Windward Islands' opinion

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Title:
Windward Islands' opinion
Physical Description:
v. : ; 31 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Philipsburg, Netherlands Antilles
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
completely irregular

Subjects

Genre:
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
v. 1- July 1, 1959-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000328444
oclc - 01746332
notis - ABV7991
sobekcm - AA00000504_00052
System ID:
AA00000504:00052

Full Text
1
"AMOR ET LABOlt OU&Ll ViNCiT" "l-uvl. v LAIMH <;tiNQt;:,:i ALL TIU :s
SATURDAY JUT," a ?'.- /
Vol. 6 N& 1
Price ttfl. 0.25
1
SPECIAL EDITION
COMMEMORATING
r
r-
1 St. LUSTP UM' Qf'TH IS NEWS PA PER
July 1, 1959
July 1, 1964
101sL VIAR OF EMANCIPATION
July 1, 1863
July 1, 1964
O T9. 7^V?C
0/ 7CC I
mM



I
WIN^WAIff ISLANDS' OPINION" ; 2 : \. V SATU DAY JULY 4, 1964
-j^~-
I i ii'
\
THE WINDWABD 7.SLANES1 OPINION
==r = /
Is published every* Saturday It was established by J.H. Lake.Sr. on ,
July 1, 1959 as a means of helping to iDprove the social, economic, educa*io'
tional and political conditions o? the Windward Islands, by advocating a-
gainst the cause of injustice and oppression.
Editor Publisher..............,.................... j.n. Lake,Sr.
Associate Editor ..................................... C.E. Daly,Jr.
Associate Editor ..................................... Mrs. D. Morales
Editorial address: P.O. Box 22
Philipsburg
.> \ \.r ,.' St. Maarten, Neth. Ant.
i i
........ .-------------------------------------------'.....
Printers: The People's Printery Tanarindesteeg N 8 Philipsburg
EEITOHIAL
In commemorating our first Lustrum the five years active existence of the "Wind-
ward Islands' Opinion" ; we first must thank the Lord for the grace and blessing He
has bestowed upon us so that from July 1, 1959 till Yuly 1, 1964 the effort to help
improve the social, econimic, educational and political conditions has not been in
vain. By advocating against the cause of injustice and oppression many enemies have
been acquired because we know that the truth is a brutal thing at times and generally
in bad grace, .,,.,...,.......
In retrospect of five years we sorely have.reasons to be aptimistic since during
the infancy of YOUK PAPEU which was a.novelty, seemed,to,many af us a batard child -
a leprose article which hqd to be shun or conceiled from our neighbours. To realize
that YOUR weekly was considered like the talisman of the African which had to be
hidden from luckier races and compare the acceptance of to-day our first lustrum.
We have never blamed you for being c'iscriminate remember, the NEGRO was in the
fourtben century condiaered a rare speciment; never a human being "for we understood
that this p '-.wwas new and that we had to grow accustcued to this new idea.
Especially when at the'zero hour the roll call was "de1 Casque'" and true visages
became apparent; especially when obsolete ideas and ambiguous attitudes were chal-
lenged; especially when the audicity was taken to expound certain personal views
we deemed it possible that the T-R U T II we had to learn not to try to sabotage
(See EDITORIAL on paKe 14) 'fotf^ nj
..1 i ^i';Ki-^in#iT> ,tm
I ^ -f


WINDWAHC ISLANDS'1 OPINION
SATUBDAY JULY 4, 1964
C A i; I g A I 2 SCHEDULES
Effective April 7 1964
M3NDAYS EBUSBAS SATILIDAYS
Arrive St. Depart St. Iaarten at 1G:14 a.n. Haarten at 10:30 a.n.
And on
< UNLAYS
Arrive St. Depart St. iaarten at 4:29 p.m. iaarten at 4:45 p.n.
CONNECT JO JS TO ST. C fi 0 I X
MONDAYS atoaBMB sATjjrjiAYs
Arrive St. Depart St. ?houas 11:20 a.n. ?honaa 2;45 p.n.
UNLAYS.
Arrive St. Depart St. Thones 5:35 p.n. Thomas 5:50 p.n.

For .reservation & info nation call tel. 2244 or 3244

MIDNIGHT BLUES AT DELFT "
By C.E. Morasse
Hard lunps of Latin-American music
rock my senses into a frenzied rhythu
and ny body quickens in tone with its
dark colour. In the fuffle of the bongo
I see jungle rivers steeling their way
under dense brushes: giant fawns and
ferns. Then like the wenon of a snake
the crackling beat of the tanbora surges
under ny skin and I an cranped into
bleak surprise. My physical is now a.
reproduction of ny sensation as ny face
is flushed with a thousand drops of
sweat still oozing cut ny pores. The
spectral vision of ny eyes creates
green, yellow, blue, red and lavender
human beings.
And laughter is a si. ly giggle a
drunken whore. Hi, hi ...." I an hear-
ing nyself laughing. 'What funny colour-
ed people .... No, not colouredJ ---
COLJUBED is biased colourful, yes...
a bouquet of archaic roses".
My now distinct Laughter crawls over
the back of tonultous sounds and rings
out in stark horror through the blar-
ing silence: Feminine chatter nale
dispute shuffling feet; gulps of
beer, sips of wine and cooled drinks;
laughter love talk and secretive
loveplay. ithythoic beating of drums;
drums ringing, muffled like the
stifled cries of abortive children;
pleading druns like broken sobs of dis-
tressed concubines. And I am the cen-
trifugal point of this human nlle*. Oh
barbaric explosion of civilized minds I
In my frenzied state of mind I realized
the combustion cf cultures that is ex-
hausted into this comparatively small
hall in Delft.
White civilization adheres to ny skin
like carnaval paint so easily washed
off. So are ny red, orange, yellow,
green and blue creatures.
To-norrow a few years further they
are not components anymore but black
or white individuals ligtt skinned
or dark skinned is the difference in
hard coin. Civilization has drained
this culture of its last drop of hu-
manity and now like the prodigal son
is tinid to return hone. Its heritage
is frowned at, lost in all obscurity -



WINDWARE ISLANDS' uPINION
SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964
, PLANKING A VACATION?
HERE IS THE. IDEAL HOLIDAY EXCUSION, TAILOE MADE FOB ST. MAARTEN
VISIT ST. CUDIX, .PUERTO RICO, SANTO DOMINGO, ARUBA, CURACAO
All five islands or any of the five
lor the LOW, LOW FARE of ONLY US 6 128.00
Take a MONTH or EVEN MORE to complete YOUR trip
NO VISA OR SPECIAL DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR
CITIZENS. OF EITHER SIDE OF THE ISLAND
SALESMEN BUYERS : TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE
LOW FARES
For further information contact:
S.E.L. MADURO & SONS (Windward Islands) Ltd.
Front Street 66, Philipsburg, Tel: 2202
WINDWARD ISLANDS DRUGSTOIE
Your Confidential Drugstore
Where you are always assured of efficient
and fast service
Offers you:
LANALOL Products: "Ilair Food"
"Shampoo", Hair dressing etc.
LADY ESTHER Products: Powder, Lipstick, nail-
polish, Lotions, Eye-liners, etc.
Ladies look YOUR best USE: NADINOLA DE LUXE,
"ARTRA" Skin tone crean.
We also
supply
all kinds of
LIQU 0 It S
Tel: 2330
_
,t-i
::'
lest in oblivion. My c
archaic heresy still
swine in the Euphrates
an ny collective exis-
t >nce haunts the banks
of the Nile footprints
iii the deseett sands.
Marching onward, hunted
like game with nets, clubs,
rope; sometines sold for
petty trinkets or corals.
Packed like sardines sexes
are annuled for here, hu-
manity is already deprived
of her privacy.
Stench cries, lamenta-
tion odour of filth and
vomit seep through wooden
ca^rgo-boatfloors as more
than a prayer to the heaven
of a biased God. Realiza-
tion of my ineptness to
coi. prebend as a total this
cor troversial situation ar-
^ret'it my coordination with
thii rhythmic music.' I shuffl


I
WINDY/AUD ISLANDS' OPINION
SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964
THE VIRGIN AT FRIAR'S-BAY
By; Canille Baly
I fell into a chance situation in which I an sure
to have seen the creatipn of an ebony nymph. She
slipped away fron ny filed attention like quick-
silver through a fist. And I cannot erase her brand-
ed impression froa ny nind. She excitingly haunts ay
nenory:
Your snile, your nouth is wide with laughter and
like the rising sun you shower the dark face of the
earth with the brilliant question irk of life.
Black nynph, your anile plays a ubribo round the
oft corner, of your blocking lips, The ailk of
^W innocence i* crjtaUfce' iA the. da*Mw* vf
Touri'Ojei; tod. the passion, that lios latent is
pure, bunanity. \%
Your veiled voice evokes again and again the
copper colour of a divine contra-alt. Your kind-
ness, your tenderness are narked in the snooth
fragile fora of your tiny hands. So frail is
your waist, that swells and ends in two beauti-
ful legs, Black Aphrodite.'
By JoveJ It was the hands of Art itself that
noulded these legs fron the purest ebony; the
shuffling of your feet caressed ny ears with their
nelodious rhythn.
Your subtle walk is reninescent cf the beauti-
ful strinding of a Watusi enpress of the ancient
negro's empire; Bronse Beauty, you are the synbol
of ny netaphysical longing....
Where I have been lacking in words; where I
have sonetines been rough and crude with ny few
words, forgive ne, for I know, I know I have been
too, too confident to believe that I could end
that which I began. Like a sifter ny words are;
they are not capable of giving inage to your puri-
ty. My words are full of holes, tfcc-y are transpa-
rent and your light shines through then.
My words are too shallow to -acccrxiodate your
riches, virtues. So nueh is lost of your divinity.
Excuse ny effort; I have derived ocatacy fron
our encounter, but a child alike I have played
with it and lost it along the way. I beg pardon
for offering you so little of so nuch, so terri-
ble nuch.....
vapour is evoked. And
as I wander through
the nusky Delft alleys
over rickety little
bridges, I try to find
evidence of a creative
sensibility within ne. |
I crave to unravel the
question which conti-
nually keeps buzzing
like a tedious nosqui-
te through ny head.
What sense of purpose
or urgency does any
of ua have?
It is chilly, cold
out hero. The iky it
Dutch-norning-grey I
an a stranger to then
inside there, in that
building in Delft.
++++++++++++
THE CMLDBEN OF SLAVES N
(Part I)
ny way through the winding selfgrati-
fying nass unto the <;obble-stones of -
Delft. One block further I hear, like
the faint thunp of %he bongo, throb of
ny heart in ny index finger, as a herald
to the nisty morning. I yawn deeply in-
to the broadening dawn and a cluster of
Yes, that is what we
are; we are the descen-
dants of slaves.
Sone four hundred years
ago our forefoathers
were bought or captured
on nany parts of the
African continent and
packed like sardines in-
to the foul-snelling
holes of sailing ships,
to be transported to the
"New World".
The perpetrators of
this nost heinious deed in
the history of mankind
were Y/hite and Christian,
and cane uainly fron Prance
England, Holland, Portugal
and Spain.
Western Europe was at *
the tine, materially the
nost advanced part of the
earth. Its lust for
wealth and power led it
to "discovery" and con-
quest of distant "un-
discovered" lands, peo-
ple and wealth. Their nighty ships trans-
ported their invincible amies, merchants
and missionaries to the Orient, Africa
and finally to the Americas. With sword
and cannon Emperors and Kings were made to
bow down, pay homage to and just plain
pay the souvereigns of Western Europe.




