CIBER Synergies

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Serving Students, Faculty and Business


CIBER


Center for International Business
Education and Research



Warrington College of Business Administration
University of Florida



Four-Year Report
Grant 3: October 2006 September 2010


.40
Vao

















CIBER Synergies:

A Comprehensive Review of Programs
Grant 3: 2006 2010
and
An Overview of Programs
Grant 4: 2010 2014


Center for International Business Education and Research











CIBER Website: http://warrington.ufl.edu/ciber/

CIBER
PO Box 117140
Warrington College of Business
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611
(352) 392-3433








From the management team


2010 was a year of renewal and retirement for The University of Florida (UF) CIBER.
The Center was successful in its application for a fourth cycle of funding from the US
Department of Education. The new $1.5 million four-year award permits continuation of
the Center's most successful programs of the 2006-2010 grant and also allows
implementation of a host of new initiatives that address international business (IB)
training challenges arising in the wake of the "Great Recession. "

The excitement of new funds and new programs was tempered by the sobering prospect
of managing them i iithuiit the assistance of long-time CIBER Associate Director, Dr.
Terry McCoy. Former Director of UF's Center for Latin American Studies, Terry was
instrumental in designing a UF CIBER plan that resulted in the first successful grant
application in 1998. He had a vision of integrating business, area studies and foreign
language expertise across campus that would indeed make UF a national resource for
improving IB training and enhancing competitiveness of US firms in global markets.
During his twelve years of dedicated service, Terry grew the vision by expanding CIBER
reach at UF and he assured successful grant performance by diligent oversight of Center
initiatives. While UF CIBER will continue to benefit from Terry's input on some specific
activities, his retirement from Center administration leaves leadership and management
gaps that will be challenging to fill.

With 2010 marking the end of the 2006-2010 grant and the beginning of the 2010-2014
program, the current volume of CIBER Synergies contains both a detailed report on
accomplishments of the former and a comprehensive overview of plans for the latter.
Particularly notable achievements of 2006-2010 include successful initiation of an African
business environment program, significant innovation and expansion of business foreign
language and culture offerings, implementation of three programs supporting development
of lB training capacity at smaller and minority-serving institutions of higher education in
Florida, and a sharp ratcheting up in sophistication and relevance of program evaluation.
These activities are scheduled for continuation and expansion in the 2010-2014 grant
cycle.

However, initiatives conceived in 2006 did not foresee the "Great Recession" that
significantly altered the IB training environment. New CIBER programs reflecting thei/me.
of sustainability and understanding the institutional frameworks of global trade and
investment respond to the changed environment. And as in past renewal proposals, new
initiatives reflect new UF CIBER partnerships. As noted in the application abstract, while
UF's proposal was submitted by the Warrington College of Business Administration
(WCBA), it was in fact the concerted effort of talented faculty from 10 colleges, 18
departments and 12 centers at UF, plus a host of other regional, national and
international institutions of higher education.

We take this opportunity to thank those faculty members and also to express our
appreciation to the UF CIBER Advisory Council (report Appendix 1) for input that
improves the effectiveness of the Center in serving students, faculty and businesses.

Carol West Andy Naranjo Isabelle Winzeler Nikki Kernaghan
Director Associate Director Assistant Director Evaluation Coordinator









I. Serving students


UF CIBER programs for students offer innovative international business (IB) training in
Florida classrooms and overseas. Simultaneously, they recognize the importance of
developing the IB research skills of both graduate and undergraduate students. And in
today's networked markets, a critical part of the educational process is linking students to
professional groups that can be on-going IB research and employment resources.

A. In UF classrooms

Earlier UF CIBER funding cycles supported basic IB course and IB course module
development. Examples included the addition of international dimensions to core
economics and business classes. Foreign language initiatives stressed development and
delivery of basic Business Spanish, Business Portuguese, Business Japanese and
Business Chinese. Some FLAC (Foreign Language across the Curriculum) courses were
introduced that interacted foreign language training with business class content. The
2006-2010 cycle focused on (1) providing foreign business culture training to students
without corresponding foreign language expertise; (2) expanding IB training to students
outside the Warrington College of Business Administration (WCBA), and; (3)
developing UF regional IB expertise, specifically through courses focused on Africa and
Latin America. A complete list of courses supported by UF CIBER, 2006-2010, is
provided in Appendix 2.

