Farm broadcasters letter - 1991

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Title:
Farm broadcasters letter - 1991
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Division
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Broadcasting and Film
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
-letter no. 2669 (July 1, 1994).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by: the Office of Communication, Radio and Television Service; 19 -<May 2, 1980>, Feb. 24, 1983-19 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division; <May 16, 1980>-Feb. 17, 1983 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Broadcasting and Film; <Apr. 27, 1990>-199 by: the Office of Public Affairs, Radio-TV Division; 199 -<1994> by: Office of Communications.
General Note:
Description based on: Letter no. 1882 (Nov. 3, 1978); title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34A

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02563831
lccn - sc 77000719
issn - 0364-5444
Classification:
lcc - S21 .A82
System ID:
AA00000580:00003

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Broadcasters letter

Full Text




Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department ofAgri Office of Public Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
Letter No. 2490 Jan. 11, 1990

1991 FARM PROGRAMS -- S r. ary of Agric tre Clayton Yeutter has announced a
series of farm program p vi jons for 199 Irops. The required acreage reduction a
farmer must make in base a T p.antings to be eligible for supports on that
program crop: wheat, 15 perent~j in 'barley & grain sorghum, 7.5 percent; upland
& extra-long staple cotton, 5 percent; and for oats, zero percent. There is no
cross compliance. Farmers may elect to make acreage reduction cuts in one program
crop to qualify for supports in that crop & pass up supports in another crop by
planting his or her full crop base, or exceeding the base, in that program crop on
the same farm. Contact: Robert Feist (202) 447-6789.

SPECIAL PLANTINGS INTENTIONS SURVEY -- USDA will conduct a special planting
intentions survey the last two weeks of January & publish the results Feb. 11.
Charles Caudill, administrator of USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service,
says the report will include 1991 national level acreage intentions for corn,
sorghum, soybeans, barley, durum wheat, other spring wheat, rice, cotton and
sunflowers. The report will also show the proportion of farmers who intend to plant
other oilseeds -- canola, rapeseed, safflower, flaxseed & mustard seed. Contact:
Duane Jewell (202) 447-7017.

IF YOU'VE GOT SOME WORNOUT HEAVY-DUTY RUBBER TIRES you can't burn or bury, here's a
solution: turn those tires into watering troughs for livestock. Herb Andrick,
district conservationist with USDA's Soil Conservation Service, in Philippi, W.Va.,
is helping West Virginia farmers do that. In addition, some farmers may become
eligible for the Agricultural Conservation Program by using these tires as "tire-
troughs," says Andrick. These used tires are generally about six to eight feet in
diameter & weigh about 1,000 pounds. Contact: Herb Andrick (304) 457-4517.

RAINDROPS POINT FINGER AT POLLUTION -- Each raindrop may not be unique like a
snowflake, but it can be different enough to tell where it came from, says Harry B.
Pionke, a USDA soil scientist. Pionke says differences in the weights of oxygen
atoms in water molecules act as fingerprints for raindrops. "We are tracing the
paths of raindrops through soil to groundwater and streams by comparing oxygen atoms
in water samples," he says. Contact: Harry B. Pionke (814) 865-2048.

COWS COULD HELP INFANTS -- A USDA scientist has found a rare & often fatal genetic
defect seen in human infants in dairy cattle. The discovery could bring scientists
closer to developing gene therapies in an animal that might be used as a model to
study the condition in humans, says Marcus E. Kehrli, Jr., a USDA veterinary medical
officer. Kehrli discovered the defect, called leukocyte adhesion deficiency or LAD,
in cattle. Human LAD was first identified by medical researchers in 1982. To date,
80 human cases have been confirmed. Contact: Marcus E. Kehrli (515) 239-8462.









ORIENTAL PERSIMMONS HIGH IN VITAMIN C -- Oriental persimmons have about three times
as much vitamin C as citrus, says Jerry A. Payne, a USDA scientist. Payne says
certain varieties of orange-red Oriental persimmons provide 218 milligrams of
ascorbic acid per 100 grams of fruit, or up to 363 percent of the recommended daily
intake of vitamin C. Citrus -- the best-known source of vitamin C -- normally
contains 40 to 70 milligrams of ascorbic acid per 100 grams of fruit. Payne says we
shouldn't confuse Oriental persimmons -- two to four inches around -- with the
smaller, seedier American type that grows wild and is "puckery." Contact: Jerry A.
Payne (912) 956-5656.

1991 MILK SUPPORT PRICE UNCHANGED -- Sec. Yeutter announced that the support price
for milk will remain at $10.10 per hundred-weight for 1991 for milk with a milkfat
content of 3.67 percent -- the national average. The equivalent support price for
3.5 percent milkfat content is $9.90 per hundredweight. Contact: Robert Feist
(202) 447-6789.

MILK INVENTORY STUDY -- USDA has asked for public comments for a milk inventory
management program which will be studied by the secretary of agriculture, as
required by the recently-enacted farm bill. Keith Bjerke, executive vice president
of USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation, said the secretary is required to submit a
report before Aug. 1 on milk inventory management programs to the Committee on
Agriculture of the U.S. House of Representatives & the U.S. Senate's Committee on
Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. Proposals should be sent, no later than Feb.
6, to Charles Shaw, Commodity Analysis Div., ASCS, USDA, PO Box 2415, Washington,
D.C. 20013. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 447-8206.

MEAT & POULTRY RESIDUE QUESTIONS -- USDA has just printed a consumer booklet about
chemical residues in meat & poultry. It explains residues, illegal levels of
residues, what the government does to protect consumers and what consumers can do to
reduce exposure to residues. For a copy of "Questions and Answers About Chemical
Residues," call Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.

NEW TEST DETECTS HARMFUL BACTERIUM -- A USDA scientist is patenting a new test that
detects & recovers harmful strains of a bacterium from food & water. Yersinia
enterocolitica, a pathogen of growing concern to federal regulatory agencies, can
reach infectious levels in milk, beef & other meat products within four days during
refrigerated storage. Saumya Bhaduri, a USDA microbiologist, says his test used
Congo red dye to detect the harmful strains. He says harmful bacteria can be
collected from food, food processing equipment, water & sewer treatment facilities &
then grown in a lab for identification & verification. Contact: Saumya Bhaduri
(215) 233-6521.

DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR PET BIRD REALLY CAME FROM? Will it get sick & die? Will it
spread disease? USDA is again warning the public & commercial buyers to be certain
they don't buy smuggled birds. Smuggled birds have been responsible for outbreaks
of Exotic Newcastle disease in the past. If you think a bird may have been smuggled
into the U.S., don't buy it. How can you tell? Birds authorized for sale have a
circular, stainless steel, USDA-approved leg-band, which is engraved with three
letters & three numbers. Contact: Margaret Webb (301) 436-6573.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE
AGRICULTURE USA #1753 -- What makes a great bottle of wine? On this edition
of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis pays a visit to a local winemaker
in Chautauqua County, New York, to find out just what goes into
making a good wine. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME


AGRITAPE NEWS


#1234 -- Iron & OJ; fast food myths; some delicious rice recipes;
window anti-cold retrofitting; lowering the thermostat. (Weekly reel
of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

& FEATURES #1742 -- USDA News Highlights; payment limitation changes;
details on Soviet credit guarantees; genetically altered fish; U.S.
wheat products popular in Japan. (Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1402 -- Balanced diet vs. the RDA; avoid fad diets; maintaining
ideal weight; Americans eat less fat; wasp bags bagworms. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., Jan. 18, livestock & poultry outlook,
turkey outlook; Mon., Jan. 21, Holiday, Tues., Jan. 22, dairy
outlook, U.S. ag trade update; Wed., Jan. 23, weekly weather & crop
outlook, catfish report; Thurs., Jan. 24, oil crops outlook crop
values; Fri., Jan. 25, livestock & poultry update, cattle on feed &
livestock slaughter.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Jan. 10, 12 & 14, 1991)

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on winter care of plants & Will Pemble
reports on breeding long-grain rice.

ACTUALITIES -- F. Paul Dickerson, general sales manager of USDA's Foreign
Agricultural Service, on the credit guarantees to the Soviet Union for
ag products; USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on the condition
of California & Florida citrus crops & winter wheat; Catherine Adams, of
USDA's Food Safety & Inspection Service, on upcoming HACCP workshops for
meat & poultry inspection; Veterinarian Keith Hand on preventing exotic
birds from being smuggled into the U.S.; USDA Economist LeLand Southard
on the hogs & pigs inventory.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Deboria Janifer reports on the WIC program; Lynn Wyvill on
home-based businesses & Pat O'Leary on the 1991 Farm Bill & the
environment.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4l l l l1 l l I ill i
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08 34 080 3

IMPACT OF FLOODING...will not be apparent until Spring thaw, says Skip Davis
(WASK, Lafayette, Ind.). He says wheat is in its dormant stage and can
withstand being covered by water for longer periods. Any erosion will become
apparent as the water recedes. Most damage has been to homes and personal
items. Skip says an $8.5 million confined-hog-operation is planned for his area
and awaits approval from the state environmental management agency. The station
is changing owners, and Skip predicts 1991 will be better than 1990.

TRANSPORTATION...is a real problem, says Max Stewart (WIBV, Belleville, Ill.).
Interstate highways are open but producers can't get to them, preventing grain
from moving to market. A series of storms dropped freezing rain and snow
bringing movement to a halt. Weight doesn't do much good under those conditions
-- wheels of big tractors spin as easily as lighter ones. Max says it took ten
minutes to read the list of closed schools.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










COLD TEMPERATURES...and icy conditions have increased the concern of Oklahoma
cattle producers, says Cyndi Young (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City). Producers
are experiencing weight gain performance problems and freezing rain has
increased the importance of providing shelter. Cyndi is busy covering
meetings -- the Oklahoma Conservation Committee was on her schedule when we
talked -- and filling in for NAFB president Ron Hays, who is traveling more
these days.

CLOSED...Georgia Agrinews, Moultrie. Everett Griner says he plans to produce
daily farm programs for a local station.

NEW VOICE...at WPRC, Lincoln, Ill., is Tom Gibson formerly with WIAI, Danville,
Ill.

NEW MEMBER...of Morning Agriculture Report, Indianapolis, Ind., is Matt Fleck,
ormer far director t WTHI-TV, Terre Haute, Ind.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department oa ture Office of tfairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2491 Jan. 18, 1991

NEW FOOD SAFETY PU '-Because many he 7 million cases of foodborne illnesses
reported each year Uk.S. r from consumers mishandling food after they buy
it, USDA has a new p a p teach consumers how to handle food safely.
"A Quick Consumer Guide Fod Handling" is a fold-out booklet that provides
do's & don't. "According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control,
approximately 85 percent of foodborne illness incidents could be avoided by
following safe methods for food handling," says Lester N. Crawford, administrator of
USDA's Food Safety & Inspection Service. Contact: Jim Greene (202) 382-0314.

SPOUSES SEPARATE -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter has exercised his
discretionary authority under the 1990 Farm Act to allow spouses to be considered as
separate people for payment limitation purposes for the 1991 through 1995 crop
years. This means spouses will be treated exactly as two siblings who are farming
together, Yeutter says. "During the past several years, many farm organizations
have brought to my attention the manner in which payment limitations have adversely
affected family farms," Yeutter says. "I am going as far as the law will allow me
with this decision." Contact: Bob Feist (202) 447-6789.

NEW CONSUMER INFO CATALOG -- The Consumer Information Center recently put out its
Winter catalog of free and low-cost federal publications. Along with a wealth of
other pubs, this issue features booklets on home mortgages, ways to lower auto
insurance costs, where to write for vital records & dietary guidelines for
Americans. For a copy of the Winter Consumer Information Catalog, contact: Linda
O'Neil (202) 501-1794.

FOREIGN BIOCONTROL AGENTS HELP -- USDA scientists based in Rome, Italy, are
recruiting, testing & shipping special crews of helpful weed-fighting bugs &
microorganisms back to the U.S. "The growth in weed biocontrol shipments has been
explosive," says Lloyd Knutson, director of USDA's Biological Control of Weeds Lab
in Rome. In 1980, he says, the Rome lab shipped 2,377 insects & microorganisms of
seven weed-attacking species. By 1990, the annual total jumped to 80,175 of 28
species. Contact: Lloyd Knutson, phone in Rome: 011-39-507-0145.

GRAZING FEES SET -- As of March 1, USDA's fee for grazing livestock on national
forests in 15 Western states will be $1.97 per head per month -- a 16 cent increase
over 1990 levels. The fee is going up, says F. Dale Robertson, chief of USDA's
Forest Service, because prices farmers & ranchers receive for beef cattle have
increased & because private grazing land lease rates have increased. Contact:
Diane Hitchings (202) 475-3778.


A S43^ : 2491








"SILVER MARKET" OPENS -- For a food exporter, targeting sales toward the "silver
market" -- the over-60 crowd -- can mean sales opportunities if products are
positioned correctly, five U.S. ag attaches & trade officers say. By the year 2000,
one in five people in developed countries will be over 60, according to United
Nations statistics. By 2025, that figure will rise to one in four. In France, for
example, older consumers will be demanding healthier foods. French seniors are
becoming as quick as the younger generation in adapting new food products such as
low-fat yogurt & convenience foods. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 382-9442.

HERBICIDES LEND A HAND -- Some herbicides fight weeds in crops by causing the weeds
to overdose on their own natural chemicals, says USDA Chemist Stephen 0. Duke.
Duke's discovery is that diphenyl ether herbicides, which are used on a variety of
crops, including soybeans, cotton & peanuts, disrupt the weed's production of
chlorophyll. When the herbicide is applied, the weed builds up a natural compound
normally used to make chlorophyll. This compound absorbs light & interacts with
oxygen to produce a form of toxic oxygen that destroys the weed cell membranes.
Contact: Stephen 0. Duke (601) 686-2311.

SMALL FARM TIPS -- The latest issue of "Small-Scale Agriculture Today" includes lots
of tips for small-scale farmers. Some of the tips are: mulch soil to conserve
moisture & control weeds; to help condition livestock, put the feed on one end of
the paddock & the water on the opposite end so the animals have to walk between the
two; and clean all purchased used farm equipment or seeds before using. Want a
copy? Contact: Howard "Bud" Kerr (202) 401-4640.

FARMER TO FARMER -- Know someone who might be interested in hosting an Egyptian
farmer on the farm for four weeks? The Agricultural Cooperative Development
International will provide each farm family $20 a day to help cover the cost of
hosting a visitor. Contact: Linda Schmid (202) 638-4611.

SEX LEADS TO UNDOING FOR MOTH -- Cranberry growers are using a sex lure as part of
an integrated pest management program aimed at cutting pesticide use. Growers use
the lure to trap cranberry girdler moths to determine whether they'll need to use
insecticides. The trap consists of a small red rubber plug impregnated with a
synthetic version of the female's pheromone. The plug is suspended over a sticky
trap. Males try to mate with the plug and become trapped when they fall in the
trap's stickumm." Contact: James Kamm (503) 757-4365.

FAR EAST MARKETS HOLD PROMISE -- U.S. ag exporters should look to the Far East for
the best sales prospects, says Mike Dwyer, a USDA trade expert. Dwyer says the best
overseas markets for U.S. ag during the next three to five years are Taiwan, Japan,
South Korea & Hong Kong. Other Far East nations near the top of Dwyer's list are
China, Singapore, Pakistan, Thailand & Malaysia. Dwyer used a model that ranks 75
countries on the basis of their market potential for a broad range of U.S. farm &
food products. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 382-9442.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1754 -- If you're tired of working for someone else, you
might want to consider starting a home-based business. On this
edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis reports on issues that must
be addressed before starting such a venture. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1235 -- 1991 retail citrus prices vary; loss of U.S. farms likely to
slow; home-based businesses; replacing your windows; preventing
foodborne illnesses. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1743 -- USDA News Highlights; planting flexibility
details; 1991 U.S. winter wheat crop; wheat prospects; a new export
forecast. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1403 -- Bio-availability of nutrients; nutrient
interactions; human cell cultures; diet & body composition; natural
weight maintenance. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., Jan. 25, cattle on feed, livestock
slaughter, livestock & poultry update, national food review; tues.,
Jan. 29, eggs, chickens & turkeys, layers & egg production; Wed.,
Jan. 30, peanut stocks & processing; Thurs., Jan. 31, ag prices;
Fri., Feb. 1, egg products, poultry slaughter, catfish production.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Jan.. 17, 19 & 21, 1991)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the 1991 USDA farm financial forecast;
Deboria Janifer reports on winter plant care.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter speaks to reporters
in Washington about GATT & other issues; Norton Strommen, USDA
meteorologist, with a crop & weather update; USDA Economist Bob McElroy
on USDA's farm costs survey; USDA Economist Kate Buckley on the citrus
fruit situation; USDA World Agricultural Outlook Board Chairman James
Donald on crop production.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill on sending food to the troops; Pat O'Leary on
environmental provisions of the 1990 Farm Bill; Will Pemble on
putting seeds to sleep.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
III I Il I 1 1llllllJ l 1II 1
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 084 5

APPLICATION OF THE FARM BILL...to everyday operations is of major interest to
producers in west central Minnesota, says Paul Weyrens (KBRF, Fergus Falls). In
the "Land of 1,000 Lakes" the new wetlands provisions will likely affect
operations. Farmers want to know how to make the rules work. On Feb. 6, Paul
will be broadcasting at the annual Crop & Forage Show in Fergus Falls covering
award winners, new products & speakers.

FOUR-STATE MEETING...the KMOA 1991 Beef Conference, is being held by the
Extension Service in Joplin, Mo., in mid-January. Hugh Robinson (KKOW,
Pittsburg, Kan.) is serving as moderator. He says local cattle producers are
happy and optimistic about 1991.
OUTSTANDING YEAR...was registered by most tobacco producers in 1990, reports
David Spatola (WNCT, Greenville, N.C.). Quotas are the same this year and, if
weather holds, 1991 also looks good.

Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












PREPARATIONS FOR FIELD WORK...are getting underway in Mississippi, says Douglas
Thomas (Progressive Farmer Network, Starkville). Corn will be planted in early
March. The network is conducting an ag seminar in February regarding the new
farm bill. Doug says understanding planting flexibility is on the minds of most
producers. Cotton and soybean acreage is expected to be larger in response to
the farm bill.

THE WEST...is big country and Evan Slack (Evan Slack Network, Denver, Colo.)
says he flew 60,000 miles in his aircraft covering the region last year. The
spirits of beef producers, he reports, are upbeat. Evan plans to cover the
National Cattlemen's Association meeting in Dallas this month, and speak at the
Eastern Oregon Ag Show, January 25-26 in Ontario, Ore., getting a good start on
mileage in 19.&I


Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Off i Affairs Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2492 1 / f Jan. 25, 1991

MEAT & POULTRY LABELING -- US ill develop st rds for mandatory nutrition
labeling of meat & poultry pro s in the ne f ture, says Assistant Secretary Jo
Ann Smith. "We believe consume rve e trition information on the labels
of all foods," Smith says. "We r i 4,i renting mandatory nutrition labeling
on meat and poultry products will not ple. We are committed to determining
the best way ..." Contact: Jim Greene (202) 382-0314.

U.S. AGRICULTURE, in its most recent annual checkup, was found to be hale & hearty -
- although with a few problems needing attention. USDA for six years has been
"taking the pulse" of the Nation's ag sector, using the Farm Costs & Returns Survey.
The most recent year, 1989, was financially the best, says Economist Mitch Morehart.
"The survey tells us how much it costs to produce various commodities in different
areas and helps us maintain a good understanding of the financial strengths and
weaknesses of U.S. agriculture," Morehart says. Contact: Mitch Morehart (202)
219-0801.

NEW FLAX FOR HEALTH-CONSCIOUS -- Flax may be the next exotic "health" food. And,
Omega, a new flax developed by USDA, may become "the" flax to be eating. According
to Jerry Miller, the USDA plant geneticist who developed it, Omega's seeds contain
omega-3, a family of fatty acids. Studies have indicated eating moderate amounts of
omega-3 & avoiding high-fat diets could help reduce the risk of cardiovascular
disease. Omega's golden-tinted seeds are ideally suited for grinding & blending
into flour. Farmers may favor Omega because it's the first yellow-seeded flax
that's disease-resistant. Foods with the new Omega flax seed might reach grocery
shelves within two years. Contact: Jerry F. Miller (701) 239-1321.

TAX GUIDES -- The IRS has tax guides especially helpful for farmers. This year's
edition of Publication 225, "Farmer's Tax Guide," has important changes for the 1990
tax year, along with specific info on filing requirements & due dates, farm business
expenses & other topics. It also has sample tax forms generally used by farmers.
Publication 51, "Agricultural Employer's Tax Guide," explains farmer-employer
responsibilities, such as social security tax & income tax withholding. Both pubs
are free by calling: 1-800-TAX-FORM. Contact: Darlyn Robinson-Boyd (202) 535-
6576.

WIND EROSION UP SLIGHTLY -- More than 1.8 million acres of Great Plains cropland &
rangeland were damaged by wind erosion during November & December 1990, up slightly
from the same period a year earlier. "The Great Plains continues to have fairly
high wind erosion damage, due primarily to continuing drought and the resulting
combination of insufficient cover and little residue," says Soil Conservation
Service Chief William Richards. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 447-5776.


A '2,\ ~~ : 3.Lt9 Z









SMUGGLING FINE DOUBLED -- Beginning Jan. 27, USDA will double the fines to travelers
entering the continental U.S. with undeclared ag products. Failing to declare
prohibited goods will now carry a $50 fine. Cases involving concealing or
misrepresenting products may receive a $100 fine. "Bringing foreign meat and plant
products into the U.S. poses a serious threat to the health of U.S. crops and
livestock," says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service. Any attempt to smuggle meats, fruits or vegetables is a federal
offense, Glosser says. Contact: Janna Evans (301) 436-7251.

ALL BUT THREE STATES -- Maryland, Montana & Nevada -- are now enrolled in the
cooperative state-federal-industry program to wipe out pseudorabies, a costly
disease of swine & other livestock, says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's
Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. Glosser says 47 states & Puerto Rico have
entered the five-step eradication program. Pseudorabies, a contagious livestock
disease, is most prevalent in swine, but it also affects cattle, sheep, dogs, cats &
other animals. Contact: Larry Mark (202) 447-3977.

USDA LOOKING FOR SCIENTISTS -- USDA is looking for 100 scientists, who are beginning
their research careers, to work on projects in food safety, global change,
biological control of crop pests & genetic engineering of plants. Applicants must
have a doctorate degree and should have less than four years post-doctoral
experience. Pay ranges from $31,116 to $37,294. The scientists will work for up to
two years as research associates at USDA labs across the country. Contact: Sandy
Miller Hays (301) 344-4089.

POLAND STRUGGLES -- The Polish government is striving to transform the country from
a centralized to a free market economy. It has taken independent steps more
dramatic than those of any other Eastern European nation, says Economist Nancy
Cochrane. In January 1990, for example, Poland launched a radical program in which
prices were.freed, subsidies eliminated & Poland's unit of currency became
internally convertible into foreign currencies. The program also provided for the
breakup of the socialized meat & dairy monopolies that had dominated the economy for
decades. Contact: Nancy Cochrane (202) 219-0621.

HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS UP -- U.S. exports of horticultural products to offshore
destinations (other than Canada) reached a record $377.4 million in October, the
first month of fiscal year 1991. This was 15 percent above the same month in 1990.
USDA experts say grapefruit, apples, pears, raisins, canned tomato paste & shelled &
prepared almonds registered the sharpest increase. Contact: Mark Tompson (202)
447-6877.

STEWARDSHIP AWARD -- USDA has awarded its 1990 Stewardship Award to the watershed
staff of the agency's Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit in California for
accomplishments in protecting the water quality of Lake Tahoe. "The hard work of
the watershed staff of the unit resulted in a cleaner and clearer Lake Tahoe -- a
national treasure," says Forest Service Chief F. Dale Robertson. The watershed
improvement program is considered by many to be the most aggressive and complex
program of its kind in the country. Contact: Diane Hitchings (202) 475-3778.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE


USA #1755 -- Burley tobacco production is a way of life that
goes back generations for Kentucky farmers. On this edition of
Agriculture USA, Maria Bynum travels to Kentucky to find out more
about the crop that pays the bills for some families. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1236 -- Home-based businesses; food safety considerations;
biotechnology & consumer response; meat inspection changes;
nutritious snacks. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1744 -- USDA News Highlights; maximum payment
acreage; 1991 pork production; 1991 citrus outlook; erosion of U.S.
farm numbers easing. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1404 -- A calorie is a calorie; the myth of dieting;
underwater weighing; eating to excess; high-tech calorie counting.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)


UPCOMING ON


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., Feb. 4, cattle numbers; Tues., Feb.
5, weekly weather & crop outlook; Feb. 6, dairy products; Mon., Feb.
11, crop production, world ag supply & demand.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Jan. 24, 26 & 28, 1991)


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES


Pat O'Leary reports on smuggling fines; Will Pemble takes a look
at soybean oil substitutes; Mike Thomas, University of Missouri,
on identifying skeletal remains.

-- USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather & crops;
USDA Economist Jim Miller on dairy outlook; Jeri Berc, USDA Soil
Conservation Service, on wind erosion; USDA Economist Steve
MacDonald on exports; USDA Economist Leland Southard on livestock &
poultry.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on farm bill & the environment;
DeBoria Janifer takes a look at the WIC program.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or
6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 089 4

JAPAN, KOREA & HONG KONG...are on Ron Powers' (WOWO, Fort Wayne, Ind.) itinerary
as he joins the Indiana Beef Cattlemen's Association for a 16-day Far East tour
beginning Feb. 1. Ron will send special reports to his station about the
region's business climate, consumer attitudes, ag related opportunities & the
outlook for getting Indiana beef to consumers.

PRODUCERS...are looking forward to the coming season says Richard Shields (KKYN
Plainview, Texas). In conversation with attendees at the Texas Corn Growers
convention and the state Cotton Council he recorded a positive outlook. Richard
says cotton producer planting intentions indicate more acreage than last year.

ATTENDANCE...was up at the KWOA Tri-State Farm Show, Jan. 8-9, says Don Wick
(KWOA, Worthington, Minn.). Exhibitors did a brisk business. Some of the well-
attended sessions involved presentations about competition in the livestock
industry. Congratulations to Don -- the Minnesota State Cattlemen presented him
their 1990 Media Award.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












MOVED...Terry Sullivan from WREX-TV, Rockford, Ill., to WBNS-TV, Columbus, Ohio.

