggest opportunity yet to practice conservation
tillage, says Robert Quinn (WHO, Des Moines, Iowa). Early arrival of winter last October
prevented many farmers from tilling their fields and state extension service and producer
organizations are urging farmers to reduce tillage this spring. More producers plan to
increase corn acreage in response to the low set-aside.

NO TILL...is attracting the attention of more farmers, says Rita Frazer (WSMI, Litchfield, III.).
Farmers in Montgomery County recently formed a Soil Savers Committee and 100 producers
attended the first meeting. Rita says the majority of farmers in her area practice minimum
tillage. February is Farmers Appreciation Month at the station. Rita is producing special
programs for the month-long promotion.

SUGAR BEETS...are spoiling on the ground, says Lyle Romine (American Ag Network,
Fargo, N.D.), and crops have lost their snow cover. Lyle says that up north everybody likes
a warm winter except farmers. Wheat producers with product to sell are grinning ear-to-ear.
He says they like the positive markets and plan to increase acreage this spring.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Farm Broadcasters Letter 11llll

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











WHEAT PRODUCERS...in the northern sections of Indiana are concerned about the
condition of their crop, says Jim Riggs (WILO/WSHW, Frankfort, Ind.). Warm conditions
late last year and recent cold snaps appear to have caused damage. Jim says a major
expansion in local production of hogs has producers keeping a close eye on prices. They
are telling him that small-sized operations and corporate producers will likely be the survivors
of any long-term drop in prices.

COTTON ACREAGE...in North Carolina has doubled each year during the past three years,
says Johnnie Hood (WPTF/Southern Farm Network, Raleigh, N.C.). Good prices and
eradication of the boll weevil set the stage for increases. He expects cotton acreage in the
state to top 600,000 this year. Johnnie says growing tobacco plant beds in greenhouses has
been a revolution in tobacco production. This year 50 percent of the planted crop is
expected to co e from greenhouses. He says it helps producers to cut labor costs.


ICC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Le



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio- TV Division


f720-4330


Letter No. 2545 D eb. 14,1992


NEW FOOD SAFETY OFFICIALS Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has named
H. Russell Cross administrator of USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service and Donald
L. White associate administrator of the agency. Cross was head of the Department of
Animal Science at Texas A&M University. He has also served 12 years with USDA's
Agricultural Marketing Service and Agricultural Research Service. White was a regional
director for the agency in Philadelphia. He has served in various agency positions. Contact:
Sharin Sachs (202) 720-9113.


NEW FOOD SAFETY GOALS H. Russell Cross, the new administrator of USDA's Food
Safety and Inspection Service, says he will make the agency one that has strong credibility
with the public, consumer groups, Congress and the industry. To do this, Cross says he will,
within the next 90 days, address the need for the agency to better define and articulate its
mission; review the more than 50 recommendations for a management evaluation report; will
assess the need to adopt National Academy of Sciences recommendations; and meet with
members of Congress, consumer groups, industry organizations, agency regional directors,
supervisors, employees and employee groups to listen to their concerns and
recommendations. Contact: Sharin Sachs (202) 720-9113.


LIVESTOCK "JOHNNY APPLESEEDS" Cattle, sheep and goats can take on the role of
Johnny Appleseed, spreading seed on western range where farm machinery can't go, says
USDA scientist Jerry R. Barrow. In New Mexico, steers were fed gelatin capsules which
contained seeds of the plants USDA scientists wanted to establish on remote and poor
quality rangeland. "Just like the kind of gelatin capsules we swallow, these also dissolve in
the stomach," Barrow says. "In our case, medicine is released, but in the steers, seeds were
released. The seeds were excreted with manure on the land two to three days later."
Contact: Jerry R. Barrow (510) 559-6068.


FBL ON FAX -- The Farm Broadcasters Letter is now available by facsimile machine. Each
Thursday by 2 p.m., Eastern time, the FBL will be on USDA's Ag NewsFAX. The four-digit
number needed to retrieve the FBL will always be the same: 9200. To receive the Farm
Broadcasters Letter from Ag NewsFAX, use the telephone connected to your FAX machine
to call (202) 690-3944. Then, press 1 4 9200 # 3 on the telephone and the start button your
FAX machine. If you encounter a problem, call Diane O'Connor (202) 720-2168.


i'la D.C. 20'







CATFISH SALES DOWN Catfish growers in the 16 states USDA surveys had sales of
$285 million during 1991, which were down 13 percent from the 1990 total sales of $329
million. The total number of operations on Jan. 1, was 1,886, down 3 percent from the July 1
total of 1,943. The 16 states surveyed are: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia,
Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South
Carolina, Tennessee and Texas. Contact: Robert E. Little (202) 720-6147.


SHEEP AND LAMB INVENTORY The sheep and lamb inventory in the United States was
10.9 million head on Jan. 1, down 3 percent from a year ago. The value of sheep and lambs
on hand was $666 million, down 9 percent from last year. The average value per head was
$61.40, down 6 percent from last year. Contact: Unda Simpson (202) 720-3578.


USDA FUNDS 35 WATER QUALITY PROJECTS USDA will provide $9.1 million for 35
Agricultural Conservation Program special water quality projects in 27 states. USDA will
provide cost-share help for remedial actions to improve water quality, solve problems caused
by ag non-point source pollution of ground and surface water and to support individual state
efforts. Such pollution stems from animal waste, fertilizers, pesticides and sediment. USDA
will work closely with state and local agencies, the U.S. Geological Survey and the
Environmental Protection Agency on all the projects. Contact: Robert Foist (202) 720-
6789.


FARM EQUIPMENT CLINIC The Farm Equipment Manufacturers Association will hold its
spring Management Clinic and Supplier Showcase April 25-29 in San Diego, Calif., at the
Hyatt Islandia Hotel. Contact: Farm Equipment Manufacturers Assn. (314) 991-0702.


USDA APPROVES 27 AREAS USDA has established 27 new Resource Conservation and
Development Areas in 23 states and the Pacific Basin, says Bill Richards, chief of USDA's
Soil Conservation Service. Richards says the action qualifies the new areas to receive federal
technical and financial assistance for land conservation, water management, community
development and other environmental concerns. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 720-5776.


FIREPLACE NOT GOOD HEAT The fireplace isn't a good way to heat your home; but for
aesthetic purposes, it's hard to beat. There's a tremendous heat loss through your fireplace;
so remember two important things -- make sure the damper is open only when you're using
the-fireplace and if possible use a glass insert to prevent heat from escaping up the chimney.
Contact: Lee Grant (301) 405-1198.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1810 Why does irradiated food have an image problem? On this
edition of Agriculture USA, Doug Wakefield looks at the food processing technique and the
controversy that surrounds it. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1292 -- "Slow" vs. "Fast" food; gold crazy; they love our pet food;
teenage jobs; repairing your credit rating. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1801 USDA News Highlights; water quality projects;
farm safety; food processing method increases shelf life; new grain varieties. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1507 Two-punch fungus; tattletale fungus; lean Piedmontese
cattle; what's the beef; African cattle evaluated. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE Fri., Feb. 21, cattle on feed; livestock update;
Mon., Feb. 24, catfish report, poultry production, U.S. ag trade update; Tues., Feb. 25,
cotton and wool outlook, weekly weather and crop update; Thurs., Feb. 27, export outlook,
world tobacco situation; Fri., Feb. 28, ag prices. (These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in
this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the swine health survey and Michigan State
University's Dave Luciani reports on saving Christmas poinsettias to bloom again next year.

ACTUALITIES Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan names new administrator and
associate administrator of USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA chief
meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop conditions, World Board
chairman James Donald on the supply/demand situation and USDA economist Ron
Gustafson on cattle.

UPCOMING FEATURES DeBoria Janifer reports on new varieties of hollies; Pat O'Leary
reports on lawn landscaping; Lynn Wyvill reports on teaching children about food safety and
nutrition.

EVERY OTHER WEEK Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.




OFFMIKE


EXPORTS...are becoming increasingly important to North Carolina farmers, says Ken
Tanner (WRAL/Tobacco Radio Network, Raleigh, N.C.). Previously, nearly half of all crops
from the state were exported, but in 1991 exports accounted for 60 percent. Ken recently
broadcast year-end figures of ag production for North Carolina that revealed four crops
brought in $1.5 billion to farmers. The leader was flue cured tobacco at $1.07 billion.
Soybeans, cotton and peanuts were the other crops that helped most Tar Heel farmers have
a good year in 1991.

FIRST ANNUAL FARM SHOW...was such a success another is being planned for next year,
says Larry Burchfield (KWCK, Searcy, Ark.). The station sponsored Ag Expo '92 in mid-
January at the White County fairgrounds. Busloads of FFA members attended. Larry
broadcast his programs live at the event. The station plans to expand exhibitor participation
next year, and move the dates from mid-week to a Friday-Saturday schedule. Larry is a
member of a two-year Cooperative Extension Service leadership program that is studying ag
in Arkansas. The 35-member class will be in Washington, D.C., later this month for talks with
federal officials.

Farm Broadcasters Letter UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
-i I | 11111 111111 1 II1
Office of Public Affairs 3 1262 08134 486 2
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












15th ANNUAL...KRES Farm Show was held in mid-January. Jim Coyle (KRES, Moberly,
Mo.) reports good attendance and 85 exhibitors. Congratulations to Jim: Last month at the
University of Missouri-Columbia annual Ag Science Week he received from the Missouri
Soybean Association its first communications award, citing him for his dedicated effort to
inform farmers and others about the betterment of the soybean industry. And at the U-
Missouri Ag Alumni meeting, Jim was recognized as an Honory Member of the organization.

CHANGES...Sue Morrison (WRFW, River Falls, Wisc.) is the new farm director replacing
Sally Smith Kaehn who is now at the Univ. of Wisconsin ag department.

OPENING...for associate farm director at Texas Agri-Business Network, Dallas. Bob
Cockrum is looking for an individual with a minimum of two years broadcast experience and
a journalism degree. Call him (214) 688-1133, extension 323.

Chief, Radio & TV Division
Chief, Radio & TV Division









Farm Broadcasters Letter 'P 199



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250
Letter No. 2546 Feb. 21, 1992

AGRICULTURE CONTINUES FINANCIAL RECOVERY -- For the majority of U.S. farms and
ranches, 1987 through 1990 can be characterized as a sustained recovery from the hard
times of several years ago, says USDA economist Mitchell Morehart. "In 1989 and
1990, farm income reached record highs -- 1989 was a particularly successful year,"
Morehart says. The proportion of all farms having positive net farm income was 62.4
percent in 1989, and 61.5 percent a year later. Contact: Mitchell Morehart (202) 219-
0801.


HEALTH CARE HELPS FARMERS -- Farm families would get broader health insurance
coverage at less cost under President George Bush's health care plan announced Feb. 6.
Self-employed farmers who have no employer-sponsored health insurance and who buy
their own health insurance can currently deduct 25 percent of their health insurance
costs from their reported income. A farm family with $35,000 in net farm income,
paying $6,000 a year for health insurance, currently saves $420 in taxes. Under Bush's
plan, they can deduct all of the $6,000 and save $4,680 in taxes. Contact: Roger
Runningen (202) 720-4623.


KEEP GOOD RECORDS FOR TAXES -- Good records can help farmers save money at tax
time. Just think of keeping your bills and receipts as a part of running your farm. When
you get ready to file your tax return, good records will make that job a lot easier. If the
IRS asks you about anything on your tax return, not having the right receipt can cost you
money. Contact: Darlyn Robinson-Boyd (202) 535-6576.


WATER QUALITY INCENTIVE PROJECTS -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan
says USDA will provide $6.75 million authorized by the 1990 farm bill to fund payments
to producers implementing Water Quality Incentive Practices under USDA's Agricultural
Conservation Program. "This is a new approach to enhance the nation's water quality,"
Madigan said. The projects provide both technical and financial assistance for producers
to change to management systems that reduce non-point source ag pollutants. Contact:
Bruce-Merkle (202) 720-8206.


RUST-NO-MORE BEANS -- Rustproof beans for tomorrow's dinner table are sprouting
faster because of a USDA research program.. "So far we've come up with 53 lines of
beans that ward off all 55 identified races, or strains, of the fungus that causes bean
rust," says J. Rennie Stavely with USDA's Agricultural Research Service. Wild beans.
collected by USDA scientists in Latin America are major sources of rust resistance. In a
bad year, rust can cost $250 million in losses nationwide. Contact: J. Rennie Stavely
(301) 504-6600.








FERTILIZER USE AND PRICES UP -- Fertilizer use in 1991-92 is expected to increase 2
percent and prices to rise 3 to 4 percent above last spring, USDA economists say.
Application rates on corn, soybeans and wheat are expected to remain near those of
1990-91. The planted area of corn and wheat, the major fertilizer-using crops, is
projected to increase, while planted area for cotton and soybeans is expected to decline
slightly. Contact: Stan Daberkow (202) 219-0456.


COLON CELLS -- Without ever touching a person, researchers can now get 20 million
living colon cells from that person's body to study the effects of various low- and high-
fat diets. USDA scientist Padmanabhan Nair says the new procedure, which he helped
develop, separates human colon cells intact and alive from stool samples using ordinary
lab equipment. "Our procedure can be done again and again," says Nair. "This will allow
nutrition researchers to follow over time the effects of certain diets on colon tissue and
possibly other body tissues." Contact: Padmanabhan P. Nair (301) 504-8145.


CHILE: RISING EXPORT STAR -- Chile's ag exports jumped from less than $400 million
to 1980 to $1.3 billion in 1990. Many factors have contributed to this export boom,
including a climate favoring cultivation of fruit and vegetables during a growing season
complementary to that of the Northern Hemisphere, economic policies that encourage
production and innovative marketing techniques. Contact: John B. Parker (202) 219-
0680.


MILK PRODUCTION UNCHANGED -- Milk production in the 21 major milk-producing
states during January totaled 10.7 billion pounds, virtually unchanged from production in
these same states a year earlier. The December revised production was 10.4 billion
pounds, which was slightly below December of 1990. Production per cow averaged
1,283 pounds for January, 32 more than a year earlier; the number of cows on farms
was 8.31 million head, 205 thousand less than a year earlier. Contact: Daniel Buckner
(202) 720-4448.


FBL ON FAX -- The Farm Broadcasters Letter is now available by facsimile machine.
Each Thursday by 2 p.m., Eastern time, the FBL will be on USDA's Ag NewsFAX. The
four-digit number needed to retrieve the FBL will always be the same: 9200. To receive
the Farm Broadcasters Letter from Ag NewsFAX, use the telephone connected to your
FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. Then, press 1 4 9200 # 3 on the telephone and
the start button your FAX machine. If you encounter a problem, call Diane O'Connor
(202) 720-2168.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1811 -- Farm families from Idaho, Iowa and New Hampshire
receive the Good Earth Council Awards for leadership on soil conservation techniques.
On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis talks with these farm families about
their award-winning methods. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1293 -- A break for breakfast; saving endangered species; water
quality "watchfish;" teenage spending power; the school lunch menus. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1802 -- USDA News Highlights; capital gains taxes and
farmers; EBDC update; high-tech pesticide on the way; the Good Earth Council Awards.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1508 -- Avoiding salmonella; the war on salmonella; mice and
salmonella; dengue and the developing world; disease simulation. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., March 2, horticultural exports; Tues.,
March 3, weekly weather and crop update; Thurs., March 5, dairy products report; Tues.,
March 10, weekly weather and crop update. (These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in
this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on national forest camping; Will Pemble reports on
sterilizing Medflies; John Snyder takes a look at the comeback of cotton.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; USDA
economist Ed Allen on wheat crop.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill takes a look at teaching children about food safety;
Pat O'Leary reports on lawn landscaping; DeBoria Janifer takes a look at new holly
varieties.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and
Monday from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKEII
3 1262 08134 491 2
FARM BROADCASTERS...are versatile. John Wagner (U-Maryland extension service,
College Park) will fill in to broadcast play-by-play of Maryland basketball while ABC radio's
Johnny Holliday covers the Winter Olympics. It's a busman's holiday for Wagner. For 20
consecutive years he has broadcast basketball play-by-play for Navy and for George
Washington University games. John was on USDA's radio-TV staff in the late '50s and
early '60s.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Max Armstrong (WGN/Tribune Radio Network, Chicago, II,). The
Illinois Pork Producers association presented to him its Communicator of the Year award ...
and to Jeff Stewart (Ag Radio Network, Utica, N.Y.). Agri Marketing magazine has selected
him as one of 12 agribusiness leaders to serve on the publication's 1992 editorial advisory
board. Jeff is the only broadcaster on the board.

REDUCED SCHEDULE...for Louis Rosandick (WFHR, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis.). Program
director Greg Gack says Louis is producing feature reports three times a week and special
projects as they arise, instead of daily broadcasts.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












I NEVER THOUGHT I'D SEE THIS...says Robert Brown (WLBK/WDEK, DeKalb, III.). A 267-
unit housing development is being built across the road from his farm. Bob bought the farm,
which is located 65 miles from Chicago, in 1952 when good land was priced at $175 to
$250 an acre, the area had a few gravel roads and there was open land as far as one could
see. Bob says developers recently offered him an astronomical sum, but he's not interested
in selling. "It's good, rich farmland," Bob says, "I'll let my kids inherit it."

SALES...of farm machinery and inputs are lethargic, says Jack Crowner (Farm Service
Network, Louisville, Ky.), but big crowds exceeding a quarter-million people attended the
National Farm Machinery Show last week in Louisville. Jack covered the event for his radio
network. After 35 years, he completed his final ag TV broadcast. At least for now. Jack
says he's in estigating opportunities to get his program back on the air.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




/l ,3 "':?5



Farm Broadcasters Letter APR



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio- TV Division Washington D.C. 202 -431
Letter No. 2547 Feb. 28, 1992

WHEAT ACREAGE UP -- Expect sharply higher spring wheat acreage this year, USDA
economists say. Spring wheat growers will see much stronger prices at planting time than
when the winter crop was seeded last fall. Winter wheat seedings were down 1.6 percent
last fall, even though the required ARP cutback in base acreage had been reduced from 15
percent to 5 percent. Contact: Ed Allen (202) 219-0840.


RURAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCILS will be established in 34 additional states and in
Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands this year, Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan
says. "We have been testing this concept in eight pilot states for nearly two years and the
success has been tremendous," Madigan says. The councils bring federal, state and local
government bodies together -- along with local business, education, health-care and labor
representatives -- and they work together to promote economic development in rural
communities. Contact: Thom Rubel (202) 720-4581.


MONTHLY SUGAR ESTIMATES -- USDA will issue monthly -- instead of quarterly -- supply
and demand estimates for U.S. sugar starting March 11, Acting Assistant Secretary of
Economics Daniel A. Sumner says. "Monthly estimates are being used to provide the public
with timely information on the sugar situation," Sumner says. "The change responds to the
industry's expressed interest in more frequent release of sugar information by USDA."
Contact: Raymond L. Bridge (202) 720-5447.


