Farm broadcasters letter - 1990

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Title:
Farm broadcasters letter - 1990
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Division
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Radio and Television Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Broadcasting and Film
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
-letter no. 2669 (July 1, 1994).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by: the Office of Communication, Radio and Television Service; 19 -<May 2, 1980>, Feb. 24, 1983-19 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Radio and Television Division; <May 16, 1980>-Feb. 17, 1983 by: the Office of Governmental and Public Affairs, Broadcasting and Film; <Apr. 27, 1990>-199 by: the Office of Public Affairs, Radio-TV Division; 199 -<1994> by: Office of Communications.
General Note:
Description based on: Letter no. 1882 (Nov. 3, 1978); title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34A

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02563831
lccn - sc 77000719
issn - 0364-5444
Classification:
lcc - S21 .A82
System ID:
AA00000580:00002

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Broadcasters letter

Full Text




Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)447-4330
Letter No. 2442 Jan. 5, 1990

WE'RE GOING INTO 1990 with nearly 34 million acres of highly erodible
cropland enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program. It's the
largest long-term cropland retirement program in U.S. history,
surpassing the 28.7 million in the Soil Bank program of the 1950's.
USDA has accepted 34,815 bids from the ninth signup to place an
additional 3.3 million acres under ten-year contracts. North & South
Dakota led in acres contracted. Contact: Bob Feist (202) 447-6789.

CONSERVATION TO REDUCE SOIL EROSION -- The Conservation Reserve
Program is expected to reduce soil erosion on the nation's cropland
by about 20 percent when the conservation practices are installed,
according to Wilson Scaling, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service.
"We already can see the benefits of the program -- in less sedimentation
increased habitat for wildlife and improved water quality," he says.
Contact: Diana Morse (202) 447-7547.

OLDER WOMEN MAY NEED MORE VITAMIN D -- Older women may need more vitamin
D than previously recommended to get through the dark days of winter,
a USDA scientist says. Elizabeth Krall says Vitamin D aids the body
in absorbing calcium and an inadequate intake during the sun-starved
days of winter can mean less calcium for the bones. Contact: Judy
McBride (301) 344-4095.

AQUACULTURE CONFERENCE SET -- Louisiana State University will sponsor
the fourth annual Louisiana Aquaculture Conference and Trade Show at
the Bellemont Hotel & Convention Center in Baton Rouge, Feb. 8 9.
The conference will address the economics of aquaculture in Louisiana,
marketing and legal restrictions. Contact: Gary Jensen (504) 388-4141.

0-25 SIGNUP DATES -- Signup in the new 0-25 program for soybeans will
be Jan. 16 through Feb. 16 for 1990 crops. Since sunflowers and
safflowers may also be planted on conservation use acres as approved
non-program crops, producers do not need to sign up for those crops.
Producers can get more information at their local USDA county
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service office. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 447-8206. -






- 2 -


"HOW TO" VIDEO ON CONSERVATION -- An hour-long "how-to" videotape
will be available to farmers early this year to help them implement
their conservation plans. "Conservation on Your Own," produced by
USDA's Soil Conservation Service and the National Association of
Conservation Districts, features eight segments on widely used soil
conservation practices, such as crop residue management, field borders,
contour buffer strips and windbreaks. For a brochure on the video,
contact: Mary Cressell (202) 382-0558.


USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE increased its service to you last year, Brenda
Curtis reports. During 1989, USDA RADIO had 233 more stories than in
1988. And, the number of calls to the USDA Newsline increased by 80.
Actual figures are:
1988 1989
Number of stories .. 1,904 2,177
With actualities 1,618 1,873
Without. ... 286 264
Total cal ls 2,570 22,650


FOREIGN FACTS -- It's new and it's packed with facts and figures -- and
it's all about global agriculture -- from Algeria to Zimbabwe. We're
talking about "Foreign Agriculture 1989," a quick, convenient guide to
recent production and trade patterns in 65 countries. Free copies to
media only. For a copy, contact: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.


DEAD WEED MEANS DEAD SLUGS -- Most gardeners and producers would
agree: The only good slug is a dead slug. Now, a USDA scientist
has found dead quackgrass kills slugs. "Killed quackgrass releases a
compound into the soil that is a nerve poison highly specific to
slugs," says Roger D. Hagin. Slugs are especially troublesome in
humid areas and have taken a heavy toll in West Coast strawberry
fields and citrus orchards. On the East Coast, they interfere with
corn production. Contact: Roger Hagin (607) 255-1712.


ANIMAL DAMAGE COMMITTEE TO MEET -- The National Animal Damage Control
Advisory Committee will hold its annual meeting Jan. 23-24 in Arlington,
Va. The meeting, which is open to the public, will meet from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. both days. "Wild animals have a place in nature," says
Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Jo Ann Smith, "but problems arise
when they attack crops and livestock or threaten human safety."
Contact: Questa Glenn (301) 436-7799.


WE STILL WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU -- We mailed survey forms to TV
broadcasters in December asking for feedback on our TV services. If
you haven't sent the form back yet, it's not too late to take a
minute to fill it out and return it to us. If you didn't receive a
survey form and want to tell us what you think, call Marci Hilt (202)
447-6445, and she'll be happy to send you a form.






3 -

FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1700 -- Some farmers are giving up the more intensive,
specialized type of farming for a more diverse ag lifestyle. Brenda
Curtis reports on one program that helps farmers in this regard.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1182 -- Food prices & the "big freeze;" the food you
eat affects your baby, too; the disposable diaper dilemma; nutritious
snacks; microwave myths. (Weekly reel f 2-1/2 3 min. consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1689 -- USDA News Highlights; dairy supports
reduced; signup announced for 0-25 soybean program; the Christmas freeze
squeeze; a 1990 export decline? (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1301 -- Sonograms & livestock; understanding cleft
palate; almanac for farmers; modeling the environment; sexing livestock.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thurs., Jan. 11, U.S. crop production
(includes freeze assessment), grain stocks report, world ag supply &
demand; Fri., Jan. 12, world ag production, world oilseed situation,
world cotton situation; Mon., Jan. 15, is a federal holiday; Tues.,
Jan. 17, crop/weather update, livestock & poultry outlook, horticultural
export report; Thurs., Jan. 18, milk production.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on rural leadership; Will Pemble on
USDA research to control suburban flies; a story about wetland
preservation from Mike Thomas of the University of Missouri; Lisa
Telder of Michigan State University on the new Fuji apple; Gary Beaumont
of the University of Illinois on a comeback for hedgerows.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen with a weather
update; USDA Economist Greg Gajewski with a short & long term
agricultural outlook; USDA Economist Kate Ruckley on the effects of
the southern freeze on citrus in Florida & Texas; USDA Economist
Verner Grise with the latest tobacco situation & outlook.

AGRICULTURE UPDATE -- News releases from USDA's Aaricultural
Stabilization and Conservation Service, presented in a news desk
format.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transoonder 120
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




4 -
OFFMIKE
THOSE...wooly bear caterpillars are fairly accurate weather pre-
dictors, says Ron Hendren (WTAD, Quincy, Ill.) In his area last
year, they were black-brown-black which indicates severe-mild-severe
conditions. Sure enough, this past December was the coldest in 105
years, and when we talked by phone in early January it was 45 degrees
outside the studio. Ron figures another nasty spell is ahead. Our
congratulations to Ron. The Illinois Pork Producers selected him
for its agricultural communicator of the year award, to be presented
at its Jan. 31 Feb. 2 convention in Peoria.

ICE...storm last month dropped the station's 2,000-foot tower, says
Dix Harper (WRAL-TV, Raleigh, N.C.). Six-inch ice on guy wires,
which melted on the side facing the sun, also felled a nearby
station's tower at the antenna farm. WRAL-TV purchased time on
another station and engineers got it back on the air in three hours.

PART...of the new team at RFD-TV in Omaha, Neb., is Mike Hansen,
sales manager. Mike moved from WOW Omaha. Kim Dlouhy, who has
been associate aqri-service director for WOW, will replace Mike.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Farm Broadcasters Letter 1111111111 111 1 111
3 1262 08134 078 7
Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington. D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













ONLY...one inch of snow on the ground, says Howard Klingler (KNUJ/
KXLP, New Ulm, Minn.), and the region entered winter in a very dry
condition. Rain this April and May will be necessary to produce a
crop. Howard said the Extension Service in his area is offering
more programs to producers than ever before.

RETURNING...to school full-time to complete work on a master's
degree is Tyson Gair (Mississippi State Ag Info Dept.). Scott
Huffman assumes responsibilities for TV feature production.

GROWTH...at Ag Day has been good during the year. Al Pell (Ag
Day, Lafayette, Ind.) says the service is now satellite fed to 37
stations. His nice comments about the USDA TV News Service were
uch appr iated and forwarded to the staff.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




A 1. 3 i : a vS



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2445 .lan P-2 liqn


SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE CLAYTON YEUTTER talks with Washington, D.C., agricultural
reporters following his Jan. 22 news briefing on rural development. Yeutter
discussed implementing six proposals designed to improve the coor -2 'Q-' of
rural development programs and serve as a catalyst for future initial^ nd. ..
secretary Roland Vqutour also participated in the event. Press S ary Kelly''\,
Shipp is to the right. (USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.) / 2
\ FEB 22 1990
RICE BRAN & CHOLESTEROL -- Louisiana State University scie ki ts have
found rice bran lowers blood cholesterol levels in humans.
they're trying to find out why. Maren Hegsted, associate pro- S '
of nutrition at the LSU School of Human Ecology, will begin research
this spring to try to determine how rice bran lowers cholesterol.
"All we know now is cholesterol may be decreased by the addition of
rice bran in the diet," Hegsted says. "We don't know what process is
involved." Contact: Ruth Patrick (504) 388-4141.









SOVIET GRAIN TALKS -- The next round of U.S. negotiations with the
Soviet Union on the U.S.-USSR long-term grain agreement, which will
expire Dec. 31, will be held March 21 & 22 in Vienna. Initial
negotiations were held Dec. 6 & 7 in Moscow. Deputy U.S. Trade
Representative Julius L. Katz will head the U.S. delegation.
Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.


ASB CATALOG -- Want to know when USDA's Agricultural Statistics
Board will be issuing its national reports during 1990? The board
estimates production, stocks, inventories, disposition, use and
prices of ag commodities, and such other items as labor and farm
numbers. For a copy of "Agricultural Statistics Board Catalog, 1990
Releases" call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. Media only, please.


TRANSPLANTING NATIVE PLANTS -- While many native or wild plants can
be adapted to the home landscape, successful transplanting is often
difficult, says a Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service
horticulturist. Tom Pope says the wet and cold days of winter are
ideal times to move native plants. Gardeners must first determine if
they can duplicate the wild plant's growing conditions, Pope says.
He has other tips for transplanting native plants. Contact: Thomas
E. Pope (504) 388-4141.


"GOOD GUY" BACTERIA -- USDA scientists are studying ways to use a
rod-shaped bacteria known as Bdellovibrio as a "good guy" to control
Salmonella and other food pathogens in food processing & packaging.
"This is the first time anyone has tried to use a predatory bacterium
for ensuring food safety," says Richard Whiting, a USDA research
food technologist. The bacteria are harmless to humans. It will
take at least a year to grow the bacteria and test their performance
as a natural control, Whiting said. Contact: Richard Whiting (215)
233-6437.


CALENDARS -- USDA has two new calendars you may find useful. The
first, "1990 Calendar of Reports," is a monthly booklet in an
easy-to-read calendar form. It lists the dates of summaries and
reports from USDA's Economic Research Service, National Agricultural
Statistics Service & the World Agricultural Outlook Board. The
second, "1990 Reports," is a single sheet of 1990 calendars listing
releases from USDA's Economic Research Service only. For a copy of
both or either, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. Media only,
please.

WRONG PHONE NUMBER -- Feedback from readers says we listed a wrong
phone number in Letter No. 2443, Jan. 12. If you're looking for the
latest info from the Consumer Information Center, this is the correct
number to call to get the new winter edition of the Consumer Information
Catalog: Mike Gill (202) 566-1794. We're sorry for any inconvenience.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1703 -- With rice becoming more & more popular with
U.S. consumers, Brenda Curtis explores the world of rice -- looking
at how to prepare the different varieties & also looking at the
nutritional aspects of rice. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1185 -- Buffalo farmers; buffalo meat is trendy; rice
bran & nutrition; rice bran recipes; planning this year's vegetable
garden. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1692 -- USDA News Highlights, more info on
conservation compliance, the president's rural development initiative
is outlined, the rail car shortage worsens, water availability & pig
growth. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1304 -- Seeds of glasnost, peach aroma, chemical
"fingerprints," New Zealand grass, older women & vitamin D. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., Jan. 31, ag prices report,
world tobacco situation; Fri., Feb. 2, catfish production, cattle
numbers; Tues., Feb. 6, crop & weather update; Wed., Feb. 7, Clayton
Yeutter's testimony before Congress on farm bill proposals; Fri.,
Feb. 9, U.S. crop production, world ag supply & demand, Soviet grain
situation; Mon., Feb. 12, farm labor, honey production.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Jan. 22)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on rice bran, the newest weapon in
the war on cholesterol; Debbie Janifer on how green vegetables in
your diet can help prevent cancer; Will Pemble on a new way to prevent
aflatoxin from getting into feeds; Joe Courson, University of Georgia,
with tips for anglers; and Lisa Telder, Michigan State University,
on aging farmers.

ACTUALITIES -- Excerpts from Sec. Clayton Yeutter's Jan. 22, Washington,
D.C., press briefing on rural development; excerpts from Yeutter's
Jan. 25 Congressional testimony on water quality; Sara Short, USDA
economist, on the dairy situation & outlook; Steve Milmoe, USDA
economist, with a U.S. ag trade outlook; John Ginzel, USDA economist,
on the livestock & poultry situation.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Farm tax changes; top agricultural states;
a "how to" conservation video.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY .. .7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 10D
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 120
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 1 I 1111II1 ill llll l11 1 IlI TI
OFFMIKE 3126208134 060 5
SNOWSTORMS...have brought needed moisture to sections ot the
midwest. Rich Hawkins (KRVN, Lexington, Neb.) says the 10
inches received in his area may go a long way toward saving
the wheat crop. There was little wind with the storm, which
meant the wet snow was deposited uniformly. And, slow
melting put most of the moisture in the ground.

ELEVEN...inches of snow that dropped on north central Iowa
improved everybody's feelings, says Al Heinz (KGLO, Mason City).

SNOWPACK...in the mountains of Idaho got a big boost recently,
but Kelly Klaas (KEZJ, Twin Falls, laho) says it remains below
normal. Kelly says dry bean producers in his region are
smiling. Prices generally go soft this time of year, and if
they hold, will provide a good return during 1990. Kelly
assumes the duties of Kathie Gier who has moved to KART,
Jerome, Idaho. Kelly served at KEZJ from '68 to '78, with
an eight-year break for farming.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











PHRASING...about weather conditions is important when
broadcasting to California producers, says Roy Isom (KMJ,
Fresno). This is the time of year when most crops will
benefit from rain, but some producers may not view the
weather news as good. Moisture can promote fungus on
certain crops, and mud will interfere with the naval orange
harvest. If rain is delayed until early February, it will
disturb pollination of almonds and fruit trees. Roy says
"good" weather is all relative.

UPCOMING...USDA will be taking the Costs & Return Survey
Feb. 12 March 30. We'll be asking 26,000 farmers and
ranchers nationwide to provide information about their 1989
production activities. Please urge your listeners who
receive the survey to participate. This information will
help everyone.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




\I. ?)4 4 a+4LK9p


Farm Bro Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2446 Feb. 2, 1990


SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE CLAYTON YEUTTER told Washington, D.C., reporters USDA's
1991 proposed budget is austere and credible, but not draconian. Yeutter said
USDA's outlays are fairly stable -- $48.3 billion in 1989, $48.2 billion in 1990
and $48.7 in 1991. USDA's Budget Director Steve Dewhurst (right) and Deputy
Secretary Jack Parnell (not shown) also answered reporters' questions at the
news briefing. (USDA Photo by Perry Rech.)


EURO-YUPPIES -- Barbecue in Bonn? Tacos in Turin? Seltzer in
Seville? Yes! Yuppie food trends have invaded Europe -- creating
opportunities for U.S. food exporters. The target? Young, European
urban professionals. "The appeal of American foods to Europe's
yuppies varies from country to country," says Mark Condon, a USDA
trade specialist. "In Milan, Italy's capital of fashion chic, the
current rage is ethnic food, especially Tex-Mex." Condon can tell
you what's hot; what's not. Contact: Mark Condon (202) 475-3417.






- 2 -


PHONE BOOK -- It's new, it's radioactive orange-colored and if you call
USDA a lot, you may need it. What is it? It's USDA's Fall 1989
Telephone Directory. Need a copy? Call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.
Media only, please.


FmHA HOUSING MONEY TARGETED -- USDA is targeting federal rural housing
funds to the 100 counties that need it the most, says Neal Sox Johnson,
acting administrator of USDA's Farmers Home Administration. "We are
starting a demonstration program to target an additional $67 million
to those counties," he says. The largest part of the funding -- $40
million -- is earmarked for the agency's single family home ownership
program. Contact: Joe O'Neill (202) 447-4323.


NEW DIRECTOR IN ILLINOIS -- Donald L. Uchtmann has been named associate
dean of the College of Agriculture and director of the University of
Illinois Cooperative Extension Service. Uchtmann, a professor of
agricultural law, has been acting director since the retirement of
William Oschwald in 1988.


WHEN YOU LOSE YOUR JOB -- Losing a job is a traumatic experience
whether it means loss of your entire income or of a second income
upon which your family's living standards have depended. You can
survive the financial crisis if you plan carefully, says Suzann E.
Knight, a family resource management specialist at the University of
New Hampshire. Knight has a list of things to do to help you survive
Contact: Holly Y. Ayer (603) 862-1498.


AFLATOXIN THREAT SLIGHT -- A USDA scientist'says the 1989 U.S. corn
crop is likely to escape the high levels of aflatoxin contamination
that hurt the 1988 crop. Weather conditions needed for unusually
high aflatoxin levels generally were not present nationally last year,
says USDA Microbiologist Donald T. Wicklow. Contact: Sandy Miller
Hays (301) 344-4089.


WHEAT QUALITY -- The 1989 domestic wheat crop declined slightly in
quality from the 1988 crop, a USDA study says. The report shows
that, of the graded samples, 56 percent in the 1989 study were assigned
the U.S. No. 1 grade, versus 64 percent in 1988. For a copy of the
report, "1989 U.S. Wheat Crop Quality," call: Allen Atwood (202)
475-3367.


GREAT PLAINS WIND DAMAGE DOWN -- Wind erosion damage on U.S. cropland
& rangeland in the Great Plains in November & December 1989 is down
from near record-breaking highs in 1988, USDA says. "Drought and
limited snow cover are the major reasons for the damage," says Wilson
Scaling, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service. Texas had the greatest
damage, accounting for a third of the total. Contact: Diana Morse
(202) 447-4772.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA 1704 -- On this edition, Dave Carter talks with
farmers, economists, statisticians and Assistant Secretary of
Agriculture for Economics Bruce Gardner about the importance of the
annual Farm Costs & Returns Survey. Farmers, legislators, agri-
businesses, educators and historians use the survey results. This
program tells you why participating in this survey is so important.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1186 -- Proposed consumer spending at USDA; all mulch
is not good mulch; how much mulch; lower calorie pizza; gardening can
be therapeutic. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1693 -- USDA news highlights; FY 91 USDA
budget proposals; the farm costs & returns survey; world rice trade;
Far East & Middle East export regions. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1305 -- Bug trading; everglades threat; measuring
starch; cotton is the 21st century; aflatoxin threat low. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., Feb. 13, weekly weather &
crop report; Wed., Feb. 14, ag income & finance outlook, horticultural
exports; Thurs., Feb. 15, ag resources outlook, milk production
report; Fir., Feb. 16, cattle on feed report.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
Jan. 31, 1990

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on 1989 tax tips for farmers & 1990
tax changes; Chris Larson on "how-to" conservation practices for farmers;
Will Pemble on aflatoxin prevention; and Mike Thomas on a "test-tube"
cow.

ACTUALITIES -- Excerpts from Sec. Yeutter's Jan. 29 Washington, D.C.,
budget briefing; Norton Strommen with a weather update; and USDA Economist
Roger Hoskin and oil crops outlook.

AGRICULTURE UPDATE -- Kate Katras on the Soviet butter purchase and
Wilson Scaling on conservation compliance.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Farm costs & returns survey; snow survey; science
student shortage; longer lasting roses & excerpts from Sec. Yeutter's
Feb. 7 testimony on the farm bill before the Senate Ag Committee.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY .. .7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY ..... 10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 10D
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

III I III 1 1 [ II 8 U III
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08134 055 5
SOIL...dryness will probably not hit the headlines until spring
planting, predicts Warren Nelson (KFAB, Omaha, Neb.). He says
there isn't enough moisture now to put a crop in the ground,
and even a normal year's precipitation would not fill the
soil profile. Warren says 80 percent of corn in his area is
irrigated, but increasing costs associated with irrigation
are eating profit margins.

MOISTURE...situation is OK, says Ron Powers (WOWO, Fort Wayne,
Ind.), and if the outlook holds the region should be in good
shape for planting. Station recently received an award from
the Allen County Soil and Water Conservation District for out-
standing support of soil and water conservation. Ron replaces
Pam Geppert, who moved with her husband to South Dakota to
operate the family farm.

NAFB...northeast regional meeting will be at the Quincy Holiday
Inn, Quincy, Ill., May 11 13.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













SOUTHEAST...NAFB regional meeting to be May 31 June 3 at the
Ocean Creek Resort and Conference Center, Myrtle Beach, S.C.