CONGRATULATIONS...Von Ketelsen (KOEL, Oelwein, Iowa) received the first Out-
standing Communicator Award from the Iowa Farm Bureau; Mark Sullivan (KIWA,
Sheldon, Iowa) promoted to farm director; Dink Embry (WHOP-FM, Hopkinsville,
Ky.), who marked 45 years with the station Jan. 20, received the Kentucky Farm
Bureau's Distinguished Service Award.

FORMER FARM REPORTER...John Holliman (CNN, Washington, D.C.), and two CNN
colleagues transfixed the world with their gripping accounts from the Al-Rashid
Hotel in Baghdad Jan. 16 & 17. Holliman, also a former NAFB-member, was AP
Radio's fir/ farm reporter & was hired to do ag news for CNN.


IC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agricult e of Public Radio-TVDivision Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2493 Feb. 1, 1991

MADIGAN NOMINATED -- Pr i ent George Bus',s nominated Rep. Edward Madigan (R-
Ill.), 55, to be 24th se y of agrict 'e. Madigan was first elected to
Congress in 1972. Repres ti),one of most important soybean & corn districts
in the country (his district c 'if er Ag Sec. John Block's farm), Madigan is
currently ranking minority mem the House Agriculture Committee. His
nomination requires Senate approval. Magidan will be the fifth person from Illinois
to serve in the president's cabinet. (The other four are: Labor Secretary Lynn
Martin, Transportation Secretary Samuel Skinner, Veterans Affairs Secretary Edward
Derwinski & EPA Administrator William Reilly.) "My goal, Mr. President," said
Madigan, "is to carry out your desire that rural Americans have a strong voice in
the councils of government. This will be a job that touches everyone in the
country."

YEUTTER ELECTED -- The Republican National Committee formally elected Secretary of
Agriculture Clayton Yeutter as chairman on Jan. 25. Yeutter is expected to leave
USDA around March 1. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

DEEP FROZEN APPLE TREES -- USDA scientists are testing deep freezing as a way to
preserve the genetic diversity of apples, but at less cost and using less land. "We
are hoping to find a method for preserving apple varieties that doesn't rely on the
land and labor needed to maintain an orchard," says Philip L. Forsline, curator of
USDA's apple collection in Geneva, N.Y. The scientists are freezing apple seeds
and stock in liquid nitrogen in the 25-year experiment. Contact: Philip L.
Forsline (315) 787-2390.

USDA PROPOSES DAIRY BREEDING STANDARDS -- USDA is seeking public comments on a
proposal to establish U.S. standards for dairy breeding cows & heifers. Daniel D.
Haley, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, says USDA proposed
the standards in response to initiatives from the dairy industry & exporters. Under
the proposal, dairy animals would have four grades -- "Supreme," "Approved,"
"Medium" & "Common." Comments are due by March 11 to: Fred L. Williams, Jr., USDA-
AMS, Rm. 2603-S, PO Box 96456, Washington, DC 20090-6456. Contact: Fred L.
Williams, Jr. (202) 447-4486.

SALMONELLA OUTBREAKS -- A preliminary review indicates that eggs were to blame for
18 of 66 reported human outbreaks of salmonella enteritidis in the U.S. in 1990,
says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection
Service. Glosser says U.S. Public Health Service investigations led to 12 flocks in
Maryland, Pennsylvania, Alabama, Indiana & Delaware. Investigations are pending on
six of the 66 outbreaks. Two-thirds of the cases happened in the Northeast & Mid-
Atlantic states. Contact: Margaret Webb (301) 436-7799.









SCIENTISTS FIND MUSCLE TOOL -- A USDA scientist says a natural chemical produced by
fungi could serve as a tool for understanding how calcium is regulated inside
skeletal & cardiac muscle. Ronald T. Riley, a USDA research pharmacologist, found
this natural chemical changes the way calcium moves into & out of muscle cells.
USDA scientists studying muscle disease in animals believe their efforts will
benefit humans. Contact: Ronald T. Riley (404) 546-3377.


SOIL & WATER CONFERENCE -- The Soil & Water Conservation Society will hold an
international conference, "Cover Crops for Clean Water," April 9 11 in Jackson
Tenn. Conference registration includes a tour of cover crop research in progress at
the University of Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station in Milan. Contact:
SWCS (515) 289-2331.

ACKER NAMED FAS ADMINISTRATOR -- Sec. Yeutter has named Duane Acker administrator of
USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service. Acker succeeds Rolland E. (Bud) Anderson, who
for personal reasons due to an illness in the family, asked to be reassigned to
other FAS activities. Acker, currently administrator of USDA's Office of Interna-
tional Cooperation & Development, will retain those duties in addition to assuming
the new responsibilities. Acker has held a number of positions in both government &
academia. He was president of the Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kans., from
1975-86. He received his doctorate in animal nutrition from Oklahoma State
University, Stillwater and bachelor's & master's from Iowa State University.
Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

DAIRY MARKETS SETTLE DOWN -- After two turbulent years, the dairy markets are
returning to normal. However, a return to surplus conditions in skim milk as well
as cream markets may be required for markets to settle down. Farm & wholesale
prices in 1991 should be relatively steady because of expanded milk output, smaller
disappearance of skim milk solids & continued government buys of butter, nonfat dry
milk & cheese. But the prices will be much lower than last year for most of 1991.
Contact: Jim Miller or Sara Short (202) 219-0770.


BELOW-AVERAGE STREAMFLOWS -- Much of the West may be facing yet another year of
below-average streamflows, says William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation
Service. Based on snowpack & precipitation data, Richards expects streamflows below
70 percent of normal in areas of eight states: all of California & Nevada, central
Utah, south-central Idaho, northwestern Colorado, southern & eastern Oregon, eastern
Wyoming & central Arizona. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 447-5776.

FOOD AID BIG BUSINESS -- USDA's food assistance programs are big business -- $27.5
billion in 1991. They make up nearly half of USDA's budget. Most people have heard
of the largest programs: food stamps, school lunch, WIC -- the special supplemental
food program for women, infants & children. Yet, much of the public is unaware that
USDA operates these programs. In all, USDA administers 13 domestic food assistance
programs that help provide better nutrition to low-income people, the elderly &
school children. All of the USDA-administered food assistance programs received
budget increases in the 1991 budget. Contact: Phil Shanholtzer (703) 756-3286.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1756 -- This generation of Americans has been called the
"Throwaway Society." However, slowly, we are learning that we must
recycle & help preserve our delicate environment. On this edition of
Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis reports on Chautauqua County, New
York, where recycling is a reality in rural America. (Weekly reel --
13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME



AGRITAPE NEWS


#1237 -- Salmonella update; new food safety booklet; cows & global
warming; what you eat is what you breast feed your baby; caring for
an elderly parent. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer fea-
tures.)

& FEATURES #1745 -- USDA News Highlights; deficiency payments; the
Western drought continues; 1990/91 soybean payments; cows & methane.
(Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1405 -- Salmon for a healthy heart; diet & cholesterol levels;
flax flour -- a healthy choice; dye test detects food pathogen; cold-
tolerant bacterium. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., Feb. 12, weekly weather & crop update,
farm labor report, world ag situation, world oilseed situation, world
cotton situation; Wed., Feb. 14, honey production; Thurs., Feb. 14,
feed situation; Fri., Feb. 15, milk production, livestock poultry
outlook.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Jan. 31, Feb. 2 & 4, 1991)


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES


Pat O'Leary reports on the environmental provisions of the 1990 farm
bill; Will Pemble reports on putting seeds to sleep.

-- Carla Hills, US Trade Representative, on GATT talks progress;
Norton Strommen, USDA meteorologist, with a crop & weather update; USDA
Economist Leland Southard on the livestock & poultry situation; USDA
Asst. Secretary James Moseley on western water supplies; USDA Economist
Ian McCormack with a U.S. oilseeds outlook.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill on home-based businesses; Pat O'Leary reports on
USDA's farm costs & returns survey.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:


THURSDAY .
SATURDAY .
MONDAY .


. .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
. .10 10:45 a.m., EST
. 8 8:45 a.m., EST


A reminder! New satellite times took effect in November of 1990. Please note the
changes in Saturday & Monday feed times.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE
PRODUCERS...are looking forward to the growing season, says John Winfield
(Mississippi Network, Jackson). Cotton prices remain attractive prompting
many farmers to closely review flexibility provisions in the new Farm Bill.
Winter wheat is in good shape, there have been few hard-freeze days, and
subsoil moisture is being replenished.

EITHER...there are more meetings this winter or I'm getting older, says Gene
Williams (WNAX, Yankton, S.D.). Some area producer organizations have held
their meetings on the same date making coverage difficult. Extension Service
has also been active in conducting meetings for crop and livestock producers.
Gene says there has been little accumulation of snow this winter, most of it
melting before the next storm arrives.

AGRI-BUSINESS COMMITTEE...of the Davenport, Iowa, Chamber of Commerce has
named Max Molleston (WKBF, Rock Island) chairman.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













A BUSY TIME OF YEAR...for Jim Coyle (KRES, Moberly, Mo.). He will be covering
the upcoming 3rd annual Beef Expo held near Columbia, sending reports to nine
stations; moderating a panel discussion at the Feb. 28 March 1 Missouri Pork
Producers Conference dealing with environmental challenges; and covering
events at Ag Science Week at Columbia College. Jim says the station held its
14th annual Farm Show during an ice storm, but attendance and the number of
exhibitors set records. Exhibitors told Jim the producers had a positive
mood.

TWO VIDEOS...produced by the Radio & TV Division will be shown to farmers in
Romania. Officials there requested "America's Most Crucial Industry" and
"USDA -- The People's Department." They plan to use the programs as an educa-
tio al toob help teach Romanian farmers about American agriculture.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




A~)JSW C1S


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Offi ic Affairs Rad division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
Letter No. 2494 { A Feb. 8, 1991
1992 BUDGET PROPOSED -- The Bu administration s equesting a total farm budget of
$55.7 billion, nearly a 1 percent increase over/ 1991 budget of $55.4 billion.
Federal subsidies to wealthier lores would be educed, crop insurance premiums
raised & food programs for needy f -i*ies would be sharply expanded under the budget
plan sent to Congress this week. There would be some additions here, some snipping
there, but no great remodeling, says Stephen B. Dewhurst, USDA's budget director.
Less than $100 million of the proposed 1992 budget for USDA would depend on Congress
enacting new legislation, he said. Contact: Stephen Dewhurst (202) 447-3323.

BUDGET BOOK -- Copies of the "1992 Budget Summary" are available from USDA.
Contact: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. Media only, please.

STAMP DESIGN CONTEST -- As part of this year's celebration of the 100th anniversary
of the National Forest System, the winning designer of the first in a series of
collectors' stamps featuring National Forest System wildlife & habitat will win
$25,000. A portion of the stamp sale proceeds will help preserve wildlife
habitats, maintain recreation facilities, help in reforestation & other conservation
activities. Contact: Robert Hendricks (202) 447-2418.

SCHOOL BREAKFAST GRANTS -- USDA has awarded $5 million to school districts in 25
states to help start school breakfast programs. "These grants are part of a five-
year program to provide start-up funds for new school breakfast programs through
1994," says Betty Jo Nelsen, administrator of USDA's Food & Nutrition Service.
"They will contribute to better nutrition and stimulate the learning process for
children at schools that begin breakfast programs." Contact: Phil Shanholtzer
(703) 756-3286.

MEDFLY FUNGI -- The Medfly's worst enemy may be tucked away in a research lab in
Ithaca, N.Y. That's where USDA Scientist Stuart Krasnoff has begun a methodical
search through a collection of 3,000 fungal isolates from all over the world that
are natural enemies of the Mediterranean fruit fly and its cousin, the Caribbean
fruit fly. Krasnoff hopes to find fungi that produce compounds as effective as
existing biological controls against fruit flies. Contact: Sandy Miller Hays
(301) 344-4089.

POOR BODY IMAGE seems to be a major cause of depression & low self-esteem in both
adults & youths, says Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service Nutritionist Beth
Reames. Being thin & having a hard body are "in," Reames says, but the new federal
Dietary Guidelines for Americans point out that neither overweight nor excessive
thinness is desirable. Both excesses can lead to health problems. Contact: Beth
Reames (504) 388-4141.









USDA SEEKS COMMENTS ON BIOTECH -- USDA is looking for public comments on its
proposed guidelines for research involving the planned introduction of genetically
modified organisms into the environment. The guidelines are a major step forward
for biotechnology research, says Charles E. Hess, assistant secretary of agriculture
for science & education. The comment period closes April 2. Send comments to:
Daniel Jones Office of Agricultural Biotechnology, Rm. 324-A, USDA, Washington, DC
20250-2200. Contact: Marti Asner (703) 235-4413.

FARMSAFE 2000 -- A Surgeon General's conference on agricultural safety & health will
be held in Des Moines, Iowa, April 30 through May 3. The purpose of the conference,
organized by the national Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the
Centers for Disease Control, is to raise consciousness, build coalitions,
disseminate information & encourage action to prevent injury & disease related to
agriculture. Surgeon General Antonia Coello Novello will speak at the conference.
Contact: Melvin L. Myers (404) 639-2376.

COUNTRY RADIO BROADCASTERS -- The 22nd annual Country Radio Seminar will be held
March 6 9 at the Opryland Hotel, Nashville, Tenn. Theme for the seminar is "On
The Road Again" and will feature more than 40 hours of educational panels, workshops
& keynote addresses on topics geared toward both the country radio & the country
music/record industries. Contact: Country Radio Broadcasters (615) 327-4487.

A WORD ON THE HERD -- Certain livestock can be depreciated if it meets the
requirements. Livestock acquired for work, breeding or dairy purposes that is not
kept in an inventory account may be depreciated. However, livestock that farmers
raise usually has no depreciable basis because the costs of raising the animals are
deducted & not added to the basis. For details, see IRS Publication 225, Farmer's
Tax Guide. Order by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

NEW PHONE BOOK -- Looking for someone at USDA? We've got just the ticket to help
you. Hot off the presses -- "USDA Telephone Directory 1990." If you'd like a copy,
call Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. We'll send you one.

CENSKY NAMED -- Under Secretary of Agriculture Richard T. Crowder has appointed
Stephen L. Censky as associate administrator of USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service.
Censky will assist in oversight & management of FAS programs. Prior to his new
appointment, Censky served as special assistant to Crowder. Censky received his
post-graduate diploma in agriculture from the University of Melbourne, Australia &
his bachelor of science from South Dakota State University. Censky is a native of
Jackson, Minn., where his parents own & operate a diversified crop & livestock farm.
Contact: Sally Klusaritz (202) 447-3448.

YEUTTER RESIGNS -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter has officially submitted
his resignation, effective March 1, so he can assume the chairmanship of the
Republican National Committee. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1757 -- USDA's budget request for fiscal year 1992 rests in the
hands of Congress. On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis
talks to USDA Budget Director Stephen Dewhurst about the budget
package. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1238 -- USDA budget proposal for fiscal year 1992; food safety &
food shopping; rice bran recipes; mid-life crisis; a groundhog day
post mortem. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1746 -- USDA News Highlights; USDA's proposed fiscal year
1992 budget; troubles for rural hospitals; cattle marketing rise; a
unique sheep farm. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1406 -- How much fish is enough; looking at cholesterol; flagging
phony flavors; gold from goldenberries; developing domestic dill.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., Feb. 18, cattle on feed; Tues., Feb. 19,
ag outlook, crop/weather update; Wed., Feb. 20, catfish production,
ag chemical usage; Fri., Feb. 22, livestock/poultry update; Mon.,
Feb. 25, ag trade update, world livestock situation; Tues., Feb. 26,
crop/weather update; Wed., Feb. 27, aquaculture outlook, world cocoa
situation.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Feb. 7, 9 & 11)


FEATURES --

ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on the farm costs & returns survey.

U.S. Trade Representative Carla Hills on GATT & the tri-lateral
trade agreement of the U.S., Mexico & Canada; USDA Budget Director
Stephen Dewhurst on the 1992 USDA budget proposal; USDA Chief
Meteorologist Norton Strommen on national weather update & analysis of
California drought situation; Norm Kallemeyn, USDA's Foreign
Agricultural Service, on U.S. poultry exports to the USSR; USDA
Economist Ron Gustafson on cattle inventories; & USDA Economist Steve
MacDonald on U.S. import/export outlook.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on farm safety for children; DeBoria
Janifer reports on USDA's Women, Infants and Children -- WIC --
program.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 11 340993111

OFFMIKE
WATER OFFICIALS...in California have stopped state project flows to farmers in
the San Joaquin Valley & will make recommendations to help citizens survive
the drought, says Walt Shaw (KRAK, Sacramento). Walt is covering the story
and says proposals being discussed include limiting use in each household,
providing only enough water for survival -- not production -- of perennial
crops & limiting other farms to groundwater, leaving thousands of acres
fallow. In the 5th year of drought California has received only 28 percent of
normal moisture. Trees are dying, which adds to the fire hazard.

UNUSUALLY WARM...temperatures in early February melted the snow, says Gary
Wulf (KZEN, Central City, Neb.), creating ponding and runoff, but the ground
remained frozen, which prevents any benefit to subsoil moisture. Gary says
consolidation of Extension Service offices into "county groups" is benefitting
producers by increasing the expertise offered by agents who specialize in a
smaller number of commodities.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












AG SHOW...is being coordinated by Bill Walters (WCUB, Manitowoc, Wisc.).
Planned for March 21 during Ag Week, 80 booths will have agri-business
exhibits. Such new food items as lamb burgers, sheep (rather than "hot")
dogs, flavored milk & cheese dessert, will also be available. A local
producer plans to show a llama.

THOUSANDS OF ACRES...of vegetables were killed as the result of an unusual
amount of rain in the Everglades, says Cindy Zimmerman (Florida Agrinet,
Ocala). In her coverage, Cindy found standing water that caused a multi-
million dollar loss of winter crops. Another major story is the recurrence of
citrus canker. She says one grower burned 47,000 trees in an effort to
eliminate the disease from a grove.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Jim Coyle (KRES, Moberly, Mo.) named Farm Broadcaster of
the Yar by e Missouri Corn Growers Association.


C POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division







Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Alfabil adio-TV Division ton D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2495 MAR 7 Feb. 15, 1991


SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE Clayton Yeutter, Press Secretary Kelly Shipp (right) & USDA Radio's Brenda
Curtis (left), get ready for Yeutter's final radio news conference in the USDA Radio Studio Feb. 11. During the
briefing for farm broadcasters, Yeutter discussed farm programs & agricultural trade. Yeutter said there would be
a ten-year adjustment on any free trade act with Mexico & it would have a snap-back tariff provision to protect U.S.
farmers. (USDA Photo by Byron Schumacher.)

WHEAT FARMERS INTEND to put 238.8 million bushels of 1990-crop wheat in the farmer-
owned reserve, says Richard T. Crowder, president of USDA's Commodity Credit
Corporation & Under Secretary for International Affairs & Commodity Programs. USDA
had announced that up to 300 million bushels would be permitted entry. Because the
total intentions are under the 300-million limit, producers may enter the entire
amount of the 1990-crop wheat they designated. Crowder said producers will earn
quarterly storage payments for reserve wheat at an annual rate of 26.5 cents per
bushel. Contact: Robert Feist (202) 447-6789.








COTTON MARKETING COMMITTEE TO MEET -- The Advisory Committee on Cotton Marketing
will meet at 8 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 20, in the Airport Hyatt Regency Hotel on
International Parkway, Dallas/Fort Worth Airport, Texas. According to Daniel D.
Haley, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, the primary purpose
of the meeting is to get the committee's recommendations on establishing premiums &
discounts for fiber strength & the premium micronaire range. Both recommendations
will be incorporated into the CCC's price support loan schedule for the first time
in 1991. Contact: Carolyn Coutts (202) 447-8998.

CARBOHYDRATE SPECIALIST TO GIVE LECTURE -- Noted carbohydrate researchers Roy L.
Whistler of Purdue University will give the USDA's annual Sterling B. Hendricks
Memorial Lecture in Washington, D.C., Feb. 17. Whistler, who was a research
scientist for USDA earlier in his career, will speak on "New Areas for Agricultural
Research." His lecture will be presented during the annual meeting of the American
Association of the Advancement of Science. Contact: Sandy Miller Hays (301) 344-
4089.

AGRICULTURE HAS COME A LONG WAY -- Thanks to its marriage with biotechnology,
agriculture is already in the 21st century. Biotech promises to provide the world's
population with food that is not only tastier & more nutritious, but also produced
in ways that lessen the reliance on pesticides & animal drugs, says David Berkowtiz,
head of technology transfer for USDA's Food Safety & Inspection Service. "Today,
our more sophisticated understanding of genetics, combined with the introduction of
biotechnology, allows us to make strides in animal and plant improvements that would
have taken generations of traditional breeding," Berkowitz says. Contact: David
Berkowitz (202) 447-8623.

CASON NAMED -- Sec. Yeutter has named James Cason as manager of USDA's Federal Crop
Insurance Corporation. Following a brief assignment with USDA's Foreign
Agricultural Service, Cason became FCIC deputy manager in May of 1990. Cason served
as deputy assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Interior from 1985 to 1989.
A native of Portland, Ore., he received his B.A. from Pacific University in Forest
Grove, Ore. David Gabriel, current FCIC acting manager, will become associate
manager. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

TURKEY TRENDS -- The National Turkey Federation will sponsor an in-depth, one-day
seminar on trends in the food service industry April 26 in Chicago, Ill. Contact:
Teresa J. Farney (703) 435-7209.


DOUBLE-TIME PLANT BREEDING -- Finding plants with desirable genetic traits, such as
disease resistance, could someday be done in a fraction of the time now required,
USDA Geneticist Keith F. Schertz says. Using a new process called Restriction
Fragment Length Polymorphism, a scientist can accomplish in two years what it might
take ten years to do with conventional plant breeding, says Schertz. "This doesn't
replace plant breeding, but it narrows the field in which breeders must search for
plants with certain characteristics," he says. Contact: Keith F. Schertz (409)
260-9252.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445










FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1758 -- The animal rights movement is spawning new research into
the best ways to handle farm animals -- considering both their
welfare & the farmers' economic well-being. Brenda Curtis talks with
several experts on the subject. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME


#1237 -- Safe food storage; diet programs; animal rights vs. animal
welfare; vinegar is versatile; organic food standards in the works.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)


AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1747 -- USDA News Highlights; farmers give first
indication of planting intentions; a U.S.-Mexican free trade
agreement; farm program signup information; some alternative swine
farrowing systems explored. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1407 -- Boron & brain activity; getting the most from iron;
nutrition research for women; viral satellite shields tomatoes;
chayote: New cash crop? (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- (Stories listed are only those USDA reports which
we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup, so please, do not let the lack of a
story listing for a certain weekday keep you from calling!) Wed., Feb.
20, crop/weather update, ag outlook summary; Thurs., Feb. 21, catfish;
Fri., Feb. 22, livestock update; Tues., Feb. 26, crop/weather update,
cotton & wool outlook; Wed., Feb. 27, export outlook; Thurs., Feb. 28,
ag prices, world tobacco situation; Fri., March 1, horticultural
exports.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Feb. 14, 16 & 18)


ACTUALITIES --


Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter in his final radio
news conference with farm broadcasters; USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton
Strommen on weather & crops; USDA Assistant Secretary Catherine Bertini
on school breakfast program; USDA World Board chairman James Donald on
planting intentions & crop production.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the alternative crop -- kenaf; DeBoria
Janifer takes a look at the WIC program; Lynn Wyvill reports on home-
based businesses.
Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST






OFFMIKE


Sl UNIVERSE OF FIORIJiliDA

I Uoj4 100 9
WAR IN THE GULF...political unrest and agricultural issues were covered by Ron
Severson (WCMY, Ottawa, Ill.). Ron had just returned from Israel when we
talked. While in the Mid East, Ron demonstrated the versatility of farm
broadcasters by filing reports on Scud attacks, political developments & a
kibbutz that uses the latest in computer operations to maximize dairy
production.


AGRIBUSINESS...& farm production in Brazil & Argentina are on the itinerary of
Jay Truitt (KMZU, Carrollton, Mo.). Jay is traveling with a group from his
station's area and will file daily reports. Teresa Reische is covering events
while Jay is away. She says local corn growers have expressed heightened
interest in ethanol production.

UPBEAT...is the description James Stewart (KFYO, Lubbock, Texas) gives to
cotton & beef producers in his region. He says equipment dealers report the
enthusiasm is being reflected in increased sales.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











IT'S VERY DRY...says Dean Thurow (KCJB, Minot, N.D.). Even the small amount
of snow they have had contains little moisture, and the 30-day outlook calls
for no change. Spring planting will likely be in dry conditions. Dean says
many producers plan to plant sunflowers.

MOVED...to WOC, Davenport, Iowa -- Lynn Watts formerly at KMZU, Carrollton,
Mo. Tom Gibson has moved to WDAN Danville, Ill., from WPRC, Lincoln, Neb.

NEW STUDIOS...for Ag Radio Network, Utica, N.Y. Physical location is
different but the address and phone number remain the same for Ed Slusarczyk &
Jeff Stewart. Congratulations to Jeff, the Northeast Farm Communicators
presented him their award for Best General Radio Farm News for his series on
"Harvest I e Farm Safety."


VIC PO LL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




Nj,13L ;2_96


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of AgricuPublicAffairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
Letter No. 2496 Feb. 22, 1991

CALIFORNIA FREEZE AV er 4 Presideni George Bush has declared a major disaster
exists in Califort & ordered pfeder1l aid to help farming communities in portions
of the state to r o er from the effc s of a severe winter freeze Dec. 19 Jan. 3.
Contact: William h44 edigovich (25 923-7100.

TIMBER REVENUE UP -- US p-sdoPnrest Service reports its 1990 timber sale program
produced revenues of nearly $1.4 billion, from a 10.5 billion-board-feet harvest.
Revenues exceeded operating expenses for the year by $629 million. "Over the past
several years, the public has questioned the costs and benefits of timber sales on
the national forests," says Forest Service Chief Dale Robertson. In 1990, 57 of the
122 national forest units returned more money than they expended. Contact: Jim
Sanders (202) 447-3772.