SEX SCENT RECRUITS BUGS -- Rescue, the first commercial sex scent to attract beneficial
insects to home gardens has hit the 'market. "The pheromone attracts spined soldier bugs
into the area so they will be there to prey on pests," says USDA entomologist Jeffrey R.
Aldrich. The yellow cone-shaped pieces of plastic contain a chemical replica of the sex
scent, or pheromone, of the male spined soldier bug -- a beneficial insect that hunts and
devours garden and shade tree pests. Contact: Jeffrey R. Aldrich (301) 504-8531.


GREENHOUSE WARMING? Not so fast, says USDA's chief meteorologist Norton
Strommen, in the current issue of National Geographic Research and Exploration
magazine. We know the earth has gone through periods of ice ages and warming, with no
contribution one-way or another by humans. At one time the earth must have been
considerably warmer than now -- and also was much cooler during the ice ages. But, the
upshot is there is too much we don't know to have any certainty at this time about the
contribution of greenhouse gases to either temperatures or rainfall and what that means to
future food production, says Strommen. Contact: Norton Strommen (202) 720- 9805.








CORN CONFERENCE -- The National Corn Growers Association and CIBA-GEIGY Seed
Division will hold their Corn Utilization Conference IV June 24-26 in St. Louis, Mo. Subjects
to be addressed include starch-based polymer technology, potential for corn co-products,
microbial fermentations, polymeric products and frontiers in processing of corn to products.
Contact: Ann Beirne (314) 275-9915.


AG OUTLOOK -- While events in Central Europe and the former Soviet Union have held
international center stage for the past two years, another part of the world -- known as the
Horn of Africa -- is facing severe food shortages in the wake of civil war and drought. Poor
natural resources and periodic drought make famine a perennial threat in Ethiopia, Sudan
and Somalia. Over the past 20 years, chronic political instability has aggravated food
shortage problems. Contact: Barbara Claffey (202) 219-1013.


FEED OUTLOOK Domestic feed grain use is projected to hit a new high at 186.7 million
tons this year as a result of larger livestock inventories; lower wheat feeding this summer;
and continued gains in food, seed and industrial uses, USDA economists say. The current
record is 184 million tons set in 1987-88. Gains in domestic feed grain use will be nearly
offset by a drop in projected exports of nearly 6 million tons from last year. Contact: Tom
Tice (202) 219-0840.


BELOW-AVERAGE STREAMFLOWS FORECAST -- Much of the West may be facing
another year of below-average streamflows, according to the latest outlook for the Western
water supply by USDA's Soil Conservation Service. With only two months remaining during
the usual snowpack accumulation phase of this season, very heavy snowfalls will be needed
to overcome current shortages. As a result of low precipitation and snowpack, 1992 could
be the sixth consecutive year of below-average streamflows for some areas of California,
Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Washington, Arizona, Colorado and Montana.
Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 720-5776.


CORRECTION: Last week's Farm Broadcasters Letter reported farm families would get
broader health insurance coverage at less cost under President George Bush's health care
plan. A farm family with $35,000 in net farm income, paying $6,000 a year for health
insurance, currently saves $420 in taxes. Under Bush's plan, they can deduct all of the
$6,000 and save $1,680 (not $4,680) in taxes. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1812 -- Maria Bynum explores efforts to find new uses for old crops.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1294 -- Pizza for breakfast; hand-washing revisited; U.S. foods make it
big in Asia; a food label poll; funky phrases and their origins. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1803 -- USDA News Highlights; dairy refund revisions;
conservation tillage affects equipment makers; U.S. apples fruitful overseas. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1509 -- Fantastic fly; wonder weevil; tropical treasure hunt;
Malaysian invasion; future fruits. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., March 10, crop/weather update; Wed.,
March 11, U.S. crop production, world ag supply and demand; Thurs., March 12, world
ag/grain situation, world cotton situation, world oilseed situation; Fri., March 13, farm labor,
sugar outlook; Mon., March 16, milk production; Tues., March 17, crop/weather update.
(These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on holly varieties; Will Pemble takes a look at bee
temper testers.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan in testimony before the Senate
subcommittee on agriculture concerning the 1993 budget; USDA meteorologist Norton
Strommen on weather and crops; USDA economist Ed Allen on wheat; USDA economist
Tom Tice on feed; USDA economist Jerry Stam on ag income.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill takes a look at teaching children about food safety;
Pat O'Leary reports on lawn landscaping; DeBoria Janifer reports on turf grass research.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.




O M UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE 1|
3 1262 08134 496 1
SOUTH EAST IOWA...Farmer of the Year will be chosen and recognized at a banquet during
National Agriculture Week, says Mike Buchanan (KBIZ, Ottumwa, Iowa). Mike says the
program brings together city and rural people on March 19 at Ottumwa's Parkview Plaza
Hotel. A slide presentation will review the farmer's accomplishments. A plaque and color
photo of the farm will be presented. Mike says the program is widely supported and the
ballroom is expected to be packed for the event. Does your station have a special program
or project during National Agriculture Week, March 15-21, or on National Agriculture Day,
March 20? Let us know and we'll share some of them.

WHEAT ACREAGE...in Arkansas is down 10 per cent from last year's total to 900,000 acres,
says Stewart Doan (ARN Agriculture, Little Rock, Ark.). Wheat farmers in the state have
experienced two consecutive poor crops. But prices reaching 11-year highs have wheat
producers in an optimistic mood.

I'M LIVING OUT OF A SUITCASE...says Valerie Parks (ABN Radio/TV, Columbus, Ohio).
She's on the road during January.,ebruary and March attending national trade shows, filing
radio reports and shooting TV segment for the network.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













AG RESEARCH PROJECTS...are being coordinated by Colleen Callahan (WMBD, Peoria,
III.) at the Illinois Central College campus. Her station co-sponsors the projects, which
involve over 60 students growing hybrid corn and soybeans. Awards are presented in
December at the Greater Peoria Farm Show. Colleen says there has been good response to
the "Fields of the Future" program from the college, students and advertisers.

THE BENEFITS OF FARM RADIO...is the topic of a speech Walt Shaw (KRAK, Sacramento,
Calif.) will give next month in Napa, Calif., at the Northern California regional meeting of the
Radio-Television News Directors Association. Walt says several station program directors will
be in attendance and he hopes to recruit them to farm broadcasting. Walt says water from
the Central Valley Project to farmers has been stopped. He's covering farmer reaction.


IC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330
Letter No. 2548 March 6, 1992

FARM EXPORT FORECAST RAISED -- USDA has raised the forecast for U.S. ag exports
in fiscal year 1992 by $1 billion, to $40 billion. Since the last forecast in December,
prospects for U.S. exports of wheat, soybeans, soybean oil and horticultural products
have improved. Also, wheat prices have strengthened be hter supplies,
further boosting the outlook for export value. Weaker corn, cotton
and tobacco exports were more than offset by gains ter produ- contact: Steve
MacDonald (202) 219-0822.
APMR iE^ n
NEW CONTACTS BOOKLET -- USDA's Economic R e ch Service, N A al Agricultural
Statistics Service and the World Agricultural Outloo o d have jus wishedd a new
"Information Contacts and Periodicals" booklet, whicn tete calendar of
reports from those agencies. For a copy, contact: Marcii 720-6445.


MOSELEY RESIGNS -- Assistant Secretary of Agriculture James Moseley is resigning
effective April 15 to return to Indiana and resume farming. "I think we have made
progress," Moseley said on the nation's environmental concerns. "However, there are
still many environmental challenges that face this country and our agriculture industry."
Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan said Moseley is "a good man, a very thoughtful,
sincere person" and he hated to see him go. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-
4623.


DEMAND UP FOR CONSERVATION -- Landowners in the 10 Great Plains states signed
more than 1,000 contracts last year to improve the quality of natural resources on nearly
3 million acres under the Great Plains Conservation Program. The program promoted
total conservation treatment on farms or ranches with the most severe soil and water
resource problems, says William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service.
The program was authorized by Congress in 1956 primarily to protect the drought-prone
Great Plains against wind erosion and to improve the economic stability of the region.
Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 720-5776.


WOMEN IN AGRICULTURE -- Women's roles in world agriculture are the subject of a new
bibliography available from USDA's National Agricultural Library. The bibliography, called
"Women in Agriculture" was compiled by Jane Potter Gates, with the library's Alternative
Farming Systems Information Center. It lists nearly 500 selected articles, books,
videotapes and reports that were published from 1979 through 1991 related to the role
of women in world agriculture. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.








AG HISTORY SOCIETY MEETING -- The Agricultural History Society will hold its annual
meeting in Chicago, III., at the Palmer House Hilton Hotel Saturday, April 4, in
conjunction with the meetings of the Organization of American Historians. "Henry A.
Wallace and Irrigation Agriculture" is the subject of the presidential address. Contact:
Wayne D. Rasmussen (202) 219-0787.


NATIONAL AG WEEK is March 15-21; National Agriculture Day is March 20 and National
Women in Agriculture Day is March 19. Contact: Margaret Speich at the Agriculture
Council of America (202) 682-9200.


NEW CORN RESISTS AFLATOXIN -- Seed companies have begun working with a new
USDA corn that repels the fungus that makes aflatoxin. This is only the second strain of
publicly-released corn able to resist aflatoxin. Contact: Gene E. Scott (601) 325-2736.


RECORD COTTON PRODUCTION -- USDA economists say the 1991 U.S. cotton crop
totaled 17.5 million bales -- 13 percent above last season. Upland production is
estimated at 17.14 million bales and extra-long staple at 399,000 bales. The harvested
area in 1991 was 12.8 million acres, nearly 10 percent above last season. The yield per
harvested acre is estimated at 656 pounds, up 22 pounds -- 3.5 percent -- from last year.
Contact: Robert Skinner (202) 219-0840.


CATTLE INVENTORY HAS MODEST EXPANSION -- The Jan. 1 cattle inventory figures
released in February confirmed that the U.S. cattle herd is expanding at a modest rate.
The total cattle and calf inventory was up 1 percent from a year earlier and this marked
the third year of expansion. The inventory was the largest since 1987. Contact: Ron
Gustafson (202) 219-0767.


FOOD SAFETY FOR KIDS -- USDA TV has produced two new features that are just for
kids. The features cover the basics of food safety and nutrition for students who prepare
their own after-school snacks. Information includes the importance of kitchen
cleanliness, keeping food refrigerated, how to use a microwave safely and how to select
snacks that taste good and are good for you. Satellite transmission times for these
stories are Sat., March 7, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. and Mon., March 9, 8 a.m. to 8:45
a.m. Contact: Lynn Wyvill (202) 720-4330.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1813 -- Brenda Curtis talks with Health and Human Services Secretary
Louis Sullivan about President George Bush's proposed health care plan and the state of rural
health care. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1295 -- Rural health care update; a warm winter; chicken's bad rap;
preventing heart disease; nutrition by phone. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1804 -- USDA News Highlights; wetlands reserve program;
President Bush's proposed health plan outlined; testing your well; bleach brighteners. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1510 -- Rust busters; research in the fast lane; keeping catfish healthy;
catfish diseases; rising catfish consumption. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., March 18, fruit and tree nut outlook; ag
chemical usage; Thurs., March 19, ag outlook; Fri., March 20, livestock and poultry update,
cattle on feed; Mon., March 23, ag trade update, catfish report, poultry production; Tues.,
March 24, weekly weather and crop update, vegetable production. (These are the USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on how to teach your children about food safety, and has a
two-part feature just for kids on how to fix after-school snacks with safety and nutrition in
mind.

ACTUALITIES -- Excerpts from Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan's radio news
conference Mon., March 2; USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and
crop conditions; USDA economist Barbara Claffey on the latest Agricultural Outlook; USDA
economist Ron Gustafson on livestock outlook; USDA economist Bob Skinner on cotton; USDA
analyst John Werner on the outlook for the western water supply.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on nutrition labeling education and Lynn
Wyvill reports on research and promotion boards.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program information in
"news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8: Thursdays
from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays from 8 8:45 a.m.,
EST.




OFFMIKE


THERE'S INTEREST IN DIVERSIFICATION...among several farmers in the area served by Ron
Hendren (WTAD, Quincy, III.). Ron says corn and hogs are the mainstays, but the region has a
soil and climate that allows most anything to grow. Producers are experimenting with peanuts,
buffalo and ostrich.

THE U.S. AUTO INDUSTRY...could learn a lot from agriculture, says Terry Henne (WSGW,
Saginaw, Mich.). He says agriculture will likely become the number one revenue generator in
the state this year, replacing auto manufacturing. Tourism ranks third. Terry broadcast live
from the Michigan Bean Day conference in Saginaw, Feb. 25. Fifteen hundred producers and
80 exhibitors met to discuss improving marketing, quality and packaging of dry edible beans.
Nearly the entire crop is exported.

MOVED...Bill Austin (WDZQ, Decatur, III.) from WSOY, Decatur replacing Gwinner Snyder. Bill
reports formation of the Heartland Network that includes Art Schrest, (WJBC, Bloomington) and
Peggy Kaye Fish (WFMB, Springfield). Orv Graham (WSOY) (217) 877-5371 is looking for a
farm director with one year of experience.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Farm Broadcasters Letter 1111 |IIllIJI/II/I/I/jIll I/I//l
31262 08134 501 8
Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











POTATO PRICES...are reflecting last year's increased acreage and big crop, says Bob
Burtenshaw (KUPI, Idaho Falls, Idaho). The large production has kept prices depressed all
winter. Grain producers like their markets, Bob says. Producers tell him they plan to boost
acreage this spring.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Gary Truitt (AgriAmerica Network, Indianapolis, Ind.). The Indiana
Pork Producers have named Gary to their communications committee. One of the committee's
goals is to examine ways the association can improve its use of radio to get its message to
farm and non-farm audiences. ...to Von Ketelsen (KOEL, Oelwein, Iowa) who was profiled in
the February issue of Mid-Am Reporter. The article says Von's approach to farm broadcasting
is to place farm markets first, followed by farm news that gets local people on the air.

IT'S ALWAS A GOOD TIME...to promote farm safety.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Pt affairs Radio- TV Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330
Letter No. 2549 -!APR 24 1992 o March 13, 1992

EXPORT FORECAST SHOULD H Higher export east by USDA at $40
billion for fiscal year 1992, should he t economy tary of Agriculture Edward
Madigan says. 'This increase is goo s culture and the U.S.
economy," Madigan says. "USDA studies n that every dollar received from
agricultural exports stimulates another $1.59 in supporting activities to produce those
exports and each $1 billion gain in exports provides for another 27,000 jobs."
Madigan says fiscal year 1992 will mark the 33rd consecutive year of an ag trade
surplus. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


WETLAND CONVERSION SLOWED -- The latest USDA tally of the nation's wetlands
on non-federal rural lands shows the pace of ag wetland conversions is slowing
significantly. From spring of 1987 to spring of 1991, 431,000 acres of wetlands were
converted to other uses, according to a USDA study. Results of the study show
annual conversions for ag purposes have declined significantly, says James Moseley,
assistant secretary of agriculture for natural resources and environment. The annual
conversion rate is down about 21,000 acres per year. Contact: Kathy Gugulis
(202) 720-9149.


HUFF NOMINATED -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan says James B.
Huff, Sr., will be nominated as administrator of USDA's Rural Electrification
Administration. Huff is Mississippi state director for USDA's Farmers Home
Administration. He operates a 600-acre cattle and tree farm, and has been active in
civic and community affairs. He received his bachelor of science degree in agriculture
from Mississippi State University. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


MARYLAND EXPANDS ELECTRONIC BENEFITS PROGRAM -- Maryland has
expanded its food stamp program to allow an additional 9,000 residents to use plastic
cards to buy their groceries. Maryland plans to take the electronic benefits transfer
(EBT) project statewide by the end of 1992. "We're pleased it's working so well for
them," says Steve Abrams, USDA's deputy assistant secretary for food and consumer
services. "Our experience with EBT so far has been that food stamp users like it,
retailers like it, bankers like it and the federal government likes it." EBT began as a
pilot project in Baltimore in November 1989. USDA is also operating pilot food stamp
EBT projects in Pennsylvania, New Mexico, Minnesota and Ohio. Contact: Phil
Shanholtzer (703) 305-2313.






EAT RIGHT MONTH -- "Eat Right America" is the theme of National Nutrition Month,
which is sponsored each March by the American Dietetic Association. The event
helps raise Americans' consciousness about the relationship between their health and
the food they eat. To eat healthfully, you should select a variety of foods every day,
say registered dietitians Diane Under and Beth Reames, who are nutrition specialists
with the Extension Service of Louisiana State University. This may sound overly
simple, they say, but variety is indeed the very spice of a healthy life. Contact: Beth
Reames (504) 388-4141.


SPOTTED OWL PLAN -- USDA's Forest Service has submitted its plan for managing
the habitat of the northern spotted owl on national forest lands in California, Oregon
and Washington to the U.S. District Court in Seattle, Wash. The plan designated 5.9
million acres of national forest land and designated wilderness as Habitat Conservation
Areas to be managed primarily as northern spotted owl habitat. The plan also
provides an opportunity to make some timber sales within the next few months to help
maintain and support jobs and communities. 'This plan was considered the most
appropriate after all factors were weighted," says James Moseley, assistant secretary
of agriculture for natural resources and the environment. Contact: Nancy Terry
(202) 205-1772.


ORGANIC STANDARDS The first meeting of the National Organic Standards Board
will be held March 23-25 in Washington, D.C. The board, which was appointed by
Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan Jan. 24, will advise Madigan on the best
ways to implement the National Organic Certification Program mandated by the 1990
Farm Bill. The meeting is open to the public, but space is limited. Contact: Rebecca
Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.


SCREWWORM OUTBREAK IN MEXICO -- USDA has dispersed sterilized
screwworm flies in three southern Mexican states after Mexican officials found 19
cases of screwworms there. Mexico had gone more than a year without a screwworm
case. Screwworms are parasites of all warm-blooded animals, particularly livestock,
but can attack wildlife, pets and humans as well. Sterile screwworms are reared by
the millions each week in a special facility in Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas, Mexico.
Contact: Mary Yurkovich (301) 436-7251.


PANEL FORMED ON BROADCAST ANTENNAE -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward
Madigan and Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan say they will form an advisory
committee to examine rental fees charged private radio and TV broadcasters for use
of federal lands. The committee will advise on appropriate methods to determine fair
market value for broadcasters putting antennae on federal lands the agencies
manage. Contact: Gordon Meyer (202) 205-1061 (USDA) or Tom Gorey (202)
208-5717 (USDI).