WimL2B ISLANDS
'LNION
SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964
NOVELTY ", STORE
Frontstreet
Philipsburg
\
Is your address for the best
For Ladies: Dresses, shoes, Lats
Peace material and other apparel
For Children: Dresses, shoes, hats,
Caps, Suits, Pajamas and Baby-dolls....
For men: Pants (Continental) sport shirts,
Working shirts (Khaki),ties, etc.,
Also souvenirs of St. Maartcn
We sell items for persons from 1-yec.r tc 99 years
WHAT YOU DON'T SEE ASK FJBJ
Why not drop in and be convinced.
Proprietor: Mrs. A. De Weever
LUXUHIJUS OFFICE SUITES
FOR LEASE IN A MODERN TWO-STORY BUILDING
IN AN EXCELLENT LOCATION
ON FRONT STREET AT N* 62 PHILIPSHUfi
FOR FURTHER INFOHMATION CONTACT:
JOHANNES (Chick) ARRINDELL
the Indian resisted they
( were pacified. In the New
World, as elsewhere, the
Wealth was for the taking;
the discoverers needed ex-
tra hands to reap this
great harvest,- and since
the Indian was either un-
cooperative or unfit, it
was decided to transport
black nen and women from
Africa to America. Some
estimates of the amount
of black people transport-
ed to America go as high
as 30 million, with some
.30.$ dying on the way *
various illnesses and .
physical abuse.
In the.New World the high-
ly civilized, Christian
Whiteuan auctioned his hu-
man property. Families
were split and sold sepa-
rately into captivity, run-
away slaves were hunted
down like wild animals.
Christianity taught (teach-
es), that all men are child-
ren of one Father and made
in the image of that Father,
but this did not disturb
the consciences of the vast
majority of these pious men
and women, for pious they
These people found the de-
of their evil system also in
Bible: "Black men were marked

Wealth poured from all corners of the globe
into the coffers of the rulers an?, the rich
of those countries; greater armies wore
outfitted, more destructive arms were made,
larger ships were built.
Africa was devided like large cake, the
better to be devoured; the Americas vc-re
cut up with the aae satanic seal. Whore
were,
fense
the
by God: they were the sons of Ham
and beyond redemption, to them the
gates of Heaven were closed anyhow."
While men of goodwill both inside
and outside the Church deplored
slavery and condemned it as evil,
it cannot be said that the Church
had always been_at the forefront in
the battle against slavery, on the
contrary it condoned it and often
gave it its blessing and defended
it: "the black people were heathens,
who could only benefit from their
bondage." It had been forbidden in
many places to convert the slaves
to Christianity and where they were
taught Christianity, it was of a
special brand, meant mainly to en-
slave the mind of. an already en-
slaved body. .
"Thou ahalt not steal (the
Maasa's goods)."
"It is harder for a rich nan


WINDWARD ISLANDS' oriNION
SATURDAY JUU4, 1964
FLY I P f fl ? f) IS LANES T|^Y{)
St. Mar.rten Own Airline
REGULAR SCHEDULED FLIGETS TO SAM .iND ST. EU5T..TIUS ON TUESDAY AND FRIDAY
FREQUENT FLIGHTS TO ST. TrlOMAS (l/ionday, Wednesday, Friday)
to
AHGUILLA (Monday, Wednesday, Friday)
to
GUADELOUPE (Wednesday) and tc ST. 263EBS daily.
In the very near future: Ae^-ular scheduled flights to St. Kitts.
Charter Flights anywhere in the Caribbean
Fly,safe, Fly dependable, Fly with cocfcrt, Fly your own airline
" WIND M A H D ISLANDS A I B g A Y S"
Information & Reservation; N.C. V/athey, Phi lips burg and WIA office Airport
FLY \UlL.Ill AND YOU 7/ILL GJT THEE
i
i
to enter into the kingdom
of heaven .... etc."
"The huuble shall be exalt-
ed." .
"By the sweat of thy brow
thou shalt eat bread."
"Honour and respect the Maasa."
"Not this life is important,
but the life hereafter."
"It is a privilege to suffer."
"Bear your cross bravely and
your..reward will cone aftc-r
death."
These and nore are the kind of reli-
gious fetters that bound and still bind
the Negro and the Coloured people of
this day.
Spue hundred years ago slavery CT>.del
and the White,pan congratulated IHHSE-J1
on.EIS great achievement: lie had s,et
the slave free.. Forgotten was the fact
that HE ILJ) ENSLAVED HIM.
But the ordeal of the Black man was
not to end with his emancipation.
To be continued.
C.A. Bruce
Aruba, 21st, of June 1964

A BRIEF SKETCH OF THE NEGRO AND LABOUR
IN Tim ANTILLES.
By L.A. Solomons
In refineries, workshops, and all
construction fields, the Negroes of
the Antilles havo proven they can meet
any test demanded by this civilization.
Over the last 40 years, Aruba and Cura-
cao have brought about this achievement
by giving the Negroes the opportunity
to master a trade, and in doing this
have up-graded themselves.
Today we coul(* look forward to employ-
ment in the mother country (Holland).


WnfCWrtBD ISLANDS' PINION
SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964
Just recieved at the F ;" 0 E CENTRE INC."
At Ci 1^-de-Sac
Fresh supply of: Dutch cheese, s; ices, an d ingredients for Indonesian
Rice-Table, Candies all kinds, tl ercos flasks, galvanized bucke ts i
folding chairs, all kinds of nea- s for sandwiches, peanut butter, fresh
butter and frozen meats of all ki nds.
Every week (Wednesday and Friday^ fresh fruits and vegetables.
complet; SELF-SERVICE
THE WEEK S SPECIAL OFFER:
SWEET PSAS sold for fls 0.25
0.15
SWEET CORN sold for fls 0.30
Specij 0.20
FOOD CENT R E F 0 0 D E DEN
I .'el: 2315
In business we could see great Negro*s
at the head of construction companies
such as (petrona & Croes), (Nahar Steel
Construction) and many others. These
great men have advanced the standard
and principles of the race.
When we look back over 40 years th;3
achieveuent is an asset to the AntilJian
Negroes; Through Labour we have dist:Dg
guished ourselves, and put a stendarc
in craftmanship as great as the greatest
the world over.
Now let us examine these facts. 4C
years ago we see Shell company coning to
Curacao and Lago Oil & Transport Com) any
coning to Aruba respectively. With these
companies we see a mass migration frcn
neighboring Islands and far off lands
taking place. People from all over tl.c
world, of different races and creeds
uade their appearance, and competed "or
the best positions available.
The Antillian Negroes were in the
back-ground .filling up last and leas1-
positions. Lack of higher education and
professional training lad handicapped
our progress.
Until these companies; started voca-
tional and trade schools, later on tiu
government granted scb >larships abroad
and set up mere trade achools, which
were successful in attracting brilliant
young nen and women. T:day Educated.
Antillians are filling top positions
thourghout the Antilles. Therefore
we could join with countless others,
young and old, in saying "LABOUR CON-
QUERS ALL THINGS."
Emancipation Proclamation is 101
years old and we are truly progress-
ing.
***************** '
Dear Mr. Editor;
Please allow me space in your much
read paper "The Windward Islands Opi-
nion" for the following:
1st. JAly 1863 1st. July 1964
Fellow Windward Islanders of Afri-
can decent: Its fitting for us first,
to give thanks to Almighty God, and
to rejoice on this Our one Hundred and
First year of our Emancipation from
slavery, since the shackels'of tyrany,
hate floggings and shameful"humilia-
tion were removed from our foreparents,
however not before the price of one
hundred guilders per slave was paid to
their slave-masters, were they reluct-
antly allowed to breath free air;
Let us all rejoice today, as free
men and women, and be proud of our
heritage, learn and study our History
and always remember that as Africans,


WINDY/ASI ISLANDS' OPINION
9
SATURDAY JULY 4. 1864
or decendants therefron, we have nothing
to be ashaned of, we have excelled in
every field around the woria, that nonu-
nents has been erected to the nenory of
our noble African brothers while at hone,
for the first tine in our history we
have our own First Class teachers to o-
ducate our youth in the persons of:
Mr. Baly and Mr. Lindeboon, they are a
credit to our Hace; Renenber that every
Negro who discharges his or her duty
faithfully is naking a contribution to
the dignity of our Hace, always renenber
that all nen were created Equal, that
the Si vine wisdon of God, as nade ueni-
fest by the two and forty laws of Nature.
Hence in all that is real and vital, all
mankind is a brotherhood under the father-
hood of Godf Renenber the Greek cormand
"Man know thyself, and by so doing we
will understand the wonders of the uni-
verse "Fear GOD and have no other fear".
Let usiake advantage of all educational
opportunity^ as they are afforded to us,
and by all neans nake good use of our
talents, renenber education is color-
blind, as only by educating ourselves and
our children, can we nake sure that tLese
shackles of ignorance, and the cruelty of
superstition and fear will never nore en-
slave the ninds of our Race, We, like all
other Races are part of this universe,
and Gods' children, and as such has the
right to enjoy all therein, as long as
we prepare ourselves we are all governed
by the universal Law; Life is inparticl,
and Destiny is nerely the use we nake of
our occult power, renenber there is no
pure Race under the sun.
Let us not be like the cynic who re-
fuses to know and understand and to e-
ducate hinself by study, because he net
only heeps hinself back, while blaning
others but he is also retarding the pro-
gress of our iiace. Let us not be like
the doubting Thonasses and soue Dreaders
who say because we are Negro's our des-
tiny is napped out for us, beware of vhen,
for they seek to enslave the nind then
we are dooned. We have nade rapid strides
since enancipation, but that is not e-
nough, we produced Navigators, Bishops,
Doctors, Lawyers, Priests, Artists and
nany other nen and wonen of learning who
F*emdly proclain St. Maarten as their
birthplace, whore they first learned their
A.D.C;. Wo are a proud Race.
So lot us all unite and nake this our
banner year for the Negro, as its being
proclained in the U.S.,,.. by the passing
of the Civil iiights Bill, and the nillions
of our black brothers amd sisters in A-
frica who received tbei::- independance,
and those awaiting the day whenHhey
too will be freej let us all there-
fore bury the past, but please not
forget it, build a sepulchre to the
sad nenory of the nillions of our
foreparents who were slaughtered on the
high seas and in the fields, so that
all the world will see and renenber
the sufferings of the Negro, and to
the funeral of slavery go. Renenber
Massa day is done.
So let us all unite our forces, and
endeavour to nake this our native is-
land St. Maarten for all nen and Races
of Good will, a haven where we can
live together in Peace and hamony, by
so doing we will be contributing to the
lasting nenory of those who were slaugh-
tered and butchered, so that we nay live
in peace. By so doing and living we
will be a credit to our Race:
Thanking you Mr. Editor for space
granted, I have the honour to be: A
NEGRO.
J.E.L. Richardson.
+++-r++++++++++++++++++++++++++
INSCRIBING ,f NEW PUPILS
The Principal of the Koolbaaischool
nakes known, that he will be in the
Koolbaaischool on Thursday July 16,
1964, fron 4 p.n. to 5 p.n. to in-
scribe new pupils for Septenber.
Caution: Your child nust be six years
old before the first of Septenber.
SLuVEUY MENTAL PHYSICAL
Dealing with the subject of slavery.
There are lots of people today who be-
lieve that enly Negroes were slaves -
But for the collective benefit of all
concern, I will endavour to nake it
plain. Slavery started in Greece. They
said civilization requires slaves Un-
less there are slaves to do the horrible
uninteresting wcrK. Culture and conten-
plcition would be icpossible. Yet hunan
slavery is wrong, insecure, and de-
noralizing.
However, let us thank God, the future
of the world, depends upon Mechanical
Slavery. Labour saving nachinery gives
(See Slavery on page 12)