HONEY PRODUCTION UP -- Honey production in 1990 was 11 percent above 1989 totals.
Honey prices averaged 52.8 cents per pound, up 3 cents from the 1989 price of 49.8
cents per pound. During 1990, there were 3.19 million bee colonies producing honey,
down 7 percent from last year. Yield per colony averaged 61.5 pounds -- up from the
unusually low 51.4 pounds in 1989. Contact: Tom Kruchten (202) 475-4870.

'STINGOMETER' HELPS FIND AFRICANIZED BEES -- A USDA scientist has invented a "temper
meter" for honeybees, which may help determine which colonies are Africanized. "If
we quickly spot bees that have Type-A personalities, we can eliminate these very
defensive bees before they invade domestic bee colonies," says Hayward G. Spangler.
"We needed the meter because it's impossible to tell domestic bees from Africanized
bees just by looking at them." The stingometer records how many stings a disturbed
colony of bees makes during a given period. A high number means cranky bees --
especially the Africanized type. Contact: Hayward G. Spangler (602) 670-6380.

AG RESOURCES: INPUTS -- Tightening world fertilizer supplies & concern over the
Persian Gulf have put upward pressure on prices. U.S. spring fertilizer prices will
likely be 5 to 9 percent higher than last year. Fertilizer supplies will be
adequate for anticipated use. Pesticide use on the ten major field crops in 1991 is
project to be up 16 million pounds from last year. Herbicide use is expected to
rise 12.2 million pounds. Energy supply & price expectations for the U.S. ag sector
reflect world crude oil market conditions. Contact: Stan Daberkow (202) 219-
0456.

FARM LABOR -- During January, farm wages averaged $6 per hour and there were 2.61
million people working on the nation's farms & ranches. The $6 rate was up 30 cents
from a year earlier. Contact: Tom Kurtz (202) 475-3228.










ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS REVISED -- USDA has revised the regulations for the
humane handling, care, treatment & transportation of dogs, cats & primates. "We
worked hard to make animal care standards easy to understand, hoping to increase
compliance and make the standards more effective," says James W. Glosser,
administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. The new standards
will take effect March 18. Contact: Sibyl Bowie (301) 436-7255.

CONSERVATION COMPLIANCE PLANS -- Farmers have fully implemented conservation
compliance plans on 40 percent of the nation's highly erodible cropland. "Farmers
are now protecting a significant amount of land from erosion, but the biggest job is
still ahead," says William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service.
"Many farmers have agreed to conservation work that they're unfamiliar with --
structural practices like waterways and terraces and management practices like
conservation tillage. This work has to be completed on schedule over the next four
years." Farmers who have questions should contact SCS. Contact: Diana Morse
(202) 447-4772.

USDA SEIZES NEGLECTED ANIMALS -- USDA has confiscated nine cougars, three bobcats,
one African lion and one tiger from an animal dealer in Leesburg, Fla. "These
animals lacked proper nourishment and veterinary care," says James W. Glosser,
administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. After
considerable effort by USDA employees, the animals were relocated outside of Florida
for care & keeping by another licensed dealer. The case has been referred to USDA's
Office of General Counsel for prosecution. Contact: Sibyl K. Bowie (301) 436-
7255.

MOTH'S SEX APPEAL -- Young female tobacco budworms raised indoors under close
supervision are just as sexy as their wild sisters, say USDA scientists. Scientists
wondered if the hybrid females, bred with a gene that sterilizes mates, might not be
able to compete with wild females. Each time a hybrid female mates, says
Entomologist Marion L. Laster, "a sterility time bomb" starts ticking within the
colony. Her male offspring, besides being sterile and unable to perpetuate the
species, waste the time of interested females looking for males. Female offspring,
on the other hand, inherit the sterility-causing trait and spread it rapidly.
Contact: Marion L. Laster (601) 686-5231.

SEED POTATOES FROM CANADA RESTRICTED -- USDA is restricting the import of some seed
potatoes from Canada because a virus found on some Canadian potatoes can also attack
tobacco, tomatoes and peppers. "We believe quick action is necessary to contain the
spread of PVY-N, especially since Canada is the source of many seed potatoes planted
in states where tobacco is an important crop," says James W. Glosser, administrator
of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Seed potatoes from Canada,
except those from Prince Edward Island & New Brunswick where the strain has been
detected, may be imported with a certificate identifying each seed lot. Contact:
Caree Lawrence (301) 436-7280.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445










FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1759 -- Scientists are now using all sorts of high tech
gadgetry to figure out the various links between diet & weight
control. On this edition of Agriculture USA, Jim Henry talks with a
USDA physiologist about weight loss & the human metabolism. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1240 -- Food preparation safety; all mulch is not good mulch; coping
with the drought; stretching limited water supplies; kids & science.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1748 -- USDA News Highlights; 1991 rice program
provisions; California's water bank; cow brain power; U.S. exports
more forest products to Spain. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1408 -- Monitoring free radicals; copper & blood pressure; copper
& the kidney; copper & the lungs; the importance of boron. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., March 5, weekly weather & crop update;
Thurs., March 7, vegetable report; Mon., March 11, U.S. crop
production, world supply & demand; Tues., March 12, weekly weather &
crop, world ag grain situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton
situation.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Feb. 21, 23 & 25)


FEATURES --

ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on Black History Month activities at USDA.

SCS Chief William Richards on conservation compliance plan
implementation; USDA Meteorologist Ray Motha on weather developments;
USDA Economist Stan Duberkow on fertilizer use & prices; USDA Economist
Ron Gustafson on livestock & poultry outlook; and USDA Economist Larry
Van Meir on feed outlook.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on home-based businesses; Pat O'Leary
reports on USDA science day for students; & DeBoria Janifer reports
on USDA Workforce Diversity.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 126208265 108 3

OFFMIKE
FARM BROADCASTERS...cover their territory to stay in touch with agricultural
producers. Max Molleston (WKBF, Rock Island, Ill.) says he put 1,200 miles on
his car in the last three weeks. He filed daily reports during the state
conferences of Illinois and Iowa pork producers, attended a series of winter
crop seminars, commodity banquets & spring hog shows to keep his listeners up to
date with latest developments. Max says when he's on the road Gayle Wittenberg
does the anchoring.

ANNUAL VISIT...to the nation's capital is being planned by Gary Wergin (KFEQ,
St. Joseph, Mo.) accompanying a delegation of the Missouri Farm Bureau.
February was a busy month covering state cattle producer meetings, FFA
activities, corn growers & Farm Bureau gatherings. Gary says Missouri corn
growers are urging that an ethanol manufacturing plant be located in the state.
Meanwhile a highway department study notes a substantial reduction of gasoline
tax revenue if ethanol use is greatly increased.




Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












SOYBEAN PRODUCERS...in six states served by Ken Tanner (Tobacco Radio Network,
Raleigh, N.C.) tell him the meager returns last year on soybeans & peanuts will
force them to use flex provisions of the farm bill to plant cotton in soy acres.
But, Ken says, producers in Virginia & North Carolina who had excellent bean
yields last year don't have the enthusiasm for cotton that those in Georgia,
Alabama & South Carolina have.

TEMPERATURES...were in the 50's for two weeks, says Tom Steever (KSOO, Sioux
Falls, S.D.). It is unknown if the weather brought crops out of dormancy, but
he says recent snowfall should protect the winter wheat region of the state.

MOVED...Gary DiGiuseppe from Brownfield Network, Jefferson City, Mo., to KWMT,
F rt Dodge Iowa, replacing Doug Cooper who moved to WOI, Ames, Iowa.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agrultgr Office of PA Alfairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2497 March 1, 1991

NEW CONSERVATION INCE VS -- America' farmers & ranchers will be given numerous
incentives to tackle environmental concerns when this year's Conservation Reserve
Program opens up for b~is March, "The new program has many opportunities for
producers as a results o bn0es Jrthe 1990 Farm Bill," says Secretary of Ag-
riculture Clayton Yeutter. There are some exciting conservation ideas in addition
to some expanded criteria for enrollment." Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT CASTS SHADOW on cotton & rice plantings, USDA says. According to
a special USDA survey, U.S.' farmers intend to plant 4 percent more corn, 1 percent
more soybeans, 2 percent more rice, 18 percent more cotton, 19 percent more sorghum
& 36 percent more sunflowers this spring than in 1990. However, spring wheat area
will slip 13 percent, farmers said. For the first time, the shifts reflect farmers'
expectations of prices & costs under the new flexibility provisions of the 1990 farm
act. California's drought may keep some farmers from reaching their early planting
intentions -- especially for cotton & rice. California livestock producers with
forage-based operations will be hit hard. Contact: Greg Gajewski (202) 219-0313.

FARM CREDIT OUTLOOK -- The farm credit outlook is guardedly optimistic as financial
institutions serving agriculture continued to recover in 1990. Total farm debt at
year end 1990, excluding household debt, is estimated at $133.9 billion, a drop of
1.3 percent from a year earlier and a 31 percent decline from the 1983 peak of
$192.7 billion. The bulk of the 1990 decline in volume is attributable to FmHA
activity. Contact: Jerome Stam (202) 219-0892.

PROFESSIONAL AG CAREERS are wise choices for college students, says a USDA report
developed at Purdue University. In the next ten years, one of the most critical
challenges facing the food, agricultural & natural resource systems is the need to
attract & educate professionals. The new report suggests college students looking
ahead to career choices would do well to seriously consider preparing for scientific
& technical careers in ag. The U.S. is not producing enough talented college
graduates in the food & ag sciences to fill highly important roles in business,
science & environmental management. Contact: Patricia Lewis (201) 763-9592.

U.S. & MEXICO SCREWWORM-FREE -- The U.S. & Mexico have declared Mexico free of
screwworms. "The joint commission for the eradication of screwworms has come a long
way in the 19 years since the program began in Mexico," says Secretary of
Agriculture Clayton Yeutter. Yeutter was one of the five original U.S.
commissioners to the bilateral group in 1973 & 1974. Even though screwworms are
eradicated, Yeutter says, livestock producers must continue to inspect their
animals, treat wounds & send in samples to ensure that a screwworm reinfestation
does not occur. Contact: Janna Evans (301) 436-7251.


2-, LS ; 3-97








SEED POTATO RESTRICTIONS EASED -- USDA has eased restrictions placed earlier in
February on imports of seed potatoes from Canada. The restrictions were placed
after the discovery of a potato virus originating from Prince Edward Island, Canada.
Contact: Caree Lawrence (301) 436-7799.


WOMEN WORRY ABOUT GETTING cancer, but they should be worrying about heart disease,
says Ruth Patrick, a nutritionist with the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service.
"Truth is that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American women, the same as for
men," Patrick says. "It just happens to them when they're ten years older."
Patrick has some tips to help women protect themselves against heart disease,
including quitting smoking and knowing their cholesterol number. Contact: Ruth
Patrick (504) 388-4141.


WESTERN WATER OUTLOOK STILL DIM -- Water supply conditions continue to decline in
many Western states because of below-average precipitation, says William Richards,
chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service. "As a result of low precipitation totals
and deteriorating snowpack conditions, forecasts continue to call for below- to
well-below average spring and summer stream flows for much of the West," Richards
says. Water supplies of less than 70 percent of average are expected in California,
Nevada, most of Utah & Oregon, southern Idaho, southwestern & southeastern Montana,
eastern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado & northwestern & central Arizona. Contact:
Ted Kupelian (202) 447-5776.


LIGHT, LEAN, LOW FAT -- That's what consumers are looking for in their meals today
and, that's why they should eat rice, says Julie Gibson, senior home economist with
the USA Rice Council. One-half cup of rice has only 80 calories, is high in complex
carbohydrates and is cholesterol & sodium-free. Gibson says rice dishes are
elegant, taste delicious and are easy & inexpensive to fix. Gibson also has rice
recipes. Contact: Julie Gibson (713) 270-6699.


PLANT IMPORT HEARING -- USDA has scheduled a public hearing for March 28 in
Washington, D.C., to review proposed revisions to federal regulations for importing
many plants, plant parts & seeds. "Certain plant pests now are found in countries
where they did not exist before," says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's
Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. "We must update our regulations to
protect U.S. agriculture from possible exposure to these foreign plant pests."
Contact: Janna Evans (301) 436-7251.


MODERATE CATTLE EXPANSION -- The Jan. 1 cattle inventory was 99.4 million head, 1
percent above the 1990 downward revision. The 1990 calf crop was off 1 percent.
The expansion phase of the cattle cycle continued as the smaller calf crop was
offset by reduced cattle & calf slaughter. Contact: Leland Southard (202) 219-
0767.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1760 -- The rice industry is riding the downward wave of reduced
exports, but the upward crest of renewed domestic consumption.
Brenda Curtis presents a capsuled look at today's rice industry.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1241 -- Rice bran oil; a world food aid gap; lowering hot water
costs; how much mulch; temperature-sensitive fabrics. (Weekly reel
of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1749 -- USDA News Highlights; CRP signup information;
preparing for new organic farming standards; Mexico declared
screwworm free; broiler outlook. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1409 -- Manganese & menstruation; copper & gender; alcohol & zinc
moderation & the heart; an RDA for copper? (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thurs., March 7, vegetable production;
Mon., March 11, U.S. crop production, world ag supply & demand; Tues., March 12,
crop/weather update, world ag/grain situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton
situation; Wed., March 13, U.S. sugar/sweetener outlook; Thurs., March 14, fruit
outlook; Fri., March 15, milk production; Mon., March 18, cattle on feed; Tues.,
March 19, ag outlook, crop/weather update, cattle on feed; Tues., March 19, ag
outlook, crop/weather update. (These are the USDA reports which we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Feb. 28, March 2 & 4)


FEATURES --



ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's latest soybean outlook; Will
Pemble reports on a new printer's ink made from soybean oil; DeBoria
Janifer reports on a plan to improve work force diversity at USDA.

Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with a crop & weather
update; USDA Economist Greg Gajewski with the latest ag outlook; USDA
Economist Ed Allen on U.S. wheat production; William Richards, USDA Soil
Conservation chief, on conservation compliance.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on a USDA science day for students; Lynn
Wyvill on farm safety for kids; DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA's
school lunch program & dietary guidelines.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Ag Update, five minutes of USDA farm program information,
presented in news desk format.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



OFFMIKE
AGRICULTURE...will start with a bang this year in Texas, says Roddy Peeples
(VSA Radio Network, San Angelo). Cotton is so attractive that it will be
planted in counties that haven't produced a crop in decades. He says the San
Angelo area cotton harvest was the best in over half a century. Moisture is
adequate statewide, most pasture is in good condition, but much of the coastal
area remains dry. Roddy reports VSA has added five affiliates in three
months.

ECONOMIC CONDITIONS...confronting dairy producers are bleak, says Louis
Rosandick (WFHR, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis.). Lower prices, which are providing
about a third less income than last year have forced several producers to
auction their farms. The weakened economy is beginning to show up in reduced
county & state revenues. Meanwhile, alternating warm and cold weather has
raised alfalfa roots out of the ground, exposing them to a potentially killing
freeze. But, Louis says, a sense of humor prevails. One making the rounds is
"It's so bad that even those who don't intend to pay back aren't borrowing."



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











EXTENT OF WINTER WHEAT KILL...is being discovered, says Bob Hoff (Northwest Ag
News Network, Spokane, Wash.). Wheat producers in eastern Washington averaged
30 to 70 percent winter kill; some portions in central state suffered 100
percent kill. Snowpack in Washington is adequate, but Bob says levels in
Oregon are very low, which reflects the fourth year of drought & prevents
cattle producers from expanding, despite high prices.

MOVED...Jim Yeary from KVRP, Haskell, Texas, to KGNC, Amarillo, replacing
Larry DeSha, who is returning to The Helming Group, Kansas City. Thanks to
Bob Givens (KGNC, Amarillo) for the info.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Cindy Zimmerman (Florida Agrinet, Ocala) for her first
edition of NAFB newsletter CHATS. New masthead, paper and type style changes.
And thanks to Sherry Newell (WJON/WWJO, St. Cloud, Minn.) for her service as
edi or la year.

VIC POWLL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. ro.2",47-4330


Letter No. 2498


March 8, 1991


DURING HIS SENATE CONFIRMATION HEARING, Secretary of Agriculture Designate Edward Madigan (right)
chats with Sen. Alan J. Dixon (D-Ill.) (left). Madigan vowed to fight like a "junkyard dog' on behalf of American
farmers during international trade talks. 'I intend to be an outspoken and aggressive advocate for agriculture," he
said. 'I have no agenda outside of agriculture." During the two-hour confirmation hearing by the Senate Agriculture
Committee, Madigan said he would oppose special legislation to resolve the financial problems of dairy farmers,
raising the possibility that to do so would open the new 1990 farm law to further changes. (Photo by Ray Lustig,
courtesy of the Washington Post.)

FAST TRACK NEGOTIATION -- President George Bush has told Congress he is requesting the
extension of fast track negotiation authority to implement international trade
agreements. Fast track, which has been used for major trade initiatives since 1974,
is essential to the successful negotiation of trade agreements. Under the fast track,
agreements are guaranteed an up-or-down vote by Congress, without amendments, within
a fixed period of time. Contact: Torie Clarke (202) 395-3230.









EDWARD MADIGAN will become
Here's a list:


the 24th secretary of agriculture. Who were the first 23?


Secretaries of Agriculture


Norman Jay Colman
Jeremiah McLain Rusk
Julius Sterling Morton
James Wilson
David Franklin Houston
Edwin Thomas Meredith
Henry Centwell Wallace
Howard Mason Gore
William Marion Jardine
Arthur Mastick Hyde
Henry Agard Wallace
Claude Raymond Wickard
Clinton Presbe Anderson
Charles Franklin Brannan
Ezra Taft Benson
Orville Lothrop Freeman
Clifford Morris Hardin
Earl Lauer Butz
John Albert Knebel
Bob Bergland
John Rusling Block
Richard Edmund Lyng
Clayton Keith Yeutter


Feb. 15,
March 6,
March 7,
March 6,
March 6,
Feb. 2,
March 5,
Nov. 22,
March 5,
March 6,
March 4,
Sept. 5,
June 30,
June 2,
Jan. 21,
Jan. 21,
Jan. 21,
Dec. 2,
Nov. 4,
Jan. 23,
Jan. 23,
March 7,
Feb. 16,


1889
1889
1893
1897
1913
1920
1921
1924
1925
1929
1933
1940
1945
1948
1953
1961
1969
1971
1976
1977
1981
1986
1989


March 6,
March 6,
March 5,
March 5,
Feb. 2,
March 4,
Oct. 25,
March 4,
March 4,
March 4,
Sept. 4,
June 29,
May 10,
Jan. 20,
Jan. 20,
Jan. 20,
Nov. 17,
Oct. 4,
Jan. 20,
Jan. 20,
Feb. 14,
Jan. 21,
March 1,


1889
1893
1897
1913
1920
1921
1924
1925
1929
1933
1940
1945
1948
1953
1961
1969
1971
1976
1977
1981
1986
1989
1991


Missouri
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Iowa
Missouri
Iowa
Iowa
West Virginia
Kansas
Missouri
Iowa
Indiana
New Mexico
Colorado
Utah
Minnesota
Nebraska
Indiana
Virginia
Minnesota
Illinois
California
Nebraska


FOOD EXPO -- Food buyers from around the world will be able to see, sample & buy a huge
variety of value-added food products from all corners of the U.S. at the 1991 NASDA
National Food & Agriculture Exposition in Las Vegas, Nev., April 30, May 1-2. The
biennial event is co-sponsored by the National Association of State Departments of
Agriculture and the Foreign Agricultural Service of USDA. It is the only show
exclusively designed to bring foreign buyers together with American food companies.
Contact: Mark Wallace (206) 586-6941.


U.S. EXPORTS -- U.S. ag exports are forecast to reach $37 billion in fiscal 1991, $1.5
billion less than forecast in November. Fiscal 1991 export volume, at 131 million
tons, is 8.5 million less than previously forecast. Reduced prospects for coarse
grains account for much of this decline, with world trade declining & competition
increasing in key markets. Projections are also lower for wheat, soybeans & soybean
meal exports, but higher for cotton. Contact: Steve MacDonald (202) 219-0827.


MEAT & POULTRY HOTLINE -- "Consumers have a lot of questions about spring foods," says
Sue Templin, supervisor of USDA's Meat & Poultry Hotline. "They ask, for example, why
some canned hams need refrigeration and others don't; and how long can hardcooked eggs
sit outside during an egg hunt." The Hotline's number: (800) 535-4555. Contact:
Karen Tracey (202) 447-9351


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1761 -- California is struggling through its fifth consecutive
year of drought. On this edition of Agriculture USA, Maria Bynum
reports on the ongoing effort to stretch limited water supplies.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


IE


TS


CONSUMER TIM


AGRITAPE NEW


NEWS FEATURE


UPCOMING ON


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES --


#1242 -- Meat labeling; food help for military families; Spring food
safety; a variety of rice, gardening for relaxation. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)


& FEATURES #1751 -- USDA News Highlights; a new secretary for
Versatile rise; opening up the Japanese market; U.S.
opportunities for cereal up. (Weekly reel of news features.)


USDA;
export


FIVE #1410 -- Copper & blood clotting; finding the zinc requirement; iron
& energy; hanging onto muscle; calcium side benefits. (Weekly reel of
research feature stories.)

USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., March 11, U.S. crop production, world supply
& demand; Tues., March 12, crop/weather update, world ag/grain
situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Wed., March
13, U.S. sugar/sweetener outlook; Thurs., March 14, fruit & tree nut
outlook; Fri., March 15, milk production; Mon., March 18, cattle on
feed; Tues., March 19, ag outlook, crop/weather update; Wed., March 20,
catfish production, ag chemical usage; Fri., March 22,
livestock/poultry update. (These are the USDA reports which we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which
are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story
listing keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of March 7, 9 & 11, 1991)


Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's Food Aid Programs; Lynn Wyvill
takes a look at Farm Safety for Just Kids.

Secretary of Agriculture Designate Edward Madigan gives
testimony during his confirmation hearings before the Senate; USDA Chief
Meteorologist Norton Strommen on latest weather & crop update; USDA
Economist Steve MacDonald on exports; USDA Economist Jerry Stam on ag
income; National Association of State Departments of Agriculture President
C. Alan Pettibone on the NASDA 1991 Food Exposition.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the alternative crop kenaf; DeBoria
Janifer takes a look at the WIC program; Lynn Wyvill reports on home-
based businesses.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08265 098 6
OFFMIKE

MARCH...is the month for farm shows, says Tom Rothman (Magnet Radio, St. Paul,
Minn.). It's one of his busiest times on the road providing coverage. Tom says
the northwest portion of Minnesota has entered its 52nd consecutive month of
drought; remainder of the state has adequate moisture as producers wait for Spring.
Major concern in the region is low dairy prices.

RANGE FIRES...& dust storms have developed in sections of Oklahoma reflecting dry
conditions existing in much of the state, says Cyndi Young (Oklahoma Agrinet,
Oklahoma City). She says a recent report indicated February was the second driest
and fifth warmest for Oklahoma since record keeping began in 1890. Cyndi is
planning to cover the 76th annual 4-H & Junior Livestock Show March 14-19 in
Oklahoma City. The event draws kids and animals from across the state. Cyndi was
holding down the fort while Ron Hays was in the nation's capital covering
confirmation hearings of Secretary-Designate Edward Madigan.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











PLANTING SEASON...is just around the corner in Indiana, says Jim Riggs (WILO/WSHW,
Frankfort). Water table is very high in southern portions of the state. Most
producers are waiting for fields to dry to do early Spring work; if there is much
delay producers will use no-till. Jim says his stations have expanded farm
programming at noon and in the morning hours.

NATIONAL AG WEEK...guest speaker at March 15 ceremonies in Washington, Ind., will
be Matt Fleck (Morning Ag Report, Indianapolis). Did your station participate in
National Ag Day?

DIED...Furney Todd (professor emeritus, North Carolina State Ag Extension Service),
heard throughout the region on 52 radio stations, & known as "Mr. Tobacco" for his
37-year leadership in tobacco plant research. Information provided by David
Spatola ( T, Greenville, N.C.).


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter
Qt 0""


United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)447-433
Letter No. 2499 March 16, 1991


MADIGAN SWEARING-IN Speaker of the House Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash) (right) administers the oath of office
to Secretary ofAgricultue Edward Madigan (left) as President George Bush watches and Mrs. Evelyn Madigan
holds the Madigan family bible. USDA Radio & USDA TV covered the event live. I am honored to join the Cabinet
of the most popular president in American History, Madigan said. 'I will do everything I can to support you, as well
as every one of the farmers and ranchers across America." (USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.)

REGULAR AEROBIC TRAINING can improve the fitness of inactive people in their 60's,
just as much as "couch potatoes" in their 20's. But the improvements occur
differently in each age group, a USDA study shows. The findings corroborate other
reports that endurance exercise improves older people's fitness but doesn't
significantly improve the maximum amount of blood the heart can pump. Contact:
William J. Evans (617) 556-3075.

TENNIS BALL-SIZED HEADS OF LETTUCE -- just right for singles -- should be on the
market in a few years, USDA scientists say. Miniature iceberg lettuce may appear in
trendy restaurants & supermarket produce section by 1993. Only the size of a tennis
ball, the midget lettuce is ideal for people who can't seem to use a whole head
while it's still fresh. Cut into wedges, it makes a single-serving salad. Contact:
Edward J. Ryder (408) 755-2800.


;11








HELP FOR RETURNING TROOPS -- Even though the U.S. has ordered a cease-fire in the
Persian Gulf War, USDA hasn't stopped offering programs of education, counseling &
"coping assistance" to families of military personnel deployed to the Persian Gulf.
And now, these programs are also helping in the "reuniting" stage, as troops begin
to come home. "Military families need to realize the three stages they normally
encounter in those situations," says Geneva Brown, a family life educator with the
Alabama Cooperative Extension Service in Auburn. The three stages are:
anticipation for separation; the actual separation; and reuniting. Contact: Adrian
Bailey (803) 656-3875.


USDA PRECLEARING TROOPS & EQUIPMENT -- USDA officials are now in the Persian Gulf
inspecting military equipment & personal baggage for prohibited ag items. "Our
inspectors will brief military units on how to prepare gear and equipment for return
to the United States, including tips on how to clean and seal materials for
transit," says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service. A major risk is from agricultural souvenirs that soldiers might
bring from the Gulf region. No-no's include camel saddles. Contact: Doug Hendrix
(301) 436-7255.