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944






FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1814 -- Five scientists take top honors from USDA for
outstanding work. Doug Wakefield highlights the five winners on this edition of
Agriculture USA. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1296 -- A plan for the Northern spotted owl; we've lost our
sheep; drought impacts on U.S. produce; smart food shopping; nutrition: how to eat
better. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1805 -- USDA News Highlights; drought potential
in the U.S.; wool business shrinking; preventing farm injuries; corn and sorghum
deficiency payments. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1511 -- New Marek's vaccine; versatile virus; OJ flavor and
vitamin C; better tasting OJ; "juiced up" juice testing. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., March 23, ag trade update,
catfish, poultry production; Tues., March 24, crop/weather update, vegetable
production; Wed., March 25, aquaculture outlook; Fri., March 27, hog/pig numbers;
Mon., March 30, ag prices; Tues., March 31, crop/weather update, world tobacco
situation, world livestock situation, U.S. grain stocks, prospective plantings. (These
are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of
a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on agricultural promotion programs; Pat O'Leary
reports on lawn landscaping; Will Pemble reports on a new cold-tolerant orange
developed by USDA scientists; John Snyder on the future of the oil crop, Canola.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on crops and weather;
USDA outlook board chairman James Donald on the latest crop report results; USDA
economist Steve MacDonald on farm trade; USDA foreign trade officer Geoffrey
Wiggin on help for U.S. ag exporters.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA soil and earthworm
research; DeBoria Janifer reports on nutrition labeling education; Lynn Wyvill on
better food safety information.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and
Monday from 8 8:45 a.m., EST.




OFFMIKE


CATTLE PRODUCERS...are doing better than expected this winter, says Bob Givens (KGNC,
Amarillo, Texas). Prices have not dipped to forecast levels, helping feedlot operators in his area
to maintain a break-even position. Bob says the winter wheat crop has had an excellent start.
Producers tell him it's the best they've seen in years.

FOURTH ANNUAL...Ag Knowledge Bowl for local FFA chapters has been completed, says Don
Wick (KWOA, Worthington, Minn.). The bowl is sponsored by the station and has the support
of FFA advisors and schools. Don taped the program and broadcast it later on his station. He
says the bowl provides recognition for those students who are performing well academically in
agricultural subjects.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Ray Wilkinson (WRAL/Tobacco Radio Network, Raleigh, N.C.). In
recognition of his long service to farm broadcasting he has received honorary lifetime
membership in the North Carolina Farm Writers and Broadcasters Association. Jack Hankins
(WELS, Kinston, retired) was awarded the Meritorious Service Award from the group. Thanks to
Dan Wilkinson, NCFWA president, for the information. The association is celebrating its 40th
year.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Farm Broadcasters Letter 1II I j11I II II 11
3 1262 08134 506 7

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












INTERESTING FIGURES...are being generated from the purchase of inputs. Eddie Gale
(WGIL/WAAG, Galesburg, III.) says sales of herbicides in his area are down about one-third.
Producers tell him they plan to use less this year even though there will be increased acreages
for soybeans and corn.

NEW FARM DIRECTOR...at WYRQ, Little Falls, Minn., is Kim Spiczka. She replaces Natalie
Schmitt who has shifted her attention to her new baby and the family farm. Kim is upholding a
family tradition of ag broadcasting. Her sister is Lori Spiczka, co-anchor with Eric Parsons on
the USDA TV program "Agriculture Update."

MOVED...Darrin Johnston to AgriAmerica Network, Indianapolis, Ind., from WKFI, Wilmington,
Ohio. Darrin says the network is producing PSAs that its stations will use during National
Agriculture Week, March 15-21. Travis Corzatt has assumed farm broadcasting responsibilities

Chief, Radio & TV Division
Chief, Radio & TV Division




Aa 1 .3 q



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)720-4330
Letter No. 2551 March 27, 1992



MAY 6 ....




SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE
Edward Madigan and USDA
Radio's Brenda Curtis get ready
for Madigan's Agriculture Day
radio news conference. (USDA
Photo by Byron Schumaker.)

REDUCING REGULATORY BURDENS -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has
announced a series of USDA actions to make USDA programs more effective and easier to
use, speed up decision making, save time, cut paper work, reduce red tape complexities,
increase output, save money and stimulate the economy.

In addition, the actions would provide more than $1 billion in economic relief to business and
consumers. Madigan announced 13 steps to ease or modify key regulatory burdens.
Specific regulatory changes will be made in programs of the Food Safety and Inspection
Service, Farmers Home Administration, Forest Service, Federal Grain Inspection Service and
the Food and Nutrition Service. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


RABIES VACCINE FIELD TEST -- USDA has asked for public comments on an
environmental assessment for field testing a live, genetically engineered, rabies vaccine in
New Jersey. The field trial is scheduled for about April 15 in Atlantic, Cape May and
Cumberland Counties, N.J. Contact: Sharon Scheidhouer (301) 436-7776.


ENHANCED WIC PACKAGE -- USDA is proposing to provide a larger food package to
breastfeeding women who participate in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women,
Infants and Children (WIC). The proposed food package would increase the amounts of
juice, cheese and legumes and add carrots and canned tuna. "We encourage women to
breastfeed their babies," says Catherine Bertini, assistant secretary of agriculture for food
and consumer services. "This enhanced food package will provide additional nutritional
support for women who make that choice," she said. Contact: Phil Shanholtzer (703)
305-2313.







BEER EXPORTS HOPPING -- Consumers around the world are popping the tops on U.S.
beers. Over the past six years, U.S. beer exports have foamed over -- growing more than
300 percent. In 1991, these exports reached a record-high level of nearly $161 million. The
U.S. traditionally exports only a small portion of domestic production, despite the fact that it is
the world's largest producer of malt beverages. Over the last decade, however, U.S.
producers have boosted their global activities, targeting many foreign beer markets.
Contact: Karen Halliburton (202) 720-1299.


WELFARE SIMPLIFICATION COMMITTEE Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan
has appointed 11 people to serve on a new committee that will study ways to simplify and
coordinate the efforts of the federal government's welfare programs. The Welfare
Simplification Committee, which was established by Congress, will look at all of the
government's public assistance programs, including food programs, cash assistance,
medical care and housing. "It is important that the nation's assistance programs work
together," Madigan says. "We need to avoid duplication of effort, which can cost taxpayers
money." The committee is to present a report to Congress by July 1993. Contact: Phil
Shanholtzer (703) 305-2313.


CATFISH PROCESSING UP -- Farm-raised catfish processed during February totaled 39.2
million pounds round weight, up 19 percent from February 1991. Net pounds of catfish
processed during the month totaled 21.1 millions, an increase of 23 percent from last year.
Contact: Robert Little (202) 720-6147.


ORANGE PRODUCTION UP -- Grower prices for all fruit in early 1992 has remained near
the high levels of a year ago, USDA economists say. The CPI for fresh apples averaged 18
percent higher in 1991 than in 1990 and the fresh-orange CPI averaged 55 percent higher. If
the March forecast, which was 4 percent higher than the first forecast in October 1991, is
realized, this season's citrus crop would be 7 percent larger than in 1990-91 and 12 percent
more than in 1989-90. Contact: Diane Bertelsen (202) 219-0884.


FBL ON FAX -- Don't forget, you can get the Farm Broadcasters Letter by facsimile
machine. Each Thursday by 2 p.m., Eastern time, the FBL will be on USDA's Ag NewsFAX.
The four-digit number needed to retrieve the FBL will always be the same: 9200. To receive
the Farm Broadcasters Letter from Ag NewsFAX, use the telephone connected to your FAX
machine to call (202) 690-3944. Then, press 1 4 9200 # 3 on the telephone and the start
button your FAX machine. If you encounter a problem, call Diane O'Connor (202) 720-2168.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1816 -- Whether you are a high school, college or professional
athlete or just someone who works out this program is packed with good advice. On this
edition of AGRICULTURE USA, Brenda Curtis talks with Dr. Linda Houghtkooper about
the role proper nutrition plays in exercise. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1298 -- Proposed regulatory reforms; Easter chicks not so nice; "900"
numbers; exercise and fluids to drink; the problems and promise of taxol. (Weekly reel of 2-
1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1807 -- USDA News Highlights; farm trade surplus
growing; cotton outlook; preventing power take off injuries; fleas on farms. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1513 -- Blue Ridge research; the virus advantage; predicting gypsy
moth damage; bounty of the sea; tasty alternative to fat. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., April 10, U.S. crop production report;
farm labor report; world ag supply and demand; Mon., April 13, world grain; ag situation and
outlook; world oilseed situation; world cotton situation; Tues., April 14, weekly weather and
crop update; vegetable outlook; Thurs., April 16, milk production report. (These are the
USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every
day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on rust-resistant beans; Pat O'Leary takes a look at
farm exports.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen reports on weather and crops;
USDA economist Barbara Claffey reports on agricultural outlook; USDA economist DianE
Bertelsen reports on fruit outlook; USDA Ag Trade Officer Geoffrey Wiggin reports on
exports to Japan.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on turf grass research; Pat O'Leary
reports on secrets of the soil.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8: Thursdays
from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Mondays from 8 8:45
a.m., EST.




4 VSTY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 5117

AG DAY PROGRAM...produced by Roger Strom (WCCO, Minneapolis, Minn.) featured
state agriculture officials speaking to grade school students about agriculture. Roger also
interviewed the students following the presentations. One of the points Roger made was
that farming is a business that buys at retail and sells at wholesale.

LESS THAN HALF...or 43 per cent of farms in the area served by Bart Bartholomew
(KLNT, Clinton, Iowa) list farming as the primary occupation. Bart says the ag census
information indicates that the trend is growing toward fewer full-time farms.

STATE LEGISLATURE...is considering a bill to allow local jurisdictions to restrict the use
of pesticides, says Dan Gordon (Tennessee Agrinet, Nashville). He says this is a
concern to Tennessee producers because it could result in many different standards
across the state.

BACK AT WORK...following a two-week bout with appendicitis, is Cindy Zimmerman
(Brownfield Network, Box 104180, Jefferson City, Mo. 65110).


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












CONGRATULATIONS...to Curt Lancaster (VSA Radio Network, San Angelo, Texas),
installed as a member of the Ag Council of America (ACA) board of directors. Curt
represents the National Association of Farm Broadcasters on the ACA board.
Another farm broadcaster, Jim Yancy (Progressive Farmer Networks, Starkville, Miss.),
represents the National Agri-Marketing Association on the board. ...and to Taylor Brown
and Rick Haines (Northern Ag Network, Billings, Mont.). Their network was the first
recipient of the new Shepherd's Voice award for broadcast media presented by the
American Sheep Industry at the association's recent convention in Orlando, Fla.

FARM TOUR...for children was covered with a live remote by Homer Quamm (WSVA,
Harrisonburg, Va.) during National Agriculture Week. Thanks to Elaine Lidholm (Virginia
Agriculture and Consumer Services, Richmond) for the information.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter I


United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)720-4330
Letter No. 2552 April 3, 1992


PLAN AHEAD FOR SUMMER CAMPING -- It isn't too early to reserve a site at a national
forest campground for this summer, says F. Dale Robertson, chief of USDA's Forest
Service. "We are entering the fourth camping season under the reservation system and are
very pleased with its success and popularity," Robertson says. Campers can make
reservations at more than 11,000 individual sites nationwide by calling 1-800-283-2267
(CAMP) Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Pacific Time) and weekends from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. The TDD number is 1-800-274-7275. You can make your reservations for up
to 120 days in advance for single family sites and 360 days ahead for groups. Contact:
Marty Longan (202) 205-1777.

SATELLITES, COMPUTERS CAN PUT FARM CHEMICALS where they're needed, a USDA
scientist says. "Why treat an entire field with the same amount of chemicals," asks ag
engineer Thomas S. Colvin. "Over large acreages, the soil can vary greatly." Colvin is
linking together government satellites and a tractor-mounted computer to research uniformly
applied chemicals on Iowa farmland. He says the system, including two satellite radio
receivers, costs about $50,000. Contact: Thomas S. Colvin (515) 294-5724.

EAST EUROPEAN COUNTRIES are struggling to adapt to free markets, USDA economists
say. The collapse of Communism in Eastern and Central Europe brought about the end not
only of a form of government, but a way of life. Farmers in these nations must now make
many of their own decisions, while their governments try to help them respond to market
forces. The outlook for U.S. ag exports to the region, although not bright in the short run, is
expected to improve in the future. Contact: Jason Lamb (202) 219-0620.

WHAT DO PEOPLE shopping for the best buys in health care have in common with fish
lovers, car owners and retired couples? All will find timely federal publications of interest to
them in the spring edition of the free "Consumer Information Catalog." The catalog,
published by the Consumer Information Center of the U.S. General Services Administration,
lists more than 200 free and low-cost booklets available from Pueblo, Colo. Since the
catalog is revised quarterly, you know it's up-to-date. For a free copy, send your name and
address to: Consumer Information Catalog, Pueblo, Colo. 81009 or call (919) 948-4000,
24-hours a day. Contact: Michael Haslet (202) 501-1794.

HOP STOCKS DOWN -- On March 1, hop growers, dealers and brewers held 73.3 million
pounds of hops, which is down 3 percent from a year ago. Hop production in 1991
increased 22 percent. Contact: James Brewster (202) 720-7688.







BROADLEAF PAPER-BARK TREE A NOXIOUS WEED USDA has added the broadleaf
paper-bark tree to its list of noxious weeds. This prevents the tree from being moved into a
country or between states without a permit. The tree is a problem, especially in Florida,
because it out-competes native vegetation. It now covers about 1.5 million areas in southern
Florida and smaller areas in California, Hawaii, Louisiana, Texas and Puerto Rico. It was
introduced into this country in the early 1900's from Australia. It was widely planted in the
1940's and 1950's because of its ability to control erosion, provide natural fences and
because it flowers when few other plants do and helps bees overwinter. Contact: Dough
Hendrix (301) 436-7253.


WESTERN WATER SUPPLY The western water supply outlook for this summer is below
normal due to continued dry weather and light snowfall this winter, USDA's Soil Conservation
Service chief William Richards says. Spring and summer streamflows are expected to be
below- to well-below average for nearly all the western states. Streamflows are expected to
be below 70 percent of average throughout California, Nevada, Oregon, southern Idaho,
southern Wyoming, southeastern Montana, northern and central Utah and along the northern
border of Colorado. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 720-5776.


CATFISH PRICES TO STRENGTHEN USDA economists say there should be a general
strengthening of farm catfish prices, at least through the first half of 1992. The 1991 average
farm price was 63.1 cents per pound, a 17 percent decrease from 1990. This was the lowest
annual-average price since 1987. Farm prices were 53 cents a pound at the end of 1991,
but rose slightly to 56 cents in February 1992. In 1991, catfish growers sold a total of 410
million pounds of food-size fish, up 4 percent from 1990. However, the value of sales fell to
$264 million, down 13 percent. The decline in revenues was the result of a nearly universal
decline in the price of food-size catfish. Contact: David Harvey (202) 219-0888.


LIVESTOCK CASH RECEIPTS OUTSHINE CROP "Amber waves of grain," may
symbolize America the Beautiful, but that's not the whole story of our Nation's farm economy.
Grain crops take a back seat to livestock and livestock products in the rankings of farm
commodities by value of production. Of the nearly $170 billion earned by U.S. ag producers
in 1990, $89.6 billion came from livestock and related products, and $80.4 billion from crops.
Cattle and calves, the Nation's leading commodity, accounted for $39.7 billion and ranked as
the number one farm product in 18 states. Contact: Roger Strickland (202) 219-0804.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1817 A compound that occurs naturally in the Pacific Yew tree is
a new anti-cancer drug for which experts are trying to find alternative sources of supplies.
On this edition of AGRICULTURE USA, Maria Bynum and Doug Wakefield talk with several
specialists about the new drug. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1299 -- In search of the Easter bunny; in search of Easter eggs;
targeting the nutrition message; in search of taxol; the great American food show goes to
Japan. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1808 -- USDA News Highlights; more aide to the
republics of the former USSR; farm income outlook; largest trade show for U.S. exporters in
Japan; fields, farmers and fireants. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1514 -- Fungus busters; nature's fungicides; putting fruit in a new
light; reduced tillage hurts fungus; post-gypsy moth forests. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., April 20, ag outlook; U.S. ag trade
update; Tues., April 21, weekly weather and crop outlook; dairy outlook; ag resources; Wed.,
April 22, catfish report; rice outlook; Thurs., April 23, oil crops outlook; Thurs., April 24, cattle
on feed; livestock and poultry update. (These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., Eastern Time, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA meat and poultry inspection; Pat O'Leary on
replanting the 1991 Capitol Christmas Tree; Will Pemble on safely protecting gardens from
insects.

ACTUALITIES -- President George Bush and his announcement on CIS aid; Secretary of
Agriculture Edward Madigan from his speech to the Public Voice national food policy
conference; USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on crops and weather; David Harvey,
USDA economist, on aquaculture; USDA economist Ron Gustafson on livestock and poultry.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA soil and earthworm research;
DeBoria Janifer reports on controlling the cattle disease brucellosis; Lynn Wyvill on
research at USDA's national research center in Beltsville, Md.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8: Thursday
from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EST, Saturday from 10 10:45 a.m., EST, and Monday from 8 8:45
a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE HlllllllllllllllllllIll
3 1262 08134 516 6
CORN PRODUCERS...in Missouri are voting on a corn referendum that would double the
rate from 1/2 cent to one cent per bushel, says Gary Wergin (KFEQ, St. Joseph). Gary
has been covering the pros and cons of the issue with live Q&A and by reading cards on
the air that he received in response to his request for feedback. Vote is expected to be
announced in mid-April.

SECOND ANNUAL...Agricuttural Show had a strong turn-out, says Gary Digluseppe
(KWMT, Fort Dodge, Iowa). Attendees enjoyed the 46 exhibitors, the speakers and warm
temperatures. Gary broadcast live from the Webster County fairgrounds with interviews
and market reports.

FARMERS APPRECIATION BREAKFAST...was a success for the station and local
producers, says Rick Bulger (WLRB, Macomb, II.). Beginning at 5:30 a.m., more than
100 farmers were served breakfast at the third annual event held at the local 4-H center.
ik says each advertiser gave ten free breakfasts to farmers who registered at the
5iarticipating business. Lou Hansen (RFD Radio Network, Bloomington) broadcast live
*-"n-- orn the event.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300 -.













BROADCASTING LIVE...from Moscow and Kiev. April 23 through May 4, Lynn Ketelsen
(Under Farm Network, Willmar, Minn.) will be in the CIS, broadcasting his programs from
farms near these two cities and the MacDonalds restaurant in Moscow. Lynn says the
toughest part may be getting a phone line.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Kelly Lenz (WIBW/Kansas Ag Network, Topeka). He has
received the 1992 Mid-Am Salute Award as the year's outstanding communicator. The
award was presented at the annual meeting in Kansas City of Mid-America Dairymen.