Historically, business language classes such as Business Chinese or Business Japanese
were the primary venue for teaching foreign business cultures. While this traditional
approach is perhaps theoretically ideal in melding language and culture, it has notable
practical limitations. Students cannot study all the languages corresponding to the major
cultures they will need to interact with in future global trade and investment.
Consequently, UF CIBER funded foreign language faculty to develop and deliver courses
in English on key foreign business cultures. Initial pilots were one-credit classes on the
Business Culture of China and the Business Culture of Japan. Enthusiastic student
evaluations consistently requested more in-depth three-credit courses which were
developed and piloted in the second half of the grant period. Augmenting the Asian
offerings was a one-credit course on the Business Culture of Africa followed by
development of a three-credit version of the material.

Escalating enrollments in Arabic language courses encouraged funding development of
Business Arabic. However, most of that enrollment increase was in first-year courses
that, given the complexity of the language, do not prepare students for a business
language class taught solely in Arabic. UF CIBER's modified Business Arabic was
designed to encourage more advanced study of the language (especially by business
students). It has more emphasis on language than a strictly business culture course, but
augments instruction in Arabic with instruction in English. It allows beginners in the
language to supplement language training with education on business practices of Arabic-
speaking countries of the world.









In the current world economy characterized by globalization of almost all markets, IB
training needs to reach students in professional and academic programs outside business
colleges. UF CIBER responded to this need by enhancing resources for IB classes serving
both business and non-business students and by sponsoring FLAC sections targeting
students outside WCBA.

Anthropology Assistant Professor Dr. Brenda Chalfin piloted a new course on
Anthropology and the New Economy: Anthropological Perspectives on Finance,
Commerce andNeoliberalism. The class encourages anthropology students to think
about IB aspects of their major and introduces business students to anthropological
perspectives on global trade. CIBER Director, Dr. Carol West's upper division elective
The Firm in the Global Economy has an enrollment that is approximately equally divided
between students from WCBA and students from Liberal Arts and Sciences. Thirty five
percent of the work in the class is a team project designing a foreign market entry
strategy for a firm. CIBER support for this important training in IB market analysis
included subsidizing the purchase of cross-country databases and funding a student
assistant to research potential project topics. (A syllabus for the Spring 2010 offering of
The Firm in the Global Economy is provided in Appendix 3 as an example of CIBER-
supported on-campus IB course offerings).

Since the inception of UF CIBER in 1998, UF's popular FLAC program has been a
model for integrating foreign language training with business content. In its traditional
form, a "FLAC section" is a one-credit discussion section conducted in a foreign
language in conjunction with a content course. It is taught by a foreign language graduate
student who receives pedagogical training and who works out reading/discussion
materials in conjunction with the content course professor (who need not speak the
language). Recent CIBER modifications of this traditional FLAC model include: (a)
elimination of association with a particular course; (b) instruction by a foreign language
professor with business interests, and; (c) instruction by a content professor with foreign
language skills. Variant (a) is used for multidisciplinary, cross-college current business
topics. Modification (b) allows foreign language professors to "test out" business foreign
language teaching without commitment to a formal 3-credit course. Variant (c) augments
stretched language staffs and builds a foreign language training constituency in non-
language departments.

The modifications have allowed CIBER to extend the FLAC concept to less commonly
taught languages and also to target non-business students as potential enrollees. Piloted in
2006-2010 were Asian Sports Markets (taught in Chinese targeting students in the
College of Health and Human Performance), Marketing ofAgricultural Products in the
European Union (taught in French targeting students in agriculture), Generational
Perspectives on Latin American Healthcare Delivery (taught in Spanish targeting
students in the College of Public Health and Health Professions) and Cities of the Spanish
Speaking World and Cities of the Portuguese Speaking World (taught in Spanish and
Portuguese respectively and targeting students in the College of Design, Construction and
Urban Planning).









Like the FLAC program, global regional focus on Latin America has been part of the UF
CIBER program since the Center was first funded in 1998. A goal of the 2006-2010
agenda was to initiate development of a UF specialization in African business. Given
burgeoning Asian economies and established major US trading partners in Europe and
strategic Mideast countries, it is natural to ask, "Why Africa?" The answer lies in the
purposes for the CIBER program outlined in the enabling Title VI Higher Education Act.
The first Center mandate is to "Be a national resource for the teaching of improved
business techniques, strategies and methodologies which emphasize the international
context in which business is conducted." [italics added]. Being a national resource
implies developing unique IB specializations not readily duplicated at other institutions.
In the case of UF, CIBER has been able to partner with world-class Centers housing
African business expertise (including the Center for African Studies in the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Public Utility Research Center (PURC) in WCBA),
making African business a natural focus for creation of a national IB resource at UF.

Need for a national resource in African IB has been amply demonstrated by surveys,
anecdotes, and foreign trade and investment statistics. The Higher Education Act requires
the Secretary of Education to consult with Federal agency heads in order to receive
recommendations regarding areas of national need for expertise in foreign languages and
world regions. In the most recent survey, conducted in September 2009, Africa was the
most commonly cited region. Anecdotal evidence from campuses confirms common
misunderstanding of the continent-e.g., students mislabeling Africa as a "country." And
ignorance inhibits commerce. Trade and investment data verify that the US lags the rest
of the world in establishing commercial ties with Africa and benefitting from recently
improved business climates. Despite the fact that the US direct investment position in
Africa has posted a compound annual growth rate that appears healthy during this decade
(5-10%), and that the share of US merchandise exports destined for Africa has increased
during the same period, those rates and shares remain approximately half non-US global
norms.

During 2006-2010, UF CIBER sponsored the infusion of African business into core
courses (particularly Principles of Macroeconomics) and IB courses (particularly The
Firm in the Global Economy) and also sponsored development and delivery of entire
classes focused on IB potential of the region-e.g., Economic Development of Africa and
Africa in the Global Economy.

B. In non-UF Florida classrooms

Funding opportunities for IB education and training innovation vary considerably across
Florida's complex higher education system with its 11 state universities, 28
community/state colleges and more than 60 private colleges and universities. For faculty
in units with endowment funds and/or external profit-making programs, income from
these sources may provide needed financial support for individual faculty initiatives. For
others, there is a critical mass of talent at the home institution that can be assembled to
attract national funding, allowing financing of a specific effort as part of a broader
program. For many educators in Florida, however, neither of these opportunities exists.









Consequently, initiatives that could yield high returns to the state's IB infrastructure
growth go unimplemented.

UF CIBER's EFIBI program ("Enhancing Florida's International Business
Infrastructure") specifically targets these missed opportunities. It serves non-UF higher
education students through grants to develop IB programs meeting the specialized needs
and structures of these institutions. To date, 21 IB development grants have been awarded
under the EFIBI program, the majority for course development. They include classes
delivered in business, in the social sciences, and in foreign language departments, and
they have impacted students at 14 non-UF institutions of higher education that span the
state from Pensacola to Miami.

Supplemental 2009-2010 CIBER funding targeted IB course enhancement at minority-
serving institutions. Having already supported program development at Historically
Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) through the Globalizing Business Schools
CIBER consortium (See Section II.C below), the UF Center focused the new funds on
program development at the major Hispanic-serving institution (HSI), Valencia
Community College. The latter is an excellent partner for developing national prototype
IB modules that serve Hispanic population of Puerto Rican heritage. It represents the
higher education venue through which US Hispanic population is most effectively
reached. Forty eight percent of HSIs are community colleges compared with only 12% of
HBCUs and 60% of Hispanics in higher education enroll in community colleges, a rate
disproportionate to all other demographic groups. And Valencia is a major HSI. It ranks
third nationally in associate degrees awarded to Hispanics-27% of its 50,000 students
are Hispanic, drawn primarily from the Orlando metropolitan area population in which
over 50% of the Hispanic population is of Puerto Rican heritage. IB modules were
developed for basic business courses that serve the dual tracks typical of institutions
awarding associate degrees, terminal career programs, and preparation for transfer into a
four-year institution.

C. Overseas training

Annual offering of the summer Business in Brazil program, conducted in Rio de Janeiro
and Sao Paulo, was continued throughout the most recent four-year grant period. The six-
credit program combines training in Portuguese, lectures and field trips on Brazilian
business practices, and cultural immersion. The unique national program has attracted
students from universities as diverse as San Diego State, Northwestern, Kansas, NYU,
UCLA, Michigan and Harvard, and has regularly resulted in follow-up internships in the
country.

For students more limited by time and/or funds, the short-term study abroad (STSA) has
increased in popularity. A key feature of CIBER-funded programs is that they be open to
students from multiple disciplines, allowing students to learn from each other as well as
from formal program activities. Two variants of the basic STSA concept exist. The "tour
model" typically consists of some background classroom work followed by 10-14 days
overseas travel to a variety of locales in a country or a region. During 2006-2010,









CIBER subsidized seven such tour model STSA programs: four offerings of the
International Financial Markets STSA which rotates in overseas destinations among
Argentina, Brazil and Chile; two deliveries of the agriculture-focused STSA to Italy,
Italian Food From Production to Policy, and; one offering of the law-focused Legal
Institutions of the Americas Study Tour-Chile. (See Appendix 4 for a sample STSA
itinerary.) In addition to providing an overseas learning experience for students, the
International Financial Markets STSA had a broad impact on WCBA offerings by
serving as a prototype for other degree-specific tours. The model, in conjunction with the
advice of its developer, CIBER Associate Director Andy Naranjo, spawned a variety of
STSA tours, available (or required) in different master's programs and targeting
destinations in Eastern Europe, Asia, the Mideast and Latin America.

In the "university model" of the STSA, students go abroad to a specific facility that is the
center for lectures and visits (much like a semester abroad to a particular foreign
university, but shorter in duration). UF's Paris Research Center provides opportunity for
UF faculty to develop European-based STSAs in this format. CIBER supported two such
programs: International Leadership: Adopting Businesses and Governments to New
Realities (a 2-credit course offered over Spring Break in Paris by PURC Director, Dr.
Mark Jamison) and Commodities to Cafes-Agricultural and Food Marketing in France
(a 2-credit course offered over the May Intercession period in Paris by Food and
Resource Economics Associate Professor James Stems).

Three programs funded research experiences abroad for students with particular focus on
Africa: (1) the Microfinance Travel Grant initiative; (2) the Doctoral Dissertation
Overseas Research program, and; (3) the Research Tutorial Abroad. Under (1), two
students per year were awarded travel grants through a competitive application process to
pursue research overseas on a microfinance topic. The students funded to date have come
from diverse UF programs, including undergraduate, MBA, and graduate Political
Science and they have focused on a variety of African countries, such as Tanzania,
Kenya, and Mali. These students have pursued a range of microfinance research topics-
e.g., how rules, terms and conditions of microfinance institutions (MFI) affect business
performance in the informal sector, use of technology (SMART cards, ATMs, mobile
phones, etc.) by African MFI's and the impact of that usage, and effects of MFI services
for women on African gender equality. Travel grants for doctoral dissertation research
not focused on microfinance supported anthropological study of Ghanaian
entrepreneurship and political science analysis of corporate social responsibility as a
competitive strategy in Equatorial Guinea.

Students conduct research on their own overseas in both the Microfinance Travel Grant
and Doctoral Dissertation Overseas Research programs. However, for many students
(and their parents), this is a daunting format when the destination is Africa. Their initial
exposure to the continent needs to be in a more structured group venue. The structured
and faculty-led STSA or Business in Brazil type programs provide models for students
interested in a region, but not at the point of traveling and conducting research on their
own abroad. However, there is not a clear destination locale for "African business"
analogous to say, Sao Paulo for "Brazilian business" or Seoul for "South Korean









business." In addition, vast size of the continent and its infrastructure limitations
discourage travel to multiple locations on a single trip. These constraints render highly
questionable how successful the STSA or Business in Brazil model might be if applied to
the African situation.

Consequently, UF CIBER developed the Research Tutorial Abroad (RTA) concept for
initial student exposure to research in Africa. In the RTA program, faculty members
submit proposals for taking 2-3 students abroad to Africa to conduct research on a
specific IB topic for 3-6 weeks. Successful applicants receive $5,000 to subsidize the
faculty member's participation and $5,000 to subsidize student participation. The
research topic defines the specific African destination-thereby avoiding the destination
selection problem of the STSA or Business in Brazil approaches-but the faculty
member's presence and organization provides the structure absent in other CIBER
programs subsidizing student research on African IB topics.

Two proposals were funded for a pilot of the program in Summer 2009. Dr. Julie Silva,
Assistant Professor of Geography, supervised field research of an undergraduate in
Namibia. He examined differences in applied stringency of eco-tourism regulations as a
function of development investors' home country (countries). Dr. Peter Schmidt,
Professor of Anthropology, supervised a graduate and an undergraduate student in
Tanzania addressing the potential for US private investment in that country's heritage
tourism development.

D. IB networking

Three UF CIBER programs have linked students with networks promoting their IB
development. For doctoral students in business, workshops organized by a consortium of
CIBERs bring together national academic IB research leaders in a discipline from various
universities to meet with students at the dissertation planning stage of their graduate
education. Students receive guidance in formulating potential IB dissertation topics and
become part of a national network of peers and intellectual leaders that can support
subsequent work on the topics. During 2006-2010, UF CIBER sponsored participation of
UF doctoral students in such specialized workshops in finance, information sciences and
operations management (ISOM) and accounting.

The biennial Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop has served
students from around the state, as well as from UF. They learn corporate perspectives on
the region from representatives of multiple industries and they gain insights on career
experiences and opportunities in Latin America from recent graduates working in the
private sector, in government agencies, and in NGOs. Approximately 200 students
attended the 2008 program.

CIBER funds representatives of the undergraduate International Business Society (IBS)