GETTING THE GARDEN READY -- Getting the right start in the spring is especially
important for a productive garden, says Horticulturist Tom Koske of the Louisiana
Cooperative Extension Service. First, he says, choose a good site & prepare it
properly for the crops you plan to grow. If you haven't already tested the soil, do
so now. Don't lime, unless the soil test calls for it, Koske says. Now is also a
good time to add compost, grass clippings or leaves. For other tips, contact:
Thomas Koske (504) 388-4141.

CONSERVATION CHANGES -- Keith Bjerke, administrator of USDA's Agricultural
Stabilization & Conservation Service, says USDA has proposed changes in highly
erodible land & wetland conservation program provisions. "Additional programs have
been added to the list of those under which benefits could be lost for violation of
the rules," Bjerke says. "Certain benefits will also be denied under the dairy
assessment refund program, the Agricultural Conservation Program, the Emergency
Conservation Programs and the Water Bank Program." Contact: Bruce Merkle (202)
447-8206.


FOOD COSTS -- Retail food prices, as measured by the Consumer Price Index, rose by
5.8 percent in 1990, the same percentage as the year before. This increase also
equaled the 1989 price increase, which was the largest since 1981. Price gains for
meats & dairy foods were sharp. Food prices in grocery stores climbed 6.5 percent
in 1990, but prices for restaurant meals advanced by 4.7 percent. Source: "Food
Costs...From Farm to Retail in 1990." Contact: Denis Dunham (202) 219-0870.


USDA TAKES OVER MARYLAND INSPECTION -- Effective March 31, USDA will assume
responsibility for the meat & poultry inspection in Maryland. Contact: Jim Greene
(202) 382-0314.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE USA #1762 -- Maria Bynum travels to California to take an in-depth look
at the economic impact of the five-year drought. (Weekly reel -- 13-
1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1243 -- The bacteria caper; housing the birds; farming in America;
gypsy moth eradication; tips on choosing the right nursing home.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)


AGRITAPE NEWS


& FEATURES #1752 -- USDA News Highlights; Madigan sworn in as 24th
secretary of agriculture; corn & barley deficiency payments; broiler
outlook; the costs of cotton. (Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1411 -- Diet & mood; adding a touch of oats; improved cotton
lines; foiling phytic acid; minerals & developing countries. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., March 25, ag trade update, world livestock
situation; Tues., March 26, weekly weather & crop update; Wed., March
27, aquaculture outlook, world cocoa situation; Thurs., March 28,
grain stocks, prospective plantings, hog & pig numbers, world tobacco
situation; Fri., March 29, ag prices, wool production. (These are
the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories each day which aren't listed in this lineup. Please don't
let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of March 14, 16 & 18, 1991)


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on National Agriculture Day & Dave Luciani
reports on help for gardeners who don't have a green thumb.

Highlights of swearing-in ceremony of Secretary of Agriculture
Edward Madigan; USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on rain in
California & dry windy weather in Great Plains; USDA Economist Jerry
Bange on corn supply & demand, soybean stocks & cotton exports; ASCS
Administrator Keith Bjerke on CRP bid process; USDA Under Secretary John
Campbell on dairy assistance.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on FmHA guaranteed loans; DeBoria Janifer
reports on the WIC program & Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's Science
Day for Kids.


Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
41111 1 1 I II I1 III11II
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08265 093 7

HOT TOPICS...at producer meetings this winter have related to environmental
protection. Art Sechrest (WJBC, Bloomington, Ill.) says there has been much
interest in sustainable agriculture, conservation farming & no-till. At a
recent statewide no-till conference in Peoria, moderated by Art, 1,700 people
attended, which reflects heightened participation & interest in the process.
Art says there is an increasing demand for farm broadcasters to MC or serve as
moderator at winter meetings.

PUTTING PENCIL...to worksheets distributed by Extension Service offices in Ohio
& Indiana has convinced many producers to sign up for Farm Bill programs this
year. Ron Powers (WOWO, Ft. Wayne, Ind.) says farmers in his area have examined
the options & are participating.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE...USDA agricultural broadcast programming is being added to the
schedule of KKUB, Brownfield, Texas, longtime user of our Hispanic Information
Service.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












CHERRY TREES...are in bloom in North Carolina & trees are in leaf, says Johnnie
Hood (WPTF/Southern Farm Network, Raleigh, NC), a result of unusually warm
weather. Johnnie says winter never really arrived this year. Producers worry
that a heavy frost will substantially reduce fruit production. Many growers are
installing sprinkler systems, just in case.

INSECT INFESTATION...has producers concerned in Kansas. Mike Dain (Mid America
Ag Network, Wichita, Kan.) says army cutworm has invaded wheat areas in many
sections of the state, causing some producers to consider alternative crops
where possible.

SEND A CARD...to Max Stewart (WIBV, Box Al, Belleville, Ill. 62222), scheduled
for a gall bladder operation March 11, & to Kathy Patton (WIBW/Kansas Ag Net,
Box 119 Tope Kan. 66601) & son Trent Michael, born Feb. 15.


IC POWEL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Pubi ,fairs Radio-TV Divisioi Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330

Letter No. 2500 !. March 22, 1991
PARNELL RESIGNS -- Deputy Secretary of agriculture Jack arnell is resigning,
effective May 1. Tendering his resignation with "miR emotions," Parnell said:
"Now the time has come to return to the ~piivate sector to pursue many opportunities
and interests that have been on hold." Par1e'll-has been deputy since April 20,
1989. He was director of California's Department of Food and Agriculture from 1987
to 1989.

FRUIT PRICES AT RECORD HIGH -- California's late-December freeze and this season's
smaller apple crop are putting upward pressure on grower & consumer prices for fresh
fruit, USDA economists say. The index of grower prices & the Consumer Price Index
for fresh fruit set record highs in January. Prices are expected to remain above
levels of a year earlier until harvest begins for late-spring & summer fruits.
Retail orange juice prices are expected to decline. Contact: Kathryn Buckley
(202) 219-0884.

THIS IS A GOOD TIME for homeowners to test the soil of their lawns & gardens. Soil
testing is a service provided by your state Cooperative Extension Service. Expect
to pay about $4 for a homeowner test; $5 for a farm test. The real key to efficient
soil testing is to take a good, representative sample. Test results are usually
available in a week. Contact: Janet Poley (202) 447-3029.

40 YEARS OF CHANGE -- When Calvin L. Beale began a career with USDA as a rural
demographer in 1953, it was a time of "extraordinary change," he says. "There was a
mass exodus from farming, far beyond that seen during the farm crisis of the 1980's.
The number of farms fell by 3 and 4 percent annually, and the number of people
living on farms declined by nearly 750,000 per year in that decade." The major
material drawbacks of rural living were overcome by electrification, modern
plumbing, central heat & paved roads, Beale says. Beale reviews 40 years of change
in the February issue of Farmline. For a copy call (202) 219-0494. Contact:
Calvin L. Beale (202) 219-0534.

SOYBEAN QUALITY RATED -- U.S. soybeans are arriving in European & Asian ports in
better condition these days, but a USDA study says we need to make further
improvements. By the end of the four-year study, U.S. soybeans were reaching
foreign destinations with fewer damaged kernels than at the start of the study. The
study highlighted the need to increase protein content of U.S. soybeans & to
decrease the amount of foreign matter in shipments. Contact: Timothy L. Mounts
(309) 685-4011.

WORLD FOOD DAY-- Wednesday, Oct. 16 has been chosen as World Food Day for 1991. The
U.S. National Committee for World Food Day will sponsor the Eighth World Food Day
Teleconference from noon to 3 p.m. that day on Telstar 301 (C-Band). Contact:
Patricia Young (202) 653-5760.








KIDS CAN HELP SAVE ENERGY, TOO -- Because children use a lot of electricity, parents
should teach them some simple energy conservation measures that could become
permanent habits by the time they grow up. Debra Acosta, with the Louisiana
Cooperative Extension Service, says children can help conserve energy by turning off
lights when they leave a room, using daylight, dusting light bulbs and by opening &
closing refrigerator doors quickly. People open refrigerators an average of 22
times every day -- that's 8,000 time a year per person. Acosta has more energy
saving tips. Contact: Debra Acosta (504) 388-4141.

AGRICULTURE MAKING DIFFICULT ADJUSTMENTS IN GERMANY -- As many as 400,000 farmers in
what used to be East Germany may lose their jobs as a result of German
reunification. But the effects of reunification go beyond the reconstituted
country's borders. Exports of U.S. grain could be hurt by an increase in grain
production in Eastern Germany, which would tend to depress world prices. Contact:
Mary Lisa Madell (202) 219-0610.

FAST FOOD RESTAURANTS SWITCH OILS -- Prodded by consumer concerns over saturated
fats, the three largest fast food chains have completed a change from beef tallow to
vegetable oils for cooking french fries. The switch should not cause major changes
in the fats & oils industry -- just reshuffle it a bit. The new oil of choice for
Wendy's fries is corn oil. McDonald's now uses a blend of corn & cottonseed oil for
all of its fried products. Burger King switched to a soybean-cottonseed oil blend
for french fires and to soybean oil for all other fried foods. Contact: James
Schaub (202) 219-0840.

NEWS FOR PICKLE LOVERS -- For the first time in 20 years, USDA is revising pickle
grading standards to accommodate changing consumer tastes & packaging preferences,
says Daniel D. Haley, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service.
Lowering salinity & acidity standards provides the mildness many shoppers now look
for in high-grade, jarred, open-shelved pickles, Haley said. The new standards also
permit a bit more stem on the pickle, reflecting the industry's switch to mechanical
picking. Without the stem standard change, the cost of stem shortening could make
pickles cost more, Haley says. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 447-6179.

A YEN FOR JAPANESE BUSINESS -- As the largest market for U.S. ag exports, Japan is
probably the country most new-to-market exporters first encounter when doing
business overseas. Knowing the cultural & business "do's and taboo's" of doing
business in Japan can often make or break a sale. One tip: because the Japanese
believe the preservation of harmony in social & business relationships is of
paramount importance, they will go to great lengths to avoid direct confrontation
with others. The April issue of AgExporter features Japan & also has more tips &
suggestions for doing business in Japan. Contact: Lynn Goldsborough (202) 382-
9442.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1763 -- The current economic slump is causing some families to
have to get by on less. Brenda Curtis talks with an expert on the
subject. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME


AGRITAPE NEWS


NEWS FEATURE


#1244 -- A new food price prediction; living on less; protecting the
U.S. from Persian Gulf pests; compost piles; appliances & your energy
bill. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)


& FEATURES #1753 -- USDA News Highlights; a decision on the grain
reserve; a dairy crisis; a study on pesticide reduction; 1991 sugar
outlook. (Weekly reel of news features.)

FIVE #1412 -- Fighting ragweed in Russia; saving the wetlands;
fructose & copper; amylose & blood sugar; soybean improvements.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., March 27, aquaculture outlook; world
cocoa situation; Thurs., March 28, grain stocks, prospective plantings, hog & pig
numbers, world tobacco situation; Fri., March 29, ag prices, wool production; Mon.,
April 1, horticultural exports; Tues., April 2, crop/weather update, tobacco
outlook; Thurs., April 4, floriculture production. (These are the scheduled USDA.
Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES
Material changed at 5 p.m.,


(202) 488-8358 or 8359.
EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of March 21, 23 & 25, 1991)


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES --


Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's guaranteed loan program for farmers;
DeBoria Janifer on USDA research to breed Easter lilies year round;
Pat O'Leary on a recent USDA science day for students.

Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan -- excerpts from USDA
National Ag Day ceremony and from March 22 USDA Radio News Conference;
Ray Motha, USDA meteorologist, with a crop & weather update; USDA
Economist Greg Gajewski with the latest ag outlook; USDA Economist Kate
Buckley on U.S. fruit & nut production; USDA Economist Jerry Stamm on
farm credit; USDA Economist Steve McDonald on farm trade.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the U.S. rice industry; Lynn Wyvill on
home-based business opportunities in rural America; DeBoria Janifer
on USDA's Women, Infants & Children program.


EVERY OTHER


WEEK -- Ag Update, five minutes of USDA farm program information,
presented in news desk format with B-roll footage.


Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




R OF FLORID

3 122 0800 44


OFFMIKE


AG DAY BREAKFAST...was delayed for two days because of a snow storm, says Al
Heinz (KGLO, Mason City, Iowa). Al served as master of ceremonies at the
well-attended event. Al says he expects few planting changes in his area as a
result of Farm Bill flexibility. Recent snow and winter rains have provided
ample subsoil moisture.

INFORMATIONAL EFFORT...by 73 members of the Ohio Farm Bureau to their
representatives in Congress was covered by Valerie Parks (ABN, Radio/TV
Columbus, Ohio). Valerie says the annual three-day trip this year focused on
wetlands, Farm Bill provisions, budget & taxes. She also stopped by to say
"Hi" to us while she was in Washington.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR...for the NAFB meeting in your region: South Central, El
Dorado, Kan., May 3-5; Northeast, Burlington, Vt., June 7-9; Southeast, St.
Petersburg, Fla., June 13-16; North Central, St. Cloud, Minn., June 27-29;
Western, Vail, Colo., July 7-10.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300


MOVED...Larry Frum to WGAL-TV,
Channel 13 in Huntington, W.Va.
from WTAX, Springfield.


Lancaster, Penn., as farm report producer, from
Peggy Fish to WFMB/WCVS, Springfield, Ill.,


SUPPLIES AND LINE CREWS...came from as far away as New York to repair electric
power lines downed by an ice storm in northeastern Illinois, says Marla
Behrends (WKAN, Kankakee). Schools were closed, some farms had no
electricity for more than a week & many producers copied market figures
wearing gloves.


DEEP FREEZE...of December may have killed half the
served by Verne Sheppard (KTOQ, Rapid City, S.D.).
is stressing/ surviving ants.


C POWEL
Chief, Radio & TV Division


winter wheat in the area
He says lack of moisture




A 2\ 3L; 2S I1


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department o agriculture Office of Pu4c Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330

Letter No. 2501VS March 29, 1991
i _______/ *


FIRST RADIO NEWS CONFERENCE Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan, Director of Public Affairs & Press
Secretary Kelly Shipp & Executive Assistant to the Secretary William O'Conner, Jr., (far right) joined USDA Radio's
Gary Crawford in the USDA Radio Studio for Madigan's first radio news conference with farm broadcasters March
22. During the 30-minute news conference Madigan answered questions from nine broadcasters as others listened
and recorded the event. (USDA Photo by Byron Schumacher.)

INK FROM SOY OIL -- Newspaper printing ink made with 100 percent soybean oil
developed by USDA may soon be making headlines. "This announcement is of special
importance on this day when Americans across this great nation are celebrating
National Agriculture Day to honor our farmers and the greatest agriculture
production the world has ever seen," said Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan.
"U.S. farmers provide 250 million Americans the highest quality of food and fiber.
Soy ink is one example of how their efforts go beyond traditional agricultural
production." If all newspaper ink were made from soy oil, it would use the oil from
about 40 million bushels of soybeans. Soy ink could cost less than traditional
newspaper inks. Contact: Marvin 0. Bagby (309) 685-4011.


































LOW-FAT BEEF -- USDA is testing low-fat beef patties in schools in six states. "Our
prompt action in buying and distributing beef patties which contain approximately 10
percent fat is part of a continuing effort to lower the fat content in school
lunches," says Betty Jo Nelsen, administrator of USDA's Food & Nutrition Service,
the agency which administers the National School Lunch Program. "No one is more
concerned than we are with healthful nutrition for the nation's school children."
USDA bought about 240,000 pounds of low-fat beef to distribute to schools in
Maryland, Georgia, Minnesota, Texas, Iowa & California. Contact: Phil Shanholtzer
(703) 756-3286.


FARM INCOME TO SLIP -- Farmers' net incomes are expected to drop in 1991 from recent
records, USDA economists say. While cash receipts are expected to remain near
record levels, lower direct government payments & slightly higher farm expenses will
pull net incomes down. USDA forecasts net farm income to be $42 to $47 billion,
nearly one-tenth below a year ago. USDA predicts net cash income will be $53 to $58
billion in 1991, compared with $58 billion in 1990. Contact: Greg Gajewski (202)
219-0213.


AG SAFETY & HEALTH -- Surgeon General Antonia C. Novello will hold a conference on
agricultural safety & health in Des Moines, Iowa, April 30 May 3. In addition to
Novello, invited speakers include Gov. Terry E. Branstad, Sec. of Labor Lynn Martin,
Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan, Sec. of HHS Louis W. Sullivan, Farm Bureau
President Dean Kleckner, USDA-Extension Service Administrator Myron D. Johnsrud &
Sen. Thomas Harkin. Contact: Melvin L. Myers (404) 639-2376.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445


IN MEMORIAL

Larry Collins, the steady hand behind
USDA Radio's voices, died of a heart
attack March 23. Larry, who was our
radio production specialist, also
coordinated equipment purchases &
radio contracts. Larry grew up in
Southeast Washington, D.C., and had
worked for USDA R-TV for more than 30
years. He served in the U.S. Navy from
1952-56 and began working for the
federal government as a guard at GSA in
1957. In his off-hours, Larry was sound
coordinator & stage manager for
"Mother's Band," a community service
band. He also devoted many volunteer
hours counseling people recovering from
drug & alcohol dependency.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1764 -- Azaleas add color & beauty to your landscape. On
this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis gives some tips on the
proper care & feeding of azaleas. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1246 -- April showers; buying fresh oranges; safe cooking; azaleas --
a favorite for landscapes; azaleas are bursting out all over.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1754 -- USDA News Highlights; U.S. Japanese trade update;
sodbuster/swampbuster; U.S. poultry wings its way to the USSR; U.S.
chocolate confectionery exports increase; a deadly Medfly lure.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1413 -- B6: How much is enough; B6 & blood sugar; skin &
the immune system; molds vs. Medflies; mold menagerie. (Weekly reel
of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., April 9, crop/weather update; Wed., April
10, U.S. crop production, world supply/demand; Thurs., April 11,
vegetables/specialties outlook, world ag/grain situation, world
oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Fri., April 12, outlook
for developing economies; Tues., April 16, milk production,
crop/weather update, ag resources outlook. (These are the USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the
lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of March 28, 29 & April 1, 1991)


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on the U.S. rice industry; DeBoria Janifer takes
a look at the WIC program; Will Pemble reports on fighting fruit
flies.

USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather &
crop update; USDA Economist Leland Southard on livestock & poultry; USDA
Soil Scientist Jeri Berc on wind erosion & water supply; USDA Economist
Jerry Stam on U.S. farm banks; USDA Economist Greg Gajewski on rural
industrial growth; NASDA President C. Alan Pettibone on NASDA '91.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the alternative crop -- kenaf; Lynn
Wyvill takes a look at home-based businesses.


Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 649 3

TWO WEEKS...after an ice storm hit northwest Indiana, several producers were
without electrical power. David Russell (Tribune Radio Network, Indianapolis,
Ind.) says portable generators were supplying power to hog houses while the
farmer's house was operating as if it were the early 1900's. Dave says there
is no indication that Farm Bill flexibility will cause major changes in
planting intentions. Producers are waiting for fields to dry.

RECENT RAINS...have provided enough moisture for Spring planting, but the
subsoil remains dry, says Bob Burtenshaw (KID, Idaho Falls, Idaho). Farm Bill
flexibility is not a problem for most producers in his area, Bob says, because
weather & soil limit what can be grown. Main concern now is low prices for
potatoes & wheat. At recent Ag Week ceremonies, Bob had double cause for
pride -- his brother Clyde was one of five inductees into the Eastern Idaho
Agriculture Hall of Fame. In 1973 his father, John, was one of the first five
inducted.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











EXPANSION...is underway, says Cindy Zimmerman (Southeast Agrinet, Ocala,
Fla.). Network is adding stations in Georgia and Alabama. To reflect the
additions, the network is changing its name from Florida Agrinet to Southeast
Agrinet. Everett Griner (formerly of Georgia Agrinews) is joining the staff.

THANKS...to Lisa Roberts (WKYA-WNES, Powderly, Ky.) for adding USDA radio
service to her broadcast schedule & to Don Sitton (KPET, Lamesa, Texas) for
letting us know how much he and his listeners enjoy our weekly radio cassette
service. Also, thanks to Gregg Primo (Newsworthy Video, Old Greenwich,
Conn.), Brad Lemmonds (KAIT-TV, Jonesboro, Ark.) & Steve Thompson (Farm Times,
Ruppert, Idaho) for their positive feedback about our satellite TV News
Service features. And, thanks to Dix Harper (WRAL-TV, Raleigh, N.C.) for
showing our "America's Most Crucial Industry" video to the Wake County
Agrib siness C uncil. Dix serves as council president.


C POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture O'ifPublic Affairs Radio. Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2502 April 5, 1991

LINKING FARMING TO THE ECONOM Although far i employs only 2 percent of the
work force & generates 1.4 per n oQf the Q sIational product, it remains an
important link in the world econ S Nits interrelationships with other
industries, says the current issue Food Review. Farming has always been
tied to the larger economy, says Economist Kathryn L. Lipton. However, increased
use of machinery, chemicals & other expensive technology, combined with a greater
reliance on export markets have strengthened agriculture's economic linkages.
Contact: Kathryn L. Lipton (202) 219-0880.

FOREST SYSTEM CELEBRATES 100 YEARS -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan says a
nationwide series of events is planned this year to help Americans celebrate the
100th anniversary of the founding of the National Forest System. "In 1991 we are
celebrating a turning point in American conservation history, the centennial of
legislation empowering the president to set aside land for forest reserves," Madigan
said. Today the National Forest System comprises over 8 percent of the geographical
area of the U.S. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

HELP FOR DISABLED FARMERS -- USDA has joined with the National Easter Seal Society &
other private, non-profit disability organizations to establish education &
assistance programs for farmers with disabilities. Nationwide, more than 500,000
farmers, ranchers & other ag workers have physical disabilities that limit their
ability to perform essential farm tasks. USDA's Extension Service has awarded
between $80,000 & $115,000 to eight programs located in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana,
Louisiana, New York, Wisconsin & Vermont. Montana, Idaho & Wyoming are sponsoring
a joint project. Contact: Brad Rein (202) 447-5285.

NASDA FOOD EXPO -- Full service news facilities will be available at the 1991
National Association of State Departments of Agriculture Food & Agriculture
Exposition, which will be held April 30 through May 2 in Las Vegas. The show brings
more than 300 American companies & their value-added ag products together with more
than 1,000 food buyers from around the world. Actualities will be available & you
can set up interviews & features, or they can be produced by the on-site radio
staff. Contact: Mark Wallace (206) 586-6941.

LONGER STORAGE FOR BROWN RICE -- USDA scientists have filed for a patent on a new
process that doubles brown rice's storage life to at least a year. The process,
which uses ethanol to prevent the rice from turning rancid, could also play a role
in increasing exports of brown rice, says Elaine T. Champagne, of USDA's
Agricultural Research Service. Of 2.5 million metric tons of rice exported by the
U.S. in 1990, brown rice accounted for 339,141 metric tons. Contact: Elaine T.
Champagne (504) 286-4357.









THICKER CATSUP -- USDA is proposing to make you work harder to get your catsup out
of the bottle. Daniel D. Haley, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing
Service, says USDA is looking for comments on proposed catsup standards that would
make the catsup thicker. Haley says the standards were requested by the Indiana
Food Processors Association, Inc., and major tomato catsup processors who say
consumers prefer thicker catsup. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 447-6179.

IT'S TIME TO GET STARTED NOW with plans for your home vegetable garden. Draw up a
garden diagram, have your soil tested & start transplants from seeds indoors.
Contact: Chuck McClurg (301) 405-4342.

RURAL ECONOMY -- It will take at least several months to tell how the current U.S.
economic downturn will affect rural areas, USDA economists say in the Winter 1990/91
issue of Rural Conditions and Trends (Contact: Sara Mills Mazie (202) 219-0520 for
a copy). Several factors appear to be important -- first, farming is much better
off now than in the early 1980's; and second, the rural economy has become more
service oriented over the last decade. The low inflation, interest rates & exchange
value of the dollar should help reduce the negative effects of the recession on
rural areas. Contact: Karen Hamrick, John Kitchen, Elizabeth Mack (202) 219-0782.

MOST WOMEN NEED TO SPEND more time in the sun during winter, says Mark Kantor, an
extension food & nutrition specialist. According to recent studies, the ability of
women -- especially older ones -- to absorb calcium is largely dependent on the
season of year. Calcium absorption & use helps strengthen bones & prevent
osteoporosis. This absorption also requires a certain hormone, a special form of
vitamin D -- much of which is made by the skin when its exposed to sunlight.
Contact: Mark Kantor (301) 405-1018.

DID YOU KNOW? Agriculture is the nation's number one industry. Together with its
related industries, agriculture provides 21 million people with jobs. The average
U.S. farmer produces the food & fiber for 128 people, here & overseas. Ten years
ago it was 109 people. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

POISON-PROOF YOUR HOME -- About three in five non-fatal home poisonings happen to
youngsters less than 5 years old. Extension Safety Coordinator Peggy Caruso says
that in addition to the children who suffer from non-fatal poisonings, some 3,000
adults die each year from accidental ingestion or inhalation of toxic solids,
liquids or gases. Caruso has several steps to prevent accidental home poisonings.
Contact: Peggy Caruso (504) 388-4141.

WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK REMAINS DIM -- Dry weather & light snowfall this winter have
contributed to unfavorable forecasts for much of the West's water supply, according
to William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service. Richards said even
with recent storms, spring & summer streamflows will be below to well-below average
for most of the West. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 447-5776.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1765 -- Farming is, indeed, America's most dangerous game,
especially for children who work or live on farms. Gary Crawford
reports on the growing number of children being hurt or killed in
farming accidents & what's being done to counter the trend. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME



AGRITAPE NEWS


#1247 --
dealing
salons.