MOVED...Donald Baker from KFRM, Great Bend, Kans., to KSNC-TV, Great Bend. Curt
Shoemaker is the new farm director at KFRM. Curt says a hot issue in his area is the
commercial rivers license issue for certain farm vehicles.


IC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter ..



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250
Letter No. 2553 April 10, 1992

FARMERS SAY BIG GAINERS in planted acres this year will be spring wheat, whose
plantings will be up 10.5 percent from last year, grain sorghum up 10 percent, rice up 4.8
percent, and corn up 4 percent. Big losers are flaxseed which will have 30 percent fewer
acres, durum wheat which will be down 22 percent, dry edible beans off 21.5 percent, and
sunflowers, off 19.6 percent. In acres planted, the biggest increases are expected in corn --
3 million more acres this year, spring wheat -- 1.6 million more acres, and grain sorghum --
up 1 million acres. The largest-reduction in acres planted will be in soybeans with 1.6 million
fewer acres than last year, durum wheat off 718,000 acres, cotton down 655,000 acres,
sunflowers down 538,000 acres and dry edible beans down 410,500 acres. Contact: John
Witzig (202) 720-2127.

FOOD PRICES IN 1991 ROSE MORE SLOWLY at supermarkets and other grocery stores
than at eating places, reversing a trend during the previous four years. Food prices in 1991,
according to the Consumer Price Index, averaged 2.9 percent above those in 1990, half the
1990 price increase of 5.8 percent. Moreover, the 1991 increase was the lowest since 1985.
There were two principle reasons for the slowdown, USDA economists say. Production of
livestock increased, generating record meat supplies. At the same time recession cut
into consumer buying power and thus, food spending. Per capital disposable income,
adjusted for inflation, fell about 1 percent in 1991. Contact: Denis Dunham (202) 219-
0870.

FUTURE GROWTH AND WELL-BEING for U.S. agriculture depend very heavily on global
export markets. We need growth in those markets, access to them and fair competition,
Under Secretary Richard Crowder told the House Committee on Agriculture recently as he
reviewed progress in the six-year-old GATT Uruguay Round negotiations. The Dunkel text
contains some "significant disappointments" for the United States, "but we believe it provides
a framework to conclude an agreement that takes an important step toward freer and fairer
trade in agriculture," Crowder said. "One of our prime objectives is to convince those few
participants who are delaying the process that any significant retreat from the Dunkel text is
unacceptable to the United States." Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.

ETHICS OF ANIMAL AG The future course of animal agriculture may be determined more
by the ethics of animal use than by technology, USDA economist Gene Wunderlich says.
"Ethical issues are a crucial factor for the livestock industry today," Wunderlich says.
"Sometimes people with professional or economic interests in animal agriculture belittle
ethical issues as unscientific or irrational." Contact: Gene Wunderlich (202) 219-0427.








ONCE IN A CENTURY OPPORTUNITY President George Bush has announced a
multilateral financial assistance package for Russia and the other new states of the former
Soviet Union to help transform their economies to free market systems. Calling this a "once
in a century opportunity" to help freedom take root and flourish there, a White House
statement said success there in democracy and open markets will "directly enhance our
national security" and the "growth of freedom there will create business and investment
opportunities for Americans and multiply the opportunities for friendship between our
peoples." Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


NO-TILL RICE offers a headstart on planting and profits, says Roy J. Smith, Jr., a USDA
agronomist. In three years of field work at Stuttgart, Ark., rice yields were just as high when
the fields were barely cultivated before planting as they are with the conventional practice of
plowing weeds into oblivion, Smith says. More significantly, njt returns were as much as
$100 higher per acre on no-till rice because production expenses such as fuel for equipment
were lower, he says. Contact: Roy J. Smith, Jr. (501) 67312661.


MEETING ON FOREIGN DISEASES SET -- The Secretary of Agriculture's Advisory
Committee on Foreign Animal and Poultry Diseases will hold a public meeting June 2 to 4 at
the Holiday Inn Beachside, Key West, Fla. Discussion topics include: regionalization and
risk assessment in international trade; action plans for emergency preparedness and mock
exercises; user fees and trade restrictions. The committee advises Secretary of Agriculture
Edward Madigan on actions to take to prevent the entry and establishment of foreign
livestock diseases. Contact: Alan Zagier (301) 436-7255.


BUILDING A HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP WITH FOOD starts at an early age, says Beth
Reames, extension nutritionist with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center. "Many
of our earliest, most memorable occasions center around food," she says. Most people
don't realize how strongly food is tied to their feelings. "Overeating is often an attempt to
satisfy our emotional hunger for love and affection," she says. Helping children build healthy
relationships with food at an early age is one of the most important things we can do for
them, Reames says. She has tips for how to help build this healthy relationship. Contact:
Beth Reames (504) 388-4141.


RUSSIAN FORAGE LOOKS GOOD -- A new variety of Russian wild rye could give U.S.
farmers a more economical forage choice for the cooler spring months before summer
grasses emerge, USDA agronomist Daniel P. Mowrey says. Russian wild rye may save soil
as well as money, Mowrey says, because the land isn't cultivated as often with a perennial.
Contact: Daniel P. Mowrey (405) 262-5291.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1818 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis conjures
up visions of the Old West and replaces them with images of the New West that include
rancher Peggy Monzingo. We'll hear about Peggy Monzingo's life on the ranch. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1300 Preventative health care; got a nutrition question; meat
bargains this year; testing soil for lead; the rural job situation. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1809 -- USDA News Highlights; the 1992 wheat ARP; the
grazing fee controversy; streamlining USDA; crop insurance. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1515 Blue lettuce; breeding better lettuce; lots of lettuce;
armyworm biocontrol; improving viral insecticides. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., April 20, ag outlook, U.S. ag trade
update; Tues., April 21, crop/weather update, dairy outlook, ag resources; Wed., April 22,
catfish, rice outlook; Thurs., April 23, oil crops outlook; Fri., April 24, cattle on feed,
livestock/poultry update. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please
don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES Lynn Wyvill reports on Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan's plan to
improve USDA management and Pat O'Leary reports on turning old tires into cattle troughs.

ACTUALITIES USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
developments; USDA economist Ron Gustafson on the outlook for holiday meat supplies
and prices, and USDA economist David Harvey on catfish supplies and prices.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for people at risk for
foodborne illness; DeBoria Janifer reports on eradicating brucellosis and Pat O'Leary
reports on the secrets of soil and earthworms in agriculture.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 1262 0813 5620

MILD WINTER...has wheat producers concerned, says Rex Childs (KFDI, Wichita, Kan.).
There are indications that wheat rust has remained in the region. Varieties that are especially
susceptible could be hard hit this spring, particularly in the western portions of the state. Rex
says another concern is the insect population that over-wintered. Alfalfa could be at risk.

PROBLEMS OF RURAL AMERICA...were addressed in a conference on Agricultural and
Rural Outlook for Northeast Missouri, held in Hannibal. Among the topics discussed, says
David Lee (KHMO, Hannibal, Mo.), were economic problems confronting rural citizens,
including the decline in jobs, and educational opportunities. Former Secretary of Agriculture
Bob Bergland was the featured speaker.

FARM SHOW...in Green Bay, Wisc., had good attendance, says Michael Austin
(WDEZ/WGEE, Green Bay). The show emphasized the materials handling aspects of dairy
production. Michael broadcast live from the show.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










MOVED...Brian Baxter from Morning Ag Report, Indianapolis, Ind., to his own video
production company, Baxter Communications, Indianapolis. ...Monty Beal (KWPC,
Muscatine, Iowa) has left the broadcasting business. KWPC has reduced its agricultural
programming.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Gene Ragan (WTVY-TV, Dothan, Ala.). April marks his 34th year
in farm broadcasting at the station. Gene has served 38 years on farm radio.

FARMING...is a dangerous occupation, second only to mining. The National Safety Council
says unsafe use of tractors and machinery account for the majority of 1,300 deaths and
120,000 disabling injuries suffered by farmers each year. The field work season is moving
norh. Ask our listeners to apply extra safety to operations this year.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division





S- -I -

Farm Broadcasters Letter MAY



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 72
Letter No. 2554 April 17, 1992

MAJOR USDA REFORMS Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan told the Senate
Agriculture Committee that Congress should join with him in making major reforms in the
management and structure of USDA. Together they could structure a department that would
serve the interests of the public well into the next century, he said. Madigan says changes
he is making on his own are designed to streamline management, realign subcabinet duties
and tighten field office operations that deliver billions of dollars of services to consumers and
production agriculture. "I have repeatedly said I want my tenure at USDA to be one in which
management is given special focus," Madigan says. Contact: Roger Runningen (202)
720-4623.


USDA IS A HUGE ORGANIZATION, Madigan says. Its $62 billion annual outlays make it
the 4th largest federal department, and its nearly 111,000 staff-year employees make it the
6th largest federal employer. Its annual budget is exceeded by only 17 foreign nations. Its
size would rank 4th among U.S. corporations and its credit and lending services would make
it one of the nation's largest banks. More than half of its budget supports food assistance
programs. Nearly 40 percent of USDA's employees are in the Forest Service, which
manages 191 million acres.


USDA'S ROLE IS CONSTANTLY CHANGING Its responsibilities are becoming much
more complex, Madigan says. The 29 pages of the 1973 Farm Bill have grown into 719
pages in the 1990 Farm Bill. Twenty years ago, one-fourth of the budget was spent on food
assistance, compared with more than half today. Peak employment was 125,185 staff-year
employees in 1980, when the budget was $25 billion; now with a budget two and-a-half times
larger, the work is done by 15,000 fewer staff-year employees. And, nearly 70 percent of the
USDA workforce is now engaged in activities other than administering farm programs.


WASHINGTON AG WATCH -- This year farm broadcasters will coordinate their annual
Washington Ag Watch with the 1992 U.S. Ag Communicators Congress in the nation's capital
in June. The NAFB event will begin on Thursday, June 25, with a reception in the USDA
Patio and run through June 27. The Communicators Congress will be held June 28 through
July 1. Washington Ag Watch Contact: Taylor Brown (406) 252-6661. USACC Contact:
(202) 785-6717.


FARM LABOR -- During the week of March 8 14, there were 286,000 hired workers on
farms and ranches in the four states USDA survey -- California, Florida, New Mexico and
Texas. Average March wage rates hired workers received ranged from $5.13 an hour in
Texas to $6.80 an hour in California. Contact: Tom Kurtz (202) 690-3228.








LYNG HEADS MISSION Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has named former
Secretary Richard E. Lyng to lead a mission to the former Soviet Union to select
agriculturally related industries where U.S. executives will be loaned as problem-solving
consultants. Lyng was secretary from 1986 to 1989. The mission is scheduled for April 20 to
May 3. The loaned executive program is part of a technical assistance package for the
former Soviet Union announced by President George Bush in November. Contact: Sally
Klusaritz (202) 720-3448.


JUNE IS FOR TURKEY LOVERS June has always been for brides, but now, it's for turkey
lovers too, the National Turkey Federation says. This year's theme is 'Turkey makes meals
fast and fit. "For the last two years, June has been Turkey Lovers' Month and because the
promotion has been so popular, the federation has again declared June as Turkey Lovers'
Month in 1992." Contact: Chin Chu Moon (703) 435-7209.


POULTRY DISEASE VACCINE DEVELOPED -- USDA scientists have borrowed a gene from
the live Marek's disease virus to create the first genetically engineered vaccine against this
highly contagious disease of poultry. The new vaccine may be commercially available in
about two years. It contains only the gene that promotes immunity to Marek's disease,
rather than the whole virus. Contact: Keyvan Nazerian (517) 337-6828.


THIN IS NOT ALWAYS IN Young people approaching the teen years often become
obsessed with achieving a perfect body, says Beth Reames, Extension Service nutritionist
with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center. "Unfortunately, dissatisfaction with
one's body image can lead desperate teens to use such weight loss methods as diet pills,
starvation diets and binge-eating and purging to achieve ultra-thinness." As many as 20
percent of adolescents may practice binge-eating followed by self-induced vomiting or other
forms of purging. Reames says adults should know the danger signs of poor eating habits in
teens. Contact: Beth Reames (504) 388-4141.


USDA HAS ROLE IN SUMMER OLYMPICS USDA officials want to make certain our
animals don't bring back a deadly horse disease when they return from competing in the
1992 Summer Olympics. 'To prevent the entry of African horse sickness into the United
States, U.S. Equestrian Team horses competing in Barcelona must be quarantined for 60
days upon their return," says Karen James of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service. "Competitors also have the option of keeping their horses in a country free of
African horse sickness for 60 days before returning to the United States." Contact: Alan
Zagler (301) 436-7799.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1819 On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis pays a
visit to some of the biggest ranches in Southwest Arizona. She gets a first-hand look at
some of the major issues facing cattle ranchers today -- environment, debate over land use
and, of course, grazing fees on public lands. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1301 U.S. foods at Euro Disney; revitalizing rural communities;
reducing pesticide use with cotton; bugs are fun; your electric bill and appliances. (Weekly
reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1810 USDA News Highlights; the new dairy initiatives;
details on the disaster payments; new rangeland management techniques; water supply
impacts pig growth. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1516 Locked-up lettuce; potent parsley; no-till rice; metabolism
and dieting; hot dog safety. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., April 27, coverage of Secretary of
Agriculture Edward Madigan's address to the National Association of Ag Journalists; Tues.,
April 28, weekly weather and crop update; Wed., April 29, coverage of Madigan's testimony
before the House Appropriations Committee; Thurs., April 30, ag prices, world tobacco
situation; Fri., May 1, horticultural exports, catfish production, cattle and calf predator loss.
(These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES Pat O'Leary reports on the changing role of USDA; Lynn Wyvill reports on at
risk food safety; Dave Luciani reports on fooling nature.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan and Walt Hill, deputy under
secretary for small community and rural development on rural economic development; USDA
meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; USDA World Board chair James
Donald on crop production; USDA soil scientist Jeri Berc on wind erosion damage.

UPCOMING FEATURES DeBoria Janifer reports on turf grass research; Pat O'Leary
reports on secrets of the soil.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE
3 `126
REFLECTIONS OF THE SOUTHWEST -- Vic Powell is off this week, so I thought I'd put down some of
my thoughts concerning my recent travels to Arizona to produce material for USDA Radio programming.
First off, we Easterners think of a big farm as 300 acres. So, when I visited the 20,000 acre ZR
Hereford Ranch outside Tucson and the 8,000 acre Diamond C Ranch, my mouth was agape most of the
time. The miles and miles of rocky hills dotted with cattle and lonely Saggorro pretty much tell the story
of a mighty different life and way of raising cattle from the Eastern cousins. I now better understand
those issues George Gatley (SW Ag Net) raises when we chat on the phone. Issues like grazing fees,
land use and ranchers' protection of the land, are but a few I was able to explore with the ranchers I
met. My bonnet is off to George because wherever I went in Arizona, people told me they listen to
George Gatley because he's a true friend of the rancher and farmers of Arizona.

MARICOPA AG RESEARCH CENTER -- One hour outside Tucson is a $10 million "farming in the desert"
research facility that is a must to see if you're in the area.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300














LORRAINE KINGDON -- (News editor, University of Arizona, Tucson) has a line-up of great stories for
farm broadcasters. She's a neat lady that helped me line up a week full of ranching and research
stories. Lorraine started her radio career in 1968 in New Jersey. She moved on to Idaho State where
she went to work for Jim Johnson (USDA Radio-TV Chief, retired). She and I compared notes and both
agreed Jim is playing golf in Washington State at least six days a week since his retirement from USDA.
For unusual story ideas from the Southwest, call Lorraine at (602) 621-7176.

AGRIAMERICA Network in Indianapolis, Ind., now has 53 stations. WXLX 950 AM now airs several
farm news and market reports each day.

MAX ARMSTRONG (WGN, Chicago) has recently been named to the position of Fire Commissioner in
the western suburbs of Chicago. In his appointment, Max will help a department with 77 full-time
fighters working fro ive stations.


ENDA URTIS-HEIKEN
Acting Chief, Radio and TV Division







Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330

Letter No. 2555 April 24, 1992

SNAIL DRAGNET USDA has a dragnet out to apprehend fist-sized snails illegally imported
from Africa. The giant African snails are popular as terrarium pets, but can reproduce rapidly
and are voracious plant feeders, says Glen Lee, deputy administrator for plant protection
and quarantine with USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. These snails were
illegally imported from Lagos, Nigeria, apparently listed as reptile shipments, and thus were
not inspected by USDA ag inspectors. A 1970s introduction of a similar snail took nearly six
years to eradicate. USDA will not fine people who turn the snails in. People with information
on the whereabouts of these exotic snails should call (301) 436-8295. Contact: Doug
Hendrix (301) 436-7253.


DESIGNER GRAINS -- Creating "designer grains" to boost the value of cereal crops will be
the focus of a USDA Feed and Food Grain Nutrient Composition Workshop, May 4 to 6 at
the St. Louis Airport Marriott. "There is a large, untapped potential to use genetics to add
value to both the food and food produced from some of our most basic grain crops," says
Charles F. Murphy, national program leader for grain crops for USDA's Agricultural
Research Service. Contact: Marcie Gerrietts (309) 685-4011.


FOREIGN OWNERSHIP -- Foreign interests owned 14.8 million acres -- or slightly more than
1 percent -- of privately-owned U.S. ag land as of Dec. 31, USDA economists say. "Holdings
have remained small and relatively steady from 1981 through 1991, fluctuating around 1
percent of privately-owned agricultural land in the United States," says John Lee,
administrator of USDA's Economic Research Service. About 53 percent of the reported
foreign holdings is actually land owned by U.S. corporations. The law requires them to
register their landholdings as foreign if as little as 10 percent of their stock is held by foreign
investors. Contact: J. Peter DeBraal (202) 219-0425.


GOOD NEWS ON HERBICIDES -- There is some encouraging news from two studies of
herbicide movement toward groundwater supplies on Texas' Blackland Prairie. The studies --
each looking at two commonly used herbicides -- found the chemicals generally move no
lower than 12 inches into the soil, well above underground water supplies, USDA scientists
report. Also, at least 90 percent of the two herbicides were no longer detectable in the soil
within 90 days of being applied. Contact: Rodney W. Bovey (409) 260-9238.


U.S. GETS SPICIER -- The U.S. imported more spices in 1991 than in 1990. The value went
from $355 million in 1990 to $362.3 million in 1991. Value wise, vanilla beans were the most
important spice import, followed by black and white pepper, capsicum peppers and paprika,
sesame seed, cassia and cinnamon. The most expensive spices are saffron, vanilla beans
and cardamom. Contact: Rex Dull (202) 720-2974.