MERGER...complete now, of the Agri-Business Network and the
Rural Radio Network to form the Agri-America Network. Based
in Indianapolis, it will serve 80 stations and brings together
the talents of Gary Truitt, Lew Middleton and Dan Modlin.

CONGRATULATIONS...to Florida Agrinet, Ocala. Their media kit
received a first-place award from the Florida Chapter of the
National Agri-Marketing Association. Agstar Advertising
produced the kit; they also captured a first-place for work
with the F ida Nurserymen and Growers Association.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




, A 1_ : q7


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250
Letter No. 2447 Feb. 9, 1990


SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE CLAYTON YEUTTER shares a laugh with his Press Secretary
Kelly Shipp and agricultural reporters after his Feb. 6 USDA Radio news conference
on the administration's 1990 farm bill proposals in Washington, D.C. Reporters
include UPI's Chuck Abbott (left) and KRF's Sue Kirchoff (right of Shipp), Doug
Palmer and Richard Cowan. (USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.)


THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION'S PROPOSED PLAN for new farm legislation
would give farmers more opportunities to grow profit-making crops
while reducing the amount spent on subsidies to prop up farm income.
Yeutter said the proposal relies on "positive incentives" to help
curb soil erosion, ground water contamination and other environmental
problems. Contact: Kelly.Shipp (202) 447-4623.






- 2 -


KEARNEY ASSUMES NEW DUTIES -- Sec. Yeutter has named Patricia Kearney
to the position of acting assistant secretary for natural resources &
environment/. Kearney previously served as Yeutter's cnief of staff.
"Pat has pj-ayed an integral part in developing the President's new
initia&tiyv~ 'America the Beautiful' and is especially well equipped to
provide leadership in implementing this important program," Yeutter
said. Kearney, 35, headed Yeutter's transition team before being
named chief of staff. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.


BLUMENTHAL NAMED CHIEF OF STAFF -- Sec. Yeutter named Gary R.
Blumenthal as his new chief of staff Feb. 2. Blumenthal has served
as Yeutter's executive assistant since July 7. Blumenthal, 33,
served USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service from 1983 to 1989, first
as a legislative assistant and since 1985 as director of the agency's
legislative affairs office office. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202)
447-4623.


WHAT'S IN A NAME? USDA has a new video about wheat classes for wheat
farmers, wheat breeders & extension agents. It's called: "What's in
a Name? Differentiating Wheat Classes." The video describes the
factors which contribute to the increasing difficulty in accurately
distinguishing different classes of wheat using visual exam methods.
For a copy of of the video or a transcript, call: Keith Sanders
(202) 475-3891.


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE MISSION TO POLAND -- Sec. Yeutter sent a team
of seven U.S. ag experts to Poland Feb. 6 through 15 as part of
continuing U.S. efforts to aid Poland in establishing an efficient,
privatized ag economy. Dr. Myron D. Johnsrud, administrator of USDA'
Extension Service, will lead the team. The mission follows a technical
assistance agreement signed in Warsaw Dec. 16. Contact: Nancy Sowers
(202) 447-4651.













HERE'S USDA'S RADIO CREW wi th
p- their favorite interview subject.
Left to right: Gary Crawford,
Brenda Curtis, Sec. Yeutter,
Larry Collins, Maria Bynum. (USDA
Photo by Bob Nichols.)






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1705 -- USDA's proposed fiscal year 1991 budget
calls for program spending levels of $68 billion. That's a
$1.7 billion increase over the fiscal year 1990 budget.
Brenda Curtis reports on the spending plan as presented by
Sec. of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter, Deputy Sec. Jack Parnell
and Chief Budget Officer Steve Dewhurst. (Weekly reel --
13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1187 -- Milk safety; a food label survey; tomato
prices; targeting housing funds; birdhouses. (Weekly reel
of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1694 -- USDA News Highlights; 1990 farm bill; what next for
crop insurance; rice program & payments; milk safety. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1306 -- Fire ant parasite; fire ant disease; milk
sugar & cataracts; vitamin C & iron; updating the RDA.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., Feb. 19 Federal Holiday;
Tues., Feb. 2U, Ag outlook, world ag outlook, catfish,
crop/weatner update; Thurs., Feb. 22, U.S. trade update,
poultry production; Fri., Feb. 23, livestock update, wool
production, world livestock production.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Feb. 8, 10 & 12)

FEATURES -- Chris Larson reports on snow survey; Dave Carter takes a
look at the farm costs & returns survey; Joe Courson,
University of Georgia, talks about extending the
attractiveness of roses; and Lisa Telder reports on science
student shortages.

ACTUALITIES: Sec. Yeutter on farm bill proposals for 1990;
John Ginzel on livestock & poultry updates; Sara Short on
latest dairy outlook.

NEXT WEEK -- Pat O'Leary reports on crop quality; DeBoria Janifer
talks about USDA's Beagle Brigade.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY .. .7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY ... 10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 10D
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 120
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 126208340506

RAILCAR...shortage is causing an economic crunch, says Mike
Hergert (KNOX, Grand Forks, N.D.). Farmers need money to pay the
banker, but tne elevator operator won't buy grain because it
can't be shipped. A two-month wait seems the rule rather than
the exception in his area. Mike says the warm January has created
an "open winter," no snow to protect soil from blowing. Above
normal rainfall l is needed this Spring.
NORTH...Central Region meeting of NAFB will be held in Grand
Forks, N.D. June 7-9, hosted by KNOX radio.
TABLE...grape producers had a good harvest, says Roy Isom (KMJ,
Fresno, Calif.). Wheat producers in the state face an uncertain
future. The Russian wheat aphid arrived last year, and will
likely impact yields this season. Some growers are using
parasitic wasps against the pest. Roy says a test project is
underway that uses lemon peels and manure to remove selinium from
soil. 'Initial results are favorable.




Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300














NICE...call from Linda Brekke (KATE, Albert Lea, Minn.) regarding
how the station uses our radio programming and a request for an
address given in a recent "Agriculture USA" program about rice
produced by USDA's Brenda Curtis.
NATIONAL....Agriculture Day is Tuesday, March 20. National
Agriculture Week is March 18-24.
CONGRATULATIONS...to NAFB president Lynn Ketelsen for his narration
of "American Farmers ... Guarding Our Grounawater," a TV special
to be aired during National Agriculture Week. A joint project by
NAFB and DowElanco, the program presents a positive story about
American agriculture. It marks the 9th consecutive national ag
week presentation on TV.
.AN...Ma is utritio n Month.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division









Farm Broadcasters Letter l 9 '



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (20

Letter No. 2448 Feb. 16, 1990

TREE PLANTING INITIATIVE -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter,
along with Texaco President & CEO James W. Kinnear and American
Forestry Assoc. Exec. VP R. Neil Sampson announced an urban tree-
planting initiative on Valentine's Day. Texaco and the Texaco
Philanthropic Foundation will provide $1 million in the first year
to support tree-planting projects in Houston, Denver & New Orleans
this spring and additional locations in the fall. Contact: Kelly
Shipp (202) 447-4623.

FLOATING ROOTS -- A USDA scientist is growing carrot roots in beakers
to try to unlock the secrets of natural soil fungi that help many
kinds of plants grow. The payoff, perhaps five to ten years away,
would be a cheaper way to mass-produce fungi as farmers' and nursery
operators' underground allies, says Plant Physiologist Sui-Sheng
(Sylvia) T. Hua. Hua says the self-sustaining roots are ideal for
her research because she grows them without bothering with soil or
carrots. "I can focus on just the root and the fungus," she says.
Contact: Sui-Sheng Hua (415) 559-5905.

GOOD NEWS FOR FERRET LOVERS -- USDA has made ferret fans happy by
approving a rabies vaccine for the weasel-like mammals. Because
ferrets have a reputation for biting and previously could not be
protected from rabies, public health authorities considered them a
public menace and some states have made it illegal to keep them.
David Espeseth, a USDA veterinarian says the vaccine was previously
approved for cats, dogs, cattle & swine. He says public health
officials may still order a ferret killed and tested for rabies
even if it has had the shot. Contact: David Espeseth (301)
436-8245.

GEARING UP FOR THE FARM BILL -- One aspect of new legislation to
replace the 1985 farm bill is food assistance programs. A new USDA
publication takes a look at options for food assistance policy in the
next decade. Food assistance is influenced by two conflicting
priorities -- containing costs and improving nutritional status, say
J. William Levedahl & Masao Matsumoto, the authors. Source: "U.S.
Domestic Food Assistance Programs, Lessons from the Past." Contact:
Levedahl & Matsumoto on (202) 786-1864.






- 2 -


FuOD CHOICES EXPAND -- During 1989 consumers were offered a record
9,200 new food items -- including 1,700 more food-enhancing condiments.
Sauces, flavoring an'd pickles with Cajun, Jamaican, Thai & Creole
flavors challenged the dominant Italian, Mexican and Chinese offerings,
says Donna Montgomery of the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service.
There were more than 1,300 new snacks and candies, 1,348 new dairy
items, almost 1,200 new bakery items (many with oat bran) and many
entrees offering low-fat, low-salt, low-cholesterol choices. Contact:
Donna Montgomery (504) 388-4141.


BALANCING WORK & FAMILY LIFE -- Cornell University Cooperative
Extension has a series of fact sheets, "Balancing Work and Family
Life," to help today's families better manage their time & money.
Series Coordinator Christiann Dean, says the series is designed to
help busy employed parents understand how today's rapid changes
affect their families, discover how others handle these challenges
and find a balance to suit their own needs. Contact: Carol Doolittle
(607) 255-7660.


WATER QUALITY PROJECTS -- USDA will establish water quality demonstration
projects in California, Florida, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska,
North Carolina, Texas and Wisconsin this year. Sec. Yeutter says
the project goal is to demonstrate cost-effective agricultural practices
that can be used and shared by farmers, the agribusiness community
and federal, state and local policy makers. Contact: Diana Morse
(202) 447-4772.


DON'T BUY SMUGGLED BIRDS -- If you're buying an exotic bird -- hookbilled
or yellow-naped Amazon are the most popular -- make sure you don't
buy one that's been smuggled into the country. Every year from
January through early spring hundreds of exotic birds enter the U.S.
illegally after the winter breeding season. "These smuggled birds
often carry such diseases as exotic Newcastle without showing symptoms,"
says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service. Exotic Newcastle virus is deadly to all birds
and would be a major problem for the poultry industry. Contact: Pat
El-Hinnawy (301) 436-7255.


THE CONSERVATION RESERVE PROGRAM will boost net farm income & improve
environmental quality over the life of the program. However, these
gains will come at the cost of somewhat higher food prices and
government administrative expenses, according to a new USDA study.
There may also oe potential downturns in farm input industries.
Net economic benefits of the program range between $3.4 billion & $11
billion in present value, according to estimates in the report.
Source: "The Conservation Reserve Program, an Economic Assessment."
Contact: C. Edwin Young & C. Tim Osborn (202) 786-1840.


HERE'S A GOOD WAY TO FIND OUT WHO WORKS WHERE -- Sue Kirchoff,
whose picture was featured prominently on the cover of last week's
Farm Broadcaster's Letter along with Sec. Yeutter, is not a reporter
for Knight-Ridder. Since August of 1989, she has been a commodities
correspondent for Reuters. We regret the error.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1706 -- Brenda Curtis presents the Bush
Administration's Farm Bill proposal in a nutshell, with comments from
Sec. Clayton Yeutter. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1188 -- Getting enough vitamin D; disposing of hazardous
products; a tree planting proposal; microwave ovens -- agents of change;
rice is still nice. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1695 -- Soviets buying more wheat; cotton
payments; Florida's tomato crop; a tree planting proposal. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1307 -- Biocontrol of hydril la; camel cotton;
food intake & disease immunity; parasitic nematodes; hairy sugar
cane. (Weekly reel of research features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., Feb. 21, crop/weather update,
catfish production; Thurs., Feb. 22, livestock/poultry outlook; Fri.,
Feb. 23, feed yearbook summary, U.S. livestock update; Mon., Feb.
26, cotton/wool outlook; Tues., Feb. 27, export outlook, crop/weather
update; Wed., Feb. 28, ag prices, world tobacco situation; Tues., March 6,
crop/weather update; Fri., March 9, U.S. crop production, world ag
supply & demand; Mon., March 12, vegetable outlook, world ag/grain
production, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of Feb. 12)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary looks at USDA's 1989 crop quality reports for
wheat, corn & soybeans; Lynn Wyvill reports on the progress of "Europe
1992;" Debbie Janifer profiles the "Beagle Brigade," cute canines who keep
contraband from coming into the country.

ACTUALITIES -- Sec. Yeutter comments on the latest USDA crop report,
prospects for a new Soviet grain deal & citrus damage in Texas &
Florida; USDA Grain Analyst Donald Novotny on Soviet buys of U.S.
grain; USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on Farmbelt weather
patterns; USDA's Outlook Board Chairman James Donald on the latest
world ag supply & demand; USDA Veterinarian Lonnie King on salmonella
emergency.

NEXT WEEK -- A pilot program in Baltimore, Md., to use plastic "benefit
cards" to get food stamps and other benefits to eligible clients;
USDA's America the Beautiful program; cotton farmers' best friend;
Chilean fruit imports.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 10D
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
rl II ir ll III I II
4 3126208134 045 6
OFFMIKE
EVEN...though prices were low last year, the fields got
enough moisture and yields were good, says Stephen Dingels
(KLGR, Redwood Falls, Minn.). That meant farmers bought
equipment. Stephen says his local John Deere dealer ranked
as one of the top ten in the nation. This year, as last,
producers are confronting low subsoil conditions. But, most
Minnesota snow arrives in March so farmers are still optimistic.

EQUIPMENT...is not moving in Dink Embry's (WHOP, Hopkinsville,
Ky.) region. Most producers are cautious, including adopting
low-input techniques. Dink says Farmers are interested in
learning more about it, but not ready to take action yet.
Aquaculture is growing there. Congratulations to Dink and
WHOP. The station recently celebrated its 50th anniversary,
and Dink has been been there covering Farm news for 44
years.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











SOUTHWEST...citrus producers are looking forward to a good
year because of the Florida freeze, says George Gatley
(Western Agri-Radio Networks, Yuma, Ariz.). Asparagus harvest
is underway and vegetable production has been helped by good
weather -- it was 82 degrees outside George's studio when we
spoke. Recent rain -- three-year's supply in two weeks --
caused flooding. In nearby California's lower San Joaquin
Valley, they're rationing water, George says. Reservoirs
are very low and the snow-rain season ends in April.

THANKS...to Charles Youngs (KLBJ, Austin, Texas) for taking the
time to write and tell us about how he uses USDA's daily
ald weekly ra o services. Sure made the staff's dly.


IC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division









Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2449 Feb. 23, 1990

CONSERVATION PLANNING -- Farmers & ranchers have developed conservation
plans for about 135 million acres of the nation's 140 million acres
of highly erodible cropland, says Wilson Scaling, chief of USDA's
Soil Conservation Service. "Farmers and ranchers themselves have
made a strong commitment to soil and water conservation with these
plans," he said. "In fact, they have already fully implemented plans
on 27 percent of the highly erodible cropland." Contact: Diana
Morse (202) 447-4772.

MORE FUNDS FOR MEDFLY -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter has
made an additional $15 million available to fight Medfly & Oriental
fruit fly infestations in California. "These infestations pose a
serious economic threat to U.S. agriculture," Yeutter said. "They
could severely disrupt the $12.3 billion fruit and vegetable industry
and cost a half-billion dollars annually in lost export markets."
Contact: Anita Brown (301) 536-7799.

PACKERS & STOCKYARDS HEAD -- Sec. Yeutter has named Virgil M. Rosendale
as administrator of USDA's Packers & Stockyards Administration.
Rosendale will oversee policy development & daily operations for the
federal agency that implements the fair-trade provisions of the
Packers & Stockyards Act. Rosendale has managed the operation of a
2,000-acre grain & livestock farm in Augusta, Ill., and is a past
president of the National Pork Producers Council. Contact: Kelly
Shipp (202) 447-4623.

NEW SALMONELLA PROGRAM -- Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Jo Ann
Smith has announced a USDA program aimed at controlling the spread of
salmonella enteritidis in table-egg poultry flocks in the U.S. Sal-
monella is a growing problem for the $3.2 billion egg industry and is
a serious public health concern as well, Smith says. The control
program will aim at testing, tracing back and certifying flocks.
Much of the work will be done through the National Poultry Improvement
Plan, a voluntary federal-state-industry program for improving
poultry breeding stock & hatchery products. Contact: Margaret Webb
(301) 436-6573.

FARM EQUIPMENT MEETING -- The 1990 Farm Equipment Manufacturers
Association's Spring Managment Clinic will be held May 5 9 in
Clearwater, Fla. Contact the association in St. Louis at (314)
991-0702.







- 2 -


NEW HYBRID ORANGE SURVIVES FREEZE -- Trees of "Ambersweet," a new
USDA orange hybrid released by USDA in January 1989, proved their cold
hardiness during the recent Florida freeze. "Ambersweet came through
with flying colors," says C. Jack Hearn, a USDA plant geneticist.
One of the main advantages of the new variety is that it ripens early
-- by mid-October and can be harvested through December. Cold weather
usually doesn't threaten Florida citrus until December or later.
Contact: C. Jack Hearn (407) 897-7300.


CENSUS WORKERS KEEP FOOD STAMPS -- People who receive food stamps
will be able to work on the 1990 census without losing any benefits
in all but seven states. The action, which waives usual food stamp
rules, is part of a USDA demonstration project. "So far, all but
seven states -- Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas
and New Hampshire -- have indicated they would participate," says
Catherine Bertini, assistant secretary of agriculture for food &
consumer services. The Census Bureau expects to hire 300,000 temporary
workers to help with the 1990 count. Contact: Phil Shanholtzer
(703) 756-3286.


USDA Plant
Hardiness
Zone Map

























.< S^
-^ ^^vv


b HI

.ii


RANGE OF AVERAGE ANNUAL MIWMUM
TEMPERATURES FOR EACH ZONE
ZONE 1 BELOW -50-F
ZONE 2 -SO- TO -40'
ZONE 3 -40- TO -30
ZONE 4 -30- TO -20-
ZONE 5 -20' TO -10'
ZONE 6 -10- TO 0 .
ZONE 7 0o TO 10 o
ZONE 8 10- To 20 [
ZONE 9 20- TO 30 -
ZONE 10 30. TO 40
ZONE 11 ABOVE 40'" C


PLANT HARDINESS MAP UPDATE -- For the first time in 25 years, USDA has updated the
Plant Hardiness Zone Map. Plant varieties are often catalogued by zones in which
they will survive & thrive. The revised map includes Alaska, Hawaii, Canada &
Mexico and is detailed enough to show county lines within states. For a copy of
the updated map, contact: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1707 -- Gary Crawford presents the story of how the
Extension Service, working with government officials and residents, is
helping rescue what was once a model community from the ravages of time,
neglect & drugs. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1189 -- Radon testing; when pets die; the microwave
mystery; Thai rice; preventing salmonella. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3
min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1696 -- USDA News Highlights; European wheat prices; the
buffalo business; fly population control; water supply affects pig
growth. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1308 -- Honest overeating; phymus gland & the skin;
device aids elderly studies; sunless tanning; dieting & fitness training.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., March 12, vegetable outlook,
world ag/grain production, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation;
Tues., March 13, crop/weather update, horticultural exports; Wed.,
March 14, fruit outlook; Thurs., March 15, sugar outlook, milk
production; Fri., March 16, cattle on feed; Mon., March 19, ag outlook;
Tues., March 20, world ag outlook, catfish, crop/weather update.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
Feb. 22, 24 & 26

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on EBT & food stamps; Will Pemble
takes a look at a new virus for gypsy moths; Joe Courson, with
the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service, describes
a cotton farmer's best friend.

ACTUALITIES -- Sec. Yeutter on the 1990 farm bill; Norton Strommen
on the latest weather & crop update; Lester Crawford on the modernization
of the federal meat & poultry inspection program; Richard Backus on
emergency funding for fruit flies in California; Greg Gajewski on the
latest ag outlook.

NEXT WEEK -- Pat O'Leary reports on America the Beautiful.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY .. 10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 100
MONDAY .8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

-4- ii iii lii III
OFFMIKE 31262082651406
FEEDING...their people has not been a priority of the USSR,
says Peggy Fish (WTAX, Springfield, Ill.). She traveled
recently with a U.S. trade mission to Moscow. Peggy says
glassnost has helped tell the Soviet people to give food
production increased emphasis and that citizens of many
other nations have abundant, quality foods in their grocery
stores. Peggy says inefficient operations result in 50
percent of new combines not being operated during harvest.
Peggy took pictures and has prepared a slide show to ag and
non-ag audiences. At the Illinois Feed and Grain meeting
she showed it twice -- each time to 150 people. Another
example of a farm broadcaster serving the community.

CONGRATULATIONS...to NAFB president Lynn Ketelsen (Linder Farm
Net, Willmar, Minn.). He will serve as panel moderator for
"Agriculture's Environmental Challenges" at the March 5
Oklahoma City convention of the National Farmers Union.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












INDIANA...producers told members of a House Agriculture
subcommittee meeting there that farm programs can encourage
actions that might not otherwise be taken, such as continuing
production instead of idling land, says Skip Davis (WASK,
Lafayette, Ind.) who covered the event. To not plant can
mean a reduction in program acreage, impacting income. Skip
says one of the goals of Farm Bill debate will be to help
create a mind-set for change.

THANKS...to George Gatley (Western Agri-Radio Networks, Yuma,
Ariz.) for feeding to USDA Radio Cooper Evans's speech to
the National Association of Soil Conservation Districts in
San Diego, Calif. Evans is White House Liaison for Agriculture.




VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division









Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio- TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2450 March 2, 1990

FARM COMMODITY PROGRAMS -- The January-March issue of National Food
Review examines farm commodity programs and their effects. For the
last half-century U.S. agriculture has been among the most productive
in the world. It has made a high-quality, low-cost diet available to
a growing population at home and has fed millions abroad. Although
U.S. agriculture has been immensely successful, American farmers have
not always prospered to the same degree. For a copy of National Food
Review, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.

KEEP ENVIRONMENT IN MIND -- It's almost time for spring cleaning, and
Karen Behm, a Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service management
specialist,says you should keep the environment in mind when you're
doing it. "Americans throw away 160 million tons of garbage a year,"
she says, "and much of it ends up in landfills." Behm has several
ideas to reduce what we consider disposable. "Although individual
actions may seem insignificant," she says, "added together they can
have an important effect on the present and future quality of our
environment." Contact: Karen Behm (504) 388-4141.

EATING RIGHT? Want to know more about dietary guidelines? Want to
interview an expert on the subject? USDA's experts on eating right
will be on media tours during the next few months. They'll be in
Denver, Colo., the week of April 23; Chicago, Ill., the week of May
21. Spokespersons will also be available for media interviews in New
York, N.Y.; Houston and San Antonio, Texas; Newport, R.I.; Wausau,
Wisc.,; and Anaheim, Calif. To schedule an interview, call: Eileen
Newman (301) 436-5724.

EXPORTS RAISED -- USDA has forecast U.S. ag exports at $38.5 billion
for fiscal year 1990. This is $500 million higher than in November.
The upward revision largely reflected a 3-million ton increase in
expected U.S. coarse grain exports. However, export value is still
expected to decline more than $1 billion from fiscal 1989. Contact:
Steve MacDonald (202) 786-1822 or Dave Pendlum (202) 382-9054.

FLAVORING LABELS -- Over the next six months, USDA will require meat
& poultry processors to list substances used to flavor meat & poultry
products by their common name on the label. "We are making this
change to better protect the public health and serve the consumer's
right to know," says Lester M. Crawford, administrator of USDA's Food
Safety & Inspection Service. Contact: Jim Greene (202) 382-0314.






- 2 -


CATHERINE BERTINI, assistant secretary for food & consumer services, shows off
the "Independence Card" used for electronic benefits transfer in Baltimore's
local food stamp program. The card works like a credit card, allowing food stamp
recipients to draw their benefits electronically and to pay for groceries without
using paper food stamps. The Baltimore project, one of several around the
country, began Nov. 30. Bertini received the Leadership & Human Services Award
from the American Public Welfare Association March 1. Contact: Susan Acker
(703) 756-3286. (USDA Photo by Pamela Faith.)


OUTER LIMI-TS -- Not only is Mt. Everest the outer limits of the
world, it's also the outer limits for the body. Last spring, USDA
scientist Robert Reynolds directed the first major nutrition study at
extreme altitudes on Mt. Everest. Although it will take another year
to analyze all the data, Reynolds says preliminary findings exploded
some mountain climbing myths. Climbers on Reynolds' expedition
averaged a 10 percent loss of their starting body weight (30 percent
had been reported as average). And, high-fat foods didn't cause
nausea or precipitate acute vomiting and the climbers didn't lose
their taste for high-fat foods. Contact: Robert D. Reynolds (301)
344-2459.


GOT AN ITEM FOR THE FARM BROADCASTERS LETTER? We like to hear from
you; and to tell others what you're doing. Are there items you'd
like to see more of; others you'd rather not? Tell us. Write or
call: Marci Hilt, USDA Radio-TV, Rm. 410-A, Washington, D.C. 20250.
-(07) 447-644b.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1708 -- Perhaps the most important document you'll
ever write is your will. Brenda Curtis talks with Montgomery County
Maryland Extension Family Life Specialist Ann Elword about the
importance of having a will. She also tells about the impact on a
family when when people die without a will. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1190 -- A hundred years of peanut butter; storing
poisonous materials; your last will & testament; fake fat; home water
conservation. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1697 -- USDA News Highlights; an environmental farm bill;
farm program sign-up; selecting wheat varieties; drought tolerant
cotton. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1309 -- Aging skin & immunity; body composition in
medicine; preservative in nutrient study; manganese absorption;
alcohol consumption study. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., March 20, weekly weather &
crop report, world ag outlook catfish report; Thurs., March 22, U.S.
trade update, poultry production report; Fri., March 23, livestock
update, wool production report, world livestock production report.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
March 1, 1990

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the "America the Beautiful"
project; Mississippi State University's Scott Huffman reports on
soils testing for gardeners; Gary Beaumont, Univ. of Illinois, reports
on new regulations for pesticide & fertilizer dealers; & Lisa Telder
has the story on Michigan State U. research on Michigan wine production.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA Economist Greg Gajewski on farmland values & 1990
food prices; USDA Economist Jerry Stam on Farmer Mac & farm debt;
Lester Crawford, administrator of USDA's Food Safety & Inspection
Service, on food labeling; USDA Economist Larry Van Meir on the feed
situation; USDA Economist LeLand Southard on the livestock & poultry
outlook; USDA Economist Scott Sanford on cotton use & prices; and
USDA Economist Ed Allen on wheat stocks.

AG UPDATE -- With news from USDA's Agricultural Stabilization &
Conservation Service.

NEXT WEEK -- The Caribbean National Forest.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY .. .7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY .10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)





OFFMIKE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 11 l HI1 11U 11 1o
3 1262 08265 130 7
NEW...program called "Women of Agriculture" is a weekly feature
being produced by Rich Hawkins (KRVN, Lexington, Neb.). He
says more voices of farmers on their daily programs are
having a positive response. Rich says a record number of farm
broadcasters were in Phoenix, Ariz., covering the National
Corn Growers Association defeat of a proposed checkoff program.
Dewey Nelson (also at KRVN) says producers face the prospect
of water rationing this summer unless the Colorado mountains
and western Nebraska receive moisture this spring. There
has been no snow cover on the flatlands for several weeks.

CROP...insurance is necessary, just as home or car insurance,
but the program needs adjusting so it is more appealing, says
Robert Brown (WLBK/WDEK, De Kalb, Ill.). Bob says that's what
producers are telling him. Bob also says he hears mixed
comments about flexibility -- the attitude often depending on
the size of a producer's operation.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300


April 1,1990.
Answer the census.


HONEY...production is down 45 percent, says Cindy Zimmerman
(Ind. Florida Agrinet, Ocala). Freezes, drought and mites
have lowered output. Producers have replanted freeze-damaged
tomato acreage, but unless moisture levels are improved, water
rationing is a possibility and could hurt production. Cindy
says most of the state has water rationing programs underway.

FARM...tour of Australia and New Zealand leaves the U.S.
March 16, says Bob Bosold (WAXX, Eau Claire, Wisc.). Forty
producers from the station's area have joined the tour.

NAFB...south central region vice president Curt Lancaster (VSA
Network, San Angelo, Texas) says region's meeting will be held
May 4-5 at South Padre Island, Texas. Charlie Rankin (KURV,
Edin urg, Tex ) will serve as meeting host.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




f-\ "


THIS FIRE ANT is carrying a pupa of a parasitic wasp which may help with bio-
logical control of imported fire ants. Imported fire ants have infested more
than 250 million acres in ten southeastern states & Puerto Rico. The parasites,
Orasema wasps, are able to mimic ant colony odors so they can hatch & eat the
ants, says Robert K. Vander Meer, a USDA chemical ecologist. "This is a fascin-
ating case of chemical mimicry," Vander Meer says. Contact: Robert K. Vander
Meer (904) 374-5918. (USDA Photo.)
BEST BUYS -- A recent USDA study found turkey, ground beef, whole chick-
en, ground chuck & pork shoulder to be the best meat buys. The economy
of a cut depends on the amount of cooked lean meat or the number of
servings it provides, as well as its price per pounds, says James T.
Heimbach, acting administrator of USDA's Human Nutrition Information
Service. "Relatively high-priced meat cuts with little or no waste may
be more economical than low-priced cuts with a great deal of bone,
gristle or fat," he said. Contact: Johna Pierce (301) 436-8617.


6 1 LJ. 4k C-


Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2451 March 9, 1990





- 2 -


UPCOMING FOOD EVENTS -- Were you ready for peanut butter's 100th
birthday? Or did you fumble that event? When it comes to food, it
seems there's always something to celebrate. To help you get ready
for the rest of the year, here's some important food dates you might
want to know:
March 12 18 -- American Chocolate Week
March 12 18 -- Bubble Gum Week
April 16 22 -- Egg Salad Week
May 1 Oct. 31 -- Gazpacho Aficionado Time
All of May -- National Barbecue Month
All of July -- National Baked Bean Month
July 15 -- National Ice Cream Day
Aug. 15 -- National Mustard Day
Sept. 28 Oct. 14 -- National Pickled Pepper Week
All of October -- National Popcorn Poppin' Month
Nov. 1 7 -- National Fig Week
Nov. 6 12 -- National Split Pea.Soup Week.

BERLIN WALL'S EFFECT -- One of the effects of the Berlin Wall coming
down, are marketing opportunities for high-value sales to East Germany
(German Democratic Republic). Some items at the top of East Germany's
shopping list are: fresh fruits & vegetables, citrus fruits & juices,
candies, condiments, wines & spirits. East Germany's agriculture
could lag behind industry in restructuring, leaving East Germany in
need of greater imports of food. Source: March 1990 Ag Exporter.
For a copy, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.

DO FARMERS WANT FLEXIBILITY? While some groups suggest there is too
much planting flexibility in the Bush Administration's 1990 Farm Bill
proposals, Sec. Clayton Yeutter says: "When you turn to farmers and
say, 'Would you or would you not like more flexibility,' I think 99
percent would say, 'Yeah, I'd like some.' I hope farmers speak up
when we look at that issue." Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

d Your census answers can help your community
n make important decisions about needed services.
Standup and be counted. Answer the census. It's good for all of us.


I
AI


CENSUS '90



April 1, 1990.

Answer the census.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1709 -- Maria Bynum reports on the latest splash in
the aquaculture business: tilapia. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min.
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1191 -- Kids & the microwave; a neighborhood reborn;
food irradiation; an automated food stamp program; measuring
lean beef. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1698 -- USDA News Highlights; a 0/25 program
for soybeans; payments on the way for 1989 crop sorghum & corn;
once-a-day feeding for cows; the EC's tree nut program. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1310 -- Ethnic body composition; alcohol & HDL
cholesterol; zinc from beef; citrus antibody test; armyworm
parasite. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., March 14, fruit outlook; Thurs.,
March 15, sugar outlook, milk production; Fri., March 16, cattle
on feed; Mon., March 19, U.S. ag outlook; Tues., March 20, world
ag outlook, catfish production, crop/weather update; Thurs.,
March 22, U.S. trade update, poultry production; Fri., March 23,
livestock update, wool production.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
March 5, 1990

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the seven dietary guidelines for
Americans; Lynn Wyvill profiles the Caribbean National Forest, a
tropical forest in USDA's Forest Service system.

ACTUALITIES -- Lester Crawford, administrator of USDA's Food Safety &
Inspection Service, on new labeling laws for flavorings & food
irradiation; Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with the
latest U.S. water outlook; Steve McDonald, USDA economist, with
the latest U.S. farm export outlook; LeLand Southard, USDA
economist, with a livestock outlook; Myron Johnsrud, administrator
of USDA's Extension Service, and Janet Poley, Extension Service,
on a recent USDA mission to Poland (with B-roll). Also: B-roll
of the first litter of Chinese pigs born in the U.S., at Clay
Center, Neb.

UPCOMING -- Deboria Janifer reports on USDA's "Eating Right" campaign;
Pat O'Leary on the top-ranked ag states; Will Pemble on rust-resistant
beans.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY .. .10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE 1111111111
3 1262 08265 135 6
FLEXIBILITY...may be a future option for producers, but Michael
Adams (WLDS, Jacksonville, Ill.) doesn't expect any major planting
intention shifts in his area. He says market prices will likely
have the largest influence on planting decisions. New equipment
sales are increasing. Mike says its no boom but going in the
right direction. He says last February was the second wettest on
record, helping to reduce the number of cattle producers hauling
water.

MORE...than our fair share is how Allen Aldridge (Kentucky Agrinet,
Louisville) describes the state's moisture situation -- but says
it is not as wet as last spring. He says prices for used farm
equipment remain high, with most producers repairing rather than
buying new. Allen predicts an increase in soybean acreage, largely
to help producers get rid of Johnson grass. He expects more acres
planted to wheat, and fewer to canola due to fungus problems and
low prices experienced last year.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300


CENSUS '90



April 1,199d

Answer the


CONGRATULATIONS...to Dix Harper (WRAL-TV/Tobacco Radio Net,
Raleigh, N.C.). The National Pork Producers Council presented Dix
with their Distinguished Service Award at their Forum meeting in
Louisville, Ky.

AGRICULTURE...week is March 18-24. National Agriculture Day is
March 20. Is your station involved?

NATIONAL...Consumers Week is April 22-29. It provides an
opportunity to cover from several perspectives issues such as
nutrition, labeling, food irradiation and the environment.

THANKS...to Col. Dink Embry (WHOP, Hopkinsville, Ky.) for having
Gov. Wallace Wilkinson recognize the value of farm broadcasting
to the state and extend the honor of Kentucky Colonel to yours
truly1


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division


* *




A1(.3L / a45p-



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2452 March 16, 1990

ALFALFA JUICE PROTEIN is being used to feed malnourished children
in Mexico. And, it could have tremendous potential elsewhere, says
Richard G. Koegel, a USDA ag engineer. An armful of alfalfa
supplies about a tablespoon of the juice concentrate, which is used
in a variety of foods such as beans, pasta and lemonade. This
research is an unexpected spinoff of studies to boost nutrition for
U.S. milk cows. Contact: Richard G. Koegel (608) 264-5149.

TREE PLANTATIONS -- While tree plantations can provide a multitude
of benefits, they also require careful planning, planting & maintenance.
University of Wisconsin-Madison Forestry Outreach Specialist Leigh
Klein has a new three-part series of publications that outlines the
steps to consider in establishing & maintaining a tree plantation. A
plantation begins long before & continues long after the trees are
planted, Klein says. Contact: Jeff Martin (608) 262-0134.

FOLTZ NOMINATED -- President George Bush has announced his intention
to nomimate John C. Foltz as administrator of the Federal Grain
Inspection Service. Foltz would succeed W. Kirk Miller. Foltz has
been executive director of the Ohio Grain & Feed Association,
Worthington, Ohio, since 1979.

CD-ROM TO FARMERS -- USDA has its first CD-ROM -- compact disk-
read only memory -- ready to speed information to farmers. USDA's
Extension Service has 16,000 workers at over 3,000 locations in the
U.S. giving technical information to farmers and consumers millions
of times a years, says Myron Johnsrud, administrator of the Extension
Service. "This disk can cut our response time significantly and
has the potential to help us serve taxpayers more efficiently."
Contact: Thomas Tate (202) 447-8155.

CORN CONFERENCE -- The National Corn Growers Association will hold
their third Corn Utilization Conference June 20 & 21 in St. Louis,
Mo. Contact: Ann Beirne (314) 275-9915

HONEY BEES READY FOR STUDY -- Honey bees bred in Yugoslavia for
resistance to Varroa mites are now out of quarantine and ready for
study at a USDA lab in Baton Rouge, La. USDA Geneticist Thomas E.
Rinderer says the lab will study the bees to see how they resist mite
attack, in hopes of learning how to check a colony for resistance &
then breed for it. Contact: Thomas E. Rinderer (504) 766-6064.






- 2 -


NEW ARBORETUM BOOK -- Hot off the press! "The National Arboretum
Book of Outstanding Garden Plants" groups the eight major plant
categories into 106 plant finder lists, according to their use and
place in the landscape. "Fragrant Flowers," Covers for Shade" and
"Trees for City" are typical list titles. Jacqueline Heriteau wrote
the book with H. Marc Cathey, director of USDA's National Arboretum,
and the staff & consultants of the National Arboretum. The book,
which has more than 450 color photos, was published by Simon &
Schuster/The Stonesong Press and sells for $39.95. Contact: Joann
Di Gennaro (212) 698-7533.


PABA HELPS SCIENTISTS -- The popular sunscreen PABA is helping
scientists who are studying diet & weight problems monitor the calorie
consumption of research volunteers. Volunteers in diet studies often
have difficulty overeating day after day. But, the scientists found
if they add PABA, which is harmless when eaten, to food, 99 percent
of its components will appear in the urine within 8 hours. Thus, if
less than 93 percent of the components are recovered, it means the
volunteer did not eat all food or collect all the urine. Thus far,
the PABA test has disqualified 3 of 26 volunteers in one study.
Contact: Susan Roberts/Frank D. Morrow (617) 556-3227/3166.



















REGIONAL CONFERENCES -- USDA TV's
Deboria Janifer was mistress of
ceremonies for the USDA Regional
Conference for Women in Kansas
City, Mo. She also moderated
two panels of women in non-tra-
ditional jobs at USDA. Conference
attendees compared Janifer to a
popular talk show host for her
lively audience participation
while moderating sessions. (USDA
Photo.)






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1710 -- Brenda Curtis talks with Montgomery Co.,
Md., Nutrition Expert Gloria King about using USDA's recommended
dietary guidelines as a practical guide to healthy eating habits.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1192 -- The bees are coming; preventing Lyme disease;
safe microwave cooking; fast food menus; crawfish for dinner.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1699 -- USDA News Highlights; do your farm bill shopping
early; single calf heifer system; crawfish production; world food
donations. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1311 -- Alcohol & older livers; fish oil caution;
cross-protected citrus; fighting the fall armyworm; tracking the
corn earworm. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., March 19, ag outlook; Tues.,
March 20, world ag outlook, catfish, crop/weather update; Thurs.,
March 22, U.S. trade update, poultry production; Fri., March 23,
livestock update, wool production, world livestock production;
Tues., March 27, crop/weather update; Wed., March 28, aquaculture
outlook; Thurs., March 29, ag prices, world tobacco outlook.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(March 15, 17 & 19)

FEATURES -- Deboria Janifer reports on USDA's "Eating Right Campaign;"
Will Pemble takes a look at rust-resistent beans; Joe Courson,
with the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service,
describes spring "pain" season.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter speaks before
the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture
on 1990 farm bill issues; USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen
on weather & crop conditions; Leslie Meyer on U.S. cotton use;
Leland Southard on hog production.

AG UPDATE -- Eric Parsons examines the zero-25 provisions with
ASCS Specialist Orville Overboe & Kathleen Katras takes a look
at corn & sorghum deficiency payments with ASCS Specialist
Phillip Scronce.

NEXT WEEK -- Pat O'Leary reports on new farm products & Deboria Janifer
takes a look at Chilean fruit imports.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY .. .10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
-4
OFFMIKE 32651257

HIGHEST PRICES...in memory for Idaho potatoes, says Bob
Burtenshaw (KID, Idaho Falls). Prices reflect the supply
and demand situation. Many regions had a short crop, but
growers in his area had excellent production. Recent series
of storms have supplied needed rain and put snow on mountain
tops, but, Bob says, they need even more.

PRODUCERS...are expressing optimism -- a real shift of attitude,
says Steve Bugbee (KXXX/KQLS, Colby, Kan.). Recent snow and
rain storms have greenedd" winter wheat and created positive
conditions for spring planting. The 30-day outlook calls
for above average wetness. No pest infestations yet.

THANKS...to Wade Wagner (KGAN-TV, Cedar Rapids, Iowa) for sharing
with USDA-TV footage shot during recent trips to Poland and
USSR. We appreciate the opportunity to use it in TV features.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300




: APR 1b 1990 m






ICE STORM...dropped trees and power lines; and some producers
were without electricity for four days, says Marla Behrends
(WKAN, Kankakee, Ill.). She says low prices will likely be
the driving force in a shift from soybeans to corn in her
region. Congratulations to Marla and Art Sechrest (WJBC,
Bloomington). The Illinois Corn Growers presented each with
Distinguished Service Award in Electronic Media. Marla
recently completed her tenth year at WKAN.

HYDRILLA...an aquatic weed, is affecting western waterways,
reports George Gatley (Western Agri-radio Networks, Yuma,
Ariz.). George says Arizona producers keep hoping for more
rain, and asked that USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen
wave the ma gic wand.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




(4 1, 3qJ : 31 LI53



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2453 March 23, 1990


SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE CLAYTON YEUTTER and Mrs. Jeanne Yeutter cut
the National Agriculture Day cake at ceremonies at USDA March 20. Sec.
Yeutter said American farmers have increased their productivity about
one-fourth in the last ten years; a rate which is twice that of the
non-farm sector. This marks the 15th year we've celebrated National
Agriculture Day on the first day of Spring. (USDA Photo by Bob
Nichols.)


FIELD TEST OF VIRUS -- A new way to use a naturally occurring insect
virus to control two of cotton's major pests will be field tested
next month near Leland, Miss. "If we succeed, farmers could have a
new way to cut back on chemicals needed to control these insects
while better protecting the environment," says USDA"s D.D. Hardee.
The test will begin the week of April 15. Contact: D.D. Hardee
(601) 686-2311.








- 2 -


USDA RADIO gets its news right from
the horse's mouth. (left to right)
Ken Dalecki, editor, Kiplinger Flor-
ido Letter; Cindy Zimmerman, WTMC
Radio/Florida Agrinet; and Brenda
Curtis, deputy chief, USDA R-TV, on
a visit to Red Oak Thoroughbred
Horse Farm, Ocala, Fla.



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION -- The 1890 Land-Grant colleges & universities
will celebrate their centennial April 18 20 at the Washington
Hilton Hotel, the Smithsonian Institution, USDA and the White House
in Washington, D.C. Contact: Bobby R. Phills (504) 771-3660.


USDA TO CHANGE ESTIMATING PROGRAM -- USDA's National Agricultural
Statistics Service will alter its estimating program in response to data
user's requests, says Charles Caudill, administrator of the agency.
Caudill said a new acreage report will be issued June 28, (rather
than in the July Crop Production report) which will include planted
acres & area to be harvested for most field crops. Also, Caudill
said, effective March 30, the grain stocks report will have estimates
for oats & grain sorghum stocks in each quarterly issue. Contact:
Kent Miller (202) 786-1494.




GARY STEWART, with the Northwest Ag
News Network, Newberg, Ore., stopped
by USDA R-TV Chief Vic Powell's -
office during a recent visit to
Washington, D.C. Stewart covered
National Ag Day activities, inter-
viewed several D.C.-based organiza-
tions, scientists at the National
Research Council about alternative
ag and USDA's R.D. Plowman, adminis-
trator of USDA's Ag Research Ser- 4
vice. He also met with Members of
Congress. (USDA Photo by Bob
Nichols.)








3 -

FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE USA #1711 -- Brenda Curtis travels to central Florida
to get a first-hand look at the damage to the citrus groves
from the Christmas freeze. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min.
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1193 -- Sandwich ascendancy; adding fiber to your
diet; child custody; reaping the benefits of research; eating
ethnic. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1700 -- USDA news highlights; farm program options; crop
price predictions; alfalfa research; ambersweet. (Weekly reel
of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1312 -- Preventing Salmonella; lost flies
rediscovered; Eskimos arriving; peanut fed cattle; lasers &
acid rain. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., March 30, prospective
plantings, grain/rice stocks; hogs & pigs report, world cocoa
situation; Mon., April 2, tobacco outlook; Tues., April 3,
weekly weather & crop outlook; Fri., April 6, dairy products
report.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
March 22, 1990


FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on farm products of the future;
Lisa Telder of Michigan State University reports on minimum
wage and the farmer; Gary Beaumont of the University of Illinois
reports on saving on herbicide costs; Joe Courson from the
University of Georgia on anglers biting on false info.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter's remarks on
National Agriculture Day; USDA Economist Greg Gajewski on the
ag outlook; USDA Economist Kate Buckley on fruit production;
and USDA Economist Peter Buzzanell on sugar.

NEXT WEEK -- U.S. imports of Chilean fruit.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ..... 7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY .... .10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFFMIKE -4 I u '

WHEAT...is a hardy plant. Give it a drink of water wnen its
thirsty and you can see it grow, says Rex Childs (KFDI, Wichita,
Kan.). Recent storms in the midwest and warm temperatures have
wheat producers smiling in his area. Rex also says their station's
coverage at the state Beef Expo found production improved, the
market higher and beef producers with a positive outlook.

SERIES...of news stories and public service announcements are
being shot by WTHI-TV, Terre Haute, Ind., about actions being
taken by producers to protect soil and water. Matt Fleck,
WTHI-TV farm director serves as spokesman. Al Dowbnia at the
station says Sullivan County Soil and Water Conservation District
representatives approached the station with the idea. The spots
will air this spring and summer.

RECUPERATING...at home is Al Carstens (KATE, Albert Lea, Minn.)
after successful triple-bypass surgery. Linda Brekke is
filling in for Al until his scheduled return in late April.


arBroadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300:
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300 -'
APR 25 i









SOUTHEASTERN...section of South Dakota received less than an
inch of moisture from recent storms. Much more is needed to
benefit subsoil, says Vivian Cooper (WNAX, Yankton, S.D.). Gene
Williams at the station says those producers who have feeder
cattle are moving them to market while prices are good.

THANKS...to Brad Lemmond (KAIT-TV, Jonesboro, Ark.) for the
feedback about his use of our news and feature service. We
appreciate knowing how broadcast editors use the material.

ALSO...nice call from Ron Davenport (KBIM-TV, Roswell, N.M.)
about his weekly use of the TV service.

FIELD...work is underway in many regions of the country. That
also means injury season is upon us. Lets all put farm safety
to se an lower t injury rate this year.

VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Lette l sO



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington
Letter No. 2454 0i

THE IMPORTANCE OF HONEYBEES -- When we think of bees, we shouldn't just
think of honey & stings, says James Tew, national program leader for
apiculture of USDA's Extension Service. Tew says we need to remember
how bees pollinate our crops, which directly affects agriculture.
Plants pollinated by honeybees include: apples, almonds, blueberries,
cranberries, cantaloupes, melons, cucumbers, alfalfa, clover, wild
fruits and berries. No other insect pollinates such a wide range
of plants, Tew says. Each year, honeybees produce about 250 million
pounds of honey -- worth about $200 million -- as a byproduct of
pollination. Contact: James Tew (216) 264-3911.

YEUTTER SWEARS IN TWO -- Sec. Clayton Yeutter has sworn in La Verne
Ausman as the 14th administrator of USDA's Farmers Home Administration
and Gary Byrne as the 11th administrator of USDA's Rural Electrification
Administration.

-- Ausman will oversee policy development & management of all FmHA
operations, which provide a wide range of credit & development assistance
to farmers & rural communities. He served as deputy undersecretary
of agriculture for small community and rural development from April
1987 to April 1989. He first joined USDA in 1986 as director of
intergovernmental affairs. He was Wisconsin secretary of agriculture,
trade & consumer protection from 1981 to 1986.
-- Byrne will oversee management of the $37 billion REA portfolio
of loans to rural electric cooperatives. He was chairman of the Bank
of Alex Brown, Sacramento, Calif., from 1985 to 1989 and president and
CEO of that bank from 1987 to 1989. He also served as chairman
or director of several other California financial institutions.
Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.

WESTERN WATER SUPPLY -- The water supply outlook is average or better
in much of the Northwest, but below average almost everywhere else in
the West, says Manly Wilder, associate chief of USDA's Soil
Conservation Service. The most dramatic changes during February took
place in Washington, southeast British Columbia and northwestern
Oregon, where well-below- and below-average snowpacks improved to
near- and above-average snowpacks. "We could have used more moisture
in the form of snow for the coming growing season," says Wilder.
"But, farmers and ranchers need to be prepared as best they can to
deal with expected shortages." Contact: Diana Morse (202) 447-4772.





- 2 -


FOOD AID PROGRAM -- Sec. Yeutter has sent Congress the Bush Admin-
istration's 1990 farm bill proposal for food aid to needy countries.
Yeutter says three food aid programs are most likely to be considered
during the farm bill debate -- Food for Peace (or P.L. 480), Food
for Progress and "Section 416(b)." "The United States has a long
history of generous food aid and we intend to have that tradition
continue," Yeutter said. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.
For a copy of the proposal publication: "199 Food Aid Legislation."
call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.


WIND EROSION DAMAGE SETS RECORD -- Wind erosion has damaged nearly 5
million acres in the Great Plains since November 1989 -- the second
highest figure on record for this time of year, says Manly Wilder,
associate chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service. "We're seeing
the continued effects of several years of drought," Wilder says.
The greatest damage was in North Dakota. Only in the 1954-55 season
was land damage higher for the Great Plains for this period, Wilder
said. Contact: Diana Morse (202) 447-4772.


NEW VIDEO ON AG -- USDA TV's Pat O'Leary has produced and directed a
new 14-minute video -- "America's Most Crucial Industry" -- which de-
tails agriculture's contributions to the U.S. "Agriculture has pro-
vided the foundation for the development of commerce in the U.S.,"says
Paul E. Kindinger, USDA's director of public affairs. USDA R-TV Chief
Vic Powell wrote the video. "America's Most Crucial Industry" is
available on 1/2-inch VHS tape for $12.00 from: Video Transfer, 5709-B
Arundel Ave., Rockville, Md. 20852; phone: (301) 881-0270. Media
review copies are available from: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. (USDA
Photo by Bob Nichols.)





- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1712 -- Gary Crawford talks with people who are
finding new uses for farm products. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2
min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1194 -- The canned meat controversy, proper handling
of poultry, extension workers in urban areas, seafood inspection,
restaurants & your diet. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min.
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1701 -- USDA News Highlights, new tentative
USSR/US grain agreement analyzed, poultry litter, a potato
pest, new orange variety. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1313 -- A preemptive strike on bollworms, safe
insecticide, infection & weight loss, salmonella & the educated
consumer, pond algae as fertilizer. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., April 6, dairy products; Mon.,
April 9, vegetable production; Tues., April 10, U.S. crop
production, world ag supply/demand, crop/weather update; Wed.,
April 11, world coton situation, world oilseed situation,
world grain/crop production, horticultural exports; Mon.,
April 16, milk production.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EST each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
March 26, 1990

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the top states for farm exports.

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with the
latest U.S. weather outlook; Ron Gustafson, USDA economist, with
the latest U.S. livestock situation & outlook; USDA Economist
Peter Buzanell, on sugar & sweeteners; USDA Economist Shannon
Hamm, on vegetables & specialties; excerpts of a speech by
MTss America for 1990 Debbye Turner (who is also a veterinary
medicine student) at USDA (with B-roll).

NEXT WEEK -- Deboria Janifer reports on U.S. imports of Chilean fruit;
Lynn Wyvill reports on Easter egg safety.

AGRICULTURE UPDATE -- Farm programs signup deadline, soil moisture &
30-day weather outlook, ASCS news.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EST, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 10D
MONDAY .... 8:30-9:15 a.m., EST, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 1 4 -
312620826 1158
HOT ISSUE...in Minnesota is whether BST should be used by milk
producers, says Cliff Mitchell (KASM, Albany). Cliff broadcast
several stories covering producers' request that the state
legislature issue a one-year moratorium on BST use. He says
Wisconsin's legislative action against BST gave a boost to
those in Minnesota opposing it.

GOOD RAINS...have producers dancing, says Mike Buchanan (KBIZ,
Ottumwa, Iowa). There has been sufficient rainfall to remove
his region from drought conditions, but, he says, just 30 miles
to the south conditions remain dry. Largest concern this
spring is ground water contamination. Recent reports issued
by the state indicate well-water contamination from ag
chemicals, but there are calls for a second look. Mike says
one report cites surface water findings that were taken last
May shortly after field application, but that year-long
studies show much lower levels.



Farm Broadcasters Letter
4 hqM W-.. WN9 ow
Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












PLANTING...will get underway late April in the region served
by Lynn Watts (KMZU/KAOL, Carrollton, Mo.). She says spring
moisture has been adequate and that producer interest in new
equipment is much greater than at this time last year. Lynn,
assistant farm director at the stations, was promoted when
former director Miles Carter moved to WIBW, Topeka, Kans.

PRODUCERS...are ready to get into fields but the weather can't
decide the season, says Darren Johnson (WKFI, Wilmington, Ohio).
Snow on daffodils has everything confused. He says strong
sales in parts indicates producers are continuing to delay new
equipment purchases. Darren says it's the time of year when
the green bean circuit slows and the FFA banquet season begins
honoring t best thing grown in America -- our children.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division





/t 1 /, 3^^5 Wl 5 i5


Farm Broadcasters Letter "^'MAY 8 19



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250> 30
Letter No. 2455 April 6, 1990

EARTH DAY CELEBRATION -- USDA will hold a special Earth Day celebration
and open house Saturday, April 21 in Washington, D.C., in the new
office of USDA's Forest Service. The offices are in the renovated,
historic Auditor's Building at 14th & Independence Ave., S.W. Visitors
will be able to hear three master storytellers -- Judith Black of
Marblehead, Mass.; Jackson Gillman of Portland Maine; and John Spelman
of Washington, D.C. -- present eight performances featuring environmental
themes. They'll also get to meet Smokey Bear & Woodsy Owl. Contact:
Sharon Prell (202) 382-0414.

NATIONAL CONSUMERS WEEK will be April 22 to 28 this year. In honor
of the occasion, the Office of the Special Adviser to the President
for Consumer Affairs in cooperation with USDA has issued a Consumer's
Resource Handbook. The handbook is chock-full of tips on how to be
a smart consumer -- how to get the most for your money & avoid consumer
problems -- and who to contact when you have a problem. For a copy
of the Consumer's Resource Handbook, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.

THINK TWICE BEFORE LETTING CHILDREN do farm work, says Elston Grubaugh,
an extension ag engineer at New Mexico State University. "Farming is
not for the lazy and certainly not for children," he says. "Farming
is among the few industries where youngsters under 16 are seriously,
sometimes fatally, injured in significant numbers." Contact: Elston
Grubaugh (505) 646-2021.

THIRSTY CATTLE -- USDA has waived some import restrictions so cattle
from sections of Mexico with severe drought can be temporarily imported
to the U.S. so they won't starve. "The drought-stricken pasturelands
in parts of Mexico cannot support the cattle," says James W. Glosser,
administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service.
"By bringing the animals temporarily to U.S. quarantined feedlots
under strict movement restrictions, we can avert starvation of the
animals and still protect the health of U.S. livestock." Contact:
Anita Brown (301) 436-5931.

ADAMS NAMED -- Lester M. Crawford, administrator of USDA's Food Safety
& Inspection Service, has appointed Catherine E. Adams to the recently-
established position of assistant administrator of the agency. Adams
will direct agency efforts to harmonize food safety standards &
policies of USDA, the Food & Drug Administration, the Environmental
Protection Agency and international food safety advisory bodies.
Contact: Jim Greene (202) 382-0314.







- 2 -


BLUE CORN -- Blue corn is becoming a unique candidate for low-input
Southwest agriculture, says George Dickerson, an extension horticulturist
with New Mexico State University. The blue corn development program
began in 1983. New Mexico blue corn acreage jumped from 860 acres in
1986 to 2,550 acres in 1989. The increased acreage can probably be
attributed to increased demand, Dickerson says. "Besides the traditional
blue corn tortilla, processors have introduced many new products
including blue corn chips, muffins and pancake mixes, and even corn
flakes," he says. Contact: George Dickerson (505) 275-2576.


What a dollar spent on food paid for in 1989
About half of the marketing bill pays labor costs. e 01

S/


f.f^ ^ y" 8M '*fi '* *.:::::: :::: i .. .i:: ::.::.:: :: i:::::

.E ::::2 5 09 0 9



24. 35' 8.5C 4.5' 4.5e 4.5 3.5. 2.5 2.5. 2.5e- 1.5 65







Farm Value Marketing Bill
Includes food eaten at home and away from home. Other costs include property taxes and insurance, accounting and professional services, promotion,
bad debts, and many miscellaneous it s.

ade. Food prices in 1989 averaged 5.8 percent above those in 1988.
The 1989 price increase ws the largest sie 1981 and was due, in













part, to the lingering effects of the 1988 drought. This graphic
coes from a new USDA booklet: Food Costs ... From Farm to Retail
240 35c 8.5c 4.5c 4.5 4.5c 3.5c 2.5c 2.5c 2.50 1.5o 6.5c


Farm Value Marketing Bill

Includes food eaten at home and away from home. Other costs include property taxes and insurance, accounting and professional services, promotion,
bad debts, and many miscellaneous items.

FOOD COSTS -- Now you know where your food dollar is going. Retail
food prices rose more last year than in mcst other yearsin the dec-
ade. Food prices in 1989 averaged 5.8 percent above those in 1988.
The 1989 price increase was the largest since 1981 and was due, in
part, to the lingering effects of the 1988 drought. This graphic
comes from a new USDA booklet: Food Costs ... From Farm to Retail
in 1989. For more information, call: Denis Dunham (202) 786-1870.
For a copy of the booklet, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.



COPPER DEFICIENCY & ALCOHOLISM -- Too little copper in the diet &
too much alcohol may cause damaged heart muscles & other internal
ravages of alcoholism, says USDA Biochemist Meira Fields. Fields
says the results of rat studies indicate it takes both dietary factors
to produce damaged heart muscle, anemia, fatty liver & elevated levels
of several toxic metabolites -- all classic effects of alcoholism.
Contact: Meira Fields (301) 344-2417.







- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1713 -- Dave Carter talks with USDA experts & farmers
about the impact of the 1985 farm bill on this year's
farm bill. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1195 -- Hurricane Hugo cleanup continues; dining out &
nutrition; menu changes; community tree planting;
4-H observations of a changing world. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1702 -- USDA news highlights; planting intentions; industrial
uses for crops; environmental issues & the farm bill;
water quality projects. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1314 -- Mite-resistant bees; human benefits from
alfalfa; mass rearing wasps; fungicide virus combination;
farming with lasers. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., April 16, milk production;
Tues., April 17, crop/weather update, Wed., April 18,
ag outlook; Thurs., April 19, dairy outlook; Fri.,
April 20, livestock update, ag resources, cattle on
feed, livestock slaughter; Mon., April 23, rice outlook,
U.S. trade update, catfish.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(April 5, 7 & 9)

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on Chilean fruit imports; Lynn
Wyvill takes a look at Easter egg safety; Chris Larson
examines the Hurricane Hugo cleanup.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter on planting
intentions for farmers; Norton Strommen on weather &
crop conditions; David Harvey on aquaculture; Peter
Buzzanell on sugars & sweeteners; Verner Grise on
tobacco.

NEXT WEEK -- Pat O'Leary reports on farming with LISA; Lynn Wyvill
takes a look at global warming; and Will Pemble
examines producing leaner lamb.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY .... 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY .. .10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




4 -
OFFMIKE

NAFB PRESIDENT...Lynn Ketelsen (Linder Farm Network, Willmar,
Minn.) and Ed Slusarczyk (Ag Radio Network, Utica, N.Y.),
chairman of the NAFB tour committee, have returned from a one-
week tour of Poland. They met government officials, visited
farms and toured port facilities in preparation for NAFB
sponsored trips June 26-July 5 and later this year. The trips
should prove to be eye-openers for all who join the tour.

TOO MUCH RAIN...is holding up field work in Mississippi. John
Winfield (Mississippi Network, Jackson) says cotton planting
is just around the corner. Increased cotton acreage is expected
in the state, with soybeans about the same as last year. John
says dampness has allowed rust to develop in some winter
wheat, but it is not widespread yet.

STOPPING...by the office this week was Mike Rogers (Michigan
Farm Bureau, Lansing). He provided welcomed feedback regarding
his use of our radio and TV service.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Farm Broadcasters Letter 111III

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington. D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












OATS...are in the ground in some sections of Wisconsin, and
alfalfa planting is underway says John Zimmerman (Wisconsin
Farm Broadcasting Network, Madison). Topsoil moisture is
sufficient for planting but timely rains will be needed to
produce a crop. John says new machinery is moving off dealer
lots, especially small-ticket items. Used equipment that is
in good shape continues to command top prices.

OUR THANKS...to Sherry Newell (WJON/WWJO, St. Cloud, Minn.).
She provided USDA radio with an audiotape feed of Sec. Clayton
Yeutter's speech to the Minneapolis meeting of Associated Milk
Producers. We credited Sherry and her station, and with her
permission used it on USDA's daily Newsline. Another example of
onr farm Voadcast helping others across the country.


VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330

Letter No. 2456 April 13, 1990

USDA TO TACKLE SHUTTLE WASP PROBLEM -- The shuttle launch pads at the
Kennedy Space Center have become a lover's lane for wasps, who fly to
the tops o# the launch pads to mate & overwinter. National Aeronautics
& Space Administration officials, concerned for employee safety & the
sensitive shuttle equipment, have turned to USDA Entomologist Peter
J. Landolt to find a less drastic means of control than a shuttle
lift-off. Developing a wasp trap.& lure will take several years of
research. "We want to develop a bait-trap system that will keep the
wasps off the shuttle," Landolt says. When Landolt completes the
system, he's got other customers waiting in the wings -- Disney World
& two tourist towers in Florida -- who also have wasp problems.
Contact: John Svinski (904) 374-5771.

FIRST GROUNDWATER POLLUTION PROJECT -- The Midwest Corn Belt will be
the first testing area for USDA's new program to protect groundwater
from contamination by fertilizers & pesticides. Secretary of
Agriculture Clayton Yeutter says a scientific panel recommended
funding five projects that include various combinations of climate,
soils & aquifers. The work will be done on farm land overlying
acquifers in: Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North
Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio & Wisconsin. Research is scheduled to
begin this summer. Contact: C. Richard Amerman (301) 344-3059.

GROWING POPCORN IN THE HOME GARDEN is easy & fun, says Louisiana
Cooperative Extension Service Horticulturist Tom Koske. Popcorn is a
long-season crop grown in about four months, just like sweet corn.
Koske has other tips for popcorn culture. Contact: Thomas Koske
(504) 388-4141.

LONGER LASTING FRUITS & VEGGIES -- A USDA chemist has developed an
edible, inexpensive film that is easy to apply to fresh fruit &
vegetables to retard ripening. "The coating extends the shelf life
of produce without harming quality," says USDA Chemist Myrna Nisperos-
Carriedo. The coating is made from oils or waxes & cellulose. After
14 days of storage, only 40 percent of tomatoes treated with the film
began ripening, compared to nearly 100 percent of untreated tomi _
she said. Contact: Myrna 0. Nisperos-Carriedo (813) 293-41 00






- 2 -


USDA INCREASES GRADING FEES -- Beginning May 1, USDA will increase
fees for certain grading & inspection of eggs, poultry & rabbits.
"Increases in the salaries and fringe benefits of federal employees
and of federally-licensed state employees providing the services
justify raising the fees," says Daniel D. Haley, administrator of
USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service. Contact: Clarence Steinberg
(202) 447-6179.


NEW DIRECTORY -- Just out -- the "1990 Directory of Public Information
Contacts, Washington, D.C." It has phone numbers and addresses of
all federal agencies. Free copies are available to members of the
press, government public affairs offices and others in public affairs
and public relations. Request copies on letterhead from: Martin
Marietta Corp., Attn: Public Relations, 6801 Rockledge Dr., Bethesda,
Md. 20817.


VITAMIN C & COPPER -- Vitamin C & adequate supplies of copper may
have the potential to fight some cancers in the human ,body, says Ed
Harris, professor of biochemistry with the Texas Ag Experiment Station
& Texas A&M Univ. Harris, who has spent years studying the function
of trace minerals in mammals, says there is considerable interest in
the interaction of vitamin C & cancer cells. The vitamin seems to
hinder the growth of two types of cancer, he says. Contact: Ag
Communications (40.9) 845-2516.


PORK PLATE APPEAL -- Japan's growing appetite for processed pork
products can help U.S. exporters bring home the bacon, says the April
issue of AgExporter magazine. The Japanese market for processed pork
products was estimated at more than 582,000 metric tons in 1988 -- a
22 percent increase over 1983. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202)
382-9442.





RON HENDREN, WTAD, Quincy, Ill.,
(left) and Jim Coyle, KREN, Mob-
erly, Mo., (right) accompanied
70 members of the Missouri Farm
Bureau during a recent legisla-
tive visit to the Nation's Cap-
ital. USDA Radio Chief Vic
Powell gave the two farm broad-
casters a tour of USDA broadcast
facilities.


100 YEARS OF OKLAHOMA AG -- Oklahoma State University has produced a
16-minute VHS videotape, "100 Years of Oklahoma Agriculture," that
covers the beginning of ag in Oklahoma to modern times. Copies are
available for $30 each from: Educational Materials Group, Ag
Communications, OSU, Stillwater, Okla. 74078. Contact: Gene Allen
405) 744-3625.





- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1714 -- Adequate health care is hard to find in many
rural areas. On this edition of AGRICULTURE USA,
Brenda Curtis travels to a small western New York
village where a community rallied to save its local
hospital. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1196 -- Diminishing rural health care; poultry picks
up popularity; solar cooking; writing a legal will;
cleaning up chemical contamination. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1703 -- USDA News Highlights; 1985 Farm Bill was a success;
pesticide & fuel cleanup; bug suckers; diminishing
rural health care. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1315 -- Varroa mite control; unsuspected salmonella
source; fly attacks corn earworm; allelopathic rice;
high protein plant extract. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., April 23, rice outlook, U.S.
trade update, catfish; Tues., April 24, weekly weather &
crop update; Wed., April 25, poultry production; Thurs.,
April 26, oil crops outlook, world tobacco situation.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
April 12, 1990

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on an Earth Day technology fair;
Lynn Wyvill reports on a Forest Sevice research project
on global change; Will Pemble reports on ag research to
produce leaner lamb; Lisa Telder reports on Michigan
State University's biomechanics evaluation lab; and
Gary Beaumont has a story on increasing sheep numbers
in the Midwest.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA Assistant Secretary Catherine Bertini on the minimum
wage & food stamps; Norton Strommen with a weather update;
& USDA World Board Chairman Jim Donald on corn & soybean
demand & 1990 meat production.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Farming with LISA; preventing foodborne illness;
credit card privacy; Georgia chicken wings.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY .... .7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY ..... 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY ...... 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 2 1059

GOOD CROP...and good prices produce a positive attitude, says
Cyndi Young (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City). Ground moisture
situation is in good shape, and recent freezing temperatures
did not produce widespread damage of the wheat crop. Cyndi
says cattle prices are up, feed lots are current, and the
outlook is good this spring.

AG OLYMPICS...planning is underway, says Don Wick (KWOA,
Worthington, Minn.). Second annual one-day event on May 6 is
held for members of FFA chapters in the tri-state region of
Minnesota, Iowa and South Dakota. KWOA conducts an ag knowledge
bowl and outdoor events. A traveling trophy is awarded to best
chapter, as well as plaques and T-shirts to individual and
team winners. Don says improved moisture conditions are allow-
ing producers to plant small grains, but soil temperatures need
to increase to plant corn. That's expected later this month.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












CONGRATULATIONS...to Mike Wiles (KTTS, Springfield, Mo.).
Mid-America Dairymen presented Mike its Salute Award, honoring
his outstanding contributions to agricultural communication.
Also, this year is Mike's 10th anniversary as farm director at
the station. Thanks to Forrest Bradley of Mid-AM for telling us.

AG COMMITTEE...of the Bismarck Chamber of Commerce is discussing
buying copies of USDA's "America's Most Crucial Industry." Al
Gustin (KFYR-TV, Bismarck, N.D.), a member of the committee,
saw it on our recent satellite transmission and thought it
would be perfect for distribution in the city's school system.
Al says the 15-minute program is a good vehicle for informing
people about American agriculture.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




t g2f.34: 257



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330

Letter No. 2457 April 20, 1990

GENETICALLY ALTERED POTATOES -- USDA will begin testing a genetically
altered potato in Idaho in May to make sure inserting genes into a
potato will not interfere with the plant's quality. The experimental
potatoes will carry two additional marker genes for research purposes,
says James W. Glosser, administrator of USDA's Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service. "The genes being transferred have proved innocuous
in many previous experiments," he said. The research is designed
to contain the plants & their pollen during the experiment and to
destroy them afterwards. Contact: Anita Brown (301) 436-5931.

GLOWING TRANSGENIC MICROORGANISM -- USDA has issued a permit to an
Auburn Univ. scientist to study the movement of a microbe genetically
engineered to glow. The tests will take place in Macon Co., Ala.,
beginning in Apr.il. One of the benefits of this research, says
Joseph Shaw, assistant professor of botany & microbiology at Auburn,
is observing the progress of the disease without destroying the
plants, as traditional laboratory methods require. Contact: Anita
Brown (301) 436-5931.

CHEMICAL-RESISTANT CATTLE PEST -- A panel of federal, state & industry
experts have come up with new strategies for livestock producers in
their war with the horn fly. The fly's growing resistance to
pyrethroid insecticides, says USDA Entomologist Sidney Kunz, is a
problem in all major cattle producing areas of the U.S.-- including
Hawaii -- and in parts of Canada. The strategies include not applying
any horn-fly insecticide until flies become a serious problem, using
compounds other than pyrethroids & timing chemical controls for
maximum results. Kunz also has a fact sheet describing the strategies.
Contact: Sidney Kunz (512) 257-3566.

RURAL HEALTH INFO CLEARINGHOUSE -- USDA & HHS are establishing a new
health service to provide info to help small communities deal with
health care problems. The service will be known as the Rural
Information Center Health Service. Health information will be
available toll-free through an 800 telephone number, says Joseph
Howard, director of USDA's National Agricultural Library. ContaL*.
Brian Norris (301) 344-3778. 14,rnA







- 2 -


NEW WEAPON AGAINST AFLATOXIN -- A compound used to prevent caking in
animal feed may reduce levels of aflatoxin in the milk of animals
eating contaminated grain. "Very high levels of aflatoxin can cause
acute poisoning and may cause liver cancer in humans," says USDA
Veterinary Toxicologist Roger B. Harvey. In one test, the level of
aflatoxin in the cows' milk dropped 20 to 47 percent after eating a
diet including the anti-caking compound. Contact: Roger B. Harvey
(409) 260-9259.


FOLTZ SWORN IN -- Sec. Clayton Yeutter has sworn in John C. Foltz as
administrator of USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service. Foltz
oversses all FGIS operations, including management of the national
grain inspection & weighing system. Foltz served as executive director
of the Ohio Grain & Feed Assoc; chief of markets with the Ohio Dept.
of Agriculture and an assistant administrator for USDA's Foreign Ag
Service. Foltz received B.S. & M.S. degrees in agriculture from Ohio
State. Contact: Allen Atwood (202) 475-3367.


AGING SYMPTOMS & DRUG ABUSE -- Every year, about a fourth of people
over age 70 take a fall. Although falls in older adults can be
attributed to illness or other physical impairments, substance abuse
& alcoholism can sometimes be the catalyst, says Judith Warren, a
gerontologist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Warren
says researchers are just beginning to discover the prevalence of
substance abuse among the elderly. Contact: Judith Warren (409)
845-1146.


SOY INKS -- Soy inks are one of an expanding series of soy-based
products which make it possible to print today's publications with
tomorrow's technology, says Agronomist Lowell McCormick, a field
representative of the American Soybean Association. McCormick says
the soy news inks have about 70 percent soybean oil. Among U.S.
newspapers using soy inks are: Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe,
St. Petersburg Times and the Cedar Rapids Gazette. Contact:
Phil Massey (504) 388-4141.


GENETICALLY ENGINEERED CORN -- Corn cells, with new genes added, have
produced fertile plants that pass new genetic traits to their offspring.
USDA Molecular Biologist Michael E. Fromm & Charles L. Armstrong with
Monsanto Co. are working together on the project. The techniques,
says Fromm, should help pave the way for introducing valuable new traits,
such as insect or disease resistance, into corn, wheat, oats, barley
& rice. Contact: Michael E. Fromm (415) 559-5908.


50 YEARS OF RESEARCH -- USDA is celebrating the 50th anniversary of
four of USDA's largest research centers. The centers are in New Orleans,
La.; Peoria, Ill.; Albany, Calif.; and Philadelphia, Pa. Consumers
will recognize a number of products & end results that came from
these centers -- mass produced penicillin, frozen concentrated orange
juice, permanent press cotton fabrics & instant potato flakes. Contact:
Matt Bosisio (309) 685-4011.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1715 -- In the last few weeks, the U.S. has been
engaged in important trade discussions all over the world.
Brenda Curtis talks with the U.S. deputy trade representative
about recent negotiations with Japan, the Soviet Union &
the European Community. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min.
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1197 -- Alternatives to toxic products; recycling gains
momentum; a new diet ingredient; saving bodies of water;
fighting global climate change at home. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1704 -- USDA News Highlights; new crop price
predictions; U.S./Japanese trade update; farm bill keyword --
flexibility; FDA releases new info on sulfamethazine in milk.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1316 -- A new dietary breakthrough; a cholesterol
reducer; a fat substitute; new diet products; attracting
"good" bugs. (Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., April 25, poultry production;
Thurs., April 26, oil crops outlook, world tobacco situation;
Mon., April 30, ag price update; Tues., May 1, crop/weather
update.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of April 16)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's "LISA" program; Lynn Wyvill
has tips on preventing foodborne illness; Will Pemble
reports on a new USDA melon meter to measure sweetness.

ACTUALITIES -- Sec. Clayton Yeutter leads an Earth Day tree planting
ceremony; USDA Asst. Sec. Charles Hess on agriculture & the
environment; Ann Chadwick, USDA consumer advisor, on Consumers
Week; Greg Gajewski, USDA economist, with the latest U.S. ag
outlook; Al West, with USDA's Forest Service, on the forest
fire season (with B-roll).

NEXT WEEK -- DeBoria Janifer reports on cutting fat from your diet;
Pat O'Leary profiles USDA's library for "LISA."

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY .. .7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY .... .10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY .. .8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


S4 _2620 2651001
4 -
OFFMIKE
1990...looks as if it will be a year with a spring, says Rich Hawkins
(KRVN, Lexington, Neb.), unlike previous years when growing conditions
changed quickly from cold winter to hot summer. Rich is working
with the Foodwatch Committee of the Nebraska Council for Public
Relations and Agriculture. The committee is producing a state
plan of action for the Foodwatch program of the Agriculture Council
of America. ACA says Foodwatch is designed to build public confidence
in the quality of the nation's food supply.

NEW...farm director at KMMJ Grand Island, Neb., is Dennis Morrice.
Our thanks to Rich Hawkins for the information.

SPRING...storms are certainly welcome in Iowa, says Mike Buchanan
(KBIZ, Ottumwa). Recent series have wet the topsoil creating
improved planting conditions. Mike says the situation is much
better than during the last two years, but subsoil remains dry.


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington. D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












TOPIC...of primary concern in Florida is water, says Catherine
Lister (Florida's Radio Network, Orlando). Almost the entire
state is under water use restrictions due to drought. She says
the water issue is becoming an important item in their coverage
of the race for Florida commissioner of agriculture.

REDUCED...water supply is also an important matter in southern
California. Santa Barbara has banned watering gardens except
from hand-held buckets, $500 fines are proposed in Los Angeles
for hosing sidewalks, San Francisco hopes its new pipeline will
compensate for a 50 percent decline in spring runoff, and there
is a 50 percent reduction in water delivered to farmers in the
central valley. George Gatley (Western Agri-Radio Networks,
Yuma, Ariz. notes o ials say the drought could last for years.


CIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division




4A 1.3;q -.5



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2458 April 27, 1990

WHAT IF THE URUGUAY ROUND GATT negotiations were to fail? The likely
result is that past conditions would not continue and that there
would be pressure for increased protectionism, according to a new
USDA study. Increased protectionism in the past "has proved to be
extremely costly," according to the authors of "GATT Trade Liberali-
zation, the U.S. Proposal." Pointing to the aftermath of the Smoot-
Hawley Act of 1930, the report says, "the successively increasing
protectionism which moved around the world led to general collapse of
trade and was a major factor in the global depression of the 1930's."
LOOKING AHEAD, the report says policies that once worked when the
world's economies were more independent, do not work so well with
growing interdependence. Not only do ag policies of one country
affect the producers and consumers of another country in today's
closely linked world, government intervention in agriculture & ag
trade is growing, the report says. For a copy of the study, contact:
Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. For more information on the report,
contact: Larry Deaton or Matt Shane (202) 786-1700 or Bob Riemen-
schneider or Lee Ann Stackhouse (202) 382-1324.

U.S. FARMLAND VALUES rose 4 percent from Feb. 1, 1989, to Jan. 1, 1990,
for an average of $693 per acre. Although below the 6 percent gain in
1988, last year's rise was the third straight increase. However, the
January 1990 value remained 16 percent below the record $823 per acre
set in 1982. After adjusting for inflation of nearly 5 percent last
year, the real value of farmland per acre fell slightly and was 42
percent below the inflation-adjusted high of 1980. Source: Ag
Resources: Ag Land Values. Contact: Roger Hexem or Fred Kuchler
(202) 786-1422.

CONSUMERS LIKE "LEAN" MEAT -- Since USDA replaced the 6-year-old
"USDA Good" label with the new "USDA Select" quality grade two years
ago there's been a lot more leaner beef on the grocery shelves, says
Jimmy Wise, a USDA marketing analyst. Wise says since USDA responded
to consumer & industry group petitions for the name change in 1987,
the amount of officially graded leaner beef has increased by more
than 700 percent. "Consumers told us they wanted a more positive
description of leaner meat available in grocery stores," says
"and they got it." Contact: Jacque Lee (202) 447-8998.






- 2 -


EARTH DAY AT AGRICULTURE -- Sec.
Clayton Yeutter, here joined by
his wife, Jeanne, planted a
flowering dogwood tree on the
lawn in front of USDA's :Admin-
istration Building on The Mall
April 19. Yeutter was also
joined at the ceremony by the
presidents of four 1890 land-
grant institutions. (USDA Photo
by Larry Rana.)


LOW-CAL ICE CREAM FROM OATS -- Ice cream lovers could soon get a
triple bonus from a new USDA product that reduces fat and calories,
while fighting blood cholesterol. "What we have is a new ingredient
made from soluble oat fiber," says USDA Chemist George E. Inglett.
"And, because we substitute it for most of the saturated fat, it
turns ice cream into a low-calorie, low-fat frozen dessert." The
product is called oatrim. Contact: George E. Inglett (309) 685-4011.


COMPUTER CALCULATES WEED THREAT -- A computer model being developed by
USDA scientists could help rice farmers decide when, how and whether
to fight back when weeds sprout in their crop. All weeds are not
created equal, says USDA Agronomist Roy J. Smith, Jr., and a single
sprig of barnyardgrass in rice is as much cause for alarm as three
bearded sprongletop weeds. The model will calculate the losses of
eight weeds on rice production with or without herbicides. Contact:
Roy J. Smith, Jr. (501) 673-2661.





- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1716 -- Maria Bynum talks with the manager of a 700-
acre sod farm in Delaware about the business & the
advantages of using sod over seed. (Weekly reel --
13-1/2 min. documentary.)


CONSUMER TIME #1198 -- Forest fire prospects; stopping the spread of the
Medfly; spring lawn care; getting into gardening;
low energy landscapes. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min.
consumer features.)


AGRITAPE #1705 -- USDA News Highlights; GATT update; broiler update;
dairy support prices; getting black students into
agriculture. (Weekly reel of news features.)


UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., May 8, crop/weather update;
Thurs., May 10, U.S. crop production, USSR grain, world
ag. supply & demand; Fri., May 11, farm labor, world
ag/grain production, world oilseeds, world cotton; Tues.,
May 15, livestock outlook, milk production, crop/weather
update; Wed., May 16, USSR outlook, horticultural
products; Thurs., May 17, cattle on feed, world dairy
situation.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(April 26, 28 & 30)

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on Soviet agriculture; DeBoria Janifer
reports on the 1890 Institution's centennial celebration;
Will Pemble reports on oatrim.

ACTUALITIES -- Sec. Clayton Yeutter, Sec. of State James Baker and U.S
Trade Rep. Carla Hills on the U.S./EC Ministerial Meeting;
Yeutter speaks to the National Association of Agricultural
Journalists; Norton Strommen on weather & crops; USDA
Economist James Miller on dairy; Norman Kallenmyn on
Taiwan.

NEXT WEEK -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's LISA library; Lisa Telder
takes a look at equine performance.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY .. 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE I-4

A YEAR'S...worth of tornadoes in one day caused nearly non-stop
coverage of the storms, says Gary Wulf (KZEN, Central City, Neb.).
Two of the twisters were on the ground for more than 100 miles,
causing damage totaling $32 million. USDA's Farmers Home Admin-
istration declared the dozen county region a disaster area. Gary
says that in the rural America tradition, neighbors worked together
to help remove debris and help each other rebuild.

WARM...temperatures have helped producers get oats in early
according to Bill Walters (WCUB, Manitowoc, Wis.). Even though
they are alongside Lake Michigan, topsoil is dry. There's two
sides to that coin, says Bill. On the one hand, the ground was not
too wet to get into the fields, on the other, timely rains will be
needed to develop the crop. Bill also says new machine sales
were up at an implement dealer open house he covered, and the
dealer was pleased with producer interest.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













LOOKING GOOD...says Charlie Rankin (KURV, Edinburg, Texas). Warm
temperatures have boosted growth. Irrigated corn is knee high and
cotton is squaring. Meanwhile, citrus producers are trimming or
removing freeze-damaged trees. Charlie says most will not have a
crop for two years.

RETURNING...from a visit with Wisconsin producers to Australia and
New Zealand is Bob Bosold (WAXX, Eau Claire, Wis.). They found
that during the cold months of July and August dairy farmers dry
their cows and shut down operations, except the few who have city
supply contracts. Deer farming is expanding. European Red Deer
are raised for meat and medicine. There is a market for antler
dust combined with ginseng to treat ailments in the Far East.
Hey, where tare's a market ...


hfI C POWELLR
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Lette I



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington 50 (202) 44
Letter No. 2459 Ma il90*

ANTI-APHID RESEARCH -- USDA scientists have found at least nine
breeding lines of barley that aren't destroyed by the Russian wheat
aphid. "Some lines thrived despite heavy feeding by aphids," says
USDA Entomologist James A. Webster. Webster said at least one m,
brewing company is using the lines to try to develop new var',
malting barley that can be grown without using insecticide.
Russian wheat aphid, which also attacks wheat, rye & forag' 1 nts,
has caused more that $240 million in damage & control cos ji the
U.S. since it was first spotted in the U.S. in 1986. Con fo
anti-aphid research progress: Robert L. Burton (405) 6 24- J.

SCHOOL BREAKFAST GRANTS -- USDA has awarded $3 million to sc
districts in 16 states to help start school breakfast program
grants are part of a five-year program to provide start-up funds
new breakfast programs, says Betty Jo Nelsen, administrator of USDA's
Food & Nutrition Serv-ice. "We know a good breakfast contributes to
good nutrition, and we know kids who are well nourished have the energy
they need to learn, work and play through a long school day." The 16
states are: Arizona, California, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana,
Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Pennsylvania,
South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont and Virginia. Contact: Phil
Shanholtzer (703) 756-3286.

AMERICAN FARMERS have an unprecedented opportunity to gain a larger
market share in a growing world market for ag products, and the
biggest obstacles are "policies which lead to unfair trade conditions
in world markets," says Sec. of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter. That's
why ag trade reform through the GATT Uruguay Round negotiations is so
important to U.S. farmers, Yeutter says. No citizens anywhere in the
world should sit idly by & continue to pay the excessive costs of
outdated ag trade barriers & outmoded production policies. Every
nation can -- and should -- do better, Yeutter says.

"The high risk path for U.S. agriculture in today's world is to not
seek trade liberalization ... the most likely alternative to a successfL
GATT Round will be mounting pressure to erect more protectionist
barriers in agriculture," Yeutter says. "This has to stop, and the
Uruguay Round is our best shot at putting on the brakes." Contact:
Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.







- 2 -


MORMON CRICKET MICROBE -- USDA scientists are releasing a one-celled
microbe that infects & kills Mormon crickets in Idaho field tests
as part of a stepped-up war on these plant-eating insects in the West.
"We hope this microbe will stop the cricket's occasional population
explosions," says USDA's Jerome A. Onsager. The microbe may eliminate
costly insecticide spraying, he says. It can kill up to 90 percent
of Mormon crickets without harming other insects. Contact: Jerry A.
Onsager (406) 994-3344.


COMPLEX CARBS -- Americans over the age of two should increase their
intake of starches and other complex carbohydrates, says the National
Academy of Sciences. They can do this by eating a combination of
breads, cereals and legumes. Complex carbohydrates, says Louisiana
Nutritionist Beth Reames, consist both of starches & fibers, which
are found in plants & enter our food supply as grain products, cereals,
fruits & vegetables. Contact: Beth Reames (504) 388-4141.


A HANDY NEW "Desk Reference Guide to U.S. Agricultural Trade" is
available free from USDA-FAS Info, 5922-S, Washington, D.C. 20250.
Phone: (202) 447-7937.


LAWN -- FRIEND OR FOE? Many homeowners see a lawn only as a chore --
to fertilize is to have to mow more often. "There are some drawbacks
to having a healthy, vigorously growing lawn," says Louisiana
Horticulturist Tom Koske, "but there are some very positive trade-
offs too." Koske has some simple guides for establishing & maintaining
a healthy lawn. Contact: Thomas Koske (504) 388-4141.












NAFB TRIP TO POLAND -- Ed
Slusarczyk, (Ag Radio Network,
Utica, N.Y.) (left) and Lynn
Ketelsen (Linder Farm Network,
Willmar, Minn.), recently met
with Lech Walensa while they
were in Poland. Slusarczyk
and Ketelsen were in Poland to
talk with ag officials, tour
farms & shipping ports & plan-
ning for NAFB's trip to Poland
this coming Fall.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1717 -- Here's some practical "do's" and don'tt" for
home gardeners. Patrick O'Leary talks to University
of Maryland extension specialists about starting a
garden, planting shrubs & ornamentals, as well as
caring for your lawn or groundcover. (Weekly reel --
13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1199 -- Sodding your lawn; conservative lawn watering;
food labeling update; the cookout lookout; vacation
frauds. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer
features.)

AGRITAPE #1706 -- USDA news highlights; tobacco assessment; slow beef
expansion; grasshopper invasion; dead chicken disposal.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1318 -- Amorous wasps plague NASA; boron & brain waves:
wheat & salty soils; bargain biotechnology; film coating
for fruit. (Weekly'reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Fri., May 19, U.S. ag outlook; Mon.,
May 21, wheat outlook, U.S. trade update, catfish;
Tues., May 22, weekly weather & crop update; Wed., May
23, ag income & finance outlook; Thurs., May 24, feed
outlook.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(May 3, 1990)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on a LISA collection at the National
Ag Library; Chris Larson on groundbreaking for a national
soil conservation center; Lisa Telder has the story
on MSU's equine performance center & Joe Courson reports
on a Georgia farmer who took a different swing at farming.

ACTUALITIES -- Highlights of Sec. Clayton Yeutter's speech at the American
Farm Bureau Federation's National Affairs Convention;
Norton Strommen on moisture conditions in the Corn
Belt & Delta states; Janet Livezey on rice production;
Norman Kallemeyn on trade with Taiwan; Steve Yoder on
trade with East Germany.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- EPA's ag advisor; deadly lawns; Georgia chicken
wings & safe handling of pesticides.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE -4- IlI Ii

GRASSHOPPER. ..infestations are expected to be heavy in sections of
the upper Midwest this year, says Dean Thurow (KCJB, Minot, N.D.)
Dean says numbers in the state's eastern section are likely to be
highest since the 1930's. Farmers are checking their fields frequently
and reporting the count per square yard. Cold fronts are bodacious
in North Dakota. Dean says a recent 70 degree overnight drop put
temperatures in the mid-20s, further stressing moisture-deficient crops.

MILLIONS OF ACRES...of rangeland in south central California are
reported in bad shape, and a million acres of irrigated cropland are
undergoing a 50 percent reduction in water delivery because of drought,
says State Conservationist Pearlie Reed. Outlook is not good.
California rain season is about ended.

DROUGHT...is definitely broken in southeast Missouri. Jeff Wheeler
(KBOA/KTMO, Kennett) says the region's rainfall totals nine inches
above average. Cotton planting is behind schedule.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












SERIES OF STORMS...in late April greatly helped to improve planting
conditions, says James Stewart (KFYO, Lubbock, Texas). Temperatures
of 40 degrees and 30 mph winds sent wind-chill figures into the teens,
but Jim says that will help dry the surface so cotton planting can
resume. Acreage is expected to be much larger than in recent years.
Attitudes are positive.

RFD-TV...programming via satellite from Omaha to rural America and
to cable systems made its final telecast last month.

COPIES...of USDA's TV videotape "America's Most Crucial Industry"
have been ordered by Robin Kinney (Linder Farm Network, Wilmar, Minn.).
She viewed the 15-minute tape with editors in Minneapolis, taking
agriculture's message to these media representatives. Mike Rogers
(Michigan Farm Bureau) ordered 200 copies to be used as an introduction
to a ricultur by speakers to non-farm audiences.


C POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter Wi,



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (
Letter No. 2460 May 11, 1990

GATT RESULTS -- What kind of results can we expect if the U.S. proposals
in the GATT Uruguay Round negotiations are accepted? World farm
trade would increase as trade barriers are reduced over the ten years.
Long-range planning for ag production & marketing would benefit. World
market prices would be higher for the highly supported ag commodities
after trade liberalization. Farmers would be more efficient -- subject
to less government intervention.

What else? Production would shift from areas with current high
support levels to those with lower levels. Taxpayers would gain.
Reduced tax burdens would save more than $80 billion yearly around
the world. Consumers would pay lower prices in several key countries,
such as the EC & Japan. Source: "GATT Trade Liberalization, the U.S.
Proposal." For a copy, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445. Contact:
Larry Deaton or Matt Shane (02) 786-1700 or Bob Riemenschneider or
Lee Ann Stackhouse (202) 382-1324.

MORE GRAIN AVAILABLE TO USSR -- Under Secretary of Agriculture Richard
Crowder announced May 8 that USDA has raised the level of grain the
USSR can buy this year without additional consultations from 20 to 22
million metric tons. The limit previously had been raised from a
base of 12 million metric tons. It was increased to 16 million metric
tons in October 1989 and to 20 in December 1989. Contact: Sally
Klusaritz (202) 447-3448.

PHOTOSYNTHESIS TAKES A NAP -- On warm, dry afternoons, corn takes a
photosynthesis nap that slows its growth, says James A. Bunce, a
USDA scientist. This is the first report of such an afternoon drop
in photosynthesis in the corn family of plants. The rate drops a
total of about 30 percent on warm, dry afternoons in normal growing
conditions. "A drop like that on a regular basis translated to
cutting growth by about 10 percent," Bunce says. Contact: James A.
Bunce (301) 344-3607.

GAULT NAMED -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter has appointed
Phyllis R. Gault as deputy assistant secretary for administration.
Gault, a CPA from Norman, Okla., has experience in both government &
the private sector. She holds a degree in accounting from East
Central State Univ., Ada., Okla. Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.





2 -

TURNIPS ARE TURNING OUT to be a big hit with sheep, says Steven P.
Hart, a USDA animal nutritionist. In feeding trials since 1986
Hart has let sheep graze on pastures planted with Purpletop, a familiar
table variety of turnip. "The sheep gain well on turnips," Hart says.
"They'll eat the leaves first, then the top of the turnip. Then
they'll actually eat down into the heart of the turnip, but they
don't pull them out of the ground." Contact: Steven P. Hart (405)
262-5291.


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER -- One major problem facing today's farmer is
getting appropriate information about low input and sustainable
farming methods. One way to get this type of information is from
ATTRA -- Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas, in
Fayettevile, Ark. ATTRA is funded by a grant from the U.S. Fish &
Wildlife Service, Dept. of Interior. ATTRA's toll free line --
(800) 346-9140 -- is getting more than 100 calls a week from farmers.
More than 40 percent of the questions center on reducing ag chemicals.
Contact: ATTRA (800) 346-9140.


GREEN REVOLUTION NOT OVER -- For the 1990's, food production in poor
nations may get a bigger boost from technologies developed decades
earlier than from emerging biotechnologies. How effectively developing
nations use these "Green Revolution" technologies -- enhanced &
extended by the newer biotechnologies -- will help determine the
future demand for U.S. food assistance. Many poor nations have yet
to update their farming .techniques or try new crop varieties. Source:
April 1990 "Farmline." For a copy call: (202) 786-1494. Contact:
Mary Knudson on (202) 786-1467 or Margot Anderson on (202) 786-1405.














TIBOR VERESS, a farm broad-
caster from the Hungarian
Radio National Network,
learns how USDA Radio
works from USDA Radio Rep-
orter Maria Bynum. He also
toured USDA TV. Veress
spent two weeks at USDA
learning how we disseminate
information in the U.S.
(USDA Photo by Vic Powell.)




3 -

FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1718 -- It's a horse racing season again and recently
Brenda Curtis paid a visit to a major horse raising & training operating
in Florida for an inside look at how horses are prepared for the big
race. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1200 -- Safe food handling; landscaping with beauty &
practicality; choosing a lawn care company; a cleaner auto fuel; eat
fruit & stay alert? (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1707 -- USDA News Highlights; flexibility --
key word in some farm bill proposals; western water getting tight; a
new weapon against horn flies; groundbreaking for a national soils
conservation center. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1319 -- Aphid-resistant barley; "user friendly"
pollution tracking; purslane -- weed or salad green; genetically
engineered insects; reducing alcohol costs. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., May 16, USSR outlook, horti-
cultural exports; Thurs., May 17, cattle on feed, world dairy situation;
Fri., May 18, U.S. ag outlook; Mon., May 21, wheat outlook, U.S.
trade update, catfish production; Tues., May 22, crop/weather update;
Wed., May 23, U.S. ag income & finance outlook, poultry production;
Thurs., May 24, feed outlook; Fri., May 25, livestock update, world
sugar situation.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of May 6, 1990)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary profiles EPA Ag Advisor & USDA Asst. Sec.
Nominee James Moseley; a report from DeBoria Janifer on cutting fat
from the diet; Lisa Telder of Michigan State University on regulating
lawn chemicals; Joe Courson of the University of Georgia on how
chicken wings have helped poultry producers.

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, with a
weather update; James Schaub, USDA economist, with the latest oilseed
outlook; Tom George, USDA conservation official, on the U.S. water
supply situation; Catherine Adams, USDA food safety official, on
FDA's recent approval of irradiation of poultry; Don Foth, with
USDA's Forest Service, with last year's reforestation report.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)





4 -
OFFMIKE
ITS A GREAT TIME...to be in agriculture, says Gary Wergin (KFEQ,
St. Joseph, Mo.). Producer attitudes have improved thanks to a
series of rain storms that have given crops a good start. The
enthusiasm carries through to other projects, such as the recent
Missouri beef cookoff conducted in a shopping mall which generated
a positive response by the public. Other side of the coin is
that rains have helped boost alfalfa weevil population & wheat rust.

PLANTING...is nearly completed in the area served by Neil Trobak
(KCIM/KKRL, Carroll, Iowa), but soil temperatures remain cool.
They're looking for timely rains and warm breezes. Neil says
prices received by cattle & hog producers are helping generate
good attitudes, too.

CROPS...are off to a good start in North Carolina, says David
Spatola (WNCT, Greenville). Development of tobacco, peanuts &
cotton is well underway & ready for warmer temperatures.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
I 11 1 1111 11 111111 111 1 1 1
Farm Broadcasters Letter 3 1262 08265 085 3

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











RUSSIAN...wheat aphids seem to be overwintering in CRP lands,-thus
escaping efforts to reduce populations on planted acres, says Gary
Stewart (Northwest Ag News Network). While little damage is
expected to the winter crop, there is concern about the aphids
attacking spring grains. Gary says rain patterns have been widely
variable throughout the Northwest -- some regions remain dry.

INJURY...to 16 year-old Ryan Patton, son of Kathy Patton (Kansas
Ag Network/WIBW, Topeka, Kan.). Field cultivator fell on him,
severing the nerves in his spinal column. He's now in a rehabilitati
center sitting up and working with weights. Doctors are looking
for a positive sign, such as a return of feeling to his legs. We
join the family in hoping for a complete recovery.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division









Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (20

Letter No. 2461 May 18, 1990

FOREIGN-OWNED LAND -- Slightly less than 1 percent of U.S.
agricultural land -- or 12.9 million acres -- was owned by foreign
interests as of Dec. 31, 1989, says John Lee, administrator of USDA's
Economic Research Service. The new total is 263,273 acres more than
a year earlier. About 60 percent of the reported foreign holdings is
actually land owned by U.S. firms, Lee said. The rest of the
foreign-held land is owned by investors not affiliated with U.S.
firms. Contact: J. Peter Debraal (202) 786-1425.

RUSSIAN SCIENTISTS VISIT USDA LABS -- Two scientists from one of
Russia's top ag institutes are touring seven USDA labs nationwide to
learn how plant germplasm facilities in the U.S. are managed. The
Soviet scientists want to establish a computer-linked database
between Russian & American germplasm collections, says Henry L.
Shands, national program leader for plant germplasm for USDA's
Agricultural Research Service. Contact: Julie Corliss (415)
559-6069.

FARM WAGES AVERAGED $5.54 for April, according to USDA's National
Agricultural Statistics Service. During the week of April 8 14,
2.96 million people worked on the Nation's farms & ranches. The
work force was comprised of 1.50 million self-employed farm operators,
427,000 unpaid workers and 833,000 workers hired directly by farm
operators. Rounding out the total were 203,000 ag service employees
doing work on farms & ranches during the survey week. Contact:
John Buche (202) 447-5446.

FARM PROGRAM FLEXIBILITY -- "There are some folks in Washington who
say that we're proposing too much flexibility and that farmers are
not ready for that much ... that they need more wisdom and guidance
from Congress and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to bear on their
decision-making," says Sec. Clayton Yeutter. "I disagree." Yeutter
says the flexibility issue is "a question of whether we fear market
signals." Yeutter says, "I don't, and I have a lot of confidence
in the farmers' ability to make their own decisions." Contact:
Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.






2 -
SECRETARY'S REPORT -- Sec. Clayton Yeutter's Annual Report is now
available. It summarizes accomplishments of USDA during 1989 and
gives an over-all view of what USDA is doing. For a copy of "Report
of the Secretary of Agriculture 1989," call: Marci Hilt (202)
447-6445.

NATURAL RESOURCE TRENDS -- Demands for most renewable natural
resources are expected to increase in the future faster than supplies,
according to a new report recently released by USDA. The assessment,
which is prepared every ten years covers private, state & federal
lands and projects the demand for & supply of renewable resources
over the next 50 years. "Our renewable resources are the building
blocks for the quality of life in America," says Dale Robertson,
chief of USDA's Forest Service. "Adequate attention to these
resources will ensure that we maintain and improve the productivity
and environmental quality of our resource base." Contact: Judy
Kissinger (202) 447-2494.

AIRBORNE CANDID CAMERAS -- A new type of video programming -- taken
from planes at 3,000 to 12,500 feet -- can reveal outbreaks of weeds,
insects and plant diseases. "In a year or so, agricultural
consultants in the U.S. may offer farmers these videos," says James
H. Everitt of USDA's Agricultural Research Service. "That wil1 allow
them to act more quickly to protect crops and livestock and to make
better use of fertilizers and pesticides." Contact: Jim De Quattro
(301) 344-4296.


JOURNALISTS'

CONFERENCE

FOOD SAFETY AND

NUTRITION UPDATE

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Food and Drug Administration


RECOGNIZE THIS LOGO? Once again
this year, USDA and the Food & Drug
Administration are sponsoring a
Journalists' Conference. This year's
conference will be June 25 & 26 at
the National Press Club, National
Press Building in Washington, D.C.
Topics to be covered include:
controlling pesticide residues in
food; latest food consumption &
consumer studies; foodborne illness;
food labeling; new food technologies,
international food safety issues.
For more info & a brochure &
registration form, call: Marci Hilt
(202) 447-6445.







- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1719 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda
Curtis talks with Texas A&M University Extension
Horticulturist Doug Welsh about a new landscape technique
called xeriscaping. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min.
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1201 -- Tanning salon warning; avoiding fat &
cholesterol; sun protection; 4-H youth & environmental
issues; household inventory. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3
min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1708 -- USDA News Highlights; 1990/91 export outlook; major
kiwifruit producers compete; alfalfa research; a new
weapon against horn flies. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1320 -- Bigger bang from Bt; just what is Bt;
germ plasma pay-off, cooler cotton; internal insect control.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., May 21, wheat outlook, U.S.
trade update, catfish; Tues., May 22, crop/weather update;
Wed., May 23, ag income & finance outlook, poultry
production; Thurs., May 24, food outlook; Fri., May 25,
livestock update, world sugar situation; Wed., May 30,
export outlook, crop/weather update; Tues., May 31, cotton/
wool, ag prices, world tobacco situation.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(May 17, 19 & 21)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the ARS National Visitor Center;
Deboria Janifer describes how to cut the fat in your diet;
Chris Larson takes a look at conservation education for science
teachers.

ACTUALITIES -- Norton Strommen on the latest weather & crop update; James
Donald on the crop production estimates; Joe O'Mara on current
GATT trade negotiations; and Jim Schaub on oilseeds.

NEXT WEEK -- Pat O'Leary reports on GATT & agriculture.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12-D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3 262 08265 139 8

FAX IT TO US! We have a new fax machine sitting in the
office with Florence Kelly & Mocile Trotter. So, now
we can fax to you & vice-versa. FAX number is: (202)
245-5165. We'll be waiting for your fax ...

THANKS for being so prompt about returning our survey forms
asking about a weekly mailed video tape feature service
from USDA. We're gratified by your response. If you
didn't get a survey form or haven't sent yours back yet,
give Marci Hilt a call on (202) 447-6445.

USDA RADIO'S Gary Crawford is a finalist in the prestigious
International New York Radio Festival competition for his
"Secret Life of Vegetables," an Ag USA. Gary will attend
the awards ceremony in New York, June 13, where he'll learn
what, if any, award he won. Congratulations, Gary!


Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington. D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













SPRING has produced a variety of hot & cold; calm & windy
in N.E. Nebraska with scattered areas of light rainfall in
an area of short moisture conditions, says Gary D. "Shep"
Scheopf (farm director, WJAG/KEXL, Norfolk, Neb.). Soil
temperatures averaged 58 degrees over the past week at
planting depths. Topsoil moisture rated 52 percent adequate
with corn planting 25 to 30 percent complete over the
state. Record livestock cash markets have kept hog &
cattle producers optimistic for the 1990 marketing year.
"Shep" reports from the Norfolk, Omaha & Sioux City Neb.,
marketing areas.

IF THIS COLUMN looks different, it's because our Chief
Vic Powell is still recovering from medical treatment for
kidney stones. We miss him and wish him a speedy recovery.


Darci Hilt
Director, Media Liaison




/



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 2025
Letter No. 2462 May 25, 1990

FARM SUBSIDY PROBLEM -- No doubt about it, farmers have an image
problem with Congress over the amount of taxpayer money used to
subsidize the nation's production of food & fiber. It's an old
story. This year, the General Accounting Office has taken one of its
periodic looks at the situation in a new report, "Farming and Farm
Programs -- Impact on the Rural Economy and on Farmers." GAO is the
chief investigative arm of Congress. GAO doesn't plow any new fields
in this 43-page report, but the report does provide timely figures
for the current 1990 farm bill debate. For a copy, call the GAO
press office at (202) 275-2812.

ANOTHER GOOD PUB to have regarding the farm bill is USDA's "Farm Bill
Issues -- Background Facts." It looks at various programs, how
they function and the results. "Farm Bill Issues" might be a handy
reference for the 1990 farm bill discussions. For a copy, call
(202) 447-2798.

FORMER UNDERSECRETARY of Agriculture Dan Amstutz is under consideration
for a seat on the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the Journal
of Commerce reported recently. Amstutz is one of four being considered
for the seat vacated last month by Bob Davis, who left CFTC to join
the New York Mercantile Exchange staff. The other three under
consideration are former Assistant Treasury Secretary Charles Sethness,
White House Ag Adviser Cooper Evans and Bill Miller, a portfolio
manager with General Motors.

"MAD COW DISEASE" -- Since 1986, more than 13,000 British cattle have
been hit by an illness known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or
"mad cow disease." The ailment can take two to eight years to show
up. Affected animals refuse to be milked, stagger as if drunk and
sometimes turn violent. More than 1,000 schools in Britan have
banned beef from their menus because of concern that the disease
could be passed to humans through food. The disease is not known to
exist in the U.S. Cattle imports from Britain were banned last
year because of the disease. Contact: Larry Mark (202) 447-3977.

QUICK -- HOW MANY CALORIES in a burger & fries? What is a calorie,
anyway? For the answer, USDA has: "Calories & Weight: The USDA
Pocket Guide." For a copy, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445.










~-2-
2 -

























NAFB SOUTH CENTRAL REGIONAL MEETING May 4 5 at South
Padre Island, Texas, was well attended. Tours included
the Atascosa Wildlife Refuge, citrus & sugar producers
and the facilities of the Confederate Air Force.


























FARM BROADCASTERS from across the nation attended the "Washington
Ag Watch" Conference in Washington, D.C., May 20 22. Evan Slack
(Evan Slack Network, Denver, Colo.) (left) was among many who
sent materials from the conference back to their stations. Evan
used USDA Radio's Maria Bynum's office to transmit his stories.
Several broadcasters took time from their schedules to visit USDA
Radio & TV staff members. (Right photo, left to right) USDA
Radio's Brenda Curtis, Jeff Stewart (Ag Radio Network, Utica, N.Y.)
Hugh Robinson (KKOW, Pittsburg, Kans.) & USDA Radio's Gary
Crawford. This photo was taken in USDA Radio's Control Room.
Crawford. This photo was taken in USDA Radio's Control Room.






3 -

FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1719 -- The June Agricultural Survey provides
information that will be used for the rest of the
year to predict crop production and stocks. On
this edition of AGRICULTURE USA, Dave Carter talks
with USDA's Chief Statistician Charles Caudill
and others about ag surveys & their importance.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1202 -- Tourist trash; a different outdoor grill;
non-toxic household products; paper recycling;
dining out; elegance on the decline. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1709 -- USDA News Highlights; 1990 sign-up results; USDA's
June survey; pond doctor; a variable weather pattern.
(Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1321 -- Adrenal gland & shipping disease; the
forests fight back; resistance -- a numbers game;
sheep take to turnips; fabulous fungus. (Weekly reel
of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 4, world ag outlook;
Tues., June 5, weekly weather & crop update; Wed.,
June 6, dairy products; Thurs., June 7, tobacco outlook.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(May 23, 1990)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on GATT & ag; Lynn Wyvill reports on
BBQ food safety; Chris Larson has the story on a
conservation canoe trip.

ACTUALITIES -- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Jack Parnell on food
safety; Arthur Dunkel, GATT director general, on GATT
progress; USDA Economist Leland Southard on pork &
beef production; USDA Economist Jim Schaub on soybean
exports; USDA Economist Greg Gajewski on farmland
values; USDA Economist Ed Alien on wheat production;
and John Phillips on Soviet wheat production.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- A fish story; crop monitoring with videos;
deadly lawns.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 10D
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 -I 1III I lllI1Y 11 ll 11111 II
OFFMIKE 31262 08265 134 9
BIG CRAP SHOOT...is the description of farming this year in the
area served by Randy Schmitt (WIKY, Evansville, Ind.). Planting
is usually completed by mid-May, but only 2% of corn is in the
ground. 10 days of baking sun is needed to dry soggy fields.
Randy says the fast approaching deadline for corn and soybeans
is June 15. Meanwhile the delay offers opportunities for
machinery maintenance. Producer attitudes are described as
optimistic, but frustrated.

SOUTH CENTRAL...region vice president Curt Lancaster (VSA
Radio Network, San Angelo, Texas) and Charlie Rankin (KURV,
Edinburg, Texas) conducted a super regional meeting at South
Padre Island, Texas, May 4-5 despite the rain. We understand a
few drops also wet the proceedings that Ron Hendren (WTAD,
Quincy, Ill.) and northeast region V.P. Joe Cornely (WRFD,
Columbus, Ohio) put together in Hannibal, Mo., May 11-13. Damp
clothes don't dampen spirits at NAFB meetings.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











FLOODS...in southwest sections of Arkansas have damaged crop
land. While no major floods have hit northeast sections of the
state, James Guthrie (KFIN, Jonesboro) says the area is too wet
even for rice planting, 30 percent behind schedule in late May.

COTTON...is key to economic well-being, says Richard Shields
(KKYN, Plainview, Texas) and its looking good. Previous two
years were disappointing, but this spring growth is well under-
way with few signs of infestations. He says producers in the
western half of the state could use moisture.

WELCOME...feedback from Bill Whittom (Farm Times, Rupert,
Idaho), Mary Gaines (Alabama Public TV) and Dave Oseland
(WCFC-TV, Chicago) regarding our TV news and feature service
distribute via satellite.


IC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2460 June 1, 1990

FARM SURVEY -- USDA will conduct a major survey of the nation's farms
& ranches June 1 15. The June Ag Survey is the first and largest
of a series of surveys USDA does during the year designed to assess
1990 crop & livestock production & inventories. USDA uses a sample
of about 130,000 farmers & ranchers nationwide to provide information
to use in making state, regional & national estimates. Contact:
Larry Beard (202) 447-5394.

SLIGHT COOLING -- A new USDA study of nearly 1,000 official weather
station records show the nation has cooled by one-third of one degree
Fahrenheit since 1920. The change was very uneven. Washington, Ga.,
for example, cooled by 3.78 degrees, while Schenectady, N.Y., warmed
by 3.23 degrees. "On average, though, the change at 961 official
weather stations over the past 70 years was about one-third degree
decrease," says Sherwood B. Idso, a USDA physicist. Contact: Sherwood
B. Idso (602) 379-4356.

IMPORTED OSTRICHES -- USDA is proposing to ease restrictions imposed
in August of 1989 on imported flightless birds. USDA banned the
import of ostriches, cassowaries, emus, kiwis and rheas after exotic
ticks were found on ostriches imported from Tanzania, Africa. Comments
on the USDA proposal to again permit imports of flightless birds are
due to USDA by June 29. Contact: Amichai Heppner (301) 436-5222.

MICROWAVE COOKING -- As popularity of microwave cooking continues to
grow, people continue to be concerned about the safety of meat &
poultry cooked in the ovens. Even the cookware & plastic wraps used
in microwaves are being questioned. The Spring 1990 issue of "Food
News for Consumers" contains a two-page microwave handbook, which
addresses these concerns. For a copy of "Food News for Consumers,"
call: Mary Ann Parmley (202) 447-9351.

FARM ECONOMY LOOKS STRONG -- The improved outlook for 1990 farm sales
is strengthening income prospects, USDA economists said recently.
Gains in cash receipts are likely to outpace both expense increases &
reductions in direct government payments. Although produ"i s
expected to increase slightly, strong demand continues
most commodity prices. Contact: Bob McElroy (202) 71 0.






- 2 -


HERE'S ANOTHER LOOK at some of the farm broadcasters from across the
nation who attended the "Washington Ag Watch" Conference in
Washington, D.C., May 20 22. Top photo: Farm broadcasters
interview Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter. Left photo:
Cindy Zimmerman (Florida Agrinet, Ocala, Fla.), center, poses with
USDA R-TV Chief Vic Powell and USDA R-TV Director of Media Liaison
Marci Hilt. Right photo: Ed Slusarczyk (Ag Radio Network, Utica,
N.Y.) is the center of attention in Vic's office. That's USDA R-TV
Deputy Chief Brenda Curtis on the right. (USDA Photo.)






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1721 -- On this segment, Brenda Curtis visits the
Orange County Florida Extension Service to learn
about their recycling program. Extension Agent Alicia
Hamrich talks about the educational program that is
the heart of this successful recycling program.
(Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1203 -- Food irradiation is safe; waste into watts;
urban 4-H clubs; the shift to unsaturated oils; why
file? (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1701 -- USDA News Highlights; haying & grazing restrictions;
controlling purple loosestrife; citrus blight; India's
tobacco industry. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1322 -- Compound produces leaner pigs; anti-cancer
agent; rice resists insects; flavor agent kills aflatoxin;
recycling power plant waste. (Weekly reel of research
feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tues., June 12, world ag supply &
demand; U.S. crop production; Soviet grain situation;
Wed., June 13 horticultural exports, world ag production;
world oilseed situation; world cotton situation; Mon.,
June 18, milk production.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(Week of May 28, 1990)

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on a new system for surveying cropland
with airborne video cameras; DeBoria Janifer looks
at new opportunities in aquaculture; Pat O'Leary discovers
a cure for "clutter stress."

ACTUALITIES -- Charles Caudill, USDA chief statistician, on the June farm
survey; Bob McElroy, USDA economist, on ag income &
finance; Larry Van Meir, USDA economist, on feed; Greg
Gajewski, USDA economist, on food prices; Ed Allen,
USDA economist, on wheat.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the "father" of USDA's
Forest Service, Will Pemble on pest-resistant potatoes.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4______ IAH I 111 III 1 I111
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08265 129 9
MIKHAIL GORBACHEV's...visit to Minnesota will have tne news ana
farm departments busy, says Roger Strom (WCCO, Minneapolis). Ag and
business leaders, the agriculture commissioner and governor's offices
have formed a coordinating committee for the Soviet leader's six-hour
tour. Following the visit, Roger says, he'll host a program featuring
interviews with people who met with the Gorbachevs.

NERVOUS FUTURE...is a description applied to producers in North
Dakota, says Mike Hergert (KNOX, Grand Forks). Subsoil in most
sections of the state remains dry and timely rains are needed for
promising grain and sugar beet crops. But the biggest factor is the
outbreak of grasshoppers. Cool temperatures have delayed the hatch.
Mike says up to 100 insects are emerging from the 1,700 eggs per
square yard, promising infestation and damage of biblical proportions.
Spraying operations are being conducted.




Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













CUTTING HAY...is underway in southwest Missouri in between the
series of storms hitting the area, says Mike Wiles (KTTS,
Springfield). Fields are not so soggy that producers can't get into
them, unlike sections of Arkansas served by Mike's station where
flooding has hit hard at agriculture production.

PORK EXPO...coverage at the Iowa state fair grounds was provided by
Cindy Cunningham (KICD, Spencer). She produced three reports a day
for listeners. Cindy says conditions vary widely in the northwest
section of the state. Some grain producers are replanting due to
flooding, while the region near South Dakota remains dry. But
overall, she says, her area looks good this Spring, with some sections
reporting planting operations ahead of schedule.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2464 June 8, 1990

IS THE WORLD FACING A FOOD CRISIS? At the height of the African famine
in 1985, only a few people voiced concern about the adequacy of the
world's food supply. Now, many believe a world food shortage is looming.
Recent USDA analyses yield some disquieting observations:
-- in many developing nations, food deficits have grown despite
improving food production;
-- developing-country cereal import bills & the cost of food
aid are greatly influenced by world cereal stocks, particularly
wheat and in the last few years, wheat output has declined;
-- exceptionally low world cereal stocks have caused international
prices to rise sharply;
-- and countries' food deficits translate food crises when
assistance fails to arrive. 13*!C
The current issue of National Food Review seses problems.
For a copy, call: Marci Hilt (202) 447-6 Contact.. ay W.
Nightingale 7202) 786-1705. 0
SJUL 11 1990
ARE FARMERS ROTATING CROPS? Concern tha continuouss cr ng is a
prevalent practice prompted USDA Economis s tan Dabery & Mohinder
Gill to study the three-year planting prac f omajor crops
(corn, winter wheat, spring wheat, soybeans," i 0YOS on & potatoes).
They found that at least 80 percent of the nat 988 harvested
cropland was planted in crop rotations for the two previous years.
The exception is cotton. About 50 percent of the 1988 cotton acreage
had been used continuously for that crop for at least three years.
Contact: Stan Daberkow & Mohinder Gill (202) 786-1464.

NO GAMBLING ALLOWED -- Scientists who name bugs can't gamble, they
need a system that pays off every time. "Sometimes naming insects
is not as easy as it would seem," says Douglas R. Miller, a USDA
expert in identifying insects, "since two insects that look alike
might be different species." Worldwide, scientists have named only
about one million species of insects. "There may be 10 to 50 million
more," Miller says. Contact: Douglas R. Miller (301) 344-3138.

TAME MAYHAW? Scientists at Louisiana Ag Experiment Station are trying
to make it feasible to grow the wild mayhaw commercially. Charles
Johnson says the mayhaw grows throughout the eastern U.S. & Canada &
is popular with home canners who make jelly from it. The small fruit
is shaped like an apple & is a brilliant waxy red when ripe. Contact:
Charles Johnson (318) 64-2662.





- 2 -


NAFB HELD ITS SOUTHEAST REGIONAL MEETING in Myrtle Beach, S.C., May 31 -
June 3 (top photo). Jim Mills (retired) won the golf classic and Nancy
& Doug Thomas (Progressive Farmer Network, Starkville, Miss.) won the
fishing tournament. Left photo: Johnnie Hood (WPTF/Southern Farm
Network, Raleigh, N.C.), Jerry Gehman (WASG, Atmore, Ala.), S.E. Region
V.P., & Ken Tanner (WRAL-TV/Tobacco Radio Net, Raleigh, N.C.) organized
the events. Right photo: Eric Parsons (USDA Ag Update) shot footage of
the tour's visit to blueberry & catfish farms. (USDA Photos.)

SOVIET AG IMPORTS -- The USSR was the second largest importer in
U.S. farm products in 1989, buying a record $3.6 billion. The U.S.
supplied nearly a fifth of Soviet ag imports & about two-thirds of
grain imports. The U.S. continues as the predominant supplier of the
USSR's hard-currency non-tropical imports. Soviet ag imports could
fall somewhat in 1990, say USDA economists. Lower grain imports &
prices and lower sugar imports might offset higher meat & vegetable
oil imports. The USSR's ability to pay for ag imports could be
strained further, if the Soviets continue to push consumer & equipment
imports. Contact: Kathryn Zeimetz (202) 786-1621.





- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1722 -- On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda
Curtis talks with Montgomery Co., Md., Extension Econ-
omist Susan Morris about an easy way to organize &
keep important records. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min.
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1204 -- Buying time-shares; pesticide & drug residues
in meat; Soviet food prices; file organization made
easy; mowing your lawn. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3
min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1711 -- USDA News Highlights; U.S.-Soviet food processing
agreement signed; farmer-owned reserve; doing business
in the Soviet Union; a farm chemical ban. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1323 -- New antibiotics discovered; citrus "a-peel;"
leafhopper biocontrol; fire ant toxicants; preventing
nitrogen leeching. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 18, milk production;
Tues., June 19, cattle on feed, U.S. ag trade update;
Wed., June 20, ag outlook; Thurs., June 21, catfish,
cherry production; Fri., June 22, livestock update,
ag resources; Mon., June 25, poultry production.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(June 7, 9 & 11, 1990)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the "Take Pride in America"
Memorial; Will Pemble takes a look at genetic
engineering; Lisa Telder reports on supermicroscopes.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter on U.S.
investments in Soviet food industries; Norton Strommen
on the latest weather & crop update; Scott Sanford
on cotton & wool; Steve Macdonald on U.S. exports &
trade; Bob Fondahn on U.S. export opportunities in
the United Kingdom.

NEXT WEEK -- Pat O'Leary reports on the "father" of USDA's Forest
Service.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 10D
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 -II I III I 11111I II I
OFFMIKE 3 1262 08265124 0
TORNADOES...in Indiana caused extensive damage to several
rural homes and buildings, says Skip Davis (WASK, Lafayette).
Most of the storms hit the state's southern area where fields
were beginning to dry from two weeks of flooding. It's getting
late to use even short-season varieties of corn & soybeans
and some producers may not be able to harvest a crop this
year. Skip says a new facility for processing hogs is being
constructed in his area. Japan will be a major market.

COOL WEATHER...in the Northwest is preventing rapid growth of
of winter and spring wheat, but when summer temperatures
arrive, producers expect excellent crops, says Rick Haines
(Northern Ag Network, Billings, Mont.). Rick also says
business leaders in some small towns are telling him they
expect a downward effect on local economies from land taken
out of production in the Conservation Reserve Program.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300













OUR THANKS...to Ray Wilkinson (WRAL-TV/Tobacco Radio Net,
Raleigh, N.C.) for serving as closing speaker at the Agriculture
Communicators in Education/USDA Office of Public Affairs Spring
Workshop in Washington, D.C., last month. Ray, who uses
humor to make his point, had them rolling in the aisles.

FOOD SAFETY...food labeling, monitoring pesticide residues and
other hot topics will be presented at the 1990 Journalists'
Conference, June 25-26, in the National Press Club, Washington,
D.C., by officials of USDA, the Food and Drug Administration,
the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Association
of State Departments of Agriculture. Government leaders in
food safety and nutrition will speak. Broadcasters are
welcome. Call our Marci Hilt (202) 447-6445 for registration
infor ation


IC POWEL;
Chief, Radio & TV Division




42)L, 3z-1`2 65--


Farm Broadcasters Letter 49



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 202.. 030
Letter No. 2465 June 15, 1990

FORCES OF CHANGE IN THE 1990'S -- As the decade of the 1990's begins,
world agriculture and its environment face contending forces for
change. Some are old forces in new guises, like the external debt
problem. But the problem assumes new shapes as economic growth &
trading patterns gradually shift. Other forces are entirely new,
however, like the dramatic changes in Eastern Europe & the USSR,
which have the potential to radically alter ongoing processes in a
short space of time. What might the future hold for the world's
major trade areas? And, what are some of the dynamics of the GATT
negotiations? An upcoming special issue of the World Agriculture
Situation & Outlook Report (available in about two weeks) will
examine these issues. Contact: Arthur Dommen (202) 786-9475.

SWEETPOTATOES HAVE BUG DEFENSES -- New sweetpotatoes with built-in
defenses against insects are producing better harvests than standard
varieties protected by insecticides in USDA trials. Chemicals occur
naturally in the skins of most sweetpotatoes, proving some resistance
to insects & nematodes. But, few have the level of resistance of
three new varieties, says USDA Plant Geneticist Alfred Jones, who
helped develop them. Contact: Alfred Jones (803) 556-0840.

HOW MUCH DID YOU SPEND FOR CLOTHES LAST YEAR? If you spent $799 for
clothing & shoes in 1989, you spent what USDA family economists
estimated each person spent. That's $39 per person more than you
spent in 1988. Half the increase can be attributed to higher prices
and half to increased buying. Other clothing facts: almost half the
fiber used in U.S. apparel is cotton; most U.S. textile imports come
from Asia; most exports went to countries in the Western Hemisphere.
Source: Recent Trends in Clothing & Textiles (Family Economics
Review, Vol. 3, No. 2) Contact: Joan C. Courtless (301) 436-8454

SUSTAINABLE AG CONFERENCE -- USDA wil cosponsor a National Sustainable
Agriculture & Natural Resources Conference in Lincoln, Neb., Aug.
15 18. At the conference, leaders in education, government, ag
producers, environmental & natural resources groups & agribusiness
will discuss future policy issues, public/private collaboration,
innovative rational/state/local programs & information networking.
Contact: Dixon Hubbard (202) 447-4341.







- 2 -


1wr~A
V


NAFB NORTH CENTRAL REGION of NAFB met June 7 9 in Grand Forks, N.D.,
and members enjoyed the North Dakota hospitality, which included good
weather. Mike Hergert, (KNOX, Grand Forks, N.D.) upper left photo,
organized the event. Roger Olson, (NAFB executive director) upper
right, presented the Agricultural Information Project program (center
photo). Lower left photo: North Central Region Vice President Doug
Cooper (KWMT, Fort Dodge, Iowa) presents golf tournament trophy and
other prizes to Gary Schoepf (WJOG, Norfolk, Neb.) (USDA Photos.)


NEW ANTIBIOTICS MAY FIGHT STAPH -- Two antibiotics inadvertently
discovered in a soil fungus have stopped the growth of staph bacteria
in USDA experiments. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the world's
leading causes of human infections, but over the years has become
resistant to some antibiotics and is showing resistance to others.
"We weren't really looking for the antibiotics," says USDA Chemist
Robert A. Baker, "we were trying to establish a relationship between
the soil fungus and a citrus disease." Contact: Robert A. Baker
(813) 293-4133.






- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1723 -- In early June, the United States & the USSR
signed a food processing industry agreement. On this edition of
Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis explores the meaning of this historic
event with U.S. industry people who are already exploring business
opportunities in the Soviet Union. She also talks with Soviet govern-
ment officials, who tell why they think U.S. business needs to open
up shop in the USSR now. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1205 -- Lawn clippings; a plan for forests; is your
child ready to stay alone; too much mulch; rules for rose gardens.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1712 -- USDA News Highlights; acreage reports; ag outlook/
price predictions; Most Favored Nation Status for the USSR; detecting
citrus blight. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1324 -- Cockroach allergies; swat team; long-term
danger; cockroaches & the courts; improving immunotherapy. (Weekly
reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Mon., June 18, milk production;
Tues., June 19, crop/weather update, cattle on feed, U.S. ag trade
update; Wed., June 20, ag outlook; Thurs., June 21, catfish, cherry
production; Fri., June 22, livestock update, ag resources (land
values).

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(June 14, 1990)

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the national forest management
plan; Will Pemble reports on a new wool protector; Joe Courson reports
on natural weed control; Mike Thomas reports on the electron microscope
for ag research and Lisa Telder reports on "supersalmon."

ACTUALITIES -- USDA Meteorologist Norton Strommen on the spring
wheat conditions & the 30-day weather outlook; World Board Chairman
Jim Donald on the latest figures for wheat & corn production; USDA
Economist Verner Grise on tobacco production; B-roll of the dedication
of the Capitol columns at USDA's National Arboretum in Washington,
D.C.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- "Father" of USDA's Forest Service & cockroach
allergies.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY .. .8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFFMIKE 3

WHAT A CHANGE...from last year, says John Weir (KBUR,
Burlington, Iowa). Field tiles are running again and ponds
are approaching normal levels. John says recent cool weather
hindered corn growth, but warm temperatures and timely rains
are greening crops and improving producer attitudes.

NORTHERN THIRD...of the state is doing OK, but most of the
southeast portion is so wet that it's too late for corn
planting, says Mike Railsback (WDAF, Kansas City, Mo.). Water
table is high, causing quick runoff and repeated flooding of
bottom land. Mike says severe storms seem to have arrived
early this year rather than in mid-summer months.

TEMPERATURES...reaching above 100 degrees and brisk winds
are stressing crops near Plainview, Texas. Lenny Ray (KVOP/KATX)
says cotton producers who have irrigation will have a crop,
but others will likely replant to milo.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










DAILY WHEAT HARVEST...reports are underway, says Dewey Nelson
(KRVN, Lexington, Neb.). Producers expect a good crop.
Only concern so far is outbreak of Russian wheat aphid in
the Panhandle where pest numbers are reported to be ten
times higher than last year. Harvest will move into Nebraska
in late June.

FARM BROADCASTERS...have the well deserved reputation of
serving their listeners. George Atkins' (Developing Countries
Farm Radio Network, Oakville, Ontario, Canada) audience is
located in 100 countries speaking 140 languages. When we
talked he was preparing a script for third world producers
about how adding ground hot chili peppers to sacks of grain
helps repel insects. George leaves for China in mid-July to
report about their low-cost farming techniques.



VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division








Farm Broadcasters Letter L 26



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2466 June 22, 1990


USDA RADIO'S GARY CRAWFORD recently accepted a gold medal at the 1990 International Radio Festival
of New York for USDA Radio's The Secret Lives of Vegetables.' The festival honors the world's best radio
programming, advertising & promotions. USDA's first in the education category beat out entries from the
Australian Broadcasting Corporation & a Mexican radio station. Crawford produced "TSLV" in 1989 for
USDA's cassette service. The 14-minute radio documentary lightheartedly explores the role of vegetables
in our meals, our health & in our culture. Crawford is shown here holding the medal with USDA Deputy
Director of Public Affairs Elizabeth Board & USDA Director of Public Affairs Paul Kindinaer. This is USDA's
first win at the festival. (USDA Photo.)

US & USSR COOPERATE IN CLIMATE STUDIES -- Scientists from the US and
the Soviet Union will spend the summer camping in the back country of
Siberia on a research expedition to collect data on climate change.
The cooperative project will assess possible effects of climate change
on forests in both countries and will develop recommendations for
management responses. Contact: Diane Hitchings (202) 465-3778.

CONTROLLING WILDLIFE DAMAGE -- USDA has completed a draft environmental
impact statement on the animal damage control program. The program
is responsible for controlling wildlife damage to agricultural &
natural resources, and protecting public health & safety. Contact:
Pat El-Hinnawy (301) 436-7799. -


A21, 3L~~ =I~f~d





2 -

LACTOSE & SALMONELLA -- Lactose (milk sugar) apparently can block
Salmonella infection in broiler chicks, even when the Salmonella
bacteria are capable of fermenting the lactose, USDA Microbiologist
Richard L. Ziprin says. Broiler chicks dosed with high numbers of
lactose-fermenting Salmonella had only a fraction of the number of
Salmonella bacteria in their bodies after a few days on lactose,
Ziprin says. It is estimated that as many as 4 million Americans
become ill each year after eating foods contaminated with Salmonella.
Contact: Richard L. Ziprin (409) 260-9302.


TRADE SURPLUS DOWN -- The April ag trade surplus fell $442 million to
$1.5 billion. This is the largest month-to-month drop since April
1989. Exports declined 17 percent to $3.3 billion, while imports
were down 12 percent at $1.9 billion. The cumulate trade surplus for
October 1989 April 1990 totaled $11.8 billion, unchanged from a
year ago. Source: U.S. Agricultural Trade Update, June 19, 1990.
Contact: Steve Milmoe (202) 786-1822.


AFRICANIZED HONEYBEE QUESTIONS -- Did you know the chance of being
injured by an Africanized -- or any honeybee -- is far less than the
chance of being hit by lightning? And, one sting from an Africanized
honeybee is no more painful or dangerous than a sting from any other
honeybee. But, Africanized honeybees tend to sting with less
provocation & in greater numbers than other honeybees. Contact:
James Tew (216) 264-3911.


EMERGENCY WATERSHED WORK -- USDA's Soil Conservation Service is
providing an initial $20 million to help communities in the South
clean up after extensive flood damages. "We're working to help the
most threatened areas first," says Wilson Scaling, chief of the Soil
Conservation Service. "We've gotten requests through our state
offices and are allocating funds now." Contact: Diana Morse (202)
447-4772.


WORLD SUGAR MARKET STILL TIGHT -- World sugar production in 1990-91
will fall short of consumption for the sixth consecutive season, USDA
economists predict. They say global sugar production will be 107.2
million metric tons, raw value, 2.3 million below consumption. Global
sugar consumption in 1990-91 is expected to rise 1.4 percent, to
109.5 million tons. The fastest growth is among the populous developing
countries. Contact: Peter Buzzanell (202) 786-1888.


CAPITOL COLUMNS that once graced the East Portico of the U.S Capitol
now stand in the Great Meadow at USDA's National Arboretum. The
columns, replaced in 1958 and abandoned, are part of Washington's and
the nation's history. The National Arboretum now provides a permanent
home for the columns. "The Capitol columns, in their new setting on
a hill with a fountain and reflecting pool, reflect the simplest and
earliest type of landscaping," says Arboretum Director H. Marc Cathey.
Contact: Kim Kaplan (301) 344-3932.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1724 -- Efforts to open up the world to more U.S.
farm products are intensifying. Maria Bynum reports on an
export center at the University of Kentucky. (Weekly
reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1206 -- Public hearings on biotechnology; smoking trends;
it's watermelon time; U.S. hams go international; lawn
chemicals become controversial. (Weekly reel of 2-1/2
3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE NEWS & FEATURES #1713 -- USDA News Highlights; biotech hearings;
a peanut marketing system; watermelon growers unite; tapping
international markets. (Weekly reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1325 -- Roach-proof construction; keeping clones;
gene pool preservation; grass seed production; dwarf tall
fescue grasses. (Weekly reel of research feature
stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., June 27, Pacific Rim outlook;
world coffee situation; Thurs., June 28, crop acreage
report, grain stocks, world tobacco situation; Fri.,
June 29, hog & pig inventory, ag prices; Tues., July 3,
crop/weather update; Fri., July 6, dairy production.

DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
Week of June 18, 1990

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on the "father" of USDA's Forest
Service and on a watermelon feast in Washington, D.C.;
Will Pemble reports on cockroach allergies & how to
avoid them; Andy Alcock of Mississippi State University
reports on a new ryegrass variety.

ACTUALITIES -- Greg Gajewski, USDA economist, has the latest ag
outlook; USDA Economist Steve Milmoe with the U.S.
ag trade update; James Grueff, USDA foreign ag specialist,
on the GATT negotiations; John Beshoar, USDA attache in
Brussels, on European trade; Geoff Wiggin, USDA ag trade
officer in Singapore on high value products trade.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'leary reports on reserving a campsite in
the national forests.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4-
_____Illli_____ II l I II I t UII l l I II ITIt 1
OFFMIKE 3 126208265 1141

FULL SCHEDULE...of daily broadcasts from county fairs, is planned this
summer, says Bob Ziegler (WIMA, Lima, Ohio). Bob's ten-fair season
operates June to September. Bob says that although crop development is
behind schedule because of wetness, equipment sales are improved,
reflecting producer confidence this year.

COTTON MARKET...is so tight, says Douglas Thomas (Progressive Farmer
Network, Starkville, Miss.), that every time a tractor breaks down in
the Delta, word gets out and prices go up. Fields in the region have
dried, allowing producers to replant, but the lateness will force
producers in northern regions to keep watch for first frost later this
year.

WHEAT TEST CUTTING...was underway in the Great Bend area of Kansas when
I spoke with Don Baker (KVGB-, Great Bend). Don says if rains will leave
them alone through the end of June they expect a 35-40 bushel crop average.

Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS














GRASSHOPPER THREAT...is substantially diminished in most of South Dakota
due to rains during insect hatch, says Matt Westergaard (KMIT-FM, Mitch-
ell). Conditions have changed in the past seven weeks, water is standing
in the fields. Small grains and grasses are looking good removing
concerns about feed supply. Matt says most producers in his area are
upbeat.

FLOODS...have subsided and fields are drying in Missouri just in time
for good development of the wheat crop, says Lynn Watts (KMZU, Carroll-
ton). Harvest will get underway in July. Lynn and crew are keeping
radio company with producers as late planting of corn and soybeans gets
underway.

IN CASE...you missed it, our Gary Crawford won a gold medal at the
International Radio Festival for his production of an AGRICULTURE USA
progr m. Details o page one.

chief, Radio & TV vision
chief, Radio & TV division








Farm Broadcasters Letter JU 25 9



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202)4474330
Letter No. 2467 June 29, 1990


SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE CLAYTON YEUTTER and Secretary of the Interior
Manuel Lujan announced a five-point package of measures to achieve a
balance between preserving the Northern Spotted Owl and protecting jobs
in the Pacific Northwest June 26. Cy Jamison, director of the Bureau of
Land Management at Interior, stands behind Lujan. "This administration is
concerned about endangered species and the livelihood of families in
the Pacific Northwest," Yeutter said. (USDA Photo.)
WHEAT STARCH -- BIODEGRADABLE WRAPPER FOR BREAD? Tomorrow's sandwich
bread might come wrapped in a bag that's made from wheat, if USDA
research pays off. Ideally, wheat starch could make biodegradable
films that are thinner, stronger and chewed up faster by microorganisms
than current biodegradables made with corn starch. "We're a long way
from biodegradable plastic made with wheat starch," says USDA Chemist
Jerold A, Betz_. "The first need is a practical way to sort out the
really small granules that would go into such plastics." aontac1:
Jerold A. Bietz (309) 685-4011.

USDA STEPS UP SURVEILLANC -- USDA is cooperating with state veterinary
diagnostic labs & Iowa State University to do a national surveillance
program to make sure the U.S. is free of bovine spongiform encephalopathy,
the so-called "mad cow" disease, that has been found in Great Britain.
Contact: Margaret Webb (301) 436-7799.


A 21, 3Y I 2Y6 7





- 2 -


GET TO KNOW ALF -- USDA's National Agricultural Library would like
you to get to know ALF. No, no. Not the wise-cracking, furry alien
of TV fame. ALF is the library's computer bulletin board, which
provides access to, and a means to exchange, ag information & resources.
And, incidentally, ALF stands for "Agricultural Library Forum."
Contact: Brian Norris (301) 344-3778.


NEW SWINE TOOL -- A new biotechnology tool can diagnose swine dysentery
two to five times faster than current tests, USDA scientists say.
Microbiologists Nell S. Jensen & Thad B. Stanton developed the DNA probe.
With the probe & a fecal sample from a pig, lab technicians can
identify the bacterium that causes swine dysentery within a day or
two. The DNA probe does the job by bonding to a unique gene sequence,
like a signature, say the scientists. Contaj;c: eil S- J.ensen .g (515)
239-8288.


AREMLALD VALU ES HIGHE -- U.S. farmland values in 1990 are expected
to rise 3 to 4 percent, which is close to last year's 4 percent
increase, USDA economists say. The 1990 forecast incorporates net
farm income close to the 1989 record, slightly lower inflation-adjusted
interest rates, slightly lower inflation and recent changes in farmland
values. The U.S. average farmland value rose in 1989 for the third
consecutive year, reaching $693 per acre as of Jan. 1, 1990. Contact:
Roger Hexem (202) 786-1422.


fAISHEPOCe.ESS1BNLUPe -- Farm-raised catfish processed during May
totaled 31.5 million pounds, up 9 percent from a year ago, USDA economists
say. The May average paid to growers was 79 cents per pound, 3 cents
above the same month last year. Contact: Ron Sitzman (202) 447-3244.


BREAL ALLIERG -- Because allergy to cockroaches poses a significant
threat to human health, a team of USDA scientists is collaborating to
help. An estimated 10 to 15 million people in the U.S. are allergic
to roaches. Where prevention isn't possible, the team hopes to
improve treatment for sensitive people, who even react to body parts
from roaches, long dead, that linger in their homes. "People simply
cannot continue to view cockroaches as just a nasty nuisance," says
USDA Entomologist Richard J. Brenner. onJaD : Ri Bchard J. Brenner
(904) 374-5937.


WIND EROSION DOWN -- Wind erosion has damaged an estimated 7.8 million
acres in the Great Plains during the Nov.-thru-May wind erosion season,
says Wilson Scalina, chief of USDA's Soil Conservation Service. This
is down from last year, when nearly 14 million acres were damaged.
Contact: Diana Morse (202) 447-4772.


YOU WON'T BE GETTING your Farm Broadcasters Letter for next two
weeks. We'll be on summer vacation. Next issue will be July 20.







- 3 -


FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1725 -- Gary Crawford looks at the problem of
groundwater pollution from agricultural chemicals and waste products and
the technologies and techniques farmers and homeowners can use to reduce
the problem. (Weekly reel -- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIMJE 12. 2 -- Spotted owl; food safety update; protecting
poultry from salmonella; nutrition labeling; selling your timeshare.
(Weekly reel of 2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRJITAPE 1714 -- USDA news highlights; integrated crop management;
maximizing catfish production; pond doctor; chilling injury. (Weekly reel
of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE I1326 -- The fungus within; resistant tall fescue;
germplasm network; innovative plant storage; freezing for the future.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

eUPMING ON USDA RADIO INEWLINE -- Fri., July 6, dairy products; Tues.,
July 10, crop/weather update, China outlook; Wed., July 11,
horticultural exports; Thurs., July 12, U.S. crop production, USSR grain
outlook, world ag. supply/demand; Fri., July 13, livestock/poultry outlook,
milk production, world cotton situation, world oilseed situation, world
grain/crop situation.

DIAL .THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(June 28, 30 and July 2, 1990)

FEATURES -- Eat LLeary reports on the national forest campsite
reservation; L~nn~iyv111 takes a look at summer food safety; .Will Pemble
describes twining in cattle research; Lisa__Tej.der reports on farmer
respiratory problems.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Qlay~.tonJYeujier and Secretary of
the Interior Manuel LuJan on spotted owl management plans; Deputy
Secretary of Agriculture Jack Parnell on food safety; Secretary of
Health and Human Services Dr,_Louis Sullivan on food labeling; USDA
chief meteorologist Dr,_ orton Strom en on weather update; USDA
economist Steve Milmoe on soviet imports.


Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY 10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 10D
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4II 111 IIIIII IIIII I I II II I
1FFMIKE 1262 08265 109 1

ROUND THE CLOCK...planting put corn in the ground, says Jeff
Nalley (WOMI/WBKR, Owensboro, Ky.), but the delay caused by
excessive moisture has resulted in reduced acreage. The plan
last Spring when warm weather arrived early was to get it all
in the ground ahead of schedule, but Jeff says a 60-day
monsoon visited the area making everything late. Tobacco is
set but behind schedule, and wheat has been hurt by wetness.

SATELLITE DISHES...were rearranged by severe weather hitting
Topeka, Kans. Kathhy jatton (WIBW, Topeka) also says the
wheat harvest in Kansas will likely be variable. Diseases and
moisture vary by region, and some observers say most producers
will not obtain 39 bushel yields. Kathy says they won't know
until the grain is in the bins. Update on her 16-year old
son injured in field accident: Ryan is home from the hospital,
continues therapy, has driven his pickup, and looks forward
to a return of feeling to his legs.



Farm Broadcasters Letter

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











COUNTY FAIRS...and state fair are on the schedule of Rita
Frazer (WSMI, Litchfield, Ill.). Rita will make daily
broadcasts throughout the fair season. Rita says wetness
has forced several producers in her area to replant to milo,
and that a tight seed market has reduced opportunities to
plant other crops.

WHEAT HARVEST...is completed in the region served by Barry
Mahler (KWFT, Wichita Falls, Texas). Late rain and leaf rust
took a toll, reducing an expected good crop to only average
yields. Cotton is up and looking good. Barry says last
December's freeze is apparent in improved pastures, up to 75
percent loss in some fields. Native grasses are doing fine.

FARM BROADCASTERS LETTER...will be on vacation the first two
weeks of Jul Lets all celebrate our freedoms on Independence
ay

-VIC POWELL
Chief, Radio & TV Division





A 2/1 3 :' 2/ 65



Farm Broadcasters Letter



United States Department of Agriculture Office of Public Affairs Radio-TV Division Washington D.C. 20250 (202) 447-4330
Letter No. 2468 July 20, 1990


RADIO NEWS CONFERENCE -- USDA Radio hosted a radio news conference with farm broadcasters July
17 on the Houston Economic Summit & the farm bill. Pictured here: Kelly ShippD (standing) press secretary
to Sec. Yeutter, (left to right around table) Assistant Secretary for Economics Bruce Gardner, Undersecretary
for International Affairs & Commodity Programs Richard Crowder. Deputy Undersecretary for International
Affairs & Commodity Programs John Campbell, Secretary of Agriculture Clavton Yeutter and USDA Radio
Moderator Brenda Curtis. (USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.)

GATT NEGOTIATIONS -- Sec. Yeutter says there'll be "a lot more blood,
sweat and tears at the negotiating table" before the GATT negotiations
are finished. The EC is vigorously opposed to phasing out farm
subsidies. Because there are less than 70 negotiating days to DOC0
GATT, you might like a copy of a new USDA publication, "The
Negotiations," which covers background, ag policy compares" US
proposals & status, update & timeline on the ag negotiation For
a copy of "The GATT Negotiations," call: Marci Hilt (202 47-6445.

FAX US YOUR FAX -- Several issues ago, we told you we hav a new fax
machine (202) 447-5165. If you're a farm broadcaster, we' ~1 e to
have your fax number so we can get printed background materT i
you. Please, fax us your fax number now! .







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THANKS TO ALL who returned the questionnaire on USDA TV's News Service.
We appreciate your responses & comments. They help us plan future
stories. We heard from a number of stations who expressed a need to
receive video tapes by mail since satellite delivery was not possible
for them. We have proposed a "tape by mail" service for features
only. We'll keep you posted as to what we'll be doing.


BEES LIKE SWEETER ONIONS, TOO -- Scientists have found why southwestern
honeybees aren't pollinating Texas, Arizona & California onion plants.
The nectar from these onions has too much potassium & not enough sugar
to suit the bees, says USDA Entomologist James R. Hagler. "If geneticists
bred onions with more appealing nectar, it could translate to more
seed for growers and less seasonal swings in onion prices at the
grocery store," Hagler says. Contact: James R. Hagler (602) 670-6220.


MOSELEY SWORN IN -- Sec. Yeutter swore in James Moseley as assistant
secretary for natural resources & environment July 2. Moseley was
nominated by Pres. Bush May 7 & confirmed by the Senate June 28.
Moseley, 42, is a native of Indiana. He attended Purdue & received a
B.S. in horticulture in 1973. For the past year, Moseley has been ag
advisor to William Reilly, administrator of the Environmental Protection
Agency. He built & managed an ag production operation for 20 years.
Contact: Kelly Shipp (202) 447-4623.


SOME SUMMER VISITORS to USDA included Orion Samuelson and Vivian Cooper. Orion, shown here with
USDA R-TV Chief Vic Powell, recently celebrated the 15th anniversary of his 30-minute weekly TV program,
'U.S. Farm Report.' The Tribune Entertainment Co. held a dinner in his honor on the USDA Patio.
Attendees included Sec. Yeutter, other USDA officials, Tribune network officials and members of Orion's
team. Vivian Cooper (WNAX, Yangton, S.D.), shown here with USDA R-TV Deputy Chief Brenda Curtis, was
in Washington with the National Farmers Union and was covering stories on Capitol Hill and at USDA.
(USDA Photos.)






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FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE USA #1728 -- Brenda Curtis presents Sec. Clayton Yeutter's
views on the progress of the farm bill & the multi-
lateral trade negotiations under GATT. (Weekly reel
-- 13-1/2 min. documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME #1210 -- Is your well contaminated? Fat & your diet,
tips on home canning; good wood to avoid defective
decks; roses for your sweetheart. (Weekly reel of
2-1/2 3 min. consumer features.)

AGRITAPE #1717 -- USDA News Highlights; farm bill; GATT negotiations;
tapping international markets; wheat outlook. (Weekly
reel of news features.)

NEWS FEATURE FIVE #1329 -- Listeria study; DNA "fingerprinting," new
iron test, low iron babies, spice & blood sugar.
(Weekly reel of research feature stories.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed., July 25, rice yearbook;
Thurs., July 26, world tobacco situation; Fri., July
27, cattle numbers; Mon., July 30, outlook for developing
economies, farm numbers & land report; Tues., July 31,
ag prices, catfish, crop/weather update; Wed., Aug. 1,
fruit yearbook; Tues., Aug. 7, crop weather update;
Wed., Aug. 8, horticultural exports.


DIAL THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION NEWS SERVICE
(July 19, 21 & 23)


FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer takes a look at new poultry products; Pat
O'Leary reports on national forest fishing; Will Pemble
examines futuristic poultry houses.

ACTUALITIES -- Sec. Yeutter on the 1990 farm bill, GATT & other
issues; USDA Meteorologist Ray Motha on latest weather
update; USDA World Board Chairman James Donald on crop
production; USDA Economist LeLand Southard on livestock
& poultry.

Available on satellite Westar IV, audio 6.2 or 6.8:

THURSDAY ... .7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
SATURDAY ... .10:30-11:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 1OD
MONDAY 8:30-9:15 a.m., EDT, Transponder 12D
(Repeat of Saturday transmission)




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CORN CROP...is 80 percent good to excellent in Nebraska with producers
in eastern third of the state concerned about corn borers while
sorghum producers are battling chinch bug, says Gary Schoepf (WJAG/KEXL,
Norfolk, Neb.). Eastern sections are experiencing the best pasture
conditions in several years. Gary says his station's home county fair
featured an information booth cosponsored by PRCA Rodeo and Entertainment
Gary says its a great time to be involved in ag broadcasting.

MOVED...Lisa Telder (TV producer for Michigan State University) to
assistant director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture. David
Putman (KPET, La Mesa, Texas) to VSA Radio Network, San Angelo.

EXPANSION...is underway at KRVN, Lexington, Neb. Rich Hawkins &
Dewey Nelson plan to add a third farm broadcaster with 5-years
experience. Interested? Contact Rich at (308) 324-2371.

JUDGES...at recent American Farm Bureau Federation awards competition
for radio & TV were Cindy Zimmerman (Florida Agrinet, Ocala) & Brian
Baxter (Morning Ag Report, Indianapolis).
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Farm Broadcasters Letter I I 11111 I 1 11111
31262 08265 104 2

Office of Public Affairs
Radio-TV Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300












CORN AND BEANS...were so late getting planted in Indiana & Illinois that
the wheat harvest was simultaneously underway in southern portions of
the states, says Gary Kinnett (WIAI, Danville, Ill.). Gary says the
region produces a variety of vegetable crops and the just-completed pea
harvest yielded a good average of 2,700 pounds per acre.

TWO TORNADOES...hit ag areas in Colorado recently, a state not known
for such weather. Mason Lewis (KOA, Denver) says he was one of the
first reporters on the scene in Limon, 120 miles east of Denver. About
80 percent of the town was damaged.

"BEST THING...I've seen that tells the story of agriculture to the
general public," says Murray Miles (Tenn. Farm Bureau Fed., Columbia)
about USDA's "America's Most Crucial Industry." He used it on his
weekly TV program. Available free to you, too. Call: Marci Hilt on
(20) 447- 445 for a copy.


VIC PO ELL
Chief, Radio-TV Division