The farmer/food connection; azaleas thrive on neglect;
with loss; pet bird problems; a new warning about tanning
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)


& FEATURES #1755 -- USDA News Highlights; rules on conservation
compliance; preparing for new rules on organic farming; U.S. poultry
exports double in last five years; U.S. rice being sold everywhere in
the world -- almost. (Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1414 -- More accurate nutrient values; neater newspapers;
cost-effective soy inks; U.S.-Soviet research first; unknown wasp
attacks corn rootworm. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., April 10, U.S. crop production, world ag
supply & demand; Thurs., April 11, vegetable/specialty crop outlook, world ag/grain
situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation; Fri., April 12, outlook
for developing economies; Tues., April 16, milk production, crop/weather update, ag
resources outlook (land values). (These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of April 4, 6 & 8)


FEATURES --



ACTUALITIES --


Lynn Wyvill reports on how to start a home-based business; a second
report features some craftsmen & women who have successfully built
home-based businesses. Pat O'Leary reports on farmers considering
kenaf as an alternative crop.

USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest 90-day weather
outlook, hard red winter wheat conditions & the drought in California;
USDA Economist Verner Grise on tobacco production; USDA Economist Dave
Harvey on the growth of the U.S. aquaculture industry & C. Alan
Pettibone, president of the National Association of State Departments of
Agriculture, on the NASDA Food Exposition in Las Vegas April 30 May 2.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on fat in the American diet. Pat
O'Leary reports on the National Grove of State Trees at the U.s.
National Arboretum. Lynn Wyvill reports on safe handling of food by
consumers.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
III III II11 l 08300 6 4 i
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 654 3
BIG INCREASE...in cotton acreage is underway in the region served by Jerry
Gehman (WASG, Atmore, Ala.), up 30 percent statewide in two years. Demand is
forecast to keep pace with production; that's helping to make producers smile.
Jerry says the boll weevil eradication program is a major factor in making
possible the acreage increase.

SOIL EROSION...problem was made visible recently in eastern Iowa. Mike
Buchanan (KBIZ, Ottumwa) says dust picked up by high winds in Kansas and
Oklahoma became mixed with rain and produced a cake of mud. Windshield wipers
just spread it around. Abundance of moisture has delayed planting. No
changes expected from planting intentions. Mike's station sponsors the
Southeast Farmer of the Year award, honoring an individual's contributions to
agriculture & community. The banquet on Ag Day filled the local hotel's
ballroom. Mike says the project serves as a boost for the region & the
station.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












SHIVERING SEASON...remains in force, says Bob Flint (WCFR, Springfield, Vt.)
but early field work is underway on farms alongside the Connecticut River.
Bob says several small dairy farms in his area have been sold to larger
operators.

DAIRY PRODUCERS...are hurting in Michigan, says Patrick Driscoll (Michigan
Farm Radio Net, Milan), but its too early to predict results of a shakeout.
Pat says cherry producers are not doing well; over-production has dropped
prices below costs.

TRIUMPH OF AGRICULTURE...exhibition was covered live by Kim Dlouhy (WOW,
Omaha, Neb.) & crew. Kim says attendance was up from last year. Kim is a
member of the Omaha Agribusiness Club board of directors & helping to plan
activities for the remainder of the year.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




A2.2ur : 2o


Farm Broadcasters



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-JV


Letter No. 2503


C .


Letter



vision Wa hington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
April 12, 1991


MANDATORY NUTRITION LABELING -- USDA has proposed mand tory nutrition labeling for
all processed meat & poultry products, a move thLtia.jld revamp close to 250,000
different food labels. USDA also proposed voluntary labels for fresh products, sa
Jo Ann R. Smith, assistant secretary of agriculture for marketing & inspection
services.


ys


"Consumers deserve more information about the
purchase," Smith said. "We believe consumers
information and we want to make it easier for
choices." USDA's public request for consumer
latest step in USDA's labeling-reform effort.
Office, Attention: Linda Carey, FSIS Hearing
Washington, D.C. 20250. Contact: Jim Greene


nutrient content of all food they
have the right to nutrition
them to make informed dietary
comments on nutrition labeling is the
Comments are due June 3 to Policy
Clerk, Room 3171-S, FSIS, USDA,
(202) 382-0314.


SPECIAL HOUSING FOR RURAL NEEDY -- A new USDA program to provide housing to
America's most needy rural counties is already succeeding, says La Verne Ausman,
administrator of USDA's Farmers Home Administration. The new program targets 100
counties in 19 states & Puerto Rico to receive special housing assistance. "Our
intent is to improve the quality of affordable housing by targeting funds to areas
that have severe, unmet rural housing needs," Ausman says. The 19 states are:
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana,
Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Puerto Rico, South
Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia & West Virginia. Contact: Sally Lawrence
(202) 447-6903.

RECLAIMING THE NIGHT -- When the sun goes down in rice country, everyone flees
indoors. Why? To escape swarms of mosquitoes with unusually voracious, highly
irritating bites & the ability to transmit diseases to humans, domestic animals &
wildlife. A team of USDA & state ag experiment station scientists has helped
residents of Stuttgart, Ark., reclaim the night. The scientists made Stuttgart a
test site & developed some improved insect management strategies. Some of the
strategies included: new formulations of insect growth hormones, some new mosquito
repellents & learning which insects feed on mosquitoes. Contact: G. J. Musick
(501) 575-4446.

SMOKERS FEEL IT IN THEIR BONES -- Women smokers who worry about developing
osteoporosis now have another reason to quit smoking, according to a USDA study.
The two-year study found smoking accelerates the loss of bone mineral -- at least in
some bones, says Elizabeth Krall, principal investigator. "The effect of smoking on
bone mineral may not be nearly as great as the effect of estrogen loss, a low
calcium intake or the lack of physical activity," Krall says. "Smoking is a small
influence, but it's an influence." Contact: Elizabeth A. Krall (617) 556-3074.











GLOBAL WARMING -- A buildup in the atmosphere of two gases that promote global
warming has been encouraged by cultivation of grasslands & use of nitrogen
fertilizer, a USDA study found. Concentrations of methane & nitrous oxide have
risen dramatically over the past few decades & together account for about 20 percent
of total expected global warming. Contact: Kevin Bronson (303) 482-5733.

HOW TO GET RID OF A WEED -- USDA scientists have finished a study on how to
eradicate common crupina, a menacing weed that threatens cropland & rangeland in
Idaho, Oregon & Washington. In addition to cropland & rangeland, the weed also
poses harm to crop production, watersheds, native plants wildlife & farm exports,
says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection
Service. Common crupina is an exotic weed, first found in the U.S. near
Grangeville, Idaho, in 1968. "Today the weed has infested 63,500 acres in north
central Idaho, Umatilla County, Ore., and Chelan County, Wash.," Glosser says. The
USDA study recommends eradicating the weed using integrated pest management.
Contact: Caree Vander Linden (301) 436-7280.

OLDER AMERICANS FACE SPECIAL RISKS -- The effects of aging, including a weakened
immune system, poor eyesight & reduced senses of smell & taste, puts 35 million
Americans over 65 at increased risk from foodborne illness. May is Older American's
Month, says Lester M. Crawford, administrator of USDA's Food Safety & Inspection
Service. "This is a good opportunity to educate older people about foodborne risks
and how they can protect themselves by following the basic rules of safe food
handling," Crawford said. Contact: Jim Greene (202) 382-0314

EFFECTS OF ASPIRIN & ALCOHOL -- Don't believe the myth that taking aspirin before
drinking limits the effects of alcohol consumption, says Peggy Caruso of the
Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service. Recent research suggests that two aspirins
can turn an innocent drink into a stiff one; and social drinking into legal
drunkenness. In a study at the Mount Sinai alcohol research center in the Bronx
Veterans Affairs Medical Center in New York, men who took aspirin before taking a
drink absorbed 40 to 100 percent more alcohol into their bloodstreams than they did
without the aspirin. Contact: Peggy Caruso (504) 388-4141.

DID YOU KNOW? Each person spent an average of $1,691 for food in 1989 (figured at
retail prices), compared with $1,645 in 1979 (at 1989 dollars) & $1,522 in 1969
(again in 1989 dollars) ... The expense of operating U.S. farms averaged nearly $575
per person in the U.S. ... There are 2.14 million farms in the U.S.; the average
size is 461 acres ... Each U.S. consumer is supported annually by the output of only
one & one-quarter acres of land ... Farm assets, including real estate, farm
operator households, livestock & poultry, machinery, crops totaled over a trillion
dollars in 1990. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202)447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1766 -- Brenda Curtis interviews a foreign service officer
who is a first-hand witness to the changes in the USSR over the past
year & its impact on the Soviet people. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME


AGRITAPE NEWS


#1248 -- A new housing program; change in the basic food groups;
no-rub news ink; life in the USSR; plant a tree. (Weekly reel of 2-
1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

& FEATURES #1757 -- USDA News Highlights; will there be more credit
guarantees for the Soviets; more markets in the Persian Gulf;
dividing the food dollar; ag progress days. (Weekly reel of news
features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1415 -- Secret of Egyptian cotton; studying cotton toxins;
nutrition study volunteers; cooking for research; nutrients & the
brain. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thurs., April 18, ag outlook; Fri., April 19,
dairy outlook, U.S. ag trade update, cattle on feed; Tues., April 23, weekly weather
& crop update, catfish production; Wed., April 24, rice outlook; Thurs., April 25,
oil crops outlook. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please
don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EST, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of April 11, 13 & 15, 1991)


FEATURES --



ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on the National Grove of State Trees at USDA's
National Arboretum; Will Pemble reports on USDA research to protect
cattle from grub insects; Michigan State's Dave Luciani reports on
better packaging for food exports.

Ray Motha, USDA meteorologist, with a crop & weather update; James
Donald, chairman of USDA's World Board, on the latest crop production
report; James Cason, manager of USDA's Federal Crop Insurance
Corporation, on crop insurance; Carole Davis, a nutritionist with USDA's
Human Nutrition Information Service, on the food groups; Fred Deneke,
USDA's Forest Service, on Arbor Day tree planting.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on demographic changes
over the years; Lynn Wyvill on safer handling of
Janifer on healthy weights for Americans.


in rural America
foods; DeBoria


EVERY OTHER WEEK: AG UPDATE, five minutes of USDA farm program information,
presented in news desk format with B-Roll.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EST
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EST
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EST




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 659 2

FRUIT TREES...in southeast Iowa are producing blossoms early this year, says
John Weir (KBUR, Burlington). Temperatures in the mid-80s have hurried the
blooming season by at least two weeks, which creates danger to the fruit if
the weather turns freezing cold. John says field work is underway & the year
is starting with ample moisture conditions.

STATE FUNDING...share for production of market reports has been cut, which
prompted a meeting with the farm broadcasting staff of KRVN & USDA's AMS, says
Rich Hawkins (KRVN, Lexington, Neb.). AMS updated KRVN on how USDA produces
market reports & is modernizing the reporting system. KRVN now plans to give
on-air credit to AMS for the day's figures. Rich says the livestock industry
is doing well, but crop producers are apprehensive about the paperwork burden
involved with complying with environmental provisions of the farm bill. He
says big producers tell him they are losing incentive to remain in production
programs.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













CROPS...are coming out of dormancy in response to summer-like temperatures,
says Roger Strom (WCCO, Minneapolis, Minn.), but snow is in the forecast.
Grain and bean producers are looking forward to a good year. Dairy producers
are facing tough times; production costs remain above income. Roger says
local co-ops predict the loss of 106 dairy farms this year.

MOVING...MAGNET Radio, St. Paul, Minn., to a new location in St. Paul -- 1370
Davern St., 55116. Tom Rothman of MAGNET says the network uses the talent of
ten farm broadcasters around the state and five regional farm directors to
produce its programming. Andy Alcock, formerly on the TV staff at Mississippi
State, has moved to the sunny beaches of the equatorial Pacific where he is
reporting for Guam Cable TV news. Thanks to Tyson Gair (Mississippi State TV
News Servic for the information.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




A ")~ \ c: J.


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Pplic Airs l i- Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2504 April 19, 1991


PESTICIDE HOTLINE -- USDA & EPA ave established a/p ticide hotline growers can
call for information on the re-rei station of mjio 'use chemicals. EPA is doing a
major review of older pesticides to.be sure they meet current scientific standards.
Because of the anticipated reduction '~jth ntu~ er of ag chemicals available,
producers who rely on chemicals for which eTTiTre is a limited market -- especially
most fruits, vegetables, flowers & ornamentals -- will be impacted. The hotline
number is (800) 262-0216, Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT.
Contact: Al Maruggi (202) 447-5654.

NATIONAL ARBOR DAY -- At 12 noon on Friday, April 26, people from all walks of life
with join Rotary International members in planting trees across America & the world.
According to Fred Denke of USDA's Forest Service, every state in the nation will
have at least one major tree-planting event in their state capitol. USDA's "America
The Beautiful National Tree Program" has a goal to plant & care for some 30 million
trees. Contact: Robert Conrad (202) 453-9696.

30 YEARS OF SERVICE -- USDA's Economic Research Service celebrated its 30th
"birthday" April 3. Actually, its roots go back 150 years to the congressional
mandate to collect ag statistics, says John Lee, ERS administrator. ERS provides
analysis & info that ag decision makers at all levels need. "By providing timely,
relevant, competent and unbiased information, we hope to serve a constituency that
bridges parties, institutions, ideologies and that thus ultimately serves the common
good of the larger society." Contact: John Lee (202) 219-0300.

FARM MACHINERY PACKS SOIL -- Corn yields fall off as much as an average of 16
bushels per acre where the wheels on farm machinery packs down the soil, a three-
year USDA study of an Iowa farm found. The study tested three fleets of farm
machinery, each exerting a different ground pressure, says Donald C. Erbach, a USDA
ag engineer. The fleets had tires, rubber tracks and experimental low-pressure
tracks. "On test plots where low ground pressure tracks were used, yields averaged
102 bushels an acre," says Erbach. "That's 19 percent greater than average yields
of 86 bushels an acre from tire-compacted soil." Contact: Donald C. Erbach (515)
294-5725.

1987 FEDERAL PAYMENTS to farm operators totaled $9.6 billion, primarily under
federal programs authorized in 1985 to limit production & encourage conservation, a
new report from the 1987 Census of Agriculture shows. The report shows nearly
700,000 of the nation's 2.1 million farms received some direct government payment.
The majority of these payments went to the largest grain & cotton farms. Contact:
Agriculture Division (800) 523-3215.









ORGANIC STANDARDS BOARD -- USDA is looking for 14 organic farmers, handlers,
retailers & experts to serve as members of the National Organic Standards Board,
which was authorized by the 1990 Farm Bill. The board will help develop standards
for producing organic farm products. The normal board membership term will be five
years. Applications are due by May 31 to Harold S. Ricker, assistant director,
Transportation & Marketing Div., AMS, USDA, Room 4006-S, P.O. Box 96456, Washington,
D.C. 20090-6456. Contact: Harold S. Ricker (202) 447-2704.

MERCHANDISING ORGANIC PRODUCE -- After a surge in sales following the Alar apple
scare, organically grown products are losing consumers' approval at the marketplace.
USDA ag economists say better merchandising may help perk up sales. Because the
perceived benefits of organic produce differ, the market is not homogeneous. The
three target markets -- environmental, health & taste conscious -- are not
necessarily mutually exclusive, but do require separate merchandising efforts.
Contact: Stephen L. Ott (202) 219-0313.


PICTURE-PERFECT VS. BLEMISHED PRODUCE -- How important is a product's appearance?
When offered a choice between picture-perfect & blemished produce, California
consumers preferred the pretty. Yet, when told the scarred produce had been grown
with half the pesticide sprays, consumers overwhelmingly chose the scarred oranges.
Consumer advocates & environmentalists say people are willing to trade some physical
perfection for lower use of pesticides. The produce industry says consumers insist
upon blemish-free fruits & veggies. Contact: Lori Lynch (202) 219-0689.

TIMBER POLICY SALE CHANGE -- USDA's Forest Service is proposing to change the
agency's commercial timber sale program to permit commercial timber sales only on
national forests where program revenues exceed costs, or, if not, where long-term
benefits of the timber sale program outweigh costs. John Beuter, deputy assistant
secretary of agriculture for natural resource & environment, says the proposal
addresses the issue of below-cost timber sale programs, which are defined in the
proposal as those for which costs have exceeded revenues for three consecutive
years. Comments are due by June 16 to: F. Dale Robertson, Chief, Forest Service,
USDA, P.O. Box 96090, Washington, D.C. 20090-6090. Contact: Denver James (202)
475-3781.


USDA INVESTIGATES DISEASE THREAT -- USDA is investigating the disease threat to the
U.S. poultry industry from a pet bird in California that was infected with exotic
Newcastle disease. So far, only one parrot is involved, says James W. Glosser,
administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. The diseased bird
was purchased March 23 in Spring Valley, Calif. It later became ill & after a
veterinarian found the bird hopelessly ill, it was destroyed humanely. USDA
confirmed the bird was infected with exotic Newcastle disease April 12. Exotic
Newcastle disease is especially deadly to commercial poultry. An outbreak that
spread from imported pet birds to poultry farms in California caused losses of $56
million between 1971 & 1974. Contact: Margaret Well (301) 435-6573.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1767 -- USDA is providing emergency food assistance to workers who
lost their jobs because of the December freeze in California's
Central Valley. On this edition of Agriculture USA, Maria Bynum
reports on the economic impact of the freeze for California
communities & consumers across the nation. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1249 -- Economizing; repotting house plants; workforce diversity;
safe microwave cooking; sugar on the rebound. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1757 -- USDA News Highlights; conservation reserve
program; final rules are out for 1991 farm programs; new agriculture
secretary sets his priorities; fast track authority. (Weekly reel of
news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1416 -- Aerobic training at 60; oxygen & older muscles; seniors
pump iron; new niacin test; vitamin C & colon cancer. (Weekly reel
of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., April 29, livestock/poultry update; Tues.,
April 30, crop/weather update, world tobacco situation, ag prices,
catfish production; Wed., May 1, horticultural exports, Tues., May 7,
crop/weather update. (These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing
keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of April 18, 20 & 22, 1991)


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on clothing care; Will Pemble takes a look at a
versatile gum for sugar.

Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan, speaking before the National
Association of Agricultural Journalists on his priorities for
agriculture & testifying before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on
Rural Development; USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather 8
crops; USDA Economist Gary Lucier on vegetables; USDA Administrator
Daniel Haley on food assistance to California; USDA World Board Chairmar
James Donald on wheat stocks.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on healthy weights; Pat O'Leary reports
on pesticide applicator training.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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OFFMIKE
SIX-PART SERIES...on "Farm Safety in the Springtime" was recently produced &
aired by Cindy Cunningham (KICD, Spencer, Iowa). Several safety issues were
covered including handling livestock, equipment hazards & what to do after an
accident. Recent rains have flooded low-lying sections in the state's
southeast, but sub-soil moisture remains short in sections of the northwest.

HUGE INCREASE...in cotton acreage is underway in Arkansas, says James Guthrie
(KFIN, Jonesboro, Ark.). Producers tell him an additional 300,000 acres will
be in production. James says he's noticed an improvement in attitude since
last winter by both farmers & local businesses. Money is available if
producers can show how they will pay it back.

THANKS...to U.S. Senator Conrad Burns (R-Mont.), a former farm broadcaster,
who recently stopped by the Radio & TV Division while he was at USDA.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












SWITZERLAND...is on the itinerary of Jack Crowner (Farm Service Network,
Louisville, Ky.). He leaves July 18 for ten days abroad as the guest of CIBA-
GEIGY. The trip is part of his selection at the 1990 NAFB convention as Farm
Broadcaster of the Year. Jack recently returned from a trip to Florida where
he covered a process that floats young tobacco plants in water to develop the
root system, rather than planting in beds.

TWENTY RADIO STATIONS...in Wisconsin recently participated in promoting &
selecting the Wisconsin Farm Wife of the Year, says Jerry Urdahl (WWIB,
Chippawa Falls, Wisc.). Each station took applications and selected a
contestant from their area for final selection. Jerry says they hope to have
30 stations participating next year.

WELCOME...to Larry Lyle (AG DAY, South Bend, Ind.) as executive producer.
Larry was rmerly a news producer in Savannah, Ga.


VIC PO LL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




A 2 i 3 ~ 2.s


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Ra ioJ Division Washington rB. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2505 1 M 5 rpril 26, 1991

MADIGAN'S PLAN FOR USDA -- Secretary of Agricult Edward Ma recently told
members of the National Association of Agricultura"A ~ meeting in
Washington, D.C., that in the months to come, he wil PA focusing on these
three broad points:
-- Protecting the environment, while protecting the rights of U.S. farmers to
use the land and the rights of U.S. citizens to a safe and abundant food supply;
-- Simplifying the way in which farmers are forced to do business by reducing
their paperwork burden, which will in turn increase their ability to make their own
choices; and
-- Helping to raise the level of the public's nutritional awareness through
USDA nutrition programs, such as food stamps & WIC. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202)
447-4623.

LEAN MEAT EDUCATION MATERIALS -- USDA's Extension Service has developed a new
program to help consumers choose & prepare lean meats. "The program incorporates
the most current research available on lean meats," says Myron Johnsrud,
administrator of USDA's Extension Service. The materials were written for various
age & economic groups, with varying levels of knowledge about meats. "The
Consumer's Choice -- Lean Meat" features info on producing lean, safe meat,
nutrition & health; buying lean meats; safe preparation; & wise selection of
"convenience" meat products. Abridged copies are available to media from: Pam
Kinney (202) 447-8344. Contact: Cathy Bridwell (202) 447-6084.

BEE CONTACTS -- As bee swarming season continues, swarms of Africanized honey bees
have been found & destroyed in Texas, just north of the U.S.-Mexican border. "Since
this is the swarming season," says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal
& Plant Health Inspection Service, "as long as the weather and food supply remain
favorable, south Texans can continue to see honey bee swarms." Africanized honey
bee contacts include:
Doug Hendrix, APHIS, Hyattsville, Md. (301) 436-7255; and
Walter Sheppard, USDA's Agricultural Research Center Bee Research Lab,
Beltsville, Md. (301) 344-2205.

BEE GENES -- According to USDA research recently published in Nature magazine, the
genes of Africanized honey bees are mixing with those of European-descended
honeybees in North & South America. "This research holds out hope that
interbreeding will mitigate the undesirable traits of the Africanized bee as it
spreads into the U.S., says Steve Sheppard, a USDA entomologist. Contact: Steve
Sheppard (301) 344-3970.









SOYBEAN QUALITY STUDY -- USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service & the Japan Oilseed
Processors Association have launched the first phase of a cooperative study of
soybean quality between origin & destination ports. The study involves inspecting
soybean cargo both at its origin, New Orleans, La., & at destination ports near
Tokyo. Data from this study will provide valuable info about the effects of
handling on soybean quality. Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 382-0378.


WHAT IS A SMALL FARM? A profitable small farm is not a big farm system with half
the acres. Remember, a big elephant chopped in half is not two small elephants.
For other thoughts & tips on small-scale ag, get the spring 1991 copy of "Small-
Scale Agriculture Today" Contact: Bud Kerr (202) 401-4640.

HUSBANDS & WIVES SEPARATE -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan has announced
that husbands & wives may qualify as separate people under the Commodity Credit
Corporation's payment-limitation rules if they do not receive payment from more than
one source. He also said an interest in an estate will not be considered another
source. Madigan said the new payment-limitation & payment-eligibility rules modify
existing rules and affect other programs. Contact: John C. Ryan (202) 447-8207.


FOREIGN-OWNED LAND -- Foreign interests owned 14.45 million acres, or slightly more
than 1 percent, of privately owned U.S. ag land as of Dec. 31. "Foreign ownership
climbed 13 percent from a year earlier," says John Lee, administrator of USDA's
Economic Research Service. From 1981 through 1990, holdings have remained
relatively steady at about 1 percent. Contact: J. Peter DeBraal (202) 219-0425.


FARMLAND VALUE UP 2 PERCENT -- U.S. farm real estate values rose 2 percent during
1990, marking the fourth straight increase since their slide in the mid-1980's, USDA
economists say. On Jan. 1, farmland & buildings averaged $684 per acre, 14 percent
above the 1987 low, but still 17 percent below the record $823 in 1982. However,
because inflation rates of 3 to 4 percent in recent years have partially offset
gains in nominal farmland values, the U.S. has not yet had a sustained recovery of
real farmland values. Contact: Roger Hexem or Fred Kuchler (202) 219-0423.


FARMERS' INVESTMENTS -- In 1991, unit sales of tractors & farm,machinery are
expected to rise an average of 4 percent from a year earlier, USDA economists say.
Several factors point toward a sustained increase in investment in equipment --
including the strengthening of farmers' financial positions, lower cost & expanding
availability of credit, an aging stock of capital equipment & higher real rates of
return on farm assets. Contact: Nathan Childs (202) 219-0313.


LAS VEGAS EXPO OPENS APRIL 30 -- Full-service media facilities will be available at
the Food & Agriculture Exposition in Las Vegas, Nev., April 30 through May 2. The
media center will include two media rooms, featuring computers, printers, FAX
machines, a copier, modem & typewriters, plus an adjacent on-site radio studio. The
media center can be reached at (702) 791-8580.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1768 -- The secretary of agriculture can have tremendous impact not
only on farm policy, but also on policies affecting the environment &
consumers. Brenda Curtis examines the views of our new secretary of
agriculture, Ed Madigan. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1250 -- The "bees" are here; the shifting sweetener scene; smoke
gets in our bones; toxins vs. pesticides in foods; rice bran.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1758 -- USDA News Highlights; changing times in the USSR;
tracking integrated pest management trends; arguing for "fast
track;" changes in the acreage conservation reserve program.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE # 1417 -- Trace elements & osteoporosis; health club fat
meters; more accurate body composition; herbicides & ozone;
herbicidal cancer treatment. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., April 30, crop/weather update, world
tobacco situation, ag prices, catfish production; Wed., May 1, horticultural
exports; no scheduled reports until May 7, but our newsline will cover daily
events & will continue to offer new items daily; Tues., May 7, crop/weather
update; Thurs., May 9, U.S. crop production, world ag supply & demand; Fri., May
10, world ag/grain situation, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation.
(These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack
of a story listing keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of April 25, 27 & 29, 1991)

ACTUALITIES -- Highlights from hearings before the House Agriculture Committee
on fast track authority & the U.S.-Mexico free trade agreement
with Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan & U.S. Trade
Representative Carla Hills; USDA Meteorologist Norton Strommen on
planting progress in the Great Plains & the Corn Belt & on the
fruit crop; USDA Economist Jim Miller on dairy; USDA Economist
Nathan Childs on California's sugar beet industry & farmland
values; & USDA Economist Ron Gustafson on cattle on feed.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on new chart for healthy weights for
Americans; Lynn Wyvill reports on safe food handling practices at
home & Pat O'Leary reports on pesticide applicator training
program.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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OFFMIKE
EVERYBODY IS TREADING WATER...but we're going to make it, says Ray Forcier
(KWKH, Shreveport, La.). In one day 22.2 inches of rain fell. Normal amount
for the year is 48 inches. Some cotton will be replanted because producers
can wait until late May, but the main problem could be getting into the field,
Ray says the outlook for May is above normal rainfall.