GOOD VEGETABLE NEWS FOR CONSUMERS This spring, U.S. growers are likely to
harvest 6 percent more fresh-market vegetables such as sweet corn, lettuce and tomatoes,
compared to last spring. USDA economists say that in Florida, sweet corn acreage is
estimated to be up 14 percent, while harvested tomato acreage will likely be down 2 percent.
California lettuce acreage is expected to be up 2 percent. Given normal weather, spring
fresh vegetable shipments should rise above a year earlier, leaving retail prices below last
year's elevated levels. Contact: Gary Lucler (202) 219-0884.


RURAL HEALTH RESOURCE GUIDES USDA's National Agricultural Library has two new
resource guides to help rural community leaders deal with problems associated with rural
health services. "Rural Health Services Funding: A Resource Guide" and "Agricultural Safety
and Health: A Resource Guide" are the latest in a series of rural development publications.
The guides list selected publications and audio-visual materials in each subject area.
Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.


BROILERS UP Commercial hatcheries in the 15 states USDA surveys set 3 percent more
eggs than a year ago. During the week ending April 11, 1992, commercial hatcheries set 147
million eggs, compared with 143 million a year earlier. Average hatchability for chicks
hatched during the week was 84 percent. Contact: Tom Kruchten (202) 690-4870.


MILK PRODUCTION UP Milk production during March totaled 11.1 billion pounds in the
21 major states, up fractionally from production in these same states a year ago. Production
per cow averaged 1,343 pounds for March, 33 pounds above March 1991. The number of
cows on farms in the 21 states was 8.26 million head, 13 thousand head below February and
200 thousand below March 1991. Contact: Daniel Buckner (202) 720-4448.


CHOLESTEROL TEST COULD HELP OYSTERS A cholesterol test developed for root-
eating worms by a USDA scientist could have an unexpected payoff -- more oysters in the
Chesapeake Bay. "I designed the test to learn more about nematodes, tiny soil-dwelling
worms," says David Chitwood, with USDA's Agricultural Research Service. Chitwood's test
identifies nematodes' cholesterol and other sterol compounds more quickly and accurately
than other methods. A University of Maryland botanist Glenn W. Patterson adapted the test
for studies aimed at learning which algae best nourishes the bay's oysters. Contact: David
J. Chitwood (301) 504-8634 or Glenn W. Patterson (301) 405-1607.


Editor: Marcl Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1820 On this edition of Agriculture USA, Jim Henry talks with
several researchers working on new methods of gypsy moth control. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1302 Raising guide dogs; "cudding" the grass; high-tech way to find
yourself; the Western fire season; new source for taxol. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1811 USDA News Highlights; wool and mohair
payments; the bee business; seeding rangeland; high-tech precision for chemical application.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1517 Rekindling biofuels research; the ethanol contribution;
buying time for pesticides; putting starch into biocontrol; micro vs macro encapsulation.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE Tues., May 5, weekly weather and crop
update; Fri., May 8, vegetable production; Mon., May 11, U.S. crop production, world ag
supply and demand; Tues., May 12, weekly weather and crop update, world cotton situation,
world oilseed situation, world ag/grain situation. (These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in
this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES Pat O'Leary reports on the cancer-fighting drug, taxol, made from Pacific yew
trees found in national forests; Will Pemble on USDA efforts to make taxol in the lab; Lynn
Wyvill on U.S. tobacco production; Dave Luciani of Michigan State University on a new fruit
packaging that controls ripening and prevents spoilage.

ACTUALITIES USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on crops and weather; USDA
economist Steve MacDonald on U.S. ag trade; USDA economist Jim Miller on dairy; USDA
economist Barbara Claffey with highlights from latest ag outlook report.

UPCOMING FEATURES Pat O'Leary reports on USDA soil and earthworm research;
DeBoria Janifer reports on controlling the cattle disease brucellosis; Lynn Wyvill on
managing crop residue for erosion control.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT, and Mondays
from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




OFFMIKE


COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE...is a hot topic in the area Steve Bugbee (KXXX/KQLS, Colby,
Kans.) serves. He has been broadcasting all the information available to him, but notes many
producers remain confused about who needs the license. Steve says the state Department of
Transportation has been operating with extended hours to process license applications.

SPECIAL INTERVIEWS...on Earth Day, April 22, were broadcast by Jay Truitt (KMZU, Carrollton,
Mo.). He interviewed farmers on the pro-active things they are doing to protect the environment,
such as recycling, soil conservation practices, and measures to protect groundwater. Teresa
Reische says she recently broadcast a program on KMZU that was aimed at farm safety for kids.
It was based on a two-day seminar that included a series of safety demonstrations and videos
watched by 110 children.

RECENT VISITOR...to the Radio and TV Division was Curt Lancaster (VSA Radio Network, San
Angelo, Texas), who stopped by while covering some state producers' meetings in Washington,
D.C. Curt said he and Roddy Peeples use aircraft to quickly cover issues and attend meetings.


Farm Broadcasters Letter 3q1 : UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Office of Public Affairs 3 1 0
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300 MAY 26 1992












SEVERAL PROPOSALS...have been made in Texas to control groundwater use. Bob Cockrum
(Texas Agri-Business Network, Dallas) says they range from the state water commission to regional
water conservation districts assuming control. It's a major issue because owners' rights at present
include access to the property's groundwater. New voice on the network is Scot Harrison,
formerly of KGVL, Greenville, Texas.

LOWER PRICES...could be a major factor in changing planting intentions of Mississippi farmers,
says Bob Wade (Progressive Farmer Network, Starkville). Bob says low prices for cotton could
cause producers to plant fewer acres. Overall financial health of producers has improved over the
last decade, Bob says. Improved management and lower indebtedness has brightened the outlook
this ear for ost Mississippi farmers.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division







Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 720-4330


Letter No. 2556 May 1, 1992



2 f Central Science
s Food Guide Pyramid Library
A Guide to Dally Food Choices
S MS 19C 1932
_ Fats, Oils, & Sweets .a
USE SPARINGLY [
Univ :" rf :"*I-!

Milk, Yogurt, Meat, Poultry, Fish,
& Cheese Dry Beans, Eggs,
Group & Nuts Group
2-3SERVINGS 2-3SERVINGS FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID -- You'll
be seeing more of this graphic in
vegetable Fruit the future. Secretary of
ERVINGS 2-4SERIGS Agriculture Edward Madigan
intends for the pyramid to be used
in a wide variety of government
Bremd,Cea publications, in nutrition text books
Rice, & Pasta
SuGrou and hopefully by private sector
Scooperators.



ALTERNATIVE AG BOARD -- USDA's Alternative Agriculture Research and
Commercialization Board will hold eight public hearings around the country in May and
June. The board was set up under the 1990 Farm Bill to establish policy, implement
programs and direct the activities of an independent center with USDA to expand
industrial uses of farm and forest products. The board reports directly to Secretary of
Agriculture Edward. Madigan. Martin Andreas, vice president of marketing for Archer
Daniels Midland is chairman of the board. Meetings will be: May 12 in Cedar Rapids,
Iowa; May 13, Atlanta, Ga.; May 14, Newark, N.J.; May 27, Portland, Ore.; May 28,
Sacramento, Calif.; June 16, Bloomington, Minn.; June 17, Bonner Springs, Kans.; June
18, Irving, Texas. Contact: Joe Roetheli (202) 401-4860.


AQUACULTURE POISED FOR GROWTH -- Aquaculture has become a prominent industry,
encompassing such products as mussels, abalone, catfish, sturgeon, alligators,
ornamental fish and aquatic plants. The harvest from the catfish industry -- by far the
largest sector of U.S. aquaculture -- reached a record 391 million pounds in 1991.
Alligator farming is one growing sector of domestic aquaculture. Alligator farms are
concentrated mainly in Louisiana and Florida. Contact: David J. Harvey (202) 219-
0888.








ONCE CONSIDERED A NUISANCE, America's wetlands are now recognized as an integral
part of a healthy ecosystem. The new Wetlands Reserve Program allows farmer to
restore wetlands converted to cropland before 1985, retiring it and other eligible acreage
in long-term easements. The first opportunity for farmers to sign up for enrollment is
expected to take place this spring. Contact: Henry Buist (202) 219-0426.


1991 FOOD PRICES, as measured by the Consumer Price Index, increased 2.9 percent,
the lowest increase since 1985, USDA economist Dennis Dunham says. Food prices at
grocery stores were up 2.6 percent. Prices of restaurant meals increased 3.4 percent,
the smallest increase since 1965. Contact: Dennis Dunham (202) 219-0870.


PER-ACRE VALUE of farmland in the U.S. increased 1 percent in 1991, USDA
economists say. That is the fifth straight yearly increase. On Jan. 1, 1992, farm real
estate values -- farmland and buildings -- averaged $685 per acre, which is 14 percent
above the 1987 low of $599, but 17 percent below the record of $823 in 1982. The
largest regional increases in farm real estate values were in the five Corn Belt states, up 3
percent from 1991, and in the five Appalachian states, also up 3 percent. The largest
state increases were in West Virginia, Arizona, Alabama, Illinois, Nevada, Utah and
Virginia. Biggest losses were in Wyoming, Colorado and Georgia. Contact: Roger
Hexem or Fred Kuchler (202) 219-0423.


NICKEL ESSENTIAL FOR PLANT GROWTH -- Plants must have nickel to complete their
life cycle, produce viable seed or make maximum use of other elements such as iron,
USDA plant physiologist Ross M. Welch says. Welch says these findings have made
nickel the first element accepted as essential for all plants since the recognition of
chlorine in 1954. One of nickel's most important roles is its effect on efficient use of
urea fertilizer by plants such as tomatoes and legumes, Welch says. Contact: Ross M.
Welch (607) 255-5434.


GRAIN PESTS TESTED -- Once banned from stored grain, the Warehouse Pirate Bug has
been pardoned by the federal government. Pirate Bugs are "fierce" predators of insect
pests that infest grain; they feed on insects and do not eat grain, John H. Brower, a
USDA scientists says. Brower, who has studied natural enemies of stored grain pests for
13 years, says the Pirate Bug has a voracious appetite for grain-damaging pests. Insects
like the Pirate Bug could be used as alternatives to fumigants and chemical sprays
commonly used to kill insects in stored grain. Contact: John H. Brower (912) 651-
3528.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1821 -- Dave Carter explores the past, present and future of the
Federal Crop Insurance program. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1303 -- The new food guide pyramid, the great snail dragnet,
researching a more sustainable type of farming, getting consumer questions answered,
U.S. ice cream goes abroad. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1812 -- USDA News Highlights; rice stocks climbing,
western weather outlook, streamlining USDA. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1518 -- Low-calorie sugar substitute; bacterial bonanza; wasps
vs. whitefly; assembly line wasps; acoustic Achilles heel. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues, May 5, crop/weather update; Fri., May
8, vegetable production; Mon., May 11, U.S. crop production, world ag supply/demand;
Tues., May 12, crop/weather update, world cotton situation, world oilseed situation,
world ag/grain situation; Thurs., May 14, outlook for CIS (former Soviet Union). (These
are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing
keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary takes a look at USDA's food guide pyramid; DeBoria Janifer
reports on streamlining USDA; Pat O'Leary reports on the dairy outlook.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan on ag issues at the National
Association of Agricultural Journalists conference in Washington, D.C.; USDA
meteorologist Ray Motha on weather and crops; USDA economist Roger Hoskin on
oilseeds; USDA World Board chairman James Donald on crop production.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on brucellosis eradication; Pat O'Leary
reports on national forest tourism.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE 1| 11IIII I II I 1IIII1I
3 1262 08134 5471
GREAT FLOOD OF '92...that hit downtown Chicago due to a collapsed tunnel wall
impacted grain trading around the world. Orion Samuelson and Max Armstrong (WGN
Radio/Tribune Radio Network, Chicago, III.) filed frequent reports about the forced
shutdown April 13-14 of the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT), the world's largest
commodity futures market, and the reduced trading sessions during the weeks of April
13 and 20. They say that the catastrophe highlighted the importance of the price
discovery market provided by the CBOT. Grain trade was at a standstill in Rotterdam, a
decline in volume was noted on the New York Stock Exchange, and many U.S. elevators
did not buy grain because they couldn't price or hedge their buys. Orion and Max kept
their listeners informed about the timing and length of trading sessions.

STALE BED METHOD...of minimum tillage has proven beneficial to cotton producers in
the area served by Chris Kimbell (KNOE, Monroe, La.). Reduced disturbance of the soil
saves moisture. That was helpful when planting began in mid-April. Chris says
producers using standard tillage methods needed rain to get their crops underway.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











SEVERAL HUNDRED CALLS...were received by Gary Kinnett WIAI, Danville, IIl.) following
broadcast of a program about state loans to farmers. Illinois Treasurer Pat Quinn outlined
the $100,000 per borrower program of low rate loans available for any agriculturally
related purpose. Gary says the loan program is an effort by the state to keep farmers on
the land.

SATELLITE TRUCK...continues a busy schedule, says Bill Ray (Agrinet Farm Radio
Network, Elizabeth City, N.C.). His crew recently broadcast live from the Virginia Beef
Expo, in Harrisonburg, Va., where 15,000 people attended. An overnight trip put them in
Ahoskie, N.C., for the annual chicken festival attended by 25,000 people from all
segments of the poultry industry. Bill says recent addition of affiliates solidifies the
network's each from Pennsylvania to South Carolina.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Let



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Publi Radio-Tf


nfren f 2 02) 72e-4330

9l0nt4p.6f 2P2 (902) 729-4330


Letter No. 2557 l!a-y w-d 8---- r-ly81992


U.S. FARMERS, the most productive it world, accou I r more than 20 million jobs
and 16 percent of the Gross Domestic t, Secre y Agriculture Edward Madigan
told the House Appropriations Subcommi .0 r chance, "we can expand our
markets, sell more products, and create more ,adigan said. U.S. agriculture is in
sound economic health and the outlook is "generally secure," Acting Assistant Secretary
for Economics Dan Sumner told the subcommittee. Wheat and milk markets are much
improved over earlier weaknesses; wheat prices are up sharply from this time a year ago;
and corn prices are higher. Contact: Rdger Runningen' (202) 720-4623.


TRADE OFFICE IN OSAKA -- USDA has ppened a new U.S g trade office in Osaka,
Japan, to help U.S. exporters tap into th6 growing Japans market, Secretary of
Agriculture Edward Madigan says. "AltKlah Japan is A rican agriculture's biggest
overseas market," Madigan says, "Accoun' jfQaFlr- fourth of total agricultural and
forestry exports, the potential for even bigger. A l'es is enormous." The U.S. sold
$7.7 billion of ag goods to Japan in fiscal year 1991, placing it first in ag exports.
Canada was second at $4.6 billion. Contact: Sally Klusaritz (202) 720-3448.


DAIRY PRICES SPRING UPWARD -- Wholesale prices of nonfat dry milk and cheese rose
in March and April, the fourth straight year the increases began before the seasonal
production peak. Skim milk markets were tight in early 1992, as commercial use of skim
solids grew from a year earlier and milk production was about unchanged. Contact: Jim
Miller or Sara Short (202) 219-0769.


RICE GROWERS TO PLANT MORE -- Rice farmers indicated in early March they intended
to plant 3 million acres to rice in 1992 -- up 5 percent from 1991. Part of the 1992
acreage increase reflects 1991's weather-related problems and part is producers
responding to the decrease in the ARP from 5 percent to zero. Contact: Janet Livezey
(202) 219-0840.


WEIGHT LOSS MAY STRESS BONES Obese women lose bone mass as they lose
weight, and this may increase their risk of osteoporosis, says Henry C. Lukaski, a USDA
physiologist. Lukaski says a group of 14 obese women in their 20's and 30's lost an
average 3 to 4 percent of their bone mass during a five-month controlled weight-loss
study. The loss occurred even though the women's diets were adequate in all vitamins
and minerals. Lukaski says the study was the first to look at the consequences of weight
loss on bone. Contact: Henry C. Lukaski (701) 795-8429.








HOW TO GET INFORMATION -- The latest edition of "How to Get Information from the
United States Department of Agriculture" is off press. In addition to frequently used
USDA phone numbers, it includes USDA Public Affairs and Agency Information Offices
phone numbers; an index of USDA agencies; a USDA organizational chart; a USDA
information staff index and a USDA subject index. For a copy, contact: Marci Hilt (202)
720-4330. Media Only, please.


INSPECTION REVIEW -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has ordered federal
investigators to conduct a food safety review at five meat packing firms following a
broadcast on ABC's "Prime Time Live" that raised questions about beef inspection
procedures at the plants. "I am deeply concerned" that allegations of beef contaminated
by dirt, hair, shotgun pellets and other foreign matter could undermine public confidence
in food safety, Madigan said. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


EXTENSION VOLUNTEERS -- Community service volunteers are an integral part of the
Cooperative Extension System -- a partnership between USDA, the 74 land-grant
universities and.county governments. Extension volunteers -- 3 million of them -- are in
every state and county, and in many local neighborhoods across the nation. Every day
they give their time, energy and talent. Contact: Charles Morgan (202) 720-3401.


CROATIA AND SLOVENIA, newly-independent countries both formerly in the Yugoslavia
federation, can now export meat products to the United States. H. Russell Cross,
administrator of USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service, said this USDA action "will
not have a significant impact on the economy, increase costs to U.S. consumers or
adversely affect U.S. competition." By law, all countries eligible to export meat to the
United States must have inspection standards at least equal to U.S. standards. Contact:
Jim Greene (202) 720-0314.


USDA REFUNDS $23 MILLION -- USDA has refunded $23 million to milk producers who
reduced 1991 milk marketing, says Keith Bjerke, executive vice president of USDA's
Commodity Credit Corporation. Any producer who did not market more milk in 1991
than in 1990 was eligible for a refund of the 5 cents per hundredweight assessment.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1822 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Gary Crawford takes a
look at the use of animals in medical and psychological research from all sides of the
issue -- from scientist to animal rights advocates. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1304 -- Animals in labs; farm on; vitamin D in milk; whole wheat for
health; athletes and nutrition. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1813 -- USDA News Highlights; dairy refunds; low-tech
farming; western water outlook; ethanol uncertainties. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1519 -- A deadly mix; weevil-specific control; nutrient-rich
persimmons; new choice for southeast growers; low-fat steak cuts. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., May 19, weekly weather/crop, ag
outlook, farm labor; Wed., May 20, wheat outlook; Thurs., May 21, catfish production,
U.S. ag trade update; Fri., May 22, feed outlook, livestock and poultry outlook, cattle on
feed. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a
story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on integrated crop management, DeBoria Janifer reports
on brucellosis eradication, Mike Thomas reports on a new program to teach kids the
fundamentals of science and Dave Luciani reports on container gardening.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
developments; Federal Grain Inspection Service Administrator John Foltz on a new
commercial inspection service; and USDA hydrologist Jon Werner on the western water
supply outlook.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary has a three-part series on tourism and the national
forests; DeBoria Janifer reports on turfgrass research and Lynn Wyvill reports on the rice
outlook.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satel/ite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 542 2

MOSCOW AND ST. PETERSBURG...were on the itinerary of Ed Slusarczyk and Jeff Stewart (Ag
Radio Network, Utica, N.Y.). They spent two weeks visiting several areas of the former Soviet
Union, and filed reports from farms that have been shifted from collective to private operation.
Their broadcasts emphasized how U.S. farmers will find new markets in the Commonwealth of
Independent States.