WBEWj^^SfaSaS::. i^I&ION- -
10
SATURDAY JULY 4 i 1964
.jf=
speaks fas
7TU7UZ'
: in review relating some
aspects of the Negro ---
Mr. C.E.Morasse, the crea-
tor of the character cull-
ed CHINCHIRI, did.not in-
tend to cpict a biased
black man who could only
rave unreasonably. He much
rather presented a local
character who experienced
his complex environmen tin
a mood Qf awareness and
who at the sun e time speak
out frankly in a construct-
ive manner. Chinchiri is
never shocking at first
sight bqt second thought
his point usually becomes
clear. Herewith we shall
leave you alone with Chin-
ehinchira reviewin g.
t Ed. Note )
"Am goin' write a deeply
racial book", Chinchiri
said to me. "^na am goin*
name it 'Darker tnan m y-
self'."
"Why," I said. "Don't you
believe there is enough ra-
cial stuff being printed Man, there
are too many superfluous volumes on
that theme already on the market."
"Naw." Chin chiri scuffed. "You wrong
there you wrong there, man. They
ain't say in' too m uch 'bout the theme:
"Tis the way you treat the beast, you
know. Man --," he was sayin g when
Grow, an old bartender at Sea-View
came up to us.
Coke" I said "Me too" Chinchiri
joined me "but kick it an' break a
icoberg in it." Crow laughed and sc.id
''You always with you high fallutin'
talks. So Rum and Coke for you, then'.'
"Right!" Chinchiri confirmed'and
his laughter sprawled recklessly all
over the place. A flew persons were
scattered about the bar. Two men droop
-ed at the bar like mosquitoes who hac.
been flitted but with not enough to
kill them. An .rtiuerican tourist passed
us on his way out and said "Hi".
"Hello" Chinchiri greeted and
:ook a sharp wwig at his drink.
'Darker than.myself", he mused as if
tasting the virtue of the words in
his mind. "You know why I picked that
title" he continued, "I nam e it so
because the rage that follow up the
consequences of a more or lesser pig-
mentation of the skin is yet more
iestrctive to the bearer than the sha-
le of the colour itself", he started
:o comment on his imaginary book now.
'In my 'Darker than myself I'll be
treatin' the fallacies of the Black
;nan in he own environment. Take for
an instance, the question of black
nen and women straightenin' theyhair .
'2ake again the lighter complesion
superiority lunacy.' All that is for
&he moon, man. 'T&s luney.'J"
'But," I sr.id "our m en are at fault.
Because they believe that a women
ju.t is not right unless her hair is
like a peel. And she's just got to
nave that tomato finish, know what I
.aenn?"
"iixaotly". Chinchiri, blurted
out. "That what am get tin' at. Men,
jri tryin' go get at the root of things.
I sty, thi blf.ck aan is still behind
and I don't mean socially econom-i-
cally and culturally neither. He's
lost his .iasculin:'.ty his manhood.
You can't see our men looking at our
own women through his "master's" eyes,
And this myopic conditioning te dar-
ker than myself man, this thing is
the original sin of my darker brother?
"rrobably you can wxpound that


r^-cr
WMraiHD ISLANDS' OriNION______________n____________SATO2DAT JULY 4, 1964
that idea somewhere else in the world but not in the West-Indies I
"diff^en? ^^ff S,4 *}??* nnn". *" tryiL^argue.
seem to Se fli??^^ t? X?i8BE thl ng here man' onl* the lm&Se
seem to be ffifferent. It boils down to this; Something like four hun-
t?.H5 ag 3*f bi^k man's personality wus viciously Ls?rated
In n?hL S y Per1?^ V"hen he ma keP* in control. When hi was allowed
^n^tf^11 ?ottJ*** that of labour. Man, wherever there waT
colonization you gom' see- the same confounded picture".
hpvo IrHl*1 wouldn,t ^vise you to fin ish that book and sell it
rrrv JWSl^tWhS nt?" T JW recnsiderin you r insinuation you
may be right. Because to brainswush a person and to paint you will in
he mind you only got to keep him ignorant ana fraid". This time Chin-
chiri wus not sm iling asusual, he was dead serious. He tinkled his
empty rum coke glas with my glass.
"Sir," Crow stood mockingly at atten ion.
"Same thing." I said.
... "ye? Bif" he said*to Chinchiri clacking his heels together.
Chmchiri continued to say,"Man, fear is th, results of ignorance.
Man, Feur does purulyze you, you know; fear does paralyze you'.' Crow
stooa droopy eyed behind the be r at Sea-View. It was middle It te after
-noon, for the usual crowd had already left. The ufternoon was lazy
and Crow was just Deginning to nod when Chinchiri and myself had en-
tered. Only the two of us were there: Chinchiri and m e were alone
together. Well, a a matter of course Crow was behind the bar. Now
you must know that Crow is a kind of stout in the middleii he is good
natureu, too good-natured.for his wwn good sometimes. In fact, he is
exactly the type of guy Bully likSe. He most always says "yes" and
flatters their puny personalities. Crow really you know has alot
of crossesn Crow is growing bald at a rapid speed. He has seven chil-
dren and don't blame him he also has a wife. All these circum sta
-ces m ake the goin most the tijje a little rough for him. He has a-
Doye all a peculiar fear for his wife. She is a small woman, drinks
like a fish an a has a dirty tongue.
The ngihbours often say: "a! you, Buddy: She Buddy, I tellin'
you: I ain 'fraida her, but she tongue, Lawd. Don't let her put that
tongue pon you at all, at all. You tellin' I, me cnile, you tellin' I
ai you, Buddy.'
And of course, theie was always more that was added to it. Well, as
for Crow, the neighbours have it; "He He can't help, poh fella -
he aone eat coo-coo soup. Y'aint see he bald; what you think he toald
bald fon you tink 'tis study, he study so much: TjoopI" They
suck their tefith "Botheration, y.,s 'tis something always botherin'
him". ,
But you believe Crow would worry about all these sayings. No,
nun.' Ke would content himself with his dear f riend Chinchiri's words:
"Man, don't worry with these damn stupid people; that's all tyeh good
for is pound molly' They ain't hurtin' they brains bout they children
future. They ain't intoicedin' into the important things in they
community. NawJ Man, don't hrt you head over then do what you think
is right."
k smile creusod around Crow' s lips then.it spread out on his
face as he thought of ti.ese roussuring words. He had heard them
speuking ull thetime. But his mind had wan dered off to last night's
experience.
"If fright does paralyze you, he said, "it does make you
take off like a kite,too. Last night I was passing by Seager's Cut
goin' to town. Man like there is no moon light these nights things
really dark, you know. Tis pretty breezy, too, you know. I itch dark
bacK.-o-me ana black _.s Egypt front-o-me. Suddenly I hear frrr. Man,
a cold-warm fear started risin' and a aubole me pace. Frrrr Frrrr
again. Cold-sweat, Buddy. This time., Boy I brock in a trot and I set
off. Hardert'Frrr Frrrr. Sink it, Man, to make m ore speed I
chook m e hat in me oosom ana aumn neur was in town before I realize
-v. V