WE'RE UNDER WATER...but not to the level in Louisiana, says Gordon Barnes
(KSSN, Little Rock, Ark.). Producers will be on the lookout for disease &
will not plant early varieties of soybeans.

CORN PLANTING...is underway, says Donald Baker (KFRM, Great Bend, Kan.).
Moisture is adequate, which helps wheat develop. Soybeans will go in the
ground about May 1. Don says producers are very interested in outcome of
credit sales to the Soviets. Don and crew are covering live the 3-I
(Implements, Irrigation & Industry) show in Garden City, April 25-27.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













DAIRY PRODUCERS...attending the recent Ohio Spring Dairy Spectacular believe
hard times facing the industry will be met with a supply management program,
says Christi Bentley-Bachman (WRFD, Columbus, Ohio). This spring marks the
third consecutive year of soggy fields. Christi says wetness & cold
temperatures will delay planting.

LOW PRICES...for wheat has prompted one producer to graze out the field & plow
it under, says Jim Yeary (KGNC, Amarillo, Texas). The farmer told Jim the
action was more cost efficient than bringing the combine out of storage.

WEEKLY COMMENTARY...is now being broadcast by former Secretary of Agriculture
John Block (National American Wholesale Grocers Association, Falls Church,
Va.) on Morning Agriculture Report, Indianapolis, Ind.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330


Letter No. 2506


May 3, 1991


PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH speaks to farm broadcasters from across the nation during the Washington AG Watch
'91, the last week in April. The broadcasters heard from a number of speakers, including Secretary of Agriculture
Ed Madigan, about the agricultural issues facing this country & the world in the years ahead. (White House Photo
by Susan Biddle.)

AMERICANS MAY EAT MORE CALORIES than the experts think, USDA scientists say.
According to Walter Mertz, director of USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center,
findings from 12 long-term studies at the center "suggest a substantial under-
estimation of food intake for the U.S. population in general." The 266 volunteers
participating in the studies said they ate about 18 percent fewer calories than they
actually needed to maintain weight. If substantiated in larger studies, the
findings have far-reaching implications, including helping to explain why the
nation's food intake data don't account for the population's increasing weight.
Contact: Walter Mertz (301) 344-4095.

HOT OFF THE PRESS -- A new "How to Get Information from USDA" book is now available.
It lists USDA public affairs & agency information offices, along with a USDA
organizational chart & a USDA subject index. For a copy, contact: Marci Hilt
(202) 447-6445. Media only, please.








REBUILDING PERSIAN GULF FOOD MARKET -- What's in demand in the Persian Gulf now that
the war is over? According to Phil Letarte, the U.S. ag trade officer in Manama,
Bahrain, there is an immediate need for imports of basic foods -- canned foods of
all types, soups, juices, dried fruits, nuts. The food trade has been destroyed in
Kuwait. Letarte sees these specific opportunities now for U.S. exporters: dried
fruits, high-quality meats, poultry, juices -- citrus & vegetable -- especially
canned rather than frozen, snack foods, chips & peanuts. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough
(202) 382-9442.

DOGWOOD FUNGUS DISCOVERED -- A USDA scientist has found the cause of the mysterious
disease that has been killing dogwood trees in the northeast. Scott C. Redlin, the
USDA scientist who identified dogwood anthracnose, says identifying the organism was
the first step in solving the dogwood dilemma. "Now that we know which fungus is
causing the disease, the next step is to develop methods to control it," Redlin
says. Disease symptoms include leaf spots & twig dieback. Contact: Scott C.
Redlin (301) 344-2280.

MICROBIOLOGICAL COMMITTEE TO MEET -- Subcommittees of the National Advisory
Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods will meet May 13-15 at the
Knickerbocker Hotel in Chicago. The committee advises the secretary of agriculture
& the secretary of health & human services on criteria for assessing food safety &
wholesomeness, as well as the effectiveness of food manufacturing practices. The
meetings are open to the public. Contact: Jim Greene (202) 382-0314.

FRIENDSHIP GARDEN ILLUSTRATES NEW GARDEN ETHIC -- Why not plant a friendship garden?
One designed to illustrate the new American garden ethic -- gardens & landscapes
planned to thrive with minimal maintenance. H. Marc Cathey, director of the USDA'S
National Arboretum, says the concept calls for gardens filled with plants that do
not have a constant need to be watered, fertilized, pruned or sprayed for insects.
Cathey recently dedicated a "Friendship Garden" at the arboretum. "This new garden
shows how a beautiful landscape can be created that has interest and color all year
round without the need for continual work or pesticides," Cathey says. Contact: H.
Marc Cathey (202) 475-4829.

NEWCASTLE DISEASE AGAIN THREATENS -- Prompted by two new outbreaks of exotic
Newcastle disease in 60 yellownape parrots, USDA is warning those who buy exotic
birds to be sure the birds they buy meet federal requirements for quarantine &
disease testing. James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service, says buyers should make certain the birds they buy are wearing
the circular stainless steel USDA-approved leg band. The band has three letters &
three numbers & indicates the bird has met federal import requirements for
quarantine & testing. Contact: Margaret Webb (301) 436-7799.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1769 -- Forget the farm bill for awhile. Now the big debate is on
free trade agreements & the administration's desire to have "fast
track" authority to negotiate those agreements. Brenda Curtis has
the story. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME


AGRITAPE NEWS


#1251 -- Better tornado warnings; reading food labels; controlling
pesticide waste; child custody issues; gas saving scams. (Weekly
reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

& FEATURES #1759 -- USDA News Highlights; Germany still divided on ag
marketing approaches; a "fast track" action plan; cattle marketing on
the rise. (Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1418 -- Arctic bacterium helps legume; sainfoin -- bloat-
free legume; pasta flour aids biocontrol; worm-resistant sheep;
amylose -- tasty & nutritious. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thurs., May 9, U.S. crop production, world ag
supply & demand; Fri., May 10, world ag/grain situation, world oilseed situation,
world cotton situation; Tues., May 14, crop/weather update, Soviet ag outlook, farm
labor report; Wed., May 15, U.S. livestock/poultry outlook, milk production; Fri.,
May 17, cattle on feed, U.S. ag outlook, world dairy outlook. (These are the USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which
are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of May 2, 4 & 6, 1991)


FEATURES --



ACTUALITIES --


Pat O'Leary reports on the national pesticide applicator training
program; DeBoria Janifer on healthy weights for Americans; Will
Pemble on USDA research to measure the salt content of soils.

Excerpts from President George Bush talking to farm broadcasters
at a Washington, D.C., news conference April 29; U.S. Trade
Representative Carla Hills on fast track authority for the North
American Free Trade Agreement; Norton Strommen, USDA meteorologist, with
a crop & weather update; USDA Economist James Schaub with the latest oil
crops outlook; Janet Livezey, USDA economist, on the U.S. rice
situation; USDA Economist Nathan Childs on farm equipment sales.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat
Wyvill on
growing &


O'Leary reports on tree planting around the world; Lynn
safer handling of consumer foods; DeBoria Janifer on
selling herbs.


EVERY OTHER WEEK -- "Ag Update," five-minutes of USDA farm program information,
presented in news-desk format with B-Roll.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
II 1 I Fll 0 111111 0 6 F1 l i II
3 1262 08300 674 1


TORNADOES...are causing a tremendous amount of property damage in
Rex Childs (KFDI, Wichita). Several mobile homes, farm buildings
have been flattened & scattered. Rex says much of the wheat crop
moisture, but recent rains have helped.


Kansas, says
& houses
needs more


SMALL GRAINS...are about half in & row crops will be completed by early May in
the region served by Larry Ristvedt (KFGO, Fargo, N.D.). Subsoil moisture
remains short, but recent rains will help get growth underway. Larry says the
outlook calls for more rain. Getting into the fields seems to have improved
producer attitudes.

FIELD WORK...is averaging five days behind schedule in Kentucky due to
wetness, but a few days of dry weather could get planting on schedule, says
Allen Aldridge (Kentucky Agrinet, Louisville). Tobacco producers are
concerned that if rain continues, bedding plants will be ready to plant before
the ground is prepared.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











FARM TOUR...of Hawaii presented interesting insights to what confronts
producers who farm in paradise, says Bob Bosold (Central Ag News Net,
EauClaire, Wisc.). Milk prices are higher than on the mainland, but costs of
labor, land & feed eats into profits. Hiring experienced help at rates
competitive to that paid by the tourist industry is a major problem.

PROPERTY TAX REFERENDUM...is scheduled for two counties in the area served by
David Biggs (WSDR, Sterling, Ill.). If approved, the tax funds would be used
to help county Extension Service offices remain open, rather than be combined
into a regional service.


FARMFEST '91...will be held Aug. 6-8 in
(Linder Farm Network, Willmar, Minn.).
Radio Network, Chicago, Ill.) will host
broadcast live.


IC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division


Austin, Minn., says Lynn Ketelsen
Lynn and Orion Samuelson (WGN/Tribune
a noon-hour stage show that will be


OFFMIKE




A V4 3:a: 5O0


Farm Broadcasters Lel 3o



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.S250 (202) 447-4330

Letter No. 2507 May 10, 1991

U.S. WHEAT SUPPORT DROPS BELOW CANADA'S -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward
Madigan says the latest calculation of producer support levels under the U.S.-
Canada Free Trade Agreement shows the level for U.S. wheat has dropped below
that of Canada's. This means Canada soon will remove import licenses for U.S.
wheat & wheat products. Under the agreement, Canada must remove such import-
restricting licenses for wheat, barley & oats from the U.S. when U.S. support
levels for each grain are equal to or less than those of Canada. Contact:
Sally Klusaritz (202) 447-3448.

AQUACULTURE EXPECTED TO GROW -- USDA economists expect domestic aquaculture to
remain a growth industry. Despite efforts to manage wild fish & shellfish
populations for their greatest sustained yield, USDA expects people in the
U.S. to continue eating more seafood than the U.S. produces. During 1980-90,
imports of edible fish products rose almost 50 percent to 3.2 billion pounds.
Catfish dominates U.S. aquaculture and USDA economists expect catfish output
to expand in 1991 & 1992. Contact: Dave Harvey (202) 219-0888.

SAFE BARBECUING -- USDA has tips on safe barbecuing, says Susan Templin
Conley, manager of USDA's Meat & Poultry Hotline. "Last year, cooking-out
questions accounted for 27 percent of total summer food-handling and
preparation calls," she says. Some outdoor cooking tips include: marinate
foods only in the refrigerator; remove visible fat from meat; cook food
thoroughly when cooking ahead & then refrigerate quickly; serve food from the
grill on a clean platter. Contact: Susan Templin Conley (202) 447-9351.

1990 AG STATISTICS OFF PRESS -- "Agricultural Statistics 1990," the annual
book of data from USDA that covers a wide variety of facts in forms suited to
most common use, is now available. USDA publishes Agricultural Statistics
each year to meet the diverse need for a reliable reference book on ag
production, supplies, consumption, facilities, costs & returns. We have a
limited number available free for media only. Contact: Marci Hilt (202)
447-6445.

SHEEP VACCINE CLOSER TO MARKET -- A USDA scientist says field tests of an
experimental vaccine show it is protecting sheep & goats against caseous
lymphadenitis, a costly tumor-like disease. Vaccination is the only
protection against the disease, which shortens an animal's life & ruins meat &
hides. Kim Brogden, a microbiologist with USDA, and co-workers have been
working on the new vaccine for six years. Contact: Kim A. Brogden (515)
239-8593.








CENSUS PAMPHLETS AVAILABLE -- The Commerce Department's Census Bureau has
published the first in a series of pamphlets highlighting results from the
1987 Census of Agriculture. The eight-page booklet has data on the farm
industry, as well as part-time farmers. It includes text, graphs & a regional
map showing part-time farming in percentages of farms, farmland & value of ag
sales. For a copy of "America's Agriculture: Part-Time Farmers" call the
Census' Agriculture Division: (800) 523-3215.


CORN FARMS -- Corn is the major field crop produced in the U.S. Each year, 70
to 80 million acres of U.S. land are planted in corn, producing about 8
billion bushels. About 60 percent of U.S. corn is used as livestock feed; the
remainder is split between domestic food use & export. USDA has a new report
which focuses on corn farms -- "Representative U.S. Corn Farms, 1987."
Characteristics such as size, land tenure, enterprise combination & financial
structure influence how particular government policies or market conditions
will affect farms. Contact: Michael E. Salassi, William D. McBride or Robert
A. Pelly (202) 219-0801.

WATER OUTLOOK BLEAK -- Water supply conditions for many Western States,
although improved over March, remain below-to-well-below average, says William
Richards, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service. Runoff volumes of less
than 70 percent of average are expected in California, Nevada, most of Oregon
& Utah, southern Idaho, central Montana, eastern & southwestern Wyoming &
northwestern Colorado. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 447-5776.

COYOTES KILLING SHEEP & LAMBS -- During 1990, predators killed 490 thousand
sheep & lambs -- a loss of $21.7 million for farmers & ranchers. Coyotes
caused 63.7 percent of sheep & lamb losses; dogs accounted for 13.6 percent
of the losses. Other common sheep predators are mountain lions, bears, foxes,
eagles & bobcats. Wild pigs are a major threat in Hawaii. Coyotes also
accounted for over half of the total losses of goats in the U.S. during 1990.
Contact: Linda Simpson (202) 447-3578.


ESSENTIAL OILS -- Last year the U.S. exported a record $155 million of
essential oils, nearly 8 percent greater than a year earlier, despite a slight
decline in volume. Essential oils include peppermint, spearmint, citrus --
orange, lime & lemon -- lavender, clove, caraway, geranium, citronella,
sassafras, nutmeg & other citrus oils. Exports of mint oils increased to
$82.5 million from 1989 shipments valued at $73.3 million, reflecting strong
sales of peppermint & spearmint oil to the U.K., Germany & Japan. Contact:
Rex E.T. Bull (202) 447-2974.

RABIES VACCINE FIELD TRIAL -- USDA will sponsor a public meeting May 17 in
Harrisburg, Pa., to discuss plans to conduct a field trial of a genetically
engineered rabies vaccine. The meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
at the Pennsylvania Game Commission, State Headquarters Building, 2001
Elmerton Ave. Contact: Amichai Heppner (301) 436-5222.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE


USA #1770 -- Wet weather put a damper on the start of spring
planting in central Iowa. On this edition of Agriculture USA,
Brenda Curtis travels to the heartland to talk with farmers, a
local banker & an extension agent about this year's crop
prospects. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1252 -- Putting food safety into perspective; tightening the
belt; extended warranties; adding fiber to your diet; new food
packages. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1760 -- USDA News Highlights; price support pro-
visions; the sound of silence; Japan -- a major market for U.S.
exporters; salmon farming. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1419 -- Smoking & bone loss; more colorful jeans; foreign
nuts in Texas; pecans promote peace; "fresh-squeezed" OJ flavor
identified. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)


UPCOMING ON


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES


USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., May 17, cattle on feed, U.S. ag out-
look, world dairy outlook; Mon., May 20, wheat outlook, catfish
production; Tues., May 21, crop/weather update, U.S. ag trade
update; Thurs., May 23, feed outlook, poultry production; Fri.,
May 24, livestock/poultry update; Tues., May 28, cotton/wool
outlook. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance.
Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep
you from calling!)


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of May 9, 11 & 13, 1991)

Pat O'Leary reports on trees around the world; Will Pemble
describes research to measure salt content in soils.

-- USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather & crops;
USDA Economist Steve MacDonald on U.S. exports; USDA Economist
Michael Kurtzig on developing economies; USDA Economist Jim Schaub
on oil crops; USDA Economist Nathan Childs on California
sugarbeets.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on growing & selling herbs; Pat
O'Leary reports on rural american history.


Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), Audio 6.2 or
6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT




11IIHIIUNf^SITY OF FLORIDA

4 3

OFFMIKE
CORN PRODUCERS...are averaging three weeks behind planting schedule in
south central Iowa because its wet & cold, say Vic McGill & Jerry Passer
(WMT, Cedar Rapids). Since the forecast calls for no change, farmers
will probably plant shorter-season varieties. Jerry says he's mowing
the lawn about every third day, when it's not raining, & a herd of goats
would be helpful.

DROUGHT...in west Texas is hurting winter wheat. Bob Cockrum (Texas
Agri-Business Network, Dallas) says several producers have told him they
plan to graze what little remains of the crop. Producers won't plant
cotton because it's too dry. Wheat in central sections is doing well,
but too much moisture is promoting rust problems. Bob says NAFB's south
central region meeting in El Dorado, Kans., was memorable, especially
when Kelly Lenz (WIBW/Kansas Ag Network, Topeka) had an interview cut
short by marble-sized hail pounding the tour bus roof.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










PLANTING...is being delayed in Minnesota by too much moisture in the
southeast, & cool temperatures across the region, says Shelly Beyer
(Linder Farm Network, Willmar). Shelly says dairy issues such as price,
supply management & GATT "fast track" are big items on their broadcast
schedule.

TOO MUCH, TOO HARD, TOO OFTEN...sums up the rainfall situation in
Louisiana, says Don Molino (Louisiana Ag News Network, Baton Rouge).
Cotton planting window remains open until mid-May, but right now it's
too wet even for rice producers. Don says enough time remains for
cotton if producers get successive dry days, but they will not plant
their planned 940,000 acres.

THANKS...to John Spence (WNCT-TV, Greenville, N.C.) for the feedback on
our TV features. He puts our satellite TV News Service to good use on
hif program &


VIC POWELL T
Chief, Radio & TV Division




/12 1, -..s 24S-


Farm Broadcasters Lett



United States Department of Agricul Office of Public Affai adio-TV Division Was
Letter No. 2508 .-..-

PROGRAM SIGNUP -- Produces ave signed con acts to enroll
feed grain, wheat, upland lextra-longt ,* le cotton & rice
acreage reduction programs, 1S saB_- under the contracts,
be designated as Acreage Conserva TiTf Reserve. In addition,
be idled under the 0/92 & 50/92 provisions of these programs
will be planted to minor oilseeds under the 0.92 provisions.
(202) 447-6789.


Wer


hington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
May 17, 1991

167.5 million acres of
in the 1991 commodity
16.9 million acres will
11.3 million acres will
& 0.5 million acres
Contact: Bob Feist


DEVELOPING ECONOMIES -- While hunger, poverty & low living standards remain major
economic concerns for developing countries, prospects of increased trade within a
more open trading system should contribute to improved economic growth in the
1990's, USDA economists say. In the 1980's, economic policies in many of these
countries were marked by a bias against agriculture, often the principal exporting
sector. The well-being of the U.S. economy is affected by the fortunes of
developing countries. Contact: Michael Kurtzig (202) 219-0680.

ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF URUGUAY ROUND -- A new USDA report analyzes the economic
implications of the Uruguay Round of GATT for U.S. agriculture. Even without
specific quantitative estimates, the report says, it is clear U.S. agriculture will
gain from an agreement because it will increase the demand for U.S. ag products.
Contact: James Vertrees (202) 475-4587.

FARM WOMEN'S FORUM -- USDA is coordinating the "1991 Farm Women's Forum," which will
be held June 13 & 14 in Washington, D.C. This year's forum will feature the three
E's for the 1990's -- energy, economics & environment. Events include briefings by
Sec. Madigan & top USDA staff, as well as key White House staff. Contact: Sally
Katt (202) 447-2798.

FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL -- "Family Farming in the Heartland" is one of three themes that
will be part of the 25th annual Folklife Festival on the Mall in Washington, D.C.,
June 28 July 7. USDA is co-sponsoring the activity with the Smithsonian
Institution. Living presentations & demonstrations at the festival will illustrate
the cultural importance & significance of family farming. Contact: Sue Nelson
(202) 447-7226.

BIOTECH CONFERENCE -- USDA will hold a national conference on federal & state
regulation of biotechnology in St. Louis, Mo., July 29 31. Subject of the
conference will be: "Transgenic Plants: Regulatory Path to Commercial Production."
Contact: Amichai Heppner (301) 436-5222.











BLOOD PRESSURE MONTH -- May is High Blood Pressure Month, a time when Americans
should review their eating habits & general lifestyle to avoid any health problems
associated with the disease, says Beth Reames, a nutritionist with the Louisiana
Cooperative Extension Service. Excessive salt intake is associated with high blood
pressure in some people, Reames says. Anyone with high blood pressure should be
aware of ways to cut salt intake & Reames has suggestions for doing that. Contact:
Beth Reames (504) 388-4141.

FRESH TOMATO STANDARDS -- On June 12, USDA will revise U.S. standards for grades of
fresh tomatoes on June 12. The new standards will establish four sizes -- small,
medium, large & extra large -- & require tomato size be marked on containers. The
revisions reflect changes in modern marketing & packaging methods, says Daniel D.
Haley, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, & respond to an
industry initiative. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 447-6179.

BIRD STUDY -- USDA, in cooperation with the FAA, is launching a $1.9 million study
of new ways to reduce collisions between birds & airplanes. "At first glance, it's
hard to believe a one-pound sea gull can damage an airplane," says James W. Glosser,
administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service, "but in fact, the
airline industry reports well over $25 million per year in damages from birds." The
site for the five-year study is Sandusky, Ohio, the field station of the Denver
Wildlife Research Center. Contact: Amichai Heppner (301) 436-5222.

SUPPLY & DEMAND -- Early-season projections from USDA suggest the world wheat crop
will decline from the 1990-91 record; world oilseed supplies will remain relatively
large; and U.S. beef production in 1991 is estimated modestly above a month ago &
steer prices are slightly reduced. USDA projects global grain production around 2
percent below the 1990-91 level, as both U.S. & foreign output decline. Contact:
Ray Bridge (202) 447-5447.


MICROWAVES EXPLODING IN HONG KONG -- Even though Hong Kong conjures up food images
of steamed dumplings, the advent of the microwave oven is giving U.S. marketers food
for thought as they get ready to introduce microwaveable products & meals to Hong
Kong. In 1989, roughly 16 percent of households owned microwaves. Greatest
microwave potential for Hong Kong sales: sandwiches, French fries, snacks, soups &
pasta, popcorn & entrees. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 382-9442.

CHOOSING MULCH COLOR -- Choosing the right color of mulch will increase plant
growth, say USDA scientists. Southern peas, for example, perform better with red
mulch. In previous experiments, the scientists found tomatoes had the highest yield
when grown using red mulch. Contact: Patrick Hunt (803) 669-5203.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1771 -- The U.S. sweetener sector is a highly competitive one,
with three major sweeteners -- sugar, high fructose corn syrup &
artificial sweeteners -- competing for consumer preference &
market share. On this edition of Agriculture USA, John Snyder h;
the first of a two-part series on sugar & sweeteners. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME



AGRITAPE NEWS


#1253 -- Soviet citizens react to price increases; fines for forbidden
fruit; U.S. fruit takes root in Singapore & Malaysia; pre-cookout
food safety; grilling foods safely. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)

& FEATURES #1761 -- USDA News Highlights; 1991 farm program signup
results; economic reform in the USSR; a better wheat future; is
BST safe? (Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1420 -- Dogwood disease identified; origin of dogwood fungus
unknown; protecting your dogwoods; tick control in campgrounds;
comparing apples & mayhaws. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., May 28, cotton/wool outlook; Wed., May 29,
export outlook, world sugar outlook; Thurs., May 30, world tobacco situation; Fri.,
May 31, ag prices; Mon., June 3, horticultural exports; Tues., June 4, crop/weather
update; Fri., June 7, tobacco outlook. (These are the USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling.)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of May 16, 18 & 20, 1991)


FEATURES --



ACTUALITIES --


DeBoria Janifer reports on growing & selling herbs; Pat O'Leary
reports on black walnut tree research; Will Pemble on USDA
research to control fruit ripening; Gary Beaumont of the
University of Illinois on crossbreeding U.S. & Chinese pigs.

Norton Strommen, USDA meteorologist, with a crop & weather
update; USDA Outlook Board Chairman James Donald on latest crop
report; Michael Kurtzig, USDA economist, on developing economies;
Catherine Adams, of USDA Food Safety & Inspection Service, on
poultry safety; USDA Farm Program Official Charles Shaw on dairy
relief measures.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on rural American history; Lynn Wyvill on
the U.S. forest system centennial; DeBoria Janifer on perennial care.

EVERY OTHER WEEK: Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program info,
in news desk format with B-Roll footage.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
III I111111 I llll H

OFFMIKE 3 1262 08300 684 0
FARM BROADCASTING...is really fun, according to Julie Claffen (FFA National Vice
President, Blue Hill, Neb.). She sat in recently for Dennis Morrice (KMMJ,
Grand Island, Neb.) airing market reports & other items on the noon program.
Julie says it was a great experience & Dennis says listeners said they enjoyed
it, too.

NAFB NORTHEAST REGION MEETING...is scheduled June 7-9 in Burlington, Vt., says
Jeff Stewart (Ag Radio Network, Utica, N.Y.). Vermont Governor Richard Snelling
along with U.S. Senator Jim Jeffords (R-Vt) & other Northeast ag leaders have
accepted invitations to attend. Jeff & Northeast V.P. Ron Hendren (WTAD,
Quincy, Ill.) say you can fax registration to (315) 337-1566.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Chuck Zimmerman (Southeast Agrinet, Ocala, Fla.). He
received the Meritorious Achievement Award of the National Agri-Marketing
Association for his leadership in improving the programs & activities of the
association's Florida chapter.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












THANKS...to Doug Cooper (Iowa State University Extension Service, Ft. Dodge) &
Jerry Perkins (Iowa Corn Promotion Board, West Des Moines) for their help to our
Brenda Curtis during her production trip to Iowa. During her travels in the
state she met with two former USDA radio interns, Kathleen Lonergan & Scott
Erickson, both now serving in communications positions at Pioneer Hybrid.