WHEAT CROP...in Kentucky is in much better shape this year. Allen Aldridge (Kentucky
Agrinet, Louisville) says much of the crop was plowed under last year due to disease. He says
disease occurrence seems lower this year. New voice on the network is a familiar
one to farmers and the agribusiness community. Jack Crowner joined the network May 4.

SIXTH YEAR OF DROUGHT...is taking its toll, says Kelly Klaas (KEZJ, Twin Falls, Idaho). Kelly
says the region's light snow pack melted early. Reduced water supplies have forced several
400 acre farms to plant only 60 acres.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs EO T
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











OUR AUDIENCE IS IN THE FIELDS...says Mike Adams (WLDS, Jacksonville, III.) getting in corn
and soybeans. Mike says those producers who took a risk and planted during the warm days of
February have corn that survived the cold snaps in March. It is up and looking good. They
could benefit from an early harvest. Interest in ethanol runs high is his listening area. Mike is
keeping listeners informed about a proposal in the state legislature mandating ethanol use in
state vehicles.

FARMERS AS ENVIRONMENTALISTS...was the title of a recent program broadcast by Tom
Riter (KFKA, Greeley, Colo.). Tom interviewed a number of experts regarding the recycling of
agricultural byproducts. An example cited is the recycling of sugar beet pulp into animal feed.
Tom says it saves beet producers $2 million in disposal costs and benefits cattle producers as a
feed ingredient.


POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter Cen



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 1b~ )OF4 3
Letter No. 2558 .~i.ayT5 92-

ANY DAY NOW, look for the U.S. to publish a substantial list of imports from the
European Community on which the U.S. proposes to increase tariffs. That's the next
step in the resolution of a five-year oilseed dispute with the EC. The U.S. would like to
see the matter settled without raising tariffs. Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan
says he hopes we can get it resolved through negotiations before the list becomes
effective. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.


AGRABILITY PROJECT -- USDA has awarded 12 "AgrAbility Project" grants for nearly
$1.5 million to 14 states to fund new and existing education and technical assistance
programs for farmers with disabilities. The 14 states are: Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,
Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Sou S na, Wisconsin,
Montana, Vermont and New Hampshire. The project enab 'lsion Service
agents and other ag and health professionals to identify ls with di ies and
provide technical assistance to them in adapting to and g modified far uipment
and tools. Contact: Brad Rein (202) 720-5285.


U.S. FARMERS LOST nearly 4.4 million head of cattle a Ives to dis e nd other
causes last year. Respiratory ailments lead the causes of i nt of total
deaths -- valued at $624 million. The second leading cause s digestive
problems with nearly 21 percent of the total, valued at $395 million. Predators --
primarily coyotes -- caused 2.4 percent of the total. The coyote losses were valued at
$24.3 million during 1991. Contact: Glenda Shepler (202) 720-3040.


SALMON HABITAT -- USDA's Forest Service has established a team of scientists and
fisheries specialists to develop new measures for improving salmon and steelhead
habitats on National Forest System lands throughout the western United States, including
Alaska. The team will work with federal agencies, state authorities and special interest
groups during its study. Contact: Len Carey (202) 205-1782.


CHILD NUTRITION GUIDE -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has begun
nationwide distribution of 350,000 copies of a new guide for child nutrition programs to
schools, child care providers and summer program sponsors. "This publication gives
practical guidance to help food service professionals provide sound nutrition to America's
children," Madigan says. Madigan says he promised school children last September that
their school food service staffs would have the tools they need by 1994 to put the
Dietary Guidelines' recommendations to work in America's school cafeterias. This new
guide is the first of a series. Contact: Darlene Barnes (703) 305-2286.









NEWSLINE ON FAX -- USDA Radio's Newsline has joined the Farm Broadcasters Letter
on USDA's Ag NewsFAX. Each day the Newsline will be available by 5:30 p.m., Eastern
Time. The four-digit number needed to retrieve it will always be the same: 9250. To
receive the Newsline from Ag NewsFAX, use the telephone connected to your FAX
machine to call (202) 690-3944. Then, press 1 4 9250 # 3 on the telephone and the
start button your FAX machine. The Farm Broadcasters Letter continues to be available
on the Ag NewsFAX each Thursday by 2 p.m., Eastern time. If you encounter a
problem, call Diane O'Connor (202) 720-2168.


SWEET ONION ACREAGE UP -- Consumers should see more sweet Spanish onions this
spring. Spring onion acreage is up 21 percent, USDA economists report. If conditions
hold, growers will harvest spring onions from 32,200 acres this year in four states --
Georgia, Texas, Arizona and California. Production in Georgia and Texas together total
4.35 million hundredweight, 25 percent above last year. Georgia growers will harvest
1.56 million hundredweight of Vidalia onions, which are grown only in Georgia. Summer,
non-storage onion acreage is estimated at 11,300 acres, which is down 8 percent from
last year. Contact: Arvin Budge (202) 720-3843.


POULTRY IRRADIATION -- USDA has proposed rules that will permit poultry irradiation to
control bacteria that can cause foodborne illness. "If this measure is adopted, we believe
poultry irradiation could play a significant role in food safety," says H. Russell Cross,
administrator of USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. The public has until July 6
to submit comments on the proposal, which would allow a range of 1.5 to 3.0 kiloGray
of irradiation. Cross says this small dose would safely and effectively control harmful
bacteria such as Salmonella, Listeria and Campylobacter. Contact: Jim Greene (202)
720-0314.


FIELD STRUCTURE REVIEW -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan and Director of
the Office of Management and Budget Richard Darman have formed a joint "SWAT
Team" to review USDA's field structure. The review will determine whether current
USDA field structure is both effective and efficient in administering programs that serve
the nation's ag communities and manage the nation's forests. Contact: Roger
Runningen (202) 720-4623.


WORLD WHEAT CROP UP -- Preliminary projections for 1992-93, suggest the world
wheat crop will increase slightly from 1991-92. However, supplies will remain relatively
tight. Because consumption will slightly exceed the increased production, ending stocks
will drop marginally. Contact: Ray Bridge (202) 720-5447.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1823 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, John Snyder talks with
USDA economists who have been working in Eastern Europe where sweeping changes
are affecting farmers and consumers alike. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1305 -- Improving salmon habitats, plant plastic; nutrition and health;
the promise of persimmon; do we want organic foods? (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1814 -- USDA News Highlights; conservation
compliance; early price projections for 92-93; farm real estate values; straw mulching.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1520 -- Safe and synergistic compounds; target-specific mesquite
control; pre-peeled oranges; coating produce for freshness; Americans are eating smarter.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., May 27, weekly weather and crop
update, cotton and wool update; Thurs., May 28, ag income/finance, world tobacco
situation; Fri., May 29, export outlook, world sugar situation, U.S. ag prices. (These are
the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every
day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary has a three-part series on national forest tourism; Lynn Wyvill
reports on U.S. rice production; Dave Luciani of Michigan State University reports on
produce packaging that prevents spoilage.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen with a crop and weather update;
USDA World Agricultural Outlook Board chair James Donald analyzes this week's crop
report; USDA economist Janet Livezey on rice; USDA Soil Conservation Service chief
William Richards on conservation compliance.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on potato production; DeBoria Janifer on
USDA turfgrass research; Lynn Wyvill on farmers with disabilities.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8.
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE 1 121A'Ak4 a'134I

ITS BEEN FUN AND HELPFUL...says Randy Rasmussen (KMA, Shenandoah, Iowa) about
a project that benefits his local FFA chapter. Randy spent two weeks in April and May
working at 20 agriculturally-related businesses in the station's area, and also doing his
noon show from the site. He says the range of work has been varied including making
pizzas, operating a bulldozer, serving as a florist and assistant to a chiropractor. His $50
salary at each business was donated to the FFA chapter. Randy says the project
received coverage in the newspapers. Tom Beavers (KMA, Shenandoah, Iowa) has
produced 20 three-minute programs about the beef industry, including nutritive value of
beef, how to cook it, and the environmental aspects of production. Tom says it has been
well received among listeners.

VIDALIA ONIONS...specialty crop is the largest in both volume and quality this year, says
Everett Griner (Southeast Agrinet, Moultrie, Ga.). Acreage has increased to 9,000 acres,
with an average yield of 325 50-pound bags per acre.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300














CASH CROP PRODUCERS...have a positive attitude this year, says Les Houck (Agri
Broadcasting Network, New Holland, Pa.), but pork producers remain concerned about
prices. Les says his area consumes more grain than it produces, therefore the network
broadcasts daily cash grain prices in Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania.

GARDENING INFORMATION...along with the usual market reports and farm programming
has generated listener response, says Warren Baker (WNCT, Greenville, N.C.). He says
the county Extension Service agents in his area have been a major source of information.
Not everybody farms, but a whole lot of people garden.


VIC POWL
Chief, Radio and TV Division









Farm Broadcasters L tte .



United States Department of Agriculture Office o c A air Raodi TV Division Washington D.C. 202 W 3
Letter No. 2559 May 22, 1992

USDA WILL HOLD a public hearing June 15 in Alexandria, Va., on the question of
whether to replace the present Minnesota-Wisconsin (M-W) milk price that is used to set
minimum prices in all federal milk marketing orders. Although the M-W price has been
widely accepted in the dairy industry as a good measure of changes in the supply and
demand for milk nationally, a continuing decline in manufacturing grade milk is gradually
making the M-W price less usable for formulating milk prices, says Daniel D. Haley,
administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service. Contact: Alicia L. Ford (202)
720-8998.


FINETUNING FERTILIZER APPLICATION -- Farmers can protect underground water
supplies without sacrificing high crop yields by simply finetuning fertilizer nitrogen
applications on irrigated corn and wheat, a USDA scientists says. In a two-year study on
a Nebraska corn farm, soil scientist James S. Schepers clamped a chlorophyll meter on
corn leaves to take the guesswork out of the amount of fertilizer nitrogen needed for
maximum yields. Contact: James S. Schepers (402) 472-1513.


SNACK FOODS BAGGING MARKETS -- Corn chips to Canada, jellybeans to Japan, salted
peanuts to Sweden -- U.S. snack foods are a hit abroad and U.S. exporters are taking
action, says Lori Huthoefer, an economist with USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service.
Since 1986, U.S. snack food exports have almost quadrupled, leaping from $155 million
to $587 million in 1991. This dynamic trend in snack food exports reflects aggressive
steps by the snack food industry to promote U.S. foods abroad. The fastest growing
exports in the U.S. snack food industry are from the confectionery group -- chocolate-
based snacks, sugar-based non-chocolate candy products, puddings, cookies, cakes,
pastries and other baked products. Confectioneries hold up better than salty snacks in
the shipping process. Contact: Lori Huthoefer (202) 720-1295.


BEEF SLAUGHTER DOWN SLIGHTLY -- USDA has released figures showing the
percentage of cattle slaughtered that were owned or controlled by the top 15 packer
firms before slaughter (known as "captive supplies") decreased about 1.7 percentage
points in 1991 from 1990. The 1991 commercial steer and heifer slaughter was 26.5
million head. The top 15 firms slaughtered 90 percent of the number, or 23.5 million
head. Data collected by USDA's Packers and Stockyards Administration showed that the
percentage of captive supplies rose in 1989 and then declined in both 1990 and 1991.
Contact: Sara K. Wright (202) 720-9528.








CORN UTILIZATION CONFERENCE -- The National Corn Growers Association will hold
their Corn Utilization Conference IV, June 24-26 at the Henry VIII Hotel and Conference
Center, St. Louis, Mo. Contact: Robin Johnston (314) 275-9915.


TREE PLANTING REPORT -- USDA has released the annual report, "Tree Planting in the
United States -- 1991," which summarizes tree planting, timber stand improvement and
nursery production activities across all ownerships of forest land in the U.S. It includes
state-by-state and ownership breakdowns, regional totals, as well as analysis of the
trends in the data. Copies are available by calling (202) 205-1379. Contact: John
Denne (202) 205-0974.


RURAL ECONOMY REMAINS SLUGGISH -- The overall rural economy remains sluggish,
despite low inflation and interest rates. Movements in consumer spending and long-term
interest rates will largely determine where the economy is headed, USDA economists say.
To get underway, a recovery must get a boost in consumer spending because it accounts
for about two-thirds of gross domestic product. The overall economic environment
should be a mildly positive factor for rural employment prospects. Because the overall
unemployment rate is expected to fall slightly during 1992, nonmetro rates should follow
suit. Contact: Jennifer L. Beattie and R. M. Monaco (202) 219-0782.


LARGE MEAT OUTPUT will put downward pressure on producer prices, USDA
economists say. Production of broilers, turkeys and eggs will likely be above a year ago,
which will cause generally lower producer prices. Poultry meat producers are facing
heightened competition from red meats. Lower prices and slightly higher feed costs are
pushing returns to near breakeven or below in each poultry sector. Contact: Leland
Southard (202) 219-0767.


RURAL POVERTY STILL HIGH -- Poverty continued to be more severe in rural areas than
in urban areas in 1990, the most recent year for which data are available, USDA
economists say. Rural areas have consistently had a higher poverty rate than urban
areas, at least since 1967. Rural people living in families headed by women is an
increasingly serious problem for rural areas. The share of the rural poor living in such
families has increased from 22 percent in 1969 to the present 30 percent. Contact:
Robert Hoppe (202) 219-0807.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1824 -- How long before farmers will not have to be concerned
about the destructive whitefly? On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis talks
with research scientists about the latest developments concerning whitefly eradication
and control. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1305 -- Restaurants and singles; potatoes -- convenient and
nutritious; how rich is enriched flour; farm-raised shrimp imports; chicken is flying high.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1815 -- USDA News Highlights; foreign food aide; meat
supplies pressure prices; 1992 whitefly outlook; transgenic cotton plants. (Weekly reel
of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1521 -- Some potatoes like it hot; cornstarch foam insulation;
dead grass herbicides; cow compound may help humans; computerized beehive. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 1, horticultural exports; Tues.,
June 2, weekly weather and crop update; Fri., June 5, dairy products report; Mon., June
8, vegetables report. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't
let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on zoysia grass research; Pat O'Leary reports on the
popular potato, Lynn Wyvill reports on summer food safety and Will Pemble reports on
using "big-eyed" bugs to attack whiteflies.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA economist Barbara Claffey on impact of general economy on entry
and exit into farming and mushroom production; USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen
on the latest weather and crop developments and USDA economist William Leifert on
former Soviet Union agricultural production.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on state rural development council; Pat
O'Leary reports on national turkey lovers' month and Lynn Wyvill reports on the livestock
outlook and food safety after a power failure.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:
Thursday from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT, and
Monday from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




It UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE III II
3 1262 08134 53
SIX-MONTHS LEAVE OF ABSENCE...has been taken by Jerry Perkins (Iowa Corn
Promotion Board, West Des Moines) to operate an agribusiness center near Stavropol,
Russia for the Iowa International Development Foundation. The center has three main
goals: display Iowa agribusiness products and technology; demonstrate high-yielding
crops and growing practices; and give instruction in marketing, processing and other
post-production techniques. Jerry will be joined at the site this summer by his wife and
three sons. Jerry says the Perkins family is regarding the change as an opportunity to
learn and grow. Thanks to Doug Cooper (Iowa State University/Ag Extension, Ames) for
the information. Doug is serving as the contact for Jerry, and has agreed to assemble
and send "Care" packages every other week to the Perkins' during their stay.

AG TOUR...of Israel is scheduled in November by Al Pell and Don Green (AgDay,
Lafayette, Ind.). They spent ten days last March in the nation producing reports for the
network on crops, markets, systems used for water-saving irrigation and research on
salinity tolerance and desalinization.


Farm Broadcasters Letter:

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












NATIONAL AG DAY...was observed by Von Ketelsen (KOEL, Oelswein, Iowa) with a
chores contest. The station volunteered Von to do chores on the winning farm.
Von says the response was terrific, lots of entries. Even the neighbors came by to watch
Von shovel out the stalls of the winning family's dairy barn. The prize also included Von
taking the family, parents and seven children, to lunch. The station is planning to
conduct the contest next year for Ag Day.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Col. Dink Embry (WHOP, Hopkinsville, Ken.). The state House
of Representatives passed a resolution honoring him for his leadership and service to the
people of K ucky. Dink has been farm director at WHOP for 47 years.


ieC POWEL L
Chief, Radio and TV Division







Central Sc!ence

Farm Broadcasters Letter i



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washingtfr oD27207Z5C12(20s2J71330
Letter No. 2560 May 29, 1992

U.S. FEED GRAIN PRODUCTION is expected to rebound in 1992-93, USDA economists
say. More acres planted and a return to more normal yields are expected to boost U.S.
feed grain production by 14 percent to 249 million tons. The higher output will more
than offset a 12 million ton decline in carrying stocks. Feed grain use in 1992-93 is
projected to increase nearly 4 million tons to 236 million. Planting progress through May
17 was ahead of the previous 5-year average. Contact: Tom Tice (202) 219-0840.


SHEEP PRODUCERS DIVERSIFYING -- Sheep and cattle ranchers may have battled over
grazing rights in the Old West, but these days they're finding that it pays to be a lot
friendlier to each other. "Mixed grazing provides greater potential to increase livestock
production in the Western States than sheep or beef cattle operations alone, says USDA
economist Hosein Shapouri. According to a 1986 USDA survey, 66 percent of s
producers also raise cattle. Moreover, 33 percent of sheep producers grow cr
percent raise livestock other than sheep or cattle. Contact: Hosein Shapour" 2) 219-
1285.
JUNt 24
SEX AND FUNGI FOIL PEST -- Fungi and sexual trickery kept root-destroyin bean
cyst nematodes from showing up for dinner in a new control scheme being p nd by
USDA scientists. "Compounds that mimic the female nematode's sex attract c Ds
pheromone, confuse the male so he can't find a female," says plant pathologist Su
L.F. Meyer. "And if they do mate, the fungus destroys many of the eggs." As a result,
there were 86 percent fewer pests in some outdoor plots last summer. USDA scientists
are now beginning more tests in Delaware and Maryland on larger plots. Contact: Susan
L.F. Meyer (301) 504-5660.


GREENHOUSE AND NURSERY SECTOR BLOSSOMING -- Americans spend almost as
much for flowers and plants as they do for fresh produce, says USDA economist Doyle
Johnson. In 1990, Americans spent $150 per person on greenhouse and nursery
products and about $196 per person on fresh produce. Johnson expects greenhouse and
nursery expenditures to keep rising in 1992 to $172 per person. Greenhouse and nursery
crops accounted for 10 percent of farm crop cash receipts -- ahead of such major crops
as wheat and cotton, Johnson says. Contact: Doyle Johnson (202) 219-0884.