WINOTAKC ISLANDS' OPINION 12 SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964
Idealize the thing had stopped. I was never before under such a cold
3we^t, Boy. And what you think twas?"
.' "You imanigin ation.' Ghinchiri s; id.
"Twas a loose band pon me hat, man, a loose band pon a me hat."
' he answered. Both of them roared with laughter. I only kept on smi-
ling, sm iling away. Chinchiri said:" ^o you see, we are even afraid
of we own shadow, bom ewhere we still have a silent fear of hundreds
of years gone by. Vi/e have lost so much of our identity that we often
fraia to becone somebody of consequence. Do you know that many of us
believe th^t certain position^ urt not for us. Like last night ke
Son what a dream I h^d"
tTWhat you got, man" Buzi-,, one of cninchiri's friends had just
entered ,.nd greeted. Tiiis Buzz was a care-free happy-go-lucky fel-
low.
"Cool, man, cool! Chinchiri answered him vaguely then con-
tinued, Heck of a night, tnough man, jies, heck of a night!"
Buzz just butted in and asked :"What dream that be, men, Chinchiri?"
"Yes, I dreamt a dream Boy, that was a* heck of a dream. And
Knew it mean something. Man, it w-a like i.m talkin' to you all'.'
Chinchiri continued.
"But teel me wh..t you drt,<..m, man. Hell, what you stallin' for.
Come on and tell us." Buzz's curiosity had become bigger then himself
and he could not suppress it any longer.
" And to think of it; To-day being the Antillian Em-ncimtion
Dny ana I dreamin' this sort of thing. M an, I feel silly repeatin'
it, really. In other words tis a dreamer' s dream ." Chinchiri shook
his head and cocked it on a. side as if he was intently listening to
something or.someone.
"Dttmnit, man, Ching, if you gwin' tellm us, tell us or drop
dead.'" Buzz raged. Buzz had a quick-temper^ Chinchiri knowing this
paid his outburst no mind, otill looking slyly he directed his gaze
to Buzz and said: "Buzzy-Boy, 1. st night I dreamt I was governor."
Buzz's mouth fell into an idiotic gape; his eyes became incredulous
of what he he<-rd. Then ^ fit of Hysterical laughter caught him and
folded him double. Buzl- finally catching his breath and tears in his
eyes from laughter blurted out: "but, man, you black! Deion Black, too'!
a11 of uo Wore silent when Buzz again s^iu: "Chinchiri, man how can
you dream a thing like that. You stupid or what. Do what! Htovernorl!
Ai you, Buddy! I bet you tis all them books you readin' that got you
dreamin' that kinda things, v/hat! You done gone crazy."
Cr.inchiri shook his herd s-dly. He looked a t me then regarded
Buzz with a dint of pity in his eyes. Then he said to me :" See,
See what I told you. The same taing we was talkin' bou t. A hundred
and one years gone now an d we talkin' Dout Emancipation end thing.
You can't see where our men have arrived after the abolishment of
they slavery. Look, how my dream shock hi m. This man only dreams
can be acout a good stiff drink of rum chasin' some mother-chile
and some money. That poor, Boy, That poor. Until we get beck our
identity truly evolved from or out of. our historical background I
can't talk 'too much bout emancipation. But of course ti got its
historical value for us as a people therefore I still think we
ought to celebrate find revere emancipation day of the Antillian
Slaves or all slaves. This kind... Emancipation is a physical thing
but I am more concerned bout our psychological emancipation."
"Chinchiri, Friend, I must agree with you." I said. All of three of
us feil silent once more and quickly after we changed the subject.
SIAVEIIY (Continued free page 9) nations were 3lave States,
great advantage over the ancient world. Jh?se nations rested on the backs
Labylon, Assyria, Phonecia, Egypt, slaves- Jt oft txDe happened in
Rrpppp iml iJnno And nil +h ,tv,0. these ancient nations, that slaves
txreece, and Hone, and all the other were 80 pientyful thai their market


OPINION
13
SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964
VALUE wasless than that of1 sheep. Sieve
owners found it cheaper., to work their
slaves to death ..... and buy new ones
than to treat then with consideration and
permit -then. to propagate. V. .;'..
./For instance, in Hone, slayes.-were,
slaughtered by the tens of thousnads >.n
the arena for the delectation of the bo-
pulace. The itomas. gladiators were, slaves.
Hone butchered her slaves when they were
plentyful and cracked and fell when the
slave supply became so7 far away that .hey
were too difficult and too cosily to fa-
tain. Ceasar murdered and pillage Gat. w
while governor of that Provence for r
other reason than that he desired to cap-
ture prisoners of. war and sell then i-to
slavery. He becane very rich of the save
trade. This murdering and pillaging c:*
Peoples actually wiped out many superior
Peoples, and high civilization of the
past. At the sane tine the constant var-
fare that was, necessary to supply th
slave market with captives weakened the
victorious nations. It sap then of ner.
and material. .....
Assyria nade her slaves fight and cap-
ture more slaves for her. She treated her
slaves nore cruelly than any other nation
of antiquity. Unless it was Rone.
Spain, once nighty mistress of Europe
and Aaerica was a slave State, She wat
as cruel to her slaves, and as wasteful
of then as is concievable possible.
The Negro race only had the late enc of
slavery. It was the Portugese who.started
the African Slave-Trade. ,: t>.>
EVINiiUDE means S E B V I C Y.
We know too what our people suffered
and we are thankful too that wc were
brought frdn darkness to the light. Ji.ly
1st. 1863 the emancipation proclamation
took place. Its now one h'indred and c: e
years since slevery was abolished'"- at
least physical slavery. But mental slavery
still exist.
Now let us turn the har:s of the clock
of tine back a little ar.< see what pro-
gress has been made, durirg that tine.
It would look nore like tragic simplicity
for me even to try to start, when being
fully receptive to the it ct, that the
Intellectual development of the human
race has been suddenly, almost abruptly,
raised to a higher plar< than that upon
which it had proceeded :'rom the days of
the primitive troglody :.i to the days of
great grandfathers. It is characteristic
of this higher plane or: development that
the progress which unt 1 lately, was so
slow muct henceforth be rapid. Man's
mind has become more flexible the
resistence of innovation has weaken-
ed, and our intellectual demands are
multiplying, while the means of satis-
fying them are increasing. We find
ourselves in the midst of a mighty re-
volution, of human thoughts conse-
quently we must confine the price of
progress to Liberty : Liberty came
to a race crouching under Egyptian
wips and led then forth from the
house of Bondage She hardened them
in the wildnrness, and made of then
a race of conquerors. The free spirit
BLUE BAND -Holland's Best
of the'Moasic took their thinkers up to
heights where e beheld the unity of
God. And inspired their poets with
strains, that still phase the highest
exaltation of thought. Liberty, Why,
who can stop Liberty? Didn't Liberty
dawned on the Phoenican coast and ships
passed the: Pillers of Hercules to plow
the unkno-ra sea? She broke in partial
light on Greece, and marbles grew to
shape of ideal beauty, word becane the
instruments subtlest thought, and a-
gaihst the scarity nalitia of all free
vities the countless hoasts of the
great King broke like surges against a
rock. Yes she cast her beanes on the
fbur acre farms of Italian husbandman
and born of a strength a power came
fo th that conquered the world.' Didn't
she glinted fron shields of German
warriors, and Agustus wept his legions out
of the night that followed hereclipse?
Her slanting rays fell again on free
cities, and a lost learning revived,
modern civilization began. A new world
was revealed And as Liberty grew so
grew art, wealth, power, knowledge and
refinement. In the History of every nation
we find the same truth. It was the
strength, born of itfagna Charta, that won
grecy and agincourt. It was the re-
viva? of Liberty from the despotism of
the I'udors that glorified the Eliza-
be than age. It was the spirit that
brought a crowned tyrant to the block
that jilanted the seed of a mighty tree.
It wai the energy of ancient freedom that,
the nv.nite is had gain unity, made Spain
the n.'.ghtest power of the world only to
fall ;o the lowest depth of weakness when
tyrejciy succeeded Liberty. What Liberty
shou 1 do for the nations of the world -
that fully accept and loyally cherishc:
her ie wonderous inventions, which are


*zm
WINDWARD ISLANDS' OPINION
14
SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964
the cark features of this century givej,
us an idea and we as a race are'not':'
excluded,
A. Th, Illidge
l^lllllllllillislillllilsilslllllllll
EDITORIAL
( Continued fron page 2)
or reject it for it oust always prevail,
today we are accepting and participating
in what we ourselves do know as benefi-
cial to the whole coununity. Silently,
if not yet openly Windward {Islanders in
turn oust thank the fate that happened
our own voices to be heard; that we nay
be coincident with our OPINION" = al-
ways the THUTH will be published irres-
pective of who dislikes it. That we nay
have freedom in the right sense of the
word; that no force may enslave us. We
can't but believe that the passing of
the Civil Eights' Bill is a coinciding
aspect of our endeavour. To us it is
obvious and we do not think we are
superstitious that the good Lord has
His hands encouraging and sustaining our
sincere efforts Note that on Wednesday,
July 1, 1964, the day of our Lustrum -
not a flag was hoisted no beating of
druns were heard no parades no offi-
cial ponp, but our Father sent his bless-
ing in the form of heavy rainfall for
our people and cattle whose critical
preoccupation was thirst drought.
God sent rain! Finally we should like
to thank wamly all those who in the
days of trials have encouraged our en-
deavour; also those who have and are
contributing in any which way so that
it proves a community project in which
all nay participate. Therefore we ought
not to speak about "Lake's paper",
but OUR paper It is Our People's
Paper. It is OUR WINDWARD ISLANDS'
OPINION. AND OUR OPINION HAVE NOT CHANGED
ITStPWNCIPLES IN NO WAY WHATEVER SINCE
ITS INITIAL TEcUST. FOR WITH LOVE AND
LABOUR ALL WILL BE OVERCOME^
July 10, 1959
Dear Sir:
A copy of your publication "Windward
Islands' Opinion" as of July 1, cane
into ny hands as a very pleasant sur-
prise.
I read it with nuch enterest, and
needless to say, it gave me a great
measure of satisfaction, so much that
I read it a second and a third time.
I want to assure you that this
little instrument, now placed at the
service of the Public in general, has
been for the longest tine a much need-
ed one.
I hope therefore that your efforts
thus contributed in this field may be
greatly rewarded, through the patronage
and support it will receive from all
those recognizing its value.
Through this nediun I wish to express
my appreciation, and hope for the con-
tinuance of this little weekly. My de-
sire is to see it go forward hand in
hand with the community, developing in-
to an organ of reliable service and an
unbiased proclaimer of tfauth.
Thank you,
L.C. Bell
San Nicolas
Aruba, N.A,
Ed. note: We h incerely hope that in our
f;?st five years of publicatior
We have been able to live up to
jfour expectations.


WINDWARD ISLAND61 OriNION
SATURDAY
1964
Date of Call: None of Vessel: Tine of Arrival: Tine of Sal line: From: To:
July 5, 1964 Riviera P 8:00 a.n 4:00 p.n.
July 17, 1964 Riviera P 8*00 a.n, 1:00 p.n.
Aug. 5, 1964 Victoria 8:00 a.n, 6:00 p.n. St. Thonas San Juan
Aug. 6, 1964 Ocean Monarch 9:00 a.n, 6:00 p.n. St. Thonas Be mud a
Aug. 6, 1964 Riviera P 8:00 a.n. 1:00 p.n.
Aug. 20, 1964 Riviera P 8:00 a.n. 1:00 p.n.
Sep. 21, 1964 Ocean Monarch 10:00 a.n. 6:00 p.n. Martinique New York
Nov. 30, 1964 Shalom 8:00 a.n. 6:00 p.n. New York
Dec. 1, 1964 Victoria a.n. p.n. St. Thonas New York
Dec. 13, 1964 Shalom 9:00 a.n. 8:00 p.n. .
Dec. 13, 1964 Victoria a.n. P.n. Gaudaloupe New York
Dec. 23, 1964 Ariadne 9:00 a.n. 5:00 p.n.
Dec. 25, 1964 Franca C 8:00 a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique
Jan. 10, 1965 Shalon 9:00 a.n. 8:00 p.n.
Jan. 12, 1965 Atlantic 10:00 a.n. 6:00 p.n. Wilnington St. Croix
Jan. 14, 1964 Oslofjord 9:00 a.n. 11:59 p.n. St. Croix St. Kitts
Jan. 19, 1965 Shalon 8:00 a.n. 5:00 g.n. New York
Jan. 23, 1965 Victoria a.n. p.n. Barbados San Juan
Jan. 27, 1965 Franca C 8:00 a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique
Feb. 6, 1965 Victoria a.n. p.n. Guadaloupe New York
Beb. 11, 1965 Franca C QiOO a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique
Mar. 7, 1965 Victoria a.n. p.n. Guadeloupe New York
Mar. 24, 1965 Franca C 8:00 a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique
Apr. 9, 1965 Victoma a.n. p.n. Guadaloupe San Juan



'
WINDWAIE ISLANDS' OPINION
Biff.! BcWQ 1 Cr-Cr-Cr-ashu
DOWN GO PRICES ON SHOES
A T
ft
(3
Beauperthuv Shoe Store
M1F.IGOT
GIGANTIC SALE ON:
SAMPLE SHOES GOING AT COST PRICE!!
OTHERS BELOW COST!
>'
YOU HAVE A WHOLE WEEK TO KAX3 USE OF THIS UNBELIEVABLE OFFER
SALE BTABKg MONDAY JULY- 6 & ENDS MONDAY JULY 13
Just received at M A T II 0. 'S STORE-
Frontstreet Philipsburg
The largest assortment of beautiful
SPQ;T SHIRTS for nen that can be found
Anywhere on the island at MODERATE PRICES
Also a large supply of curtain good &
dress naterial
See Miss M A T H 0 the lady with the
Chaming snile and be convinced that:
This is the place to do your shopping
CHESS FiiNS ATTENTION
We are now ueeting every Wednesday
at
SEA-VIEW Hotel Dining-roon
At 8-0:30
There will be lessons for beginners
We are looking forward to seeing also
Our friends fron the FRENCH SIDE
ft


Full Text

PAGE 1

WINDY/ASI ISLANDS' OPINION 9 SATURDAY JULY 4. 1864 or decendants therefron, we have nothing to be ashaned of, we have excelled in every field around the woria, that nonunents has been erected to the nenory of our noble African brothers while at hone, for the first tine in our history we have our own First Class teachers to oducate our youth in the persons of: Mr. Baly and Mr. Lindeboon, they are a credit to our Hace; Renenber that every Negro who discharges his or her duty faithfully is naking a contribution to the dignity of our Hace, always renenber that all nen were created Equal, that the Si vine wisdon of God, as nade uenifest by the two and forty laws of Nature. Hence in all that is real and vital, all mankind is a brotherhood under the fatherhood of God f Renenber the Greek cormand "Man know thyself, and by so doing we will understand the wonders of the universe "Fear GOD and have no other fear". Let usiake advantage of all educational opportunity^ as they are afforded to us, and by all neans nake good use of our talents, renenber education is colorblind, as only by educating ourselves and our children, can we nake sure that tLese shackles of ignorance, and the cruelty of superstition and fear will never nore enslave the ninds of our Race, We, like all other Races are part of this universe, and Gods' children, and as such has the right to enjoy all therein, as long as we prepare ourselves we are all governed by the universal Law; Life is inparticl, and Destiny is nerely the use we nake of our occult power, renenber there is no pure Race under the sun. Let us not be like the cynic who refuses to know and understand and to educate hinself by study, because he net only heeps hinself back, while blaning others but he is also retarding the progress of our iiace. Let us not be like the doubting Thonasses and soue Dreaders who say because we are Negro's our destiny is napped out for us, beware of vhen, for they seek to enslave the nind then we are dooned. We have nade rapid strides since enancipation, but that is not enough, we produced Navigators, Bishops, Doctors, Lawyers, Priests, Artists and nany other nen and wonen of learning who F*emdly proclain St. Maarten as their birthplace, whore they first learned their A.D.C;. Wo are a proud Race. So lot us all unite and nake this our banner year for the Negro, as its being proclained in the U.S.,,.. by the passing of the Civil iiights Bill, and the nillions of our black brothers amd sisters in Africa who received tbei::independance, and those awaiting the day whenHhey too will be freej let us all therefore bury the past, but please not forget it, build a sepulchre to the sad nenory of the nillions of our foreparents who were slaughtered on the high seas and in the fields, so that all the world will see and renenber the sufferings of the Negro, and to the funeral of slavery go. Renenber Massa day is done. So let us all unite our forces, and endeavour to nake this our native island St. Maarten for all nen and Races of Good will, a haven where we can live together in Peace and hamony, by so doing we will be contributing to the lasting nenory of those who were slaughtered and butchered, so that we nay live in peace. By so doing and living we will be a credit to our Race: Thanking you Mr. Editor for space granted, I have the honour to be: A NEGRO. J.E.L. Richardson. +++-r+++++++ +++++++++++++++++++ INSCRIBING ,f NEW PUPILS The Principal of the Koolbaaischool nakes known, that he will be in the Koolbaaischool on Thursday July 16, 1964, fron 4 p.n. to 5 p.n. to inscribe new pupils for Septenber. Caution: Your child nust be six years old before the first of Septenber. SLuVEUY MENTAL PHYSICAL Dealing with the subject of slavery. There are lots of people today who believe that enly Negroes were slaves But for the collective benefit of all concern, I will endavour to nake it plain. Slavery started in Greece. They said civilization requires slaves Unless there are slaves to do the horrible uninteresting wcrK. Culture and contenplcition would be icpossible. Yet hunan slavery is wrong, insecure, and denoralizing. However, let us thank God, the future of the world, depends upon Mechanical Slavery. Labour saving nachinery gives (See Slavery on page 12)



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WnfCWrtBD ISLANDS' PINION SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964 • Just recieved at the F ;" 0 E CENTRE INC." At Ci 1^-de-Sac Fresh supply of: Dutch cheese, s; ices, an d ingredients for Indonesian Rice-Table, Candies all kinds, tl ercos flasks, galvanized bucke ts i folding chairs, all kinds of neas for sandwiches, peanut butter, fresh butter and frozen meats of all ki nds. Every week (Wednesday and Friday^ fresh fruits and vegetables. COMPLET; SELF-SERVICE • THE WEEK S SPECIAL OFFER: SWEET PSAS sold for fls 0.25 0.15 SWEET CORN sold for fls 0.30 Specij 0.20 FOOD CENT R E F 0 0 D E DEN I .'el: 2315 In business we could see great Negro*s at the head of construction companies such as (petrona & Croes), (Nahar Steel Construction) and many others. These great men have advanced the standard and principles of the race. When we look back over 40 years th;3 achieveuent is an asset to the AntilJian Negroes; Through Labour we have dist:Dg guished ourselves, and put a stendarc in craftmanship as great as the greatest the world over. Now let us examine these facts. 4C years ago we see Shell company coning to Curacao and Lago Oil & Transport Com) any coning to Aruba respectively. With these companies we see a mass migration frcn neighboring Islands and far off lands taking place. People from all over tl.c world, of different races and creeds uade their appearance, and competed "or the best positions available. The Antillian Negroes were in the back-ground .filling up last and leas 1 positions. Lack of higher education and professional training lad handicapped our progress. Until these companies; started vocational and trade schools, later on tiu government granted scb >larships abroad and set up mere trade achools, which were successful in attracting brilliant young nen and women. T:day Educated. Antillians are filling top positions thourghout the Antilles. Therefore we could join with countless others, young and old, in saying "LABOUR CONQUERS ALL THINGS." Emancipation Proclamation is 101 years old and we are truly progressing. ***************** Dear Mr. Editor; Please allow me space in your much read paper "The Windward Islands Opinion" for the following: 1st. JAly 1863 1st. July 1964 Fellow Windward Islanders of African decent: Its fitting for us first, to give thanks to Almighty God, and to rejoice on this Our one Hundred and First year of our Emancipation from slavery, since the shackels'of tyrany, hate floggings and shameful"humiliation were removed from our foreparents, however not before the price of one hundred guilders per slave was paid to their slave-masters, were they reluctantly allowed to breath free air; Let us all rejoice today, as free men and women, and be proud of our heritage, learn and study our History and always remember that as Africans,



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r^-cr WMraiHD ISLANDS' OriNION __n S ATO2DAT JULY 4, 1964 that idea somewhere else in the world but not in the West-Indies I "diff^en? ^^ff S, !" 4 *}??* nnn ". *" tryiL^argue. seem to Se fli??^^ T? X?I 8 B E thl ng here man onl the lm& Se seem to be ffifferent. It boils down to this; Something like four hunT?£.H5 ag 3*f b i^k man's personality wus viciously Ls?rated In n?hL S y Per1 ?^ V hen he ma ke P* in control. When hi was allowed ^n^tf^ 11 ? ott J*** that of labour. Man, wherever there waT colonization you gom' seethe same confounded picture". hpvo IrHl* 1 wouldn,t ^vise you to fin ish that book and sell it rrrv J W Sl^t Wh S n t? T JW rec nsiderin you r insinuation you may be right. Because to brainswush a person and to paint you will in he mind you only got to keep him ignorant ana fraid". This time Chinchiri wus not sm iling asusual, he was dead serious. He tinkled his empty rum coke glas with my glass. "Sir," Crow stood mockingly at atten ion. "Same thing." I said. ... "y e ? Bi £f" he said*to Chinchiri clacking his heels together. Chmchiri continued to say,"Man, fear is th, results of ignorance. Man, Feur does purulyze you, you know; fear does paralyze you'.' Crow stooa droopy eyed behind the be r at Sea-View. It was middle It te after -noon, for the usual crowd had already left. The ufternoon was lazy and Crow was just Deginning to nod when Chinchiri and myself had entered. Only the two of us were there : Chinchiri and m e were alone together. Well, a£ a matter of course Crow was behind the bar. Now you must know that Crow is a kind of stout in the middleii he is good natureu, too good-natured.for his wwn good sometimes. In fact, he is exactly the type of guy Bully likSe. He most always says "yes" and flatters their puny personalities. Crow really you know has alot of crossesn Crow is growing bald at a rapid speed. He has seven children and don't blame him he also has a wife. All these circum sta -ces m ake the goin most the tijje a little rough for him. He has aDoye all a peculiar fear for his wife. She is a small woman, drinks like a fish an a has a dirty tongue. The ngihbours often say : "A! you, Buddy: She Buddy, I tellin' you: I ain 'fraida her, but she tongue, Lawd. Don't let her put that tongue pon you at all, at all. You tellin' I, me cnile, you tellin' I ai you, Buddy.' • And of course, theie was always more that was added to it. Well, as for Crow, the neighbours have it; "He — He can't help, poh fella he aone eat coo-coo soup. Y'aint see he bald; what you think he toald bald fon you tink 'tis study, he study so much: TjoopI" They suck their tefith "Botheration, y.,s 'tis something always botherin' him". But you believe Crow would worry about all these sayings. No, nun.' Ke would content himself with his dear f riend Chinchiri's words: "Man, don't worry with these damn stupid people; that's all tyeh good for is pound molly' They ain't hurtin' they brains bout they children future. They ain't intoicedin' into the important things in they community. NawJ Man, don't hrt you head over then do what you think is right." K smile creusod around Crow' s lips then.it spread out on his face as he thought of ti.ese roussuring words. He had heard them speuking ull thetime. But his mind had wan dered off to last night's experience. "If fright does paralyze you, he said, "it does make you • take off like a kite,too. Last night I was passing by Seager's Cut goin' to town. Man like there is no moon light these nights things really dark, you know. Tis pretty breezy, too, you know. I itch dark bacK.-o-me ana black _.s Egypt front-o-me. Suddenly I hear frrr. Man, a cold-warm fear started risin' and a aubole me pace. Frrrr Frrrr again. Cold-sweat, Buddy. This time., Boy I brock in a trot and I set off. Harder t' F rrr£ Frrrr. Sink it, Man, to make m ore speed I chook m e hat in me oosom ana aumn neur was in town before I realize -v. V



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WINDWARE ISLANDS' uPINION SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964 PLANKING A VACATION? HERE IS THE. IDEAL HOLIDAY EXCUSION, TAILOE MADE FOB ST. MAARTEN VISIT ST. CUDIX, .PUERTO RICO, SANTO DOMINGO, ARUBA, CURACAO All five islands or any of the five lor the LOW, LOW FARE of ONLY US 6 128.00 Take a MONTH or EVEN MORE to complete YOUR trip NO VISA OR SPECIAL DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR CITIZENS. OF EITHER SIDE OF THE ISLAND SALESMEN BUYERS : TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE • • LOW FARES For further information contact: S.E.L. MADURO & SONS (Windward Islands) Ltd Front Street 66, Philipsburg, Tel: 2202 WINDWARD ISLANDS DRUGSTOIE Your Confidential Drugstore Where you are always assured of efficient and fast service Offers you: LANALOL Products: "Ilair Food" "Shampoo", Hair dressing etc. LADY ESTHER Products: Powder, Lipstick, nailpolish, Lotions, Eye-liners, etc. Ladies look YOUR best USE: NADINOLA DE LUXE, "ARTRA" Skin tone crean. We also supply all kinds of LIQU 0 It S Tel: 2330 _————— ,t-i %  : •: %  lest in oblivion. My c archaic heresy still swine in the Euphrates an ny collective exist >nce haunts the banks of the Nile footprints iii the deseett sands. Marching onward, hunted like game with nets, clubs, rope; sometines sold for petty trinkets or corals. Packed like sardines sexes are annuled for here, humanity is already deprived of her privacy. Stench cries, lamentation odour of filth and vomit seep through wooden ca^rgo-boatfloors as more than a prayer to the heaven of a biased God. Realization of my ineptness to coi. prebend as a total this cor troversial situation ar^ret'it my coordination with thii rhythmic music.' I shuffl



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' WINDWAIE ISLANDS' OPINION Biff.! BcWQ 1 Cr-Cr-Cr-ashu DOWN GO PRICES ON SHOES A T •ft (3 Beauperthuv Shoe Store M1F.IGOT GIGANTIC SALE ON: SAMPLE SHOES GOING AT COST PRICE!! OTHERS BELOW COST! >' YOU HAVE A WHOLE WEEK TO KAX3 USE OF THIS UNBELIEVABLE OFFER SALE BTABKg MONDAY JULY6 & ENDS MONDAY JULY 13 Just received at M A T II 0. 'S STORE Frontstreet Philipsburg The largest assortment of beautiful SPQ;T SHIRTS for nen that can be found Anywhere on the island at MODERATE PRICES Also a large supply of curtain good & dress naterial See Miss M A T H 0 the lady with the Chaming snile and be convinced that: This is the place to do your shopping CHESS FiiNS ATTENTION We are now ueeting every Wednesday at SEA-VIEW Hotel Dining-roon At 8-0:30 There will be lessons for beginners We are looking forward to seeing also Our friends fron the FRENCH SIDE ft



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WBEWj^^SfaSaS::. i^I&ION10 SATURDAY JULY 4 i 1964 .JF= speaks fas %  7TU7UZ' : in review relating some aspects of the Negro Mr. C.E.Morasse, the creator of the character culled CHINCHIRI, did.not intend to cpict a biased black man who could only rave unreasonably. He much rather presented a local character who experienced his complex environmen tin a mood Qf awareness and who at the sun e time speak out frankly in a constructive manner. Chinchiri is never shocking at first sight bqt second thought his point usually becomes clear. Herewith we shall leave you alone with Chinehinchira reviewin g. t Ed. Note ) "Am goin' write a deeply racial book", Chinchiri said to me. "^na am goin* name it 'Darker tnan m yself'." "Why," I said. "Don't you believe there is enough racial stuff being printed Man, there are too many superfluous volumes on that theme already on the market." "Naw." Chin chiri scuffed. "You wrong there you wrong there, man. They ain't say in' too m uch 'bout the theme: "Tis the way you treat the beast, you know. Man --," he was sayin g when Grow, an old bartender at Sea-View came up to us. •Coke" I said "Me too" Chinchiri joined me "but kick it an' break a icoberg in it." Crow laughed and sc.id ''You always with you high fallutin' talks. So Rum and Coke for you, then'.' "Right!" Chinchiri confirmed'and his laughter sprawled recklessly all over the place. A flew persons were scattered about the bar. Two men droop -ed at the bar like mosquitoes who hac. been flitted but with not enough to kill them. An .rtiuerican tourist passed us on his way out and said "Hi". "Hello" Chinchiri greeted and •:ook a sharp wwig at his drink. 'Darker than.myself", he mused as if tasting the virtue of the words in his mind. "You know why I picked that title" he continued, "I nam e it so because the rage that follow up the consequences of a more or lesser pigmentation of the skin is yet more iestrctive to the bearer than the shale of the colour itself", he started :o comment on his imaginary book now. 'In my 'Darker than myself I'll be treatin' the fallacies of the Black ;nan in he own environment. Take for an instance, the question of black nen and women straightenin' theyhair '2ake again the lighter complesion superiority lunacy.' All that is for &he moon, man. 'T&s luney.'J" 'But," I sr.id "our m en are at fault. Because they believe that a women ju.t is not right unless her hair is like a peel. And she's just got to nave that tomato finish, know what I .aenn?" "iixaotly". Chinchiri, blurted out. "That what am get tin' at. Men, jri tryin' GO get at the root of things. I sty, thi blf.ck aan is still behind and I don't mean socially econom-ically and culturally neither. He's lost his .iasculin:'.ty his manhood. You can't see our men looking at our own women through his "master's" eyes, And this myopic conditioning te darker than myself man, this thing is the original sin of my darker brother? "rrobably you can wxpound that



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I WIN^WAIff ISLANDS' OPINION" ; 2 : \. V SATU DAY JULY 4, 1964 -j^~I %  • %  i II' \ T HE WINDWABD 7.SLANES 1 OPINION ==r %  = / %  Is published every* Saturday It was established by J.H. Lake.Sr. on July 1, 1959 as a means of helping to iDprove the social, economic, educa*io' tional and political conditions o? the Windward Islands, by advocating against the cause of injustice and oppression. Editor Publisher j.n. Lake,Sr. Associate Editor C.E. Daly,Jr. Associate Editor Mrs. D. Morales Editorial address: P.O. Box 22 Philipsburg .> \ \.r ,. %  %  %  St. Maarten, Neth. Ant. i i • %  Printers: The People's Printery Tanarindesteeg N£ 8 Philipsburg EEITOHIAL In commemorating our first Lustrum the five years active existence of the "Windward Islands' Opinion" ; we first must thank the Lord for the grace and blessing He has bestowed upon us so that from July 1, 1959 till Yuly 1, 1964 the effort to help improve the social, econimic, educational and political conditions has not been in vain. By advocating against the cause of injustice and oppression many enemies have been acquired because we know that the truth is a brutal thing at times and generally in bad grace, .,,.,..., In retrospect of five years we sorely have.reasons to be aptimistic since during the infancy of YOUK PAPEU which was a.novelty, seemed,to,many af us a batard child a leprose article which hqd to be shun or conceiled from our neighbours. To realize that YOUR weekly was considered like the talisman of the African which had to be hidden from luckier races and compare the acceptance of to-day our first lustrum. We have never blamed you for being c'iscriminate remember, the NEGRO was in the fourtben century condiaered a rare speciment; never a human being "for we understood that this p '-.wwas new and that we had to grow accustcued to this new idea. Especially when at the'zero hour the roll call was "de 1 Casque'" and true visages became apparent; especially when obsolete ideas and ambiguous attitudes were challenged; especially when the audicity was taken to expound certain personal views we deemed it possible that the T-R U T II we had to learn not to try to sabotage (See EDITORIAL on pa K e 14) 'fotf^ nj ..1 • %  • i ^i';Ki-^in#iT> ,T M I ^ -f % %  %  % 



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I WINDY/AUD ISLANDS' OPINION SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964 THE VIRGIN AT FRIAR'S-BAY By; Canille Baly I fell into a chance situation in which I an sure to have seen the creatipn of an ebony nymph. She slipped away fron ny filed attention like quicksilver through a fist. And I cannot erase her branded impression froa ny nind. She excitingly haunts ay nenory: Your snile, your nouth is wide with laughter and like the rising sun you shower the dark face of the earth with the brilliant question irk of life. Black nynph, your anile plays a ubribo round the •oft corner, of your blocking lips, The ailk of ^W innocence i* crjtaUfce' iA the. da*Mw* v f Touri'Ojei; tod. the passion, that lios latent is pure, bunanity. \% Your veiled voice evokes again and again the copper colour of a divine contra-alt. Your kindness, your tenderness are narked in the snooth fragile fora of your tiny hands. So frail is your waist, that swells and ends in two beautiful legs, Black Aphrodite.' By JoveJ It was the hands of Art itself that noulded these legs fron the purest ebony; the shuffling of your feet caressed ny ears with their nelodious rhythn. Your subtle walk is reninescent cf the beautiful strinding of a Watusi enpress of the ancient negro's empire; Bronse Beauty, you are the synbol of ny netaphysical longing.... Where I have been lacking in words; where I have sonetines been rough and crude with ny few words, forgive ne, for I know, I know I have been too, too confident to believe that I could end that which I began. Like a sifter ny words are; they are not capable of giving inage to your purity. My words are full of holes, tfcc-y are transparent and your light shines through then. My words are too shallow to -acccrxiodate your riches, virtues. So nueh is lost of your divinity. Excuse ny effort; I have derived ocatacy fron our encounter, but a child alike I have played with it and lost it along the way. I beg pardon for offering you so little of so nuch, so terrible nuch vapour is evoked. And as I wander through the nusky Delft alleys over rickety little bridges, I try to find evidence of a creative sensibility within ne. | I crave to unravel the • question which continually keeps buzzing like a tedious nosquite through ny head. What sense of purpose or urgency does any of ua have? It is chilly, cold out hero. The iky it Dutch-norning-grey I an a stranger to then inside there, in that building in Delft. ++++++++++++ THE CMLDBEN OF SLAVES N (Part I) ny way through the winding selfgratifying nass unto the <;obble-stones of Delft. One block further I hear, like the faint thunp of %he bongo, throb of ny heart in ny index finger, as a herald to the nisty morning. I yawn deeply into the broadening dawn and a cluster of Yes, that is what we are; we are the descendants of slaves. Sone four hundred years ago our forefoathers were bought or captured on nany parts of the African continent and packed like sardines into the foul-snelling holes of sailing ships, to be transported to the "New World". The perpetrators of this nost heinious deed in the history of mankind were Y/hite and Christian, and cane uainly fron Prance England, Holland, Portugal and Spain. Western Europe was at the tine, materially the nost advanced part of the earth. Its lust for wealth and power led it to "discovery" and conquest of distant "undiscovered" lands, people and wealth. Their nighty ships transported their invincible amies, merchants and missionaries to the Orient, Africa and finally to the Americas. With sword and cannon Emperors and Kings were made to bow down, pay homage to and just plain pay the souvereigns of Western Europe.



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1 "AMOR ET LABOlt OU&Ll ViNCiT" "l-uvl. v LAIMH <;tiNQt;:,:i ALL TIU %  :s SATURDAY JUT," A ?'.- / Vol. 6 N& 1 Price ttfl. 0.25 1 SPECIAL EDITION COMMEMORATING • r r%  1 St. • LUSTP U M Qf'TH IS NEWS PA PER July 1, 1959 July 1, 1964 101sL VIAR OF EMANCIPATION July 1, 1863 July 1, 1964 O T9. 7^V?C 0/ 7CC I MM



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WINDWARD ISLAND6 1 OriNION SATURDAY 1964 Date of Call: None of Vessel: Tine of Arrival: Tine of Sal line: From: To: July 5, 1964 Riviera P 8:00 a.n 4:00 p.n. July 17, 1964 Riviera P 8*00 a.n, 1:00 p.n. Aug. 5, 1964 Victoria 8:00 a.n, 6:00 p.n. St. Thonas San Juan Aug. 6, 1964 Ocean Monarch 9:00 a.n, 6:00 p.n. St. Thonas Be mud a Aug. 6, 1964 Riviera P 8:00 a.n. 1:00 p.n. Aug. 20, 1964 Riviera P 8:00 a.n. 1:00 p.n. Sep. 21, 1964 Ocean Monarch 10:00 a.n. 6:00 p.n. Martinique New York Nov. 30, 1964 Shalom 8:00 a.n. 6:00 p.n. New York Dec. 1, 1964 Victoria a.n. p.n. St. Thonas New York Dec. 13, 1964 Shalom 9:00 a.n. 8:00 p.n. %  Dec. 13, 1964 Victoria a.n. P.n. Gaudaloupe New York Dec. 23, 1964 Ariadne 9:00 a.n. 5:00 p.n. Dec. 25, 1964 Franca C 8:00 a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique Jan. 10, 1965 Shalon 9:00 a.n. 8:00 p.n. Jan. 12, 1965 Atlantic 10:00 a.n. 6:00 p.n. Wilnington St. Croix Jan. 14, 1964 Oslofjord 9:00 a.n. 11:59 p.n. St. Croix St. Kitts Jan. 19, 1965 Shalon 8:00 a.n. 5:00 g.n. New York Jan. 23, 1965 Victoria a.n. p.n. Barbados San Juan Jan. 27, 1965 Franca C 8:00 a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique Feb. 6, 1965 Victoria a.n. p.n. Guadaloupe New York Beb. 11, 1965 Franca C QiOO a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique Mar. 7, 1965 Victoria a.n. p.n. Guadeloupe New York Mar. 24, 1965 Franca C 8:00 a.n. 3:00 p.n. St. Thonas Martinique Apr. 9, 1965 Victoma a.n. p.n. Guadaloupe San Juan



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WINDWARD ISLANDS' oriNION SATURDAY JUU4, 1964 FLY I P f fl ? f) IS LA N E S T|^Y{) St. Mar.rten Own Airline REGULAR SCHEDULED FLIGETS TO SAM .iND ST. EU5T..TIUS ON TUESDAY AND FRIDAY FREQUENT FLIGHTS TO ST. TrlOMAS (l/ionday, Wednesday, Friday) to AHGUILLA (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) to GUADELOUPE (Wednesday) and tc ST. 263EBS daily. In the very near future: Ae^-ular scheduled flights to St. Kitts. Charter Flights anywhere in the Caribbean Fly,safe, Fly dependable, Fly with cocfcrt, Fly your own airline WIND M A H D ISLANDS A I B g A Y S Information & Reservation; N.C. V/athey, Phi lips burg and WIA office Airport FLY \UlL.Ill AND YOU 7/ILL GJT THEE i i to enter into the kingdom of heaven .... etc." "The huuble shall be exalted." •. "By the sweat of thy brow thou shalt eat bread." "Honour and respect the Maasa." "Not this life is important, but the life hereafter." "It is a privilege to suffer." "Bear your cross bravely and your..reward will cone aftc-r death." These and nore are the kind of religious fetters that bound and still bind the Negro and the Coloured people of this day. Spue hundred years ago slavery CT>.del and the White,pan congratulated IHHSE-J 1 on.EIS great achievement: lie had s,et the slave free.. Forgotten was the fact that HE ILJ) ENSLAVED HIM. But the ordeal of the Black man was not to end with his emancipation. To be continued C.A. Bruce Aruba, 21st, of June 1964 A BRIEF SKETCH OF THE NEGRO AND LABOUR IN Tim ANTILLES By L.A. Solomons In refineries, workshops, and all construction fields, the Negroes of the Antilles havo proven they can meet any test demanded by this civilization. Over the last 40 years, Aruba and Curacao have brought about this achievement by giving the Negroes the opportunity to master a trade, and in doing this have up-graded themselves. Today we coul(* look forward to employment in the mother country (Holland).



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*zm WINDWARD ISLANDS' OPINION 14 SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964 the cark features of this century givej, us an idea and we as a race are'not':' excluded, A. Th, Illidge l^lllllllllillislillllilsilslllllllll EDITORIAL ( Continued fron page 2) or reject it for it oust always prevail, today we are accepting and participating in what we ourselves do know as beneficial to the whole coununity. Silently, if not yet openly Windward {Islanders in turn oust thank the fate that happened our own voices to be heard; that we nay be coincident with our OPINION" = always the THUTH will be published irrespective of who dislikes it. That we nay have freedom in the right sense of the word; that no force may enslave us. We can't but believe that the passing of the Civil Eights' Bill is a coinciding aspect of our endeavour. To us it is obvious and we do not think we are superstitious that the good Lord has His hands encouraging and sustaining our sincere efforts Note that on Wednesday, July 1, 1964, the day of our Lustrum not a flag was hoisted no beating of druns were heard no parades no official ponp, but our Father sent his blessing in the form of heavy rainfall for our people and cattle whose critical preoccupation was thirst drought. God sent rain! Finally we should like to thank wamly all those who in the days of trials have encouraged our endeavour; also those who have and are contributing in any which way so that it proves a community project in which all nay participate. Therefore we ought not to speak about "Lake's paper", but OUR paper It is Our People's Paper. It is OUR WINDWARD ISLANDS' OPINION. AND OUR OPINION HAVE NOT CHANGED ITStPWNCIPLES IN NO WAY WHATEVER SINCE ITS INITIAL TEcUST. FOR WITH LOVE AND LABOUR ALL WILL BE OVERCOME^ July 10, 1959 Dear Sir: A copy of your publication "Windward Islands' Opinion" as of July 1, cane into ny hands as a very pleasant surprise. I read it with nuch enterest, and needless to say, it gave me a great measure of satisfaction, so much that I read it a second and a third time. I want to assure you that this little instrument, now placed at the service of the Public in general, has been for the longest tine a much needed one. I hope therefore that your efforts thus contributed in this field may be greatly rewarded, through the patronage and support it will receive from all those recognizing its value. Through this nediun I wish to express my appreciation, and hope for the continuance of this little weekly. My desire is to see it go forward hand in hand with the community, developing into an organ of reliable service and an unbiased proclaimer of tfauth. Thank you, L.C. Bell San Nicolas Aruba, N.A, Ed. note: We h incerely hope that in our f;?st five years of publicatior We have been able to live up to jfour expectations.



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WINDWAHC ISLANDS' 1 OPINION SATUBDAY JULY 4, 1964 C A i; I g A I 2 SCHEDULES Effective April 7 1964 M3NDAYS EBUSBAS SATILIDAYS Arrive St. Depart St. Iaarten at 1G:14 a.n. Haarten at 10:30 a.n. And on < UNLAYS Arrive St. Depart St. iaarten at 4:29 p.m. iaarten at 4:45 p.n. CONNECT JO JS TO ST. C fi 0 I X MONDAYS atoaBMB sATjjrjiAYs Arrive St. Depart St. ?houas 11:20 a.n. ?honaa 2;45 p.n. UNLAYS. Arrive St. Depart St. Thones 5:35 p.n. Thomas 5:50 p.n. For .reservation & info nation call tel. 2244 or 3244 MIDNIGHT BLUES AT DELFT By C.E. Morasse Hard lunps of Latin-American music rock my senses into a frenzied rhythu and ny body quickens in tone with its dark colour. In the fuffle of the bongo I see jungle rivers steeling their way under dense brushes: giant fawns and ferns. Then like the wenon of a snake the crackling beat of the tanbora surges under ny skin and I an cranped into bleak surprise. My physical is now a. reproduction of ny sensation as ny face is flushed with a thousand drops of sweat still oozing cut ny pores. The spectral vision of ny eyes creates green, yellow, blue, red and lavender human beings. And laughter is a si. ly giggle a drunken whore. Hi, hi ...." I an hearing nyself laughing. 'What funny coloured people .... No, not colouredJ COLJUBED is biased -— colourful, yes... a bouquet of archaic roses". My now distinct Laughter crawls over the back of tonultous sounds and rings out in stark horror through the blaring silence: Feminine chatter nale dispute shuffling feet; gulps of beer, sips of wine and cooled drinks; laughter love talk and secretive loveplay. ithythoic beating of drums; drums ringing, muffled like the stifled cries of abortive children; pleading druns like broken sobs of distressed concubines. And I am the centrifugal point of this human nlle*. Oh barbaric explosion of civilized minds I In my frenzied state of mind I realized the combustion cf cultures that is exhausted into this comparatively small hall in Delft. %  White civilization adheres to ny skin like carnaval paint so easily washed off. So are ny red, orange, yellow, green and blue creatures. To-norrow a few years further they are not components anymore but black or white individuals — ligtt skinned or dark skinned is the difference in hard coin. Civilization has drained this culture of its last drop of humanity and now like the prodigal son is tinid to return hone. Its heritage is frowned at, lost in all obscurity



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OPINION — 13 SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964 VALUE wasless than that of 1 sheep. Sieve owners found it cheaper., to work their slaves to death ..... and buy new ones than to treat then with consideration and permit -then. to propagate. V. .; %  '.•.• ./For instance, in Hone, slayes.-were, slaughtered by the tens of thousnads >.n the arena for the delectation of the bopulace. The itomas. gladiators were, slaves. Hone butchered her slaves when they were plentyful and cracked and fell when the slave supply became so 7 far away that .hey were too difficult and too cosily to fatain. Ceasar murdered and pillage Gat. w while governor of that Provence for r other reason than that he desired to capture prisoners of. war and sell then i-to slavery. He becane very rich of the save trade. This murdering and pillaging c:* Peoples actually wiped out many superior Peoples, and high civilization of the past. At the sane tine the constant varfare that was, necessary to supply th slave market with captives weakened the victorious nations. It sap then of ner. and material. ..... Assyria nade her slaves fight and capture more slaves for her. She treated her slaves nore cruelly than any other nation of antiquity. Unless it was Rone. Spain, once nighty mistress of Europe and Aaerica was a slave State, She wat as cruel to her slaves, and as wasteful of then as is concievable possible. The Negro race only had the late enc of slavery. It was the Portugese who.started the African Slave-Trade. : t>.> EVINiiUDE means S E B V I C Y. We know too what our people suffered and we are thankful too that wc were brought frdn darkness to the light. Ji.ly 1st. 1863 the emancipation proclamation took place. Its now one h'indred and c: e years since slevery was abolished'"at least physical slavery. But mental slavery still exist. Now let us turn the har:s of the clock of tine back a little ar.< see what progress has been made, durirg that tine. It would look nore like tragic simplicity for me even to try to start, when being fully receptive to the it ct, that the Intellectual development of the human race has been suddenly, almost abruptly, raised to a higher plar< than that upon which it had proceeded :'rom the days of the primitive troglody :.i to the days of great grandfathers. It is characteristic of this higher plane or: development that the progress which unt 1 lately, was so slow muct henceforth be rapid. Man's mind has become more flexible the resistence of innovation has weakened, and our intellectual demands are multiplying, while the means of satisfying them are increasing. We find ourselves in the midst of a mighty revolution, of human thoughts consequently we must confine the price of progress to Liberty — : Liberty came to a race crouching under Egyptian wips and led then forth from the house of Bondage She hardened them in the wildnrness, and made of then a race of conquerors. The free spirit BLUE BAND -Holland's Best of the'Moasic took their thinkers up to heights where e beheld the unity of God. And inspired their poets with strains, that still phase the highest exaltation of thought. Liberty, Why, who can stop Liberty? Didn't Liberty dawned on the Phoenican coast and ships passed the: Pillers of Hercules to plow the unkno-ra sea? She broke in partial light on Greece, and marbles grew to shape of ideal beauty, word becane the instruments subtlest thought, and agaihst the scarity nalitia of all free vities the countless hoasts of the great King broke like surges against a rock. Yes she cast her beanes on the fbur acre farms of Italian husbandman and born of a strength a power came fo th that conquered the world.' Didn't she glinted fron shields of German warriors, and Agustus wept his legions out of the night that followed hereclipse? Her slanting rays fell again on free cities, and a lost learning revived, modern civilization began. A new world was revealed And as Liberty grew so grew art, wealth, power, knowledge and refinement. In the History of every nation we find the same truth. It was the strength, born of itfagna Charta, that won grecy and agincourt. It was the reviva? of Liberty from the despotism of the I'udors that glorified the Elizabe than age. It was the spirit that brought a crowned tyrant to the block that jilanted the seed of a mighty tree. It wai the energy of ancient freedom that, the nv.nite is had gain unity, made Spain the n.'.ghtest power of the world only to fall ;o the lowest depth of weakness when tyrejciy succeeded Liberty. What Liberty shou 1 do for the nations of the world that fully accept and loyally cherishc: her ie wonderous inventions, which are



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WimL2B ISLANDS •'LNION SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964 NOVELTY ", STORE Frontstreet Philipsburg \ Is your address for the best For Ladies : Dresses, shoes, Lats Peace material and other apparel For Children : Dresses, shoes, hats, Caps, Suits, Pajamas and Baby-dolls.... For men : Pants (Continental) sport shirts, Working shirts (Khaki),ties, etc., Also souvenirs of St. Maartcn We sell items for persons from 1-yec.r tc 99 years WHAT YOU DON'T SEE ASK FJBJ Why not drop in and be convinced. Proprietor: Mrs. A. De Weever LUXUHIJUS OFFICE SUITES FOR LEASE IN A MODERN TWO-STORY BUILDING IN AN EXCELLENT LOCATION ON FRONT STREET AT N* 62 PHILIPSHUfi FOR FURTHER INFOHMATION CONTACT: JOHANNES (Chick) ARRINDELL the Indian resisted they ( were pacified. In the New World, as elsewhere, the Wealth was for the taking; the discoverers needed extra hands to reap this great harvest,and since the Indian was either uncooperative or unfit, it was decided to transport black nen and women from Africa to America. Some estimates of the amount of black people transported to America go as high as 30 million, with some .30.$ dying on the way •* %  various illnesses and physical abuse. In the.New World the highly civilized, Christian Whiteuan auctioned his human property. Families were split and sold separately into captivity, runaway slaves were hunted down like wild animals. Christianity taught (teaches), that all men are children of one Father and made in the image of that Father, but this did not disturb the consciences of the vast majority of these pious men and women, for pious they These people found the deof their evil system also in Bible: "Black men were marked Wealth poured from all corners of the globe into the coffers of the rulers an?, the rich of those countries; greater armies wore outfitted, more destructive arms were made, larger ships were built. Africa was devided like large cake, the better to be devoured; the Americas vc-re cut up with the aae satanic seal. Whore were, fense the by God: they were the sons of Ham and beyond redemption, to them the gates of Heaven were closed anyhow." While men of goodwill both inside and outside the Church deplored slavery and condemned it as evil, it cannot be said that the Church had always been_at the forefront in the battle against slavery, on the contrary it condoned it and often gave it its blessing and defended it: "the black people were heathens, who could only benefit from their bondage." It had been forbidden in many places to convert the slaves to Christianity and where they were taught Christianity, it was of a special brand, meant mainly to enslave the mind of. an already enslaved body. "Thou ahalt not steal (the Maasa's goods)." "It is harder for a rich nan



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WINOTAKC ISLANDS' OPINION 12 SATURDAY JULY 4, 1964 Idealize the thing had stopped. I was never before under such a cold 3we^t, Boy. And what you think twas?" .' "You imanigin ation.' Ghinchiri s; id. "Twas a loose band pon me hat, man, a loose band pon a me hat." he answered. Both of them roared with laughter. I only kept on smiling, sm iling away. Chinchiri said:" ^o you see, we are even afraid of we own shadow, bom ewhere we still have a silent fear of hundreds of years gone by. Vi/e have lost so much of our identity that we often fraia to becone somebody of consequence. Do you know that many of us believe th^t certain position^ urt not for us. Like last night ke Son what a dream I h^d—" tTWhat you got, man" Buzi-,, one of cninchiri's friends had just entered ,.nd greeted. Tiiis Buzz was a care-free happy-go-lucky fellow. "Cool, man, cool! Chinchiri answered him vaguely then continued, Heck of a night, tnough man, jies, heck of a night!" Buzz just butted in and asked :"What dream that be, men, Chinchiri?" "Yes, I dreamt a dream Boy, that was a* heck of a dream. And Knew it mean something. Man, it w-a like i.m talkin' to you all'.' Chinchiri continued. "But teel me wh..t you drt,<..m, man. Hell, what you stallin' for. Come on and tell us." Buzz's curiosity had become bigger then himself and he could not suppress it any longer. And to think of it; To-day being the Antillian Em-ncimtion D n y ana I dreamin' this sort of thing. M an, I feel silly repeatin' it, really. In other words tis a dreamer' s dream ." Chinchiri shook his head and cocked it on a. side as if he was intently listening to something or.someone. "Dttmnit, man, Ching, if you gwin' tellm us, tell us or drop dead.'" Buzz raged. Buzz had a quick-temper^ Chinchiri knowing this paid his outburst no mind, otill looking slyly he directed his gaze to Buzz and said: "Buzzy-Boy, 1. st night I dreamt I was governor." Buzz's mouth fell into an idiotic gape; his eyes became incredulous of what he he<-rd. Then ^ fit of Hysterical laughter caught him and folded him double. BUZLfinally catching his breath and tears in his eyes from laughter blurted out: "but, man, you black! Deion Black, too'! A11 of uo Wore silent when Buzz again s^iu: "Chinchiri, man how can you dream a thing like that. You stupid or what. Do what! Htovernorl! Ai you, Buddy! I bet you tis all them books you readin' that got you dreamin' that kinda things, v/hat! You done gone crazy." Cr.inchiri shook his herd s-dly. He looked a t me then regarded Buzz with a dint of pity in his eyes. Then he said to me :" See, See what I told you. The same taing we was talkin' bou t. A hundred and one years gone now an d we talkin' Dout Emancipation end thing. You can't see where our men have arrived after the abolishment of they slavery. Look, how my dream shock hi m. This man only dreams can be acout a good stiff drink of rum chasin' some mother-chile and some money. That poor, Boy, That poor. Until we get beck our identity truly evolved from or out of. our historical background I can't talk 'too much bout emancipation. But of course ti got its historical value for us as a people therefore I still think we ought to celebrate find revere emancipation day of the Antillian Slaves or all slaves. This kind... Emancipation is a physical thing but I am more concerned bout our psychological emancipation." "Chinchiri, Friend, I must agree with you." I said. All of three of us feil silent once more and quickly after we changed the subject. SIAVEIIY (Continued free page 9) nations were 3lave States, great advantage over the ancient world. J h ? se nations rested on the backs Labylon, Assyria, Phonecia, Egypt, slaves Jt oft txDe happened in Rrpppp iml iJnno And nil +h ,tv, 0 these ancient nations, that slaves txreece, and Hone, and all the other were 80 p i e ntyful thai their market