AG PROGRAMMING...is getting into the air in new ways. A passenger on a U.S. Air
flight called our Pat O'Leary regarding a feature Pat had produced. Instead of
a movie the airline showed the program "Newsworthy" (Gregg Primo, Old Greenwich,
Conn.) that contained Pat's feature on household hazards. Thanks to Greg Gibson
(Mississippi State University) for his comments about how they use our TV
programming in their weekly half-hour program, & to Lynn McClure (WDZ, Decatur,
Ill.) for her letter about positive listener response to consumer programming
produced b ur Gary Crawford.

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
Letter No. 2509 May 24, 1991

APRIL FARM WAGES UP -- During the week of April 7 13, farm operators paid their
hired workers an aveet4ewa4e:.' f, .81 per hour, which was up 27 cents from a year
earlier, USDA econpmilsts say. Dhr't the survey week, there were 2.95 million
people working ontl` Nation's farys, ranches. Contact: Tom Kurtz (202) 475-
3228.
n1 i I
SHRIMP & SOY MEAL During tests wi six different soy-based feed pellets, shrimp
unexpectedly put on between 4 & 2Z recent more weight with the cheapest, least
processed commercia~K soy meal fe a, according to USDA Chemist David J. Sessa.
"Since feed is the bieggg j "9e for shrimp farmers," Sessa says, "they will
likely snap up any new, less costly feed that keeps their shrimp healthy and fast
growing." The findings could increase sales of U.S. soybean meal. Contact: David
J. Sessa (309) 685-4011.

LOW-FAT TECHNOLOGIES -- USDA is holding a meeting June 18 in Gaithersburg, Md., to
review the technologies now being developed to produce low-fat ground beef. Since
much of the agenda involves cooking & tasting, the event will be held in the
Gaithersburg Senior High School cafeteria. "This will be a good chance for
government specification writers and purchasing officials to meet with industry
designers of the many low-fat ground beef technologies and exchange ideas," says
Daniel D. Haley. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 447-6179.

SOVIETS TRIM IMPORTS -- Soviet officials have been unable to establish conditions
for a market system to replace central administrative control, creating uncertainty
for the future of U.S. ag exports to the country, USDA Economist Kathryn Zeimetz
says. U.S. ag exports in 1991 are likely to decrease in value by more than one-
third from 1990. The value of grain exports may be down 40 percent, despite $1
billion in export credits authorized in December for the Soviets. In 1990, the
Soviet Union remained one of the top buyers of U.S. farm products, although
purchases were about 9 percent below the previous year's record level of $3.3
billion. Contact: Kathryn Zeimetz (202) 219-0621.

1990 FACT BOOK OF AGRICULTURE -- Did you know U.S. consumers spent 11.8 percent of
their disposable personal income (after taxes) on food in 1989? And, for each
dollar spent for food in 1990, the farm value was 24 cents. Where did the rest go?
Packaging cost 8 cents; intercity transportation was 4.5 cents; depreciation was 4.5
cents; advertising accounted for 4 cents; fuels & electricity cost 3.5 cents;
before-tax profits was 3 cents; rent was 3 cents; interest cost 2.5 cents; repairs
were 1.5 cents and other costs accounted for 6.5 cents. If you had read a copy of
the recently published "1990 Fact Book of Agriculture" you would already know this.
For a copy, call Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. Media only, please.








NON-FARM INCOME -- About three-fourths of farm operators had off-farm income in
1988, says USDA Sociologist Felicia LeClere. "Over the last 20 years, the
prevalence of part-time farming increased substantially," she says. Jobs accounted
for 65 percent of the off-farm income & the remainder came from investments, welfare
payments, Social Security payments & other sources. Some farm operators work part
time off the farm because their farm operations are economically marginal, LeClere
says. Contact: Felicia LeClere (202) 219-0534.


AG IN CLASSROOM -- Through the efforts of "Ag in the Classroom," a national ag
literacy project coordinated by USDA, students learn more about agriculture.
Through Ag in the Classroom workshops & in-service training, teachers learn how to
integrate agriculture into the subjects they teach. "The aim is not to teach kids
how to become farmers or ranchers," says Program Director Shirley Traxler, "but
rather to help them understand the role and importance of agriculture in today's
economy and society." Ag in the Classroom celebrates its 10th anniversary this
year. Contact: Shirley Traxler (202) 447-5727.


FARM MACHINERY SALES UP -- Unit sales of tractors & other farm machinery rose in
1990, says USDA Economist Marlow Vesterby. This continues a trend that began in
1987, when farmers started replacing aging equipment after several years of
deferring purchases. Sales jumped 10 percent for two-wheel-drive tractors & 15
percent for combines. Capital expenditures for farm machinery totaled $8.1 billion
last year. Contact: Marlow Vesterby (202) 219-0422.

PASTA-LIKE WEED -- USDA scientists have whipped up their own brand of "pasta" to
kill weeds & insects. The scientists wrap such natural pest controls as nematodes &
fungi in a dough that acts as "an effective biological control of insects and
weeds," says William J. Connick, Jr., a USDA research chemist. Connick found that
durum wheat flour, called semolina -- the same flour for pasta -- can be used to
make granules that entrap nematodes & fungi so they can be applied to fields.
Contact: William J. Connick, Jr. (405) 286-4527.


FMHA BEGINS HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM -- USDA will begin guaranteeing
commercial housing loans to help low- & moderate-income rural residents get home
financing in a 20-state pilot program. La Verne Ausman, administrator of USDA's
Farmers Home Administration, says the program authorizes FmHA guarantees of loans
made by eligible commercial credit institutions in rural areas of Arizona, Arkansas,
California, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan,
Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia & Washington. Contact: Sally Lawrence (202) 447-4323.


CANOLA STANDARDS -- USDA is proposing to establish U.S. standards for canola. Such
standards would require official inspection & weighing of canola seed shipped
outside the U.S., except under certain provisions. Official inspection & weighing
would be available for domestic shipments, but not required. John C. Foltz,
administrator of USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service, says U.S. consumption of
canola oil has more than doubled in the past two years. Consumer interest has grown
primarily due to its nutritional characteristics. Contact: Dana Stewart (202)
382-0378.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE USA #1772 -- The consumption of sugar & sweeteners is on the
increase in the U.S. & in the second of a two-part series, John
Snyder examines the health implications with various experts.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1254 -- Summer food safety; watt reduction; food safety questions
about BST; are food additives safe; more stone-washed colors.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)


AGRITAPE NEWS


& FEATURES #1762 -- USDA News Highlights; help for the dairy
industry; FmHA home loan program; help for disabled farmers; dairy
inventory. (Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1421 --Navy divers cram carbohydrates; carbohydrates & trace
elements; "washed-up" gypsy moths; viruses in vats; mastitis
prevention. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., June 11, weekly weather & crop report;
U.S. crop production, world ag supply & demand; Wed., June 12,
world ag/grain situation, world cotton situation, world oilseed
situation; Thurs., June 13, ag income/finance outlook; Fri., June
14, U.S. sugar yearbook. (These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of
a story listing keep you from calling.)


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of May 23, 25 & 27, 1991)


ACTUALITIES --


USDA Meteorologist Norton Strommen on crop development &
the latest 30-day weather outlook; USDA Economist Ed Allen on
wheat outlook; USDA Economist Leland Southard on poultry
production & retail meat & poultry prices; USDA Economist Nathan
Childs on retail food prices; & Kathryn Zeimetz on the Soviet
Union's agricultural production, consumer prices & imports.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on the centennial of the National
Forest System & Deboria Janifer reports on water lilies & care of
perennials.

EVERY OTHER WEEK: Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program info,
in news desk format with B-Roll footage.

Available on Satellite Westar IV, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 1111

OFFMIKE
VACATION...also offers opportunities for interviews, says Michael Adams (WLDS,
Jacksonville, Ill.). Mike noticed a neighbor doing some conservation work &
took advantage of the opportunity to get an interview for use when he returns to
work. Mike says damage caused by recent hail storms will lead to replanting a
few acres, but generally his region is ahead of state averages for corn & beans.

CEDAR RIVER...is expected to crest several feet higher than usual level for
Spring floods in Iowa, causing major problems for people living in low areas.
Richard Balvanz (WMT, Cedar Rapids, Iowa) says corn is nearly planted & there is
the usual high participation in programs by producers.

COTTON CROP...is forecast to be off about 10 percent in Arkansas, says Stewart
Doan (ARN Agriculture, Little Rock). Soggy fields have prevented producers from
planting a hoped-for 1 million acres. Stewart says weather is now shifting to
drier summer patterns.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












WASTE MANAGEMENT BILLS...in the Ohio legislature are being followed by Joe
Comely (WRFD, Columbus, Ohio). Joe says it is becoming more apparent that
environmental & farmers' needs require all interests to work together instead of
forcing unacceptable change. A few days of dry weather has prompted day & night
corn-planting operations, which resulted in 2 million acres of corn being
planted in one week.

HOT TOPIC...in the region served by Taylor Brown (Northern Ag Network, Billings,
Mont.) is a study that recommended reintroducing wolves in Yellowstone Park.
Taylor has been covering local hearings where he reports cattle producers are
voicing their opposition. Taylor says wheat producers are behind schedule but
grinning. Ground moisture & prospects for a good wheat crop are the best in
years.

A REMINDER...Flag Day is Friday, June 14. Is your station or community planning
an bserva le?


Chief, Radio & T DivisionLL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV ivsion WashingtonD.
Letter No. 2510 i .;U 18 ri


io (202) 447-4330
y 31, 1991


EMERGENCY PROVISIONS -- Secretary of Agriculture E donMadigan ss special
provisions are available to producers who have not b .t crops due to
natural disasters. "Drought in the West & abnormal rai e Midwest and
Delta areas have kept many producers from planting their crops," Madigan says. "I
want producers to know all of the planting options available to them in connection
with their participation in the commodity ARP and the options available to them to
withdraw from the contract to participate in the ARP if they are unable to plant
their intended acreage to program crops." Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 447-8206.

AG IN THE CLASSROOM will hold its 10th annual conference in Washington, D.C., June 8
- 11. Educators and people in agriculture & government from throughout the U.S. &
Canada will meet to share ideas, study instructional materials and discuss issues
facing agriculture & education. Through Ag in the Classroom workshops & in service
training, teachers learn how to integrate agriculture into the subjects they teach.
Contact: Shirley Traxler (202) 447-5727.

GOAT VOTE -- Mohair producers will vote June 17-28 on a referendum to decide whether
to continue a market promotion & improvement program. The new program would
continue to authorize deductions from producer price support payments. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 447-8206.

BROILERS TO LEAD GAINS -- During 1991, red meat & poultry production is expected to
rise more than 3 percent. Poultry output, led by continued growth in broilers,
should rise about 5 percent, USDA economists say, while red meat production should
increase 2 percent. This would be the first year-to-year gain for red meat since
1988. Pork producers' returns are favorable & are expected to remain so for the
rest of 1991. Contact: Leland Southard (202) 219-0767.

CATFISH UP -- During April, producers processed 31.2 million pounds of farm-raised
catfish, up 1 percent from a year earlier. Producers in April also sold 15.9
million pounds of processed fish, an increase of 3 percent from April 1990. Average
prices processors received during the month for whole catfish were $1.53 per pound
for ice pack & $1.62 for frozen fish. Contact: Ron Sitzman (202) 447-3244.

GLOBAL GRAIN -- The first forecasts for the 1991-92 marketing year show global grain
output declining slightly & nearly equaling consumption. This would leave global
grain stocks at about the same level next year, USDA economists say. After 1990-
91's record production & falling prices, the new forecasts signal some price
strength for wheat, but some weakness for feed grains & oilseeds. Contact: Greg
Gajewski (202) 219-0313.











WHEAT PRODUCTION PROJECTED DOWN -- USDA economists expect U.S. wheat production in
1991 to be down nearly 25 percent from 1990 to 2.07 billion bushels. Causes
include reduced plantings, harvest of a smaller portion of plantings in certain key
states & a forecast drop in winter wheat yields from last year's near-record.
Contact: Ed Allen (202) 219-0840.


WATER OUTLOOK BELOW AVERAGE -- Cooler than average temperatures in April improved
snowpack conditions in parts of the West, but water supply conditions remain below-
average for most of the region, says William Richards, chief of USDA's Soil
Conservation Service. "Snowpack conditions actually improved in the northern half
of the West in April, but measurements in the Southwest show that snow remains only
in the higher watersheds," says Richards. The biggest improvement was in the
Missouri River Basin where streamflow forecasts improved 15 to 30 percent.
Streamflow volume forecasts for the Columbia River Basin remain relatively
unchanged. Contact: Ted Kupelian (202) 447-5776.


TEA PRODUCTION A RECORD -- During 1990, global tea production was a record 2.56
million tons -- over 3 percent greater than a year earlier. This was above the
previous all-time high of 2.48 million tons in 1988. The bumper 1990 crop was
mainly the result of record harvests in India, Sri Lanka & Kenya. However, China's
crop was down for the second consecutive year in response to poor market conditions.
Contact: E.T. Dull (202) 2974.


GENETICALLY ENGINEERED SPUDS -- Potatoes with genes borrowed from chicken eggs or
moths might shrug off hazards that can ruin ordinary spuds, USDA scientists say.
Plant Physiologist William R. Belknap says USDA is planting potatoes with new genes
in four states --,Idaho, North Dakota, Minnesota & Maine. This is the first outdoor
test most of the spuds face. Contact: William R. Belknap (415) 559-6072.


USSR CHANGES REACH CRITICAL POINT -- The changes taking place in the USSR have
reached a critical point, USDA economists say. In the past year, the USSR has
changed producer & consumer prices throughout the economy. The national government
is progressively less able to coordinate fiscal & monetary policies. As a result of
the many changes, forecasting Soviet ag production, consumption & trade will be more
difficult in 1991 than at any time in the last decade. Contact: Kathryn Zeimetz
(202) 219-0621.


NON-METRO/METRO CHILDREN -- A USDA demographer has found children living in metro
areas are in a somewhat better financial position than children living in non-metro
areas. In the new USDA report, Carolyn C. Rogers analyzes the economic well-being
of children living in families with at least one parent. She compares children in
non-metro areas with those in metro areas. Poverty rates for children in non-metro
areas have historically been higher than those in metro areas. Contact: Carolyn C.
Rogers (202) 219-0534.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE


USA #1773 -- The public may be concerned about the possibility
that toxins in the form of pesticides & additives may be in some
foods, but one expert says many foods contain natural toxins which
do not seem to concern people. Brenda Curtis reports. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1255 -- Go camping, America; western fire season could be bad;
home water treatment -- is it really needed; protecting
California's food bounty; new lawn care regulations proposed.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1763 -- USDA News Highlights; one Florida county
goes "whole hog" for integrated pest management; USDA cattle
numbers raise controversy; a promotion to sell more U.S. wood in
Japan; emergency options for farmers who can't plant. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE-#1422 -- Copper & fructose; new natural fungicide;
biocontrol bonanza; more effective chemigation; screening
pesticides. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., June 5, a big turkey promotion in
Washington; Fri., June 7, U.S. tobacco outlook; Tues., June 11, crop/weather
outlook, U.S. crop production report, world ag supply & demand; Wed., June 12,
world ag/grain, world cotton, world oilseed; Tues., June 13, ag
income/finance. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(May 30, June 1 & 3)

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on conservation & national forests; Will
Pemble reports on pesta control for weeds & insects.


ACTUALITIES


-- USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather & crops;
USDA Economist Larry Van Meir on feed outlook; USDA Economist
Michael Kurtzig on developing economies; USDA Economist Scott
Sanford on cotton & wool; USDA Soil Scientist Jeri Berc on water
supply in West.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on growing perennials; Pat
O'Leary reports on late planting in the Corn Belt.

Available on Satellite Westar 4, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or
6.8:
THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT

NOTE THIS ONE-TIME CHANGE -- On Saturday, June 22, only, from 10 a.m. to 10:45
a.m., the coordinates will be Westar 4, Transponder 19. This is a one-time
only transponder change.







OFFMIKE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08300 694 9


SIX-PART SERIES..."Will Dad Be On The Farm Next Year" was produced & broadcast
on KMA, Shenandoah, Iowa, says Tom Beavers. Based on an Iowa State University
study on farm & rural life, the programs noted that one in five farmers in the
state plans to retire in the next five years. The series also examined the
effects on schools, hospitals, churches, government & other services.

WHEAT HARVEST...has started to move north. Bob Givens (KGNC, Amarillo, Texas)
says a wet season in the state's southern portion has delayed harvest of an
average wheat crop, while further north there is little to harvest that is not
irrigated. Bob says dryland crop planting will be risky this year.

CROPS...are in better shape than at this time last year, says Charles Blake
(WIKY, Evanville, Ind.). Corn is up 10 inches and wheat is doing well.
Charlie is covering a lake management seminar conducted by the Soil & Water
Conservation District. He says there is much interest in the topic.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













THE ONLY MAJOR CHANGE...in crop acreage this year is a gain in cotton &
reduction in soybeans, says Dan Gordon (Tennessee Agrinet, Nashville).
Producers are staying with familiar items. But Dan has noticed the number of
farmers producing tobacco is one-half the number 10 years ago, while acreage
has remained constant. He says the answer is tobacco farmers are leasing out
their allotments.

CORN IS COMING UP...in good condition in southeast Iowa, says Monty Beal
(KWPC, Muscatine). Earlier the fields dried allowing producers to get the
crop in, but frequent rains since have produced low-land flooding. Monty says
they aren't far away from producers who are behind schedule due to wetness.


NEW STATION...is being added
(Morning Agriculture Report,
has target ign-on daf of


C POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV division


to the network, say Brian Baxter & Wayne Jenkins
Indianapolis, Ind.). WGMB-TV Baton Rouge, La.,
June 3.




A221, S : 2 (1


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of wiieis lfhbllic Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
Letter No. 2511 June 7, 1991

DEADLY BIRD DISEA-SE! Four outbreakQ f exotic Newcastle disease -- a deadly viral
disease of poultry'\pet birds -- have/prompted USDA to alert consumers that the
pet birds they're tiy'Qg may be telf1ally ill with a sickness that could infect
other birds, including pQultry fl9c is. "If this disease enters poultry flocks,
losses could climb in Mt ilio h f dollars," says James W. Glosser, administrator
of USDA's Animal & Plant Inspection Service. Buyers should make sure the
birds they buy are wearing a circular stainless steel USDA-approved leg band, which
is engraved with three letters & three numbers. Contact: Margaret Webb (301) 436-
6573.

NUTRITION INFO CENTER QUESTIONS -- From "How do you cook penguin?" to "How long can
you freeze chocolate chips?", the Food & Nutrition Information Center of USDA's
National Agricultural Library has heard it all. This September will mark the 20th
anniversary of the center, which is still one of the best government sources for the
most current info on food & human nutrition. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 344-
3778.

WALKING & CHOLESTEROL -- A regular program of walking can lower your blood
cholesterol, but only if you do enough of it, says Louisiana Cooperative Extension
Service Nutritionist Sara Seals. A recent study at Brigham Young University in Utah
helped confirm recent research showing low intensity exercise in sufficient amounts
can have positive cardiovascular benefits. "By walking just 30 minutes a day,"
Seals says, "you can gain a major health benefit." Contact: Sara Seals (504) 388-
4141.

WORLD ECONOMY & EXCHANGE RATES -- Economic activity for the world in 1991 will be
slower than in 1990 -- because virtually all the developed countries face declining
real output growth, USDA economists say. However, developing countries as a group
are expected to improve their overall performance in 1991, as Asia continues its
output expansion & Latin America benefits from much lower inflation. Inflation, led
by oil prices expected to be at or below 1990 levels, will subside significantly
this year, paving the way for recovery in 1992. Contact: Alberta Jerardo (202)
219-0717.

HISTORIC PAPERS USED IN RESEARCH -- USDA's National Ag Library will use an historic
collection of the papers of George Washington Carver to test the feasibility of
converting written materials to electronic images on high-capacity, laser-readable
discs, known as CD-ROM's. Carver's papers can then be used by ag & research
libraries worldwide. The libraries will then evaluate the effectiveness of the
system for making scientific info more accessible. Contact: Brian Norris (301)
344-3778.








LAND REFORM IN CENTRAL EUROPE -- The ownership & structure of ag land is the subject
of intense debate through Central Europe -- Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary,
Romania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria & Albania. The new governments of post-communist
Central Europe have enacted a significant body of land-holding legislation.
Although it is hard to document, the share of land under private cultivation has
certainly increased, USDA economists say. The future of state & collective farms
falls within the framework of privatization. The claims of ownership on these lands
constitute a major problem for governments, as does the question of the optimal farm
size to achieve efficient production. Contact: Nancy J. Cochrane & Mark R. Lundell
(202) 219-0621.

BUGGING THE BUGS -- USDA scientists are trying to find new ways to keep insects out
of packages of cereal, flour, cake mixes & pet foods. The scientists are working to
find the weaknesses in the packaging & study how insects get in the products.
Michael Mullen, an entomologist with USDA's Agricultural Research Service, says thus
far, the scientists have found packages with plastic wrap on the outside & those
with heavier plastic wrap on the inside are more insect-resistant. Also, they've
found well-sealed openings and glass, plastic & metal containers are most bug-proof.
Contact: Michael Mullen (202) 912) 233-7981.

EXPORT FORECAST -- U.S. ag exports should reach $37 billion in fiscal 1991 & export
volume is expected to be 129 million tons, USDA economists say. Compared with last
year, exports are expected to be down $3.1 billion & 20 million tons. Reduced grain
exports account for much of the expected drop. Other reasons include last year's
record world wheat production, record grain production in China & near-record output
in the Soviet Union. Contact: Steve MacDonald (202) 219-0822.

AGNEWSFAX -- A new service from USDA uses the recorded voice of USDA Radio's Gary
Crawford to help you get specific USDA news releases on your FAX machine. To try
AgNewsFAX, use a touchtone phone connected to your facsimile machine & dial (202)
475-3944. Crawford's recorded voice will then guide you through the service.
Contact: Diane O'Conner (202) 447-4026.

EDIBLE FRUIT & VEGETABLE COATING -- Several companies are interested in developing a
new edible coating that retards ripening & browning of fresh fruits & vegetables.
"The coating extends the shelf life of produce without harming quality even when
stored at 70 degrees Fahrenheit, or normal room temperature," says Myrna Nisperos-
Carriedo, a USDA scientist. The USDA-developed coating is water based & contains
natural food ingredients. USDA has applied for a patent on the invention, but
private companies can license it and develop the coating. Contact: Myrna 0.
Nisperos-Carriedo (813) 293-4133.

COTTON & WOOL OUTLOOK -- Last year's cotton production totaled 15.5 million 480-lb.
bales, 27 percent ahead of last season. During the 1990-91 marketing year, both
U.S. & world cotton prices have risen above those of the past season. Wool
production was down 1 percent during 1990; average fleece weight was nearly 8
pounds. Contact: Scott Sanford (202) 219-0840.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE


USA #1774 -- If you're looking for an unusual pet, you might like
a Vietnamese potbellied pig. On this edition of Agriculture USA,
Gary Crawford introduces these rare & somewhat expensive "little
piggies." (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1256 -- The Americans & food quiz; California avocados popular
in the Far East; learning about the Medfly; looking for a lawn
care company; those little piggies. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3
minute consumer features.)


AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1764 -- USDA
wheat program; U.S. cotton
reel of news features.)


News Highlights; GATT update;
production; sales-a-poppin'.


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1423 -- Testing vitamin B6 status; vitamins &
medicine; elderly strength training; selenium & cancer; new white
sweet potato. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 17, milk production; Tues., June
18, crop/weather update, cattle on feed; Wed., June 19, ag outlook, Thurs.,
June 20, catfish production, cherry production; Fri., June 21, ag resources
outlook, livestock/poultry update; Mon., June 24, ag trade update, poultry
production. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES
Material changed at 5 p.m.,


(202) 488-8358 or 8359.
EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE


FEATURES --



ACTUALITIES


Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's Ag Research Center in Beltsville,
Md.; Will Pemble reports on USDA research to preserve tropical
fruits; Dave Luciani, Michigan State Univ., on controlling mos-
quitoes; Joe Courson, Univ. of Georgia, on getting rid of fleas.

-- Ray Motha, USDA meteorologist, with a crop & weather update;
USDA Economist Larry Van Meir with a feedgrains forecast; USDA
Economist Nathan Childs on California's sugarbeet industry; USDA
Soil Conservationist Leroy Brown on conservation compliance plans.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on urban national forests; Lynn
Wyvill on USDA Forest Service partnerships; DeBoria Janifer on
USDA Forest Service education programs.


OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
in news desk format with B-Roll footage.


Available on Satellite Westar 4, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or 6.8:


THURSDAY
SATURDAY
MONDAY


.... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
.... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
.... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT


NOTE THIS ONE-TIME CHANGE -- On Saturday, June 22,
the coordinates will be Westar 4, Transponder 19.
transponder change.


only, from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.,
This is a one-time only


1992
(Weekly


EVERY
info,





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFMIKE
PART-TIME FARMERS...got their crops in late due to excessive moisture, but
two-weeks of good weather gave them the opportunity to complete the effort,
says Skip Davis (WASK, Lafayette, Ind.). Recent rains have produced short-
term ponding but crops generally are responding to abundant moisture.

THREE WEEKS AWAY...from harvest and wheat is looking good, says Steve Bugbee
(KXXX/KQLS, Colby, Kan.). There has been an infestation of miller moths as
they migrate west, but no damage reported yet. Corn is responding to good
moisture conditions. Steve will be covering live the expected big turnout at
Beef Empire Days in Garden City.

CROP IS SWIMMING AWAY...literally, says John Winfield (Mississippi Network,
Jackson). Heavy rains have flooded catfish ponds allowing catfish to escape &
undesirable species to intrude. John says cotton producers are 50 percent
behind schedule & harvest will be on borrowed time, but the window remains
open to plant soybeans.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











1991 FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL...will be conducted on The Mall in Washington, D.C., by
the Smithsonian Institution, June 28 to July 7. It will feature live coverage
by farm broadcasters. Rich Hawkins (KRVN, Lexington, Neb.) & Lee Kline (WHO,
Des Moines, Iowa) were invited by festival officials to participate in this
year's activities. The theme is "Family Farming in the Heartland." USDA will
provide its usual coverage of the festival -- daily on USDA Radio's Newsline &
three-times a week on the satellite feed from USDA TV News.