HOW TO GET INFO -- The latest edition of "How to Get Information from the United
States Department of Agriculture" is still available. In addition to frequently used USDA
phone numbers, it includes phone numbers for USDA public affairs and agency info
offices. For a copy, contact: Marci Hilt (202) 720-6445. Media only, please.









NEWSLINE ON FAX -- USDA Radio's Newsline has joined the Farm Broadcasters Letter
on USDA's Ag NewsFAX. Each day items on the Newsline will be available by 5:30
p.m., Eastern time. The four-digit number needed to retrieve it will always be the same:
9250. To receive the Newsline from Ag NewsFAX, use the telephone connected to your
FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. Then, press 1 4 9250 # 3 on the telephone and
the start button your FAX machine. The Farm Broadcasters Letter continues to be
available on the Ag NewsFAX each Thursday by 2 p.m., Eastern time. If you encounter
a problem, call Diane O'Connor (202) 720-2168.


AQUACULTURE IS U.S. AG'S LATEST SUCCESS STORY -- The U.S. aquaculture
industry is laying the groundwork for future growth, says USDA economist David Harvey.
Aquaculture's potential is just being tapped, Harvey says. Over the past two decades,
U.S. producers have taken to aquaculture production and have been quite successful,
making it a major force in some parts of the domestic market. Even though 90 percent
of the fish consumed is caught in the wild, the harvest of wild-catch is approaching its
full potential, so aquaculture producers will need to fill future demand. Contact: David
Harvey (202) 219-0888.


MADIGAN APPOINTS MEDERO -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has
appointed Frederick R. Medero as associate administrator of USDA's Farmers Home
Administration. Medero most recently was managing director for The International
Environmental Investment Fund after serving as vice president for asset finance at the
investment banking firm of Kidder, Peabody & Co., Inc. Medero is a native of New York
and a graduate of St. John's University Law School and New York University Graduate
Law School. Contact: Dallas Sweezy (202) 720-4323.


USDA RADAR HELPS PRESERVE INDIAN BURIAL SITE -- Soil scientists and
conservationists wanted to prevent a 2,000-year-old American Indian burial ground in
Vermont from eroding into a river. However, they didn't know how far the boundaries
extended and they didn't want to dig because that would disturb the site. A USDA
ground-penetrating radar system -- a device housed in a wooden "sled" pulled along the
ground by truck -- solved the problem. As a result, USDA conservationists worked with
Vermont officials to alter the design of the streambank stabilization project to minimize
disturbances of the ancient burial ground. Contact: Anne Dudas (802) 951-5795.


WHEAT SUPPLIES -- USDA economists say total U.S. wheat supplies in 1992-93 will be
2.73 billion bushels -- the lowest since 1975-76. While the 1992 wheat crop, projected
at 2.27 billion bushels, is projected up 14.5 percent, much lower forecast carrying stocks
will more than offset increased production. U.S. wheat production in 1992 is led by a
projected 18 percent rise in winter wheat. Contact: Ed Allen (202) 219-0840.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1825 -- Consumer-ready foods are rapidly closing in on bulk farm
commodities as the leader in the world export market. Doug Wakefield reports on some
of the new winners in agricultural exporting. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1307 -- Keeping farmland in local hands; biotech foods; food safety
before the cookout; grilling foods safely; new program to control food poisoning bacteria
in eggs. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1816 -- USDA News Highlights; more help for disabled
farmers; the changing face of ag exports; no silver bullets for whitefly control; measuring
fertilizer needs. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1522 -- High-tech beehive; boosting honey production; bee
breeding tool; the buzz about pollination; good news about herbicides. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., June 5, dairy product output; Mon.,
June 8, vegetable production; Tues., June 9, crop/weather update; Wed., June 10, U.S.
crop production, world ag supply and demand; Thurs., June 11, U.S. tobacco outlook,
world ag and grain situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Fri., June
12, farm labor. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the
lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on rural development councils; Pat O'Leary takes a
look at "Turkey Lovers Month;" Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety and power failures.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; Allan
West, with USDA's Forest Service, on forest fire season; USDA economist Steve
MacDonald on U.S. exports.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on wheat outlook; Pat O'Leary reports
on USDA's Osaka Trade Office in Japan; Lynn Wyvill reports on livestock and poultry
outlook.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, transponder or channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink
frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 -
10:45 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE

OVERALL IMPRESSION...after a ten-day visit in May to farms in Russia and the Ukraine is
the impact of what the lack of incentive does to efficiency, says Lynn Ketelsen (Linder
Farm Network, Willmar, Minn.). Lynn says there is a stark contrast between private and
state farms. The private farms he saw were spotless, the machinery in working order
and people had pride in their work. Farmers starting out as private operators are pioneers
in a region that is largely third world, 40 years behind. Lynn says their determination to
rebuild agriculture was a moving experience.

FARM PROGRESS SHOW...is scheduled for Sept. 29 Oct. 1 in Columbus, Ind. Gary
Truitt (AgriAmerica Network, Indianapolis, Ind.) is making plans to cover the events. A
series of special updates on harvest activities, weather and traffic conditions will help
those attending the outdoor show. Gary says the network opened the planting season
with a week-long series of reports on farm safety. Among the issues cited in the series
were the hazards confronting farmers at planting time and the pressure of long hours that
create fatigue and can lead to accidents.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












HIGH WINDS...in the northern plains have caused some sugar beet producers to replant,
says Chris Blaine (KNOX, Grand Forks, N.D.). Chris has aired reports of producers
replanting 1,000 acres that had seed blown from the dry ground.

THANKS...for the feedback from George Gatley (Western Agri-Radio Networks, Yuma,
Ariz.) regarding his use of USDA radio features and documentaries offered in our weekly
cassette service.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Gary Crawford (USDA Radio) and his wife Debra Taylor. They
were married May 16. ...and to Johnnie Hood (WPTF/Southern Farm Network, Raleigh,
N.C.) and Peggy Esten. Their wedding date is June 19.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division






0_WI I Central Science

Farm Broadcasters, Lette e


Florid
United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV ...f.N -- s&boin, D.C. 20250
Letter No. 2561 .

EXPORT FORECAST SECOND HIGHEST ON RECORD -- USDA has raised its forecast for
1992 U.S. ag exports to $41 billion, up $1 billion from the February Outlook. Secretary
of Agriculture Edward Madigan said the figure is the second highest ag export value ever,
surpassed only by the fiscal 1981 figure of $43.8 billion. "The overall 1992 export
outlook has improved for U.S. soybeans, coarse grains, livestock products and
horticultural products," Madigan says. "This improvement shows that U.S. farmers can't
be beat when it comes to providing high-quality foods and feeds at competitive prices."
Contact: Stephen MacDonald (202) 219-0882.


NET CASH FARM INCOME UP -- USDA economists say 1992 net cash farm income will
be up. Production expenses have eased and government payments have increased since
the April forecasts, raising net cash income to a projected $51 to $58 billion from $49 to
$55 billion (April projection). Wheat cash receipts are likely to be 25 to 30 percent
higher than last year. Total cash receipts from food grains are projected to be the
highest in 7 years. Cash receipts from fruit and nuts are likely to push past $10 billion, a
new record. Dairy receipts will be up from a year ago. Contact: Bob Dubman (202)
219-0809.


USDA PUBLIC MEETING -- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Ann M. Veneman will hold a
USDA public meeting in Columbia, S.C., June 12 to hear how producers think USDA can
improve its services. The effort is part of Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan's
"Let Farmers Be Farmers" initiative, which is aimed at improving USDA's efficiency.
Contact: Eric Ruff (202) 720-4623.


AFRICANIZED HONEYBEES TO SPREAD -- Africanized honeybees can be expected to
spread to as many as four more states -- Arizona, California, New Mexico and Louisiana --
over the next 18 to 24 months, Anita Collins, a USDA geneticist says. Collins heads
USDA's Honey Bee Research Unit in Weslaco, Texas. How quickly the Africanized
honeybees spread will depend on the weather and on geographic obstacles such as
desert areas that offer no food or shelter to the swarming bees, Collins says. Contact:
Anita Collins (512) 969-4870.


RURAL REVITALIZATION -- USDA has expanded six Resource Conservation and
Development Areas in six states -- Arizona, Arkansas, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania
and Texas -- as part of USDA's rural revitalization efforts. "We are looking forward to
working with more communities as we assist local people in improving their economy and
the environment," says William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service.
Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 720-5776.








STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN FARM SECTOR -- The trend toward fewer but larger farms
continued during the turbulent 1970's and 1980's, but more slowly than during the
previous two decades, USDA ag economists Donn A. Reimund and Fred Gale say in a
new USDA publication -- "Structural Change in the U.S. Farm Sector, 1974-87: 13th
Annual Family Farm Report to Congress." Farm business returns and farm household
income are comparable with their non-farm counterparts. Farm households are wealthier
than the average American household, but farm businesses are much smaller than
businesses in other industries. Contact: Donn A. Reimund (202) 219-0522.


NEW WHEATGRASS BOOSTS PROFITS -- The legacy of a long-dead Soviet scientist is
coming to life with the release of Manska, a new wheatgrass for grazing that could put
extra pounds on steers and extra dollars in cattle producers' pockets. Seeds for Manska,
which takes its name from a contraction of "Mandan" and "Nebraska," were donated to
the U.S. in 1936 by Nikolai Ivanovich Vavilov, the Russian germplasm pioneer. Vavilov
died in 1943 in a Siberian labor camp. Commercial seed of Manska should be available
to farmers-by 1993. Contact: Kenneth P. Vogel (402) 472-1564.


ZERO ARP FOR WHEAT -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has announced a
zero percent acreage reduction program for the 1993 wheat crop. "We want our farmers
to recognize the commitment to exports behind this decision," Madigan said. "We will
continue to be a reliable supplier of wheat and we will sell that wheat into world markets.
We are committed to being competitive, using the Export Enhancement Program and all
other export promotion authorities at our disposal." Contact: Ray Waggoner (202) 720-
8206.


POULTRY IMPROVEMENT MEETING -- The biennial National Poultry Improvement Plan
Conference will be held June 29-July 2 in Colorado Springs, Colo. The conference gives
participants the opportunity to tell USDA about past success and future direction.
Scheduled topics include changes in the pulloram testing procedures and the use of a
federally licensed Salmonella enteritidis vaccine for some breeding chickens. Contact:
Alan Zagier (301) 436-7799.


NEW POTATO A REAL CHIPPER -- Costal Chip, a new potato for making chips, will be
good news for growers if it's a hot summer, says Kathleen G. Haynes, a USDA plant
geneticist. "We're hoping Coastal Chip will fill the market gap that can occur when
growers have problems with Atlantic, the most popular variety now used for potato chips
in the Northeast," she says. The new variety was used by some growers in the 1990
and 1991 crop years and is expected to be planted on a larger scale this year. Contact:
Kathleen G. Haynes (301) 504-7405.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1826 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Doug Wakefield and
eight members of the agricultural attache service highlight foreign markets where U.S.
exports are doing well. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1308 -- The role of the U.S. Department of Agriculture; a recession-
proof business; shrimp imports stir debate; rejuvenate, recycle, reuse; nutrition; old habits
die hard. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS AND FEATURES #1817 -- USDA News Highlights; North American free
trade negotiations; U.S. tobacco trade; no silver bullets; timeliness of the cotton
operation. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1523 -- Africanized bees to spread; living with Africanized bees;
bees and the educated consumer; bees and repellents; non-parch peanuts. (Weekly reel
of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 15, milk production, Asia
outlook; Tues., June 16, crop/weather update, sugar situation; Thurs., June 18, ag
outlook; Fri., June 19, cattle on feed; Mon., June 22, catfish, livestock/poultry update;
Tues., June 23, poultry production, ag trade update, crop/weather update; Wed., June
24, ag resources outlook; Thurs., ag chemical usage, cherry production. (These are the
USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you
from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on fishing in National Forests; DeBoria Janifer on the
upcoming western forest fire season; Will Pemble reports on how trees can slow global
warming.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan on GATT issues; USDA chief
meteorologist Norton Strommon on crops and weather; Bob Skinner, USDA economist on
cotton and wool production; USDA conservationist John Warner on the western water
outlook; Bob Dubman, USDA economist on farm income and finance.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA's wheat outlook; Pat O'Leary
reports on USDA's Osaka trade office; Lynn Wyvill reports on livestock and poultry.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, transponder or channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink
frequency 4160 MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 -
10:45 a.m., EDT, and Mondays from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE

A NEW SERVICE...for listeners has been installed, says Charles Blake (WIKY, Evansville,
Ind.). Called the "loyal listener phone," it has several categories of information, including
three for the agribusiness community: ag prices; a calendar of ag events; and an ag
weather advisory. The information is updated each day. You can hear it by calling (812)
422-9000. Charles says the "loyal listener phone" offers the ability for the station to
provide the service whenever a listener needs the information.

A GOOD LISTENING TOOL...is how a long-running series of programs is described by
Rich Balvanz (WMT, Cedar Rapids, Iowa). The station conducts interviews with 27
farmers across the state during the first days of planting and all the way through to
harvest. He says it is an effective way of keeping farmers informed of conditions and
developments during the production season. Rich also says the business community is
showing its interest in improving farm safety by sponsoring safety announcements on the
station.

Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












FEEDBACK...continues to be received by Gary Cooper (Southeast Agrinet, Ocala, Fla.) regarding
a series he produced on pre- and post-emergence spraying. His goal was to target growers and
consumers about the proper use of herbicides and insecticides. This time of year is the meeting
season for Florida vegetable and citrus producers. Gary says a major concern he hears is the
possible impact on Florida agriculture of a North American Free Trade Agreement.

A SERIES...on beef production and preparation was broadcast recently by Michael Dain (Mid
America Ag Network, Wichita, Kan.). Michael says the programs provided information to both
producers and consumers about the beef industry and the nutritive value of beef in the diet.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Bob Bosold (Central Ag News Network, Eau Claire, Wisc.). He has
received the top honor from the Wisconsin County Agents Association at their annual banquet.
June is Dairy Month. Bob plans to broadcast live from the Marshfield, Wisc., Mayor's breakfast --
for 3,000 peo e -- which recognizes the industry.


VIC POW LL
Chief, Radio and TV Division








Farm Broadcasters



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Divis


Central Science


--Wntaia, t' 2J0250


Letter No. 2562 June 12, 1992

NEW EXTENSION PROJECTS -- USDA's Extension Service is establishing education and
assistance projects on 29 Indian Reservations and tribal lands in 21 states. The $1.5
million program will provide education and technical assistance to Native American
communities through programs in agriculture, horticulture, 4-H and youth leadership,
nutrition and health. Contact: Hollis Hall (202) 720-6506.


USDA LIMITS CUTTING IN NATIONAL FORESTS -- USDA has proposed limiting clear-
cutting on national forests lands. "The new policy will limit clearcutting to areas where it
is essential to meet forest plan objectives, such as establishing habitat for endangered
species of wildlife," says F. Dale Robertson, chief of USDA's Forest Service. Robertson
says the proposal is part of a more ecological approach to management of USDA's 191-
million-acre national forest system. Clearcutting is a harvest method in which all trees
are removed at the same time from a site. Contact: Andy Fisher (202) 205-1055.


HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS -- Exports of U.S. horticultural products in March were
$538.8 million, up 23 percent from a year ago, USDA Foreign Agricultural Service
experts say. All commodity groupings contributed to the improved March export
showing, with the exception of dried fruit. Commodities registering the largest increases
were: oranges, rebounding from the impact of last year's low production, up 157
percent to $37 million; fresh tomatoes, up 73 percent to $19 million; and apples, up 71
percent to $29 million. During the first six months of fiscal year 1992, the total value of
U.S. horticultural exports was $3.1 billion -- 16 percent more than the same period last
year. Contact: Mark Thompson (202) 720-6877.


MAKING COW'S MILK MORE HUMAN -- Cow's milk can be made more like human breast
milk in a new process being patented by a USDA scientist. John Woychik, a USDA
chemist, says the new process makes cow's milk easily digested by infants without
causing an allergy linked to milk protein. "Cow's milk and human breast milk differ
significantly in protein concentration and composition," says Woychick. "It's these
differences that make human milk more nutritious and more easily digested than cow's
milk." In the new process, cow's milk is cooled and microfiltered to separate proteins in
one continuous step, in contrast to costly separate batch procedures. Contact: John
Woychik (215) 233-6483.


FARM LABOR -- During the week of April 12 18, there were 2.87 million people
working on the nation's farms and ranches -- down from 2.94 million a year ago. Farm
operators paid their hired workers an average wage of $6.05 per hour -- 24 cents more
than they were paid a year ago. Contact: Tom Kurtz (202) 690-3228.










FARM POPULATION DECLINES -- About 4.6 million people, or 1.9 percent of the total
U.S. population, lived on farms in 1990, says Daniel Sumner, USDA assistant secretary
for economics. "Changes over the 1980s show a continuation of the decline in the farm
resident population over many decades," Sumner says. "However, the 24.1 percent
decline in the 1980's was somewhat less than the rate of decrease in the 1970s." The
farm population consists of people living on farms in rural areas; it does not include the
relatively few farms in urban areas. Source: Residents of Farms and Rural Areas: 1990.
Contact: Laarni Dacquel (202) 219-0534 or Donald Dahmann (301) 763-5592.


SCIENTISTS IN HALL OF FAME -- USDA's Agricultural Research Service, the chief
research agency of USDA, has inducted three USDA scientists into their Hall of Fame for
1992. "These scientists have made contributions with major impacts on agriculture in
this country and around the globe," says ARS administrator R. Dean Plowman. "Their
expertise is still sought in the scientific community. Younger scientists would do well to
set similar goals in their careers." The three scientists are: entomologist Raymond C.
Bushland of Kerrville, Texas; poultry geneticist Lyman B. Crittenden of East Lansing,
Mich.; and corn geneticist Arnel R. Hallauer of Ames, Iowa. All are retired from federal
service. Contact: Ben Hardin (309) 685-4011.


ACCREDITING VETERINARIANS -- USDA has proposed a uniform national program to
replace veterinary accreditation at the state level. "National standards would allow
accredited veterinarians to perform federal veterinary service in several states," says Billy
G. Johnson, deputy administrator for veterinary services of USDA's Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service. "The current system requires veterinarians who move, work
near state borders, or work in several states to be accredited by each of those states."
Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.


WATER OUTLOOK DIM FOR WEST -- Water supply conditions remain lower than normal
in many Western states, says William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation
Service. "Spring runoff began earlier than usual this year as April temperatures melted
the already low snowpacks found in most of the western states," Richards says. "It
appears that most of the West will be faced with below- to well-below average
streamflows. Only the southernmost and northernmost areas of the West are likely to
receive average or above-average streamflows." Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 720-
5776.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1827 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Doug Wakefield
introduces you to seven key players in the international food marketing business.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1309 -- Turkey lovers month; African food crisis; rural household
income; summer cooking hazards; report on streamlined meat inspection. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1818 -- USDA News Highlights; wetlands reserve
program; pork from Mexico; U.S. tobacco trade; no silver bullets. (Weekly reel of news
features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1524 -- Worm-resistant cattle; biotech bulls; genetic bee barrier;
telling bees apart; backing up honeybees. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 29, ag prices outlook; Tues.,
June 30, weekly weather and crop outlook, acreage report, grain stocks, hog and pig
numbers, world tobacco situation, world coffee situation; Wed., July 1, farm production
spending ('91), horticultural exports. (These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Plae.-se don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the western water supply and Lynn Wyvill reports
on the poultry and livestock outlook and on egg safety.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan on international trade; USDA
meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop developments and USDA
Food Safety and Inspection Service administrator Russell Cross on streamlining poultry
inspection.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on the feed outlook; Pat O'Leary reports
on the cotton outlook and farm income and Lynn Wyvill reports on a program to help
farmers with disabilities continue farming.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT,
and Mondays from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.





SNIVERSITy OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 576 0

THE PHONE SYSTEM,...in Russia squelched plans to send daily feeds, says Owen Davis
(Michigan Farm-f idio Network, Lansing). Owen's partner Patrick Driscoll was a member of a
two-week information tour last month hosted by the Michigan Department of Agriculture that
visited Moscow, St. Petersburg, Minsk and the Ukraine. Owen says a Russian phone line became
available only once during the tour. Pat said there is little agricultural production near Moscow,
and due to transportation and other problems a smaller amount of food was available. Pat
returned with a number of programs that were broadcast on the network. Owen also says that
Michigan producers tell him about one-quarter of the cherry and grape crops were damaged by
late frost. With the large cherry crop of last year the reduced production may not have much
effect on prices. The impact on grape prices are unknown at this time.

TOUR...of manufacturing facilities in England, Belgium and Italy was recently completed by Ken
Tanner (WRAL-TV/Tobacco Radio Network, Raleigh, N.C.). Ken reviewed the Ford New Holland
agricultural equipment assembly plants in those countries and interviewed company officials
about improving production while maintaining staff at their U.S. plants.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











COTTON MARKET...is reacting to the expected drop in yield from producers in many sections
of Texas, says Larry DeSha (KGNC, Amarillo, Texas). Excessive wetness has forced some
producers to replant, but many can't get into fields due to soggy conditions. Wheat producers
are telling Larry their crop looks good, but wetness is delaying harvest and increasing chances of
quality problems. Larry also says he likes the new service offered by the National Association of
Farm Broadcasters. It provides the USDA radio Newsline and other news feeds daily via satellite.

JUNE IS DAIRY MONTH...and is being observed by John Everly (KDTH, Dubuque, Iowa) with a
special series of interviews. John visits dairy farms in his region and produces a daily program.
The station also plans to broadcast live a series of breakfasts with dairy producers. John says
that last year the program generated response from both urban and rural listeners, and helped
communicate city residents the work and life on a farm.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio and TV Division







Farm Broadcasters Lettera Science



United States Department of Agrifilft' Office of Pu s Radio-TV Division Washington, D. 20250. (202) 720-4330
uimvC rsity of Florida
Letter No. 2563 ------L 9 2-

CATTLE INSPECTIO CANGES -- USD ill add meat inspectors to assure food safety
at five meat packing a s operating d an approved quality control program, says H.
Russell Cross, adminis t .LoUS l ,AF.-od Safety and Inspection Service. "This will be
one of a number of step s ~'taking to modernize cattle inspection," he says.
Cross says VSDA has based the initial improvements on recommendations made by a
scientific review panel, which concluded that beef products produced in plants operating
under streamlined inspection procedures are of equal quality and safety as those
produced under traditional inspection procedures. Contact: Roger Runningen (202)
720-4623.


STATES TO GET $310 MILLION -- USDA will share an estimated $310 million in 1992
National Forest System receipts among 43 states and Puerto Rico. Receipts are collected
from land-use fees and sale of resources on 191 million acres of national forests and
grasslands. Federal law requires states to use their share of the receipts for public
schools and roads. Contact: Ann Matejko (202) 475-3787.


CHEESE-MAKING LEFTOVERS STOP EROSION -- To prevent soil erosion and boost
harvests on poor soils, leftovers from cheese-making may be the "whey" to go. "We
found that pumping cottage cheese whey onto sloped, furrow-irrigated fields can cut soil
erosion losses between 65 and 75 percent," says Melvin J. Brown, a soil scientist with
USDA's Agricultural Research Service in Kimberly, Idaho. Whey, in case you've
forgotten your nursery rhymes, is a leftover from the cheese-making process. It is
slightly milky and watery and is a little sticky because of its sugar and protein content.
The scientists used whey from cottage cheese, which is acidic, about the same pH as
vinegar. Contact: Melvin J. Brown (208) 423-6530.





USDA RADIO'S GARY CRAWFORD has
won the top award the New York
International Radio Festival gives in the
information/education category. Gary won
for "The Bacteria Caper." In some ways,
the awards are the Oscars of radio,
because they cover not only journalistic
achievements, butproduction, personalities
and promotion. Other finalists in the
catetory included the Australian
Broadcasting Corp. and several other radio
stations and production houses here and
abroad. (USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.)








NEW APPOINTMENTS -- Daniel A. Sumner has been sworn in as assistant secretary of
agriculture for economics. Sumner, who has served as the acting chief economist since
January, was confirmed by the Senate June 9. Before coming to USDA as deputy
assistant secretary for economics in January 1990, Sumner was a professor of
economics and business at North Carolina State University, Raleigh ... Duane Acker has
been sworn in as assistant secretary of agriculture for science and education. He was
also confirmed by the Senate June 9. Before his appointment, Acker was administrator
of USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service and Office of International Cooperation and
Development. Before joining USDA Acker was president of Kansas State University and
also was director and assistant to the administrator of the U.S. Agency for International
Development. Contact: Roger Runningen (202) 720-4623.



FARM LABOR -- During the week of May 10-16, there were 529,000 hired workers on
farms and ranches in the 11 surveyed states (New York, Pennsylvania, North Carolina,
Florida, Michigan, Wisconsin, Texas, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington and California).
This compares with 487,000 workers a year ago. Average May wage rates ranged from
$4.63 per hour in Wisconsin to $6.45 in Florida. Contact: Tom Kurtz (202) 690-3228.


WORLD OILSEEDS -- USDA experts project world oilseed production for 1991-92 at
223.8 million tons, nearly unchanged from last month, but up 3 percent from last year.
The major change this month is a reduction in Paraguay's soybean crop. Contact: Jim
Matthews (202) 720-5448.


VOTE SET ON MUSHROOM PROMOTION PROGRAM -- USDA is asking mushroom
producers if they want a promotion, research and consumer information program for
fresh mushrooms. Producers will vote on the proposed program from July 22 through
Aug. 12. The program, which would be funded by producer assessments, would be
administered by a council of four to nine producer and importer members. Council
members would be appointed by the secretary of agriculture from nominees submitted by
the industry. Contact: Rebecca Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.


PICKING A RIPE MELLON -- Picking a ripe early-season melon takes a little know-how,
says Tom Koske, extension horticulturist with the Louisiana State University Agricultural
Center. "Watermelon ripen very little after harvest," Koske says. Some say the tendril
nearest the fruit dries and becomes brown as the melon ripens. Many growers "thump"
the melon or slap it, listening for a dull, hollow sound. A sharp metallic ring indicates
immaturity. The surest way to check a melon usually is to check the ground spot, Koske
says. The area where the melon lies on the soil is yellow when immature. It changes to
a creamy white when the melon is ripe. Contact: Thomas J. Koske (504) 388-2222.

Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1828 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis travels to
Cochise, Ariz., where she visits with organic farmers Doug and Evelyn Corron. She finds
out how they started in the business during their so-called retirement years. (Weekly reel
-- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1310 -- Meat inspection changes; a forest management partnership;
Western water woes; houseplant soap opera; farming on a few acres in the desert.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS and FEATURES #1819 -- USDA News Highlights; oilseeds and
retaliation; irrigation for cotton; fields of plastic; an electric farmer. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1525 -- "Tobacco" soap kills whiteflies; fungus fingerprinting;
beekeepers keep watch; wild bee hunt; bee blips. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., July 7, weekly weather and crop
update; Thurs., July 9, crop production report; world ag supply/demand; Fri., July 10,
farm labor report, world ag/grain situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation.
(These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA feed outlook; Pat O'Leary reports on
USDA's cotton crop; Will Pemble takes a look at xanthase to recover natural gas; Pat
O'Leary reports on farm income.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Ray Motha on weather and crops; USDA World
Board chair James Donald on world supply and demand estimates.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA's child nutrition guide; Lynn
Wyvill reports on helping farmers with disabilities; Pat O'Leary reports on a new USDA
trade office in Japan.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT,
and Mondays from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 571 1

VIC POWELL is on vacation, so this gives Brenda a chance to practice her writing skills!?!

WASHINGTON AG WATCH ... All of us here at USDA Radio-TV are looking forward to
saying hello to the farm broadcasters who are coming to Washington, D.C., to participate
in this year's two-day event. Taylor Brown (NAFB president) and the public affairs staff
in Radio-TV have been trying to get all the details worked out for this jam-packed session
June 25 and 26. "Not only has this event become the news gathering opportunity of the
year for many NAFB members," Taylor says, "but the 1992 program will be especially
valuable because it will be held in conjunction with the quadrennial U.S. Ag
Communicators Congress, which draws leading ag communicators from all fields."

STORY IDEAS -- One of the things the USDA Radio-TV staff wants to hear from NAFB
members attending the Washington Ag Watch is what stories you want covered more,
less or not at all! Please let us know, because you are our best clients.

Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










CONGRATULATIONS to USDA Radio's Gary Crawford for bringing home top honors at
this year's International Radio Awards Festival in the information/education category. I
keep hoping some of Gary's production talents will rub off ...

MAX MOLLESTON (WKBF, Rock Island, III.) wrote to me about my reflections of the
Southwest (OFFMIKE, April). Max said the column I wrote on my travels to Arizona
brought to mind his own reflections of the Rockies after the NAFB Western meeting last
summer. Max wrote a beautiful poem titled "Western Meeting." Space limitations
dictate I can share only a few lines: "Shadows of clouds on the mountains spell in wind
and water directions of timely and timeless progressions. Rock forms the past and future
at a glance, habitable and unhabitable ..."

S you at s ington Ag Watch!


B ENDA URT S
acting Chie Radio and TV Division








Farm


United States,


Office


ters Lette& Library



Radio-TV Division Washington, D.C. 6' c 02


Letter No. 2564 \' June 26, 1992

U.S. AG EXPORTS UP-- .. agricultural exports during April -- at $3.7 billion -- were up
18 percent from the same month last year, according to the June issue of Agricultural
Trade Highlights. Sharply higher shipments of wheat, soybeans and products, and high-
value products accounted for most of the gain. April's performance brings the
cumulative fiscal 1992 total to $26.3 billion, up 13 percent from the same period last
year. Consumer-oriented exports are up 19 percent over the same seven-month period
last year. Contact: Mike Woolsey (202) 720-1294.


YOUTH AT RISK -- USDA has awarded $10 million to state Extension Services to
establish and continue "Youth at Risk" programs in certain communities across the
nation. The "Youth at Risk" program is targeted to youth who are vulnerable because of
poverty, lack of parental and community support and negative peer pressure, says Myron
Johnsrud, administrator of USDA's Extension Service. In 1991, $7.5 million in federal
funds supported 70 projects. The $10 million for 1992 will allow for the continued
support of 68 of these programs, and for the creation of 25 additional projects. Contact:
Tom Willis (202) 720-2047.


SWISS CHEESE UNDERCUTS U.S. -- The U.S. government has determined that Swiss
cheese imported from Switzerland is being subsidized by that country's government and
is unfairly undercutting the price of U.S.-produced Swiss cheese, Secretary of Agriculture
Edward Madigan says. "This determination opens the way for the U.S. trade
representative to notify the government of Switzerland that it has 15 days from
notification to eliminate the subsidy or otherwise ensure that the wholesale price of the
imported cheese is not less than the wholesale price of U.S.-produced produce," Madigan
says. If the issue is not resolved within 15 days, the next step would be a
recommendation to the president that import fees be imposed on the Swiss cheese.
Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.


FOREST RESEARCH PROJECT AT LINCOLN UNIVERSITY -- USDA's Forest Service is
establishing a research project at Lincoln University, an 1890 Land Grand institution in
Jefferson City, Mo. The unit will study the long-term effects of forest management
practices on site productivity in central hardwoods forest ecosystems. Ronald Lindmark,
director of Forest Service's North Central Forest Experiment Station, called the new effort
"an excellent opportunity to strengthen ties with the historically black university's faculty
and students while learning how best to manage the central hardwoods forests in an
environmentally sound way." Contact: John Denne (202) 205-0974.







U.S. SPECIALISTS HELP RUSSIA -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan is sending
four teams of wholesale market development specialists to Russia this spring and summer
to help that country stabilize and modernize its food marketing system. "This technical
assistance is designed to help Russia set up an efficient system of post-harvest handling,
storage and wholesale marketing and distribution of food products," Madigan says.
"Such a system will be an important component in the federation's continuing progress
toward developing workable free markets and a stable democracy." Three of the teams
are already in Russia and the fourth will travel there later this summer. Contact: Connie
Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.


USDA'S NATIONAL ORGANIC STANDARDS BOARD will meet July 7 to 10 in Fort
Collins, Colo. Daniel D. Haley, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service,
says the board will review progress reports and plans of its subcommittees and develop a
long-range plan for board program implementation. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202)
720-8998.


HISTORIC BARNS -- The University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program at
Burlington is sponsoring a new course on barn history. The course is designed for
planners and policy makers, teachers, farmers, property owners, historians and students
studying conservation and preservation of historic agricultural properties. From the small
"English" barns of the late 1700's to the five-story dairy barns of the early 20th century,
lingering evidence of medieval transitions, bountiful harvests and bleak hard times can be
found in the barns, which dot our rural landscape. Contact: University of Vermont
(800) 639-3210.


WILD WHEAT GENES -- A type of wild wheat carries genes that may provide resistance
to future infestations of the leaf rust that has ravaged this year's hard red winter wheat
crop, USDA scientists report. The genes appear to be very powerful against rust, says
Thomas "Stan" Cox, a wheat geneticist with USDA's Agricultural Research Service at
Manhattan, Kans. Leaf rust infects wheat plant leaves, resulting in lower seed formation
and yields. Contact: Stan Cox (913) 532-7260.


BALANCED FOOD INTAKE -- Americans have conflicting emotions surrounding their ideas
about food and eating. "Current emphasis of achieving a certain body weight or shape
has led many Americans to feelings of guilt and unrealistic expectations about what is
attainable through diet," says Beth Reames, extension nutritionist with the Louisiana
Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Center. Slow weight loss is probably best
way to lose weight and keep it off, Reames says. Contact: Beth Reames (504) 388-
4141.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 720-6445
Fax: (202) 690-2165
Ag NewsFAX (202) 690-3944







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1829 -- Maria Bynum visits a special farm in Delaware that shows
farmers several valuable soil conservation practices. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1311 -- Meat for the grill; food programs and food banks; five
vegetables a day; organic or not; don't waste yard "wastes." (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1820 -- USDA News Highlights; Secretary of
Agriculture Edward Madigan assesses reorganization; animal drug residues down; whey
may be the way to rejuvenate soils; the western water situation. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1526 -- Insulin and dwarfism; hot bath for guavas; controlling
nuisance bees; death by mating; versatile nematode. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., July 1, farm production spending
(1991), horticultural exports; Fri., July 3, federal holiday, no scheduled USDA reports
until Tues., July 7, crop/weather update; Thurs., July 9, U.S. crop production, world ag
supply and demand; Fri., July 10, farm labor, world ag/grain situation, world oilseed
situation, world cotton situation. (These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's new Osaka, Japan, trade office; DeBoria
Janifer on USDA's child nutrition guide; Lynn Wyvill on summer grilling safety.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan on USDA streamlining; USDA
meteorologist Tom Puterbaugh on U.S. crops and weather; USDA economist Jim Hauver
with USDA's latest agricultural outlook.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on electronic preservation of old books at
USDA's National Agricultural Library; Lynn Wyvill reports on crop residue management;
DeBoria Janifer on research at the National Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Md.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
information in "news desk" format with B-roll.

Available on Satellite Galaxy 6, channel 23, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 4160
MHz.: Thursdays from 7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT, Saturdays from 10 10:45 a.m., EDT,
and Mondays from 8 8:45 a.m., EDT.




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 566 1

DID HIGH MOISTURE LEVELS...in no-till soybean fields make the plants more susceptible to
frost damage? That was the question Skip Davis (WASK, Lafayette, Ind.) put to producers in the
state's northwest section hit by frost in early June. Nearby fields that had been conventionally
tilled, and therefore drier, were not damaged. Skip says it was the only variable among the fields.
The producers said it was something to think about, but they replanted using no-till. The Indiana
State Fair, Aug. 12-23, celebrates 100 years at its location in Indianapolis. Skip's daughter
Stefanie, a student at Franklin College, is part of a team touring Indiana county fairs and events
this summer promoting the state fair.

LEAVING SUFFICIENT RESIDUE...and how to measure it are goals of the Illinois Crop Residue
Management Team, says Peggy Kaye Fish (WFMB, Springfield, III.). Peggy is a member of the
team, and is also working to form a group in her county to help in the effort. Producers are urged
to check their conservation plan for compliance, and to measure residue after planting. Peggy
says the busy season has definitely arrived. Multi-meeting days and the first of a series of county
fairs to cover.


Farm Broadcasters Letter


Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
US. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












QUALITY AND QUANTITY...of agricultural loans were higher this season in the region served
by Roger Flemmer (KFAB, Omaha, Neb.). Roger says availability of funds put loan volume above
last year's level.

FFA...projects have been receiving help from farm broadcasters. Ed Johnson (ABN Radio/TV,
Columbus, Ohio) produced a story about a 29-year old maple syrup operation that is conducted
by chapter members in Mason, Mich. Mike Miller (Agnet, Houston, Texas) is raising funds for
chapters by helping FFA students sell subscriptions.

THANKS...for the feedback from John Rader (KERI, Bakersfield, Calif.). John says in response
to listener requests, the station is featuring a USDA Consumer Time feature every weekday.
Consumer Time is part of the weekly series of programs available to stations on cassette. John
says the station's George Miller will be away from the microphone until next month while he's
recovering froq an injury.

VIC POWELL V
Chief, Radio and TV Division