1991 HURRICANE SEASON...began June 1 & runs through Nov. 30. First storm to
be named Ana.

REMINDER...that on June 30 USDA is closing its pioneering "USDA Online"
computer service. Subscribers can transfer to USDA's Computerized Information
Delivery (CID) service where more information is available. A new Farm
Broadcasters Letter is entered every Friday on CID.



Chief, Radio & TV Division




A2\,3': 252


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office fkic Affairs a vision Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2512 June 14, 1991

FARMER-OWNED RESERVE -- Farmers likely to find/te new Farmer-Owned Reserve
Program, revamped by the 1990 fa bll, is simplar more closely aligned with
market conditions than the old pro rm. But the ne reserve does not isolate wheat
from the market as effectively as t 6ldrplroaft ', so its impact on prices is likely
to be reduced. "Among the major changes, says USDA Economist Joy Harwood, "are
that producers may redeem farmer-owned reserve loans at any time without penalty,
and that storage payments will be made at the end of each quarter following entry
into the program, rather than annually in advance." Contact: Joy Harwood (202)
219-0840.

TREE NUT PRODUCTION GROWS RAPIDLY -- Paced by greater demand from health-conscious
Americans & more and more satisfied customers abroad, the U.S. tree nut industry is
enjoying great success. In fact, the farm value of the nut crop last year was more
than $1 billion, up about 25 percent from 1989 & 5 percent from 1988. "Tree nut
production, consumption and exports are just going right on up," says USDA Economist
Doyle Johnson. "Growth in the industry has been very significant." Contact: Doyle
Johnson (202) 219-0884.

GOOD EARTH AWARD PROGRAM -- The Good Earth Family Awards Program, a nationwide
awards program that highlights those farmers & ranchers who offer quality farm
products while making positive contributions to water quality & natural resources,
will honor its three national winners in Washington, D.C., in December. The
program, now in its ninth year, is coordinated by the Good Earth Council & its
parent organization, the National Endowment for Soil & Water Conservation. Case IH,
one of the world's largest manufacturers of ag equipment, recently became a new
sponsor of the program. Contact: Lee Shields (202) 546-7407.

SEED VAULT ADDITION -- USDA recently broke ground on a $8.2 million, 65,000 square-
foot addition to its National Seed Storage Lab in Fort Collins, Colo. "This
addition more than quadruples the capacity of the nation's more important seed
vault, which already is home to more than 228,000 seed and plant accessions," says
R. Dean Plowman, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Research Service. The
original lab was opened by President Dwight Eisenhower in 1958. Construction is
scheduled to take about 18 months. Contact: Dennis Senft (415) 559-6068.

NEW SCS ASSOCIATE CHIEF -- Galen S. Bridge is the new associate chief of USDA's Soil
Conservation Service. Bridge, who has been with SCS for 34 years, succeeds R. Mack
Gray, who retired June 3. Bridge, 56, began his career with SCS in 1957 in Maine,
his native state. He earned a bachelor's degree in ag engineering from the
University of Maine & a master's from the University of Virginia. Contact: Ted
Kupelian (202) 447-5776.






2

HORSE INSPECTION -- USDA is proposing to change its requirements for inspection of
horses at horse shows under the Horse Protection Act. The proposal responds to
feedback USDA received from people actually working at horse shows, indicating that
some of the requirements are potentially risky, impractical or unnecessarily costly,
says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection
Service. "If the changes are implemented, inspection will go more smoothly, and
there will be no increased risk that sore horses will go undetected," Glosser says.
The Horse Protection Act is designed to eliminate scoring -- the use of cruel
methods, devices or irritants to cause pain in a horse's legs to make a more
pronounced gait in the show ring. Contact: Sibyl Bowie (301) 436-5931.

BLACK BEAR RESEARCH -- Lynn Rogers, a USDA wildlife research biologist, has a unique
way of studying how we can use the timber in forests while maintaining the black
bear's habitat. Rogers, who has been studying black bears for more than 24 years,
literally lives with the bears for 24 to 48 hours at a time, once a week. Rogers
says his Minnesota study is the only on-site, close-range effort being done anywhere
on bears. He recently began his sixth season of following the black bears on site.
Contact: Lynn Rogers (218) 365-4138.

CRAWFORD RECEIVES USDA AWARD -- USDA Radio's Gary Crawford was one of 112 individual
employees, teams & groups honored by Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan at
USDA's 45th Honor Awards Ceremony June 11. Crawford received USDA's Superior
Service Award for "outstanding creativity in production of radio documentaries that
entertain and inform the nation's citizens about agricultural issues affecting their
lives." Contact: Joan Hayden (202) 447-3083.

STRAWBERRIES UP SLIGHTLY, ONIONS DOWN -- Strawberry production in the seven major
states -- Florida, California, Louisiana, Michigan, New Jersey, Oregon &
Washington -- in the winter & spring seasons totaled 12.2 million cwt, up only
fractionally from 1990. Adverse weather in the major spring producing states offset
Florida's winter season large jump in output. Spring onion production is forecast
at 7.58 million cwt, which is down 1 percent from last year, but 3 percent above
1989. The area for harvest, at 28,200 acres, is up 2 percent. Lower yields in
three of the four producing states -- Arizona, California, Georgia & Texas -- are
responsible for the downturn in production. Contact: Arvin Budge (202) 447-4285.

MORE POULTRY AVAILABLE -- During April USDA certified 2.12 billion pounds of poultry
wholesome. This figure, for ready to cook poultry, is 13 percent above the amount
certified in April of 1990. During March, 1991, 1.89 billion pounds were certified.
Contact: Ronald Sitzman (202) 447-3244.

FOREST PAYMENTS -- Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan says 43 states & Puerto
Rico will share an estimated $312 million as their portion of the 1991 National
Forest System receipts. Madigan said 25 percent of the total 1991 receipts will be
returned to states in which National Forest System lands are located. Contact: Ann
Matejko (202) 475-3787.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE


USA #1774 -- Trace elements are found in the foods we eat in
microscopic amounts. Many scientists feel they are important to
proper nutrition. On this edition of Agriculture USA, Jim Henry
talks with nutrition scientists about these trace elements.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1256 -- Look out for the sun; the "green" consumer; kids,
TV & nutrition; the Beagle Brigade; extension specialists to
Poland. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)


AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1764
relief; protecting
invade Washington.


-- USDA News Highlights; expanded disaster
their flocks; pesticide protection; turkeys
(Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1424 -- Freezing apple buds; apple collection; minnows &
the environment; studying insect-borne diseases; domestic rubber
supply. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., June 14, U.S. sugar yearbook; Mon.,
June 17, milk production; Tues., June 18, weekly weather & crop report, cattle
on feed, ag outlook; Thurs., June 20, catfish, cherries; Fri., June 21, ag
resources, livestock & poultry update. (These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you
from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the late planting season & Lynn Wyvill
reports on the quick guide to food safety.


ACTUALITIES


-- USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on corn, soybean &
cotton crop; USDA World Board Chair Jim Donald on wheat, cotton &
meat; USDA Forest Service Deputy Chief Allan West on the
California forest fire season; USDA Analyst Mark Lindeman on the
winter grains crop in the Soviet Union & USDA Economist Verner
Grise on tobacco.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on cookout food safety; Pat O'Leary
reports on the Iowa school of Soviet bankers & DeBoria Janifer
reports on buying perennials.


Available on Satellite Westar 4, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or
6.8:
THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY .... .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT

NOTE THIS ONE-TIME CHANGE -- On Saturday, June 22, only, from 10 a.m. to 10:45
a.m., the coordinates will be Westar 4, Transponder 19. This is a one-time
only transponder change.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 /1 1 1IIII III I 11 IIII UIII E
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08303 695 3
WEATHER...is the big topic in the north-central region of Iowa served by Gary
DiGiuseppe (KWMT, Fort Dodge). Dry weather finally arrived on the last
weekend for planting corn. Yields are expected to be down substantially,
fewer acres have been planted and most to short-season varieties. A few days
remain in the soybean window, but there is producer concern about fields being
repetitively planted to beans. When we talked Gary was preparing for a
broadcast with representatives of the Iowa Turkey Federation to discuss
industry developments & new ways to prepare & serve turkey.

NORTHEAST...regional meeting in Burlington, Vt., June 7-9 of the National
Association of Farm Broadcasters was well attended. Speakers included:
Vermont Governor Richard Snelling, the commissioner of agriculture of Vermont
& the ag commissioner of New York, along with other farm & commodity group
leaders in the Northeast. Congratulations to Jeff Stewart (Ag Radio Network,
Utica, N.Y.) who organized the successful events.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












TOUGH SITUATION...resulting from too much moisture confronts a number of
producers in Georgia, says Everett Griner (Southeast Agrinet, Ocala, Fla.)
Watermelon crops in poorly drained fields are suffering disease or late
development, corn roots that were growing upward are now drying & twisting the
plant & the tobacco crop is not growing uniformly, which will interfere with
mechanical topping. But, Everett says, crops overall are better than last
year.

CELLULAR TELEPHONE...is a handy item for Tom Gibson (WDAN, Danville, Ill.).
He uses it to get reports & quotes before air time & then to broadcast his
news program live from local grain elevators. Remote units are no longer used
for his coverage. Tom also says the news items on pages one and two of this
publication are used on his program & he calls the listed contact for more
information. We appreciate the feedback.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2513 June 21, 1991

HAVE A SAFE PICNIC -- Summertime isn't complete without picnics, but USDA
specialists warn that if you don't take proper care, food can spoil quickly. USDA
has tips to help prevent foodborne illness, including: plan ahead, bring the cooler
& a list of foods to take along. Did you know mayonnaise is OK on picnics?
Contrary to popular belief, mayo is not a food safety villain, and actually can
control bacterial growth. USDA's Meat & Poultry Hotline (800) 535-4555, can answer
questions about summer food safety. Contact: Susan Conley (202) 447-3333.

EDUCATION IS THE KEY -- Do you think students in your area need to know more about
agriculture? USDA has a program to help! Through the efforts of "Ag in the
Classroom," a national ag literacy project that USDA coordinates, students learn
more about agriculture. Teachers learn how to integrate ag into the subjects they
teach. "The aim is not to teach kids how to be farmers or ranchers," says Program
Director Shirley Traxler, "but rather to help them understand the role and
importance of agriculture in today's economy and society. Contact: Shirley Traxler
(202) 447-5727.

COMPUTERS COULD SAVE BILLIONS -- U.S. corn growers could save a billion dollars a
year on herbicides if a new weed-predicting computer program meets goals set for it,
says R. Dean Plowman, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Research Service. The
experimental program, called the Corn-Weed-Bioeconomic Model, is the first to link
weed-killing costs to profits in irrigated corn farming. "Our goal is to cut yearly
herbicide use by 15 to 20 percent," says ARS Plant Physiologist Edward E. Schweizer.
"That could translate into saving corn growers $15 per acre. Over the past two
growing seasons do farmers participated in a study using the computer's
recommendation Edward E. Schweizer (303) 482-7717.

USDA IMPLI S PESTICIe PROGRAM -- USDA is beginning a new $16 million
cooperati ederal-gtae p 'cide residue monitoring program for food, beginning
with fres i\iL& vegeta e Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan says.
"Under the program, fr and vegetables will be tested at wholesale
distribution c ers to e that consumers will not be buying foods that have any
harmful pest .Madigan says. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 447-
6179.

JAPANESE VENDING MACHINES -- The average Japanese feeds $137 each year into vending
machines, choosing from foods & drinks that range from octopus dumplings & pizza to
beer & yogurt drinks. Futuristic machines dispense food that actually "cooks
itself" when a customer pulls a string on the bottom of the container. Even though
most of the foods in Japanese vending machines is now domestic, USDA ag trade
experts think there is more than enough room for U.S. food & beverage exporters to
take advantage of this $17 billion market. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough (202) 382-
9442.







NET INCOME DOWN SLIGHTLY -- A 1 percent growth in crop sales & a 1 percent drop in
livestock sales are likely to leave total 1991 cash receipts between $164 & $169
billion, which is below 1990's record, but still above previous years' receipts.
Prices for wheat & dairy products are forecast to average well below last year &
USDA economists expect a much smaller wheat crop. Livestock receipts are expected
to drop more than 10 percent on dairy farms, but increase on red meat farms. Direct
government payments will probably total less than last year because of decreases in
disaster & deficiency payments. USDA economists expect net cash income to shrink 5
percent in 1991. Contact: Robert Dubman (202) 219-0807.

SUMMER INTERNS AT USDA -- USDA has hired about 900 student interns to work at USDA
offices around the country this summer. About 250 of the interns will be employed
at USDA headquarters in Washington, D.C. "Our Summer Intern Program provides
college and university students with hands-on experience in professional,
administrative, and technical positions at USDA," says Associate Deputy Secretary
Charles R. Hilty. "We hope this experience will encourage more students to enter
agriculture-related fields and pursue careers in those areas at USDA when they
graduate." Contact: Debbie Johnson (202) 447-7131.

MORE MEN GROCERY SHOPPING -- More men now participate in the weekly grocery shopping
trip today than they did 10 years ago, a new study found. Donna Montgomery, a
nutritionist with the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service, says 40 percent of
men are family grocery shopping, compared to 32 percent in 1980. Evening shopping
is becoming more popular, she says, and Friday has displaced Thursday as America's
favorite shopping day. Contact: Donna Montgomery (504) 388-4141.

COSTS OF EATING OUT in the U.S. are going up faster than the costs of eating at
home. Between 1980 & 1988, the expenditures for food per person in an urban
household increased 36 percent. Expenses for eating at home went up only 22
percent, while outlays for eating out went up 61 percent, according to a study just
released by USDA. Part of the higher expenses for eating out is explained by the
fact that people are eating out more. People with higher incomes eat out more than
people with lower incomes. Source: "Food Spending in American Households, 1980-
88." Contact: David M. Smallwood (202) 219-0864.

LAUNDRY WHITENER HELPS KILL GYPSY MOTHS -- The stuff in laundry bleach that makes
whites whiter & brights brighter could hang gypsy moth caterpillars out to dry. A
USDA scientist says a fluorescent whitener increased the number of caterpillars a
virus -- named Abby -- killed in lab tests by ten times. Martin Shapiro, a USDA
entomologist discovered the laundry whitener's extra kick when he set out to protect
the virus from the suns ultraviolet rays. In the tests, the whitener not only
blocked the rays, it mysteriously enhanced the virus' effectiveness. Contact:
Martin Shapiro (301) 344-4327.

FARM WORKERS -- During the week of May 12-18, there were 487 thousand hired workers
on farms & ranches in the 11 states USDA surveyed. This compares with 471 thousand
workers a month earlier. Average May wages ranged from $4.46 per hour in Wisconsin
to $6.30 in Florida. Contact: Tom Kurtz (202) 475-3228.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445






FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE


USA #1775 -- By 1993 a nationwide system of standards for organic
foods will be in place. On this edition of Agriculture USA, John
Snyder talks with officials & members of farming, consumer &
industry groups about the impact of this system. (Weekly reel --
13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1257 -- Heading off global warming;
everyone; forest fires threaten life &
& nutrition. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to
features.)


nutrition education for
property; recycling; teens
3 minute consumer


AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1765 -- USDA News Highlights; results of the dairy
study; Soviet credit needs may increase; GATT update; fly
population control. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1425 -- Reducing apple bruises; rats reseed desert; mini-
lettuce scored big; diet & cataracts; biosoap kills whiteflies.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 24, ag trade update; Tues., June
25, weekly weather & crop outlook, ag chemical usage; Thurs., June 27, planted
acreage, grain stocks, world tobacco; Fri., June 28, ag prices, hogs/pigs,
world coffee situation. (These are the USDA reports we know about in advance.
Our Newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on Soviet Summer School; Dave Luciani,
Michigan State University, takes a look at exotic morel mushrooms.


ACTUALITIES


-- Sec. Madigan signs an agreement to speed production of the
anti-cancer drug taxol; USDA Meteorologist Norton Strommen on
weather & crops; USDA Economist Peter Buzzanell on sugars &
sweeteners; USDA Economist Robert Dubman on farm income; USDA
Economist Verner Grise on tobacco.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on growing perennials; Pat
O'Leary reports on low-fat ground beef.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
info, in news desk format with B-Roll footage.

Available on Satellite Westar 4, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or
6.8:


THURSDAY
SATURDAY
MONDAY


. .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
. .10 10:45 a.m., EDT
. .8 8:45 a.m., EDT


NOTE THIS ONE-TIME CHANGE -- On Saturday, June 22, only, from 10 a.m. to 10:45
a.m., the coordinates will be Westar 4, Transponder 19. This is a one-time
only transponder change.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 1262 08303 700 1
OFFMIKE
WHEAT CROP...in sections of Missouri is in sad shape, says Dick Marshall
(Brownfield Network, Jefferson, Mo.). Excessive moisture has caused a variety
of diseases, lowering yields in some fields to less than 20 bushels per acre.
Producers are grazing cattle on wheat, rather than harvesting it. Late corn
will need timely summer rains.

HIGH PRICES...& good weather are enticing producers to plant the largest
cotton crop since the mid 1960's, says Ken Tanner (WRAL-TV/Tobacco Radio Net,
Raleigh, N.C.). Cotton producers planted nearly twice the 200,000 acres
harvested last year. Tobacco is developing well, but Ken says blue mold
disease is active in some regions of the state & weather conditions will
influence its spread.

EDITORIAL STAFF...of Michigan Farm Radio Network has moved its offices (to
7402 Westshire Dr., #135, Lansing, Mich. 48917), says farm director Pat
Driscoll. New phone is (517) 627-5526. Corporate office remains in Milan.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











SMITHSONIAN...Folklife Festival has invited Verlene Looker (KMA, Shenandoah,
Iowa) to broadcast from The Mall in Washington, D.C., June 28-July 7. She is
the third broadcaster to participate in the "Family Farming in the Heartland"
theme. Other two are Rich Hawkins (KRVN, Lexington, Neb.) and Lee Kline (WHO,
Des Moines, Iowa). Secretary of Agriculture Ed Madigan will speak at the
opening ceremony, June 28.

GRASSHOPPERS...in Florida? You bet, & causing damage to nearly everything
that grows in Dade City, says Cindy Zimmerman (Southeast Agrinet, Ocala,
Fla.). The insects are concentrated in numbers greater than anyone can
remember & located in a 10-square mile area. Aerial spraying is underway but
new waves seem to develop. Congratulations to Cindy, who served as host of
the NAFB Southeast Region meeting, & to John Winfield (Mississippi Network,
Jackson), Southeast VP, for a successful conference. We'll never forget the
visit to th IMC phosphate dragline with machinery right out of "Star Wars."


VIC POWER L
Chief, Radio & TV Division







Farm Broadcasters


Letter


United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs
Letter No. 2515


-iv Washh fif
k" ivff 1991).*


D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
July 5, 1991


FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL Rich Hawkins (center) (KRVN, Lexington, Neb.) broadcast live from The Mall in front of
USDA's Administration Building during the 25th Folklife Festival. His special guests Monday, July 1, included Vice
President Dan Quayle & Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan. Rich was one of three farm broadcasters -
the other two were Verlene Looker (KMA, Shenandoah, Iowa) & Lee Kline (WHO, Des Moines, Iowa) who
particiapted in the Smithsonian's 'Family Farming in the Heartland' festival. (USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.)

LIMITED RESOURCE FARMERS -- About 200 farmers from seven southeastern states will
attend the Small or Limited Resource Farmers Regional Conference July 10 11 in
Nashville, Tenn. Sponsored by USDA's Farmers Home Administration & Tennessee State
Univ., the conference will provide opportunities for farmers to get info through
discussions, lectures & one-on-one meetings with government officials, educators &
subject matter experts. States represented include: Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi & Tennessee. Contact: Sally Lawrence (202) 447-
6903.

SLIDES FOR THE ASKING -- We've now got slides available of Secretary of Agriculture
Edward Madigan. Want one? Media only, please. Contact: Marci Hilt (202) 447-
6445.









VENEMAN SWORN IN -- Ann M. Veneman was sworn in June 27 as deputy secretary of
agriculture, becoming the first woman to occupy the number two position at USDA.
Veneman will assist Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan in supervising the work
of the entire department. Veneman has been deputy undersecretary for international
affairs & commodity programs since June 1989. She joined USDA's Foreign Agriculture
Service in 1987 as associate administrator. She received her B.A. in political
science from the University of California, her Master's from the University of
California at Berkeley and her law degree from the University of California.
Contact: Cameron Bruemmer (202) 447-4623.

RECESSION'S IMPACTS are equally shared in urban & rural areas, USDA economists say.
Fourth-quarter data on employment & unemployment suggest the current recession, at
least at the national level, is affecting urban & rural areas about equally. But,
this similarity does not erase the fact that, even in the relatively good times
enjoyed by rural people as recently as two years ago, their economic position has
not improved in relation that of urban people. Contact: Karen Hamrick (202) 219-
0782.

JUST THE FAX -- USDA news releases are now automatically available via fax machine.
To learn how to use AgNewsFax, use your fax machine phone to call (202) 475-3944.
Push 9 on your telephone and press the "start" button on your fax. USDA's fax will
fax the info to your fax. Contact: Diane O'Connor (202) 447-4026.

RESEARCH & TEACHING GRANTS -- Associate Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Charles R.
Hilty says USDA will provide $8.25 million during fiscal year 1991 to the 1890 land
grant institutions for 43 teaching & research projects. This is the second year of
the grants program. Last year, USDA funded 29 projects at $5.5 million. Contact:
Pat Casula (202) 447-4423.

GERMAN FARMHOUSE -- The Museum of American Frontier Culture, Staunton, Va., has
added a German farmhouse to its farmstead exhibit. It earlier had a Scotch-Irish
(Ulster) farm, an English farm and an American farm. The museum has a number of
special events during the summer. Contact: Museum of American Frontier Culture
(703) 332-7850.

FARM INCOME PROSPECTS -- Farmers' cash receipts this year are unlikely to top 1990's
record & government payments are expected to fall. So even the relatively small
increases expected in expenses will bring net incomes down, USDA economists say.
Net cash income for 1991 is forecast at $52 billion to $57 billion, a drop of $1
billion to $6 billion from last year. Contact: Greg Gajewski (202) 219-0313.

VACATION SCHEDULE -- The Farm Broadcasters Letter will be on summer vacation July 19
& 26 this year. We will resume publishing again Aug. 2.


Editor: Marci Hilt Phone: (202) 447-6445








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE


USA #1778 -- Even though the temperatures are steamy outside,
it pays to make sure your house is well insulated against both
heat & cold. On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis
talks with University of Maryland Energy Specialist Lee Grant
about taking care of rising energy costs.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1260 -- Home restoration; new turkey products; new chicken
processing methods; fire prevention; insulation for all seasons.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1768 -- USDA News Highlights; farm expenses are up;
Mexico -- a big market for U.S. pears; a fuel-proof engine;
sustainable agriculture. (Weekly reel of news features.)


NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1427 -- Fats & the liver; magnetic resonance imaging;
flies detect lemon pest; microbes & desert grass; new green
southern pea. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)


fire-


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thurs., July 18, dairy outlook; Fri., July
19, U.S. ag outlook, catfish production; Mon., July 22, ag trade update;
Tues., July 23, weekly weather & crop update, livestock & poultry update,
cattle on feed; Wed., July 24, mink production. (These are the USDA reports
we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries many stories every day which
are not listed in this lineup. Please don't let the lack of a story listing
keep you from calling!)

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE


FEATURES --


ACTUALITIES


Pat O'Leary on the Smithsoniam Institute's Festival of American
Folklife; Scott Huffman, Mississippi State University, reports on
a new old-fashioned hot dog.

-- Vice Presient Dan Quayle at the Folklife festival speaking on
trade issues; Sec. Madigan also at the festival speaking on GATT &
trade; USDA Meteorologist Ray Motha on weather & crops; USDA
Economist Steve MacDonald on exports; USDA Economist Felix
Spinelli on hogs & pigs; LaVerne Ausman, administrator of USDA's
Farmers Home Administration, on FmHA loans; USDA Economist Robert
Dubman on farm income.


UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer looks at exercise & the elderly; Lynn
Wyvill reports on farmers with disabilities.

EVERY OTHER WEEK -- Agriculture Update, five minutes of USDA farm program
info, in news desk format with B-Roll footage.

Available on Satellite Westar 4, Transponder 12D (Channel 23), audio 6.2 or
6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30 7:45 p.m., EDT
SATURDAY ..... ..10 10:45 a.m., EDT
MONDAY .... .8 8:45 a.m., EDT




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
110 1 li lul i 11 011
3 126208 34463 1
OFFMIKE
DIFFERENT PROBLEMS...are confronting producers in North Dakota as compared to
conditions of the last three years, says Mike Hergert (KNOX, Grand Forks,
N.D.). Plenty of rain this Spring & Summer has helped crops & insects alike,
a real switch from dryness that had reduced production. Mike says stem rust,
white mold & insects associated with moisture are keeping producers busy.

INTENSIVE CARE...for Jim Yancy (Progressive Farmer Network, Starkville,
Miss.). Jim recently underwent a quadruple bypass operation. Send a card to
him at North Mississippi Medical Center, 830 S. Gloster, Tupelo, Miss. 38801.
Doug Thomas is leaving the network in mid-July. He bought a 275 acre hog
operation in Kentucky. Doug's replacement is Bob Wade with the USDA in
Memphis, and former radio-TV reporter for the Louisiana Department of
Agriculture.

BIG NEWS...at WKFI, Wilmington, Ohio, is the July 6 marriage of Darrin
Johnston. After the honeymoon he'll cover six county fairs.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










CONGRATULATIONS...to Steve Malone (Georgia Farm Bureau, Macon). His weekly TV
program "Georgia Farm Monitor" was selected at the annual AFBF information
conference as the best regularly scheduled TV program among state farm
bureaus.

NEW STATION...has been added to the network, say Brian Baxter & Wayne Jenkins
(Morning Agriculture Report, Indianapolis, Ind.) -- KVEO, Brownsville, Texas.

HE LIKES IT...the new service being offered by USDA -- AgNewsFax. Rich
Hawkins (KRVN, Lexington, Neb.) says the station uses it for background and
broadcasts. It's available for your operation too. Info on page 2 of this
issue.

THANKS...for the feedback from Greg Primo (Newsworthy, Long Island, N.Y.)
about how o r TV pro mming is used on the 66-station network.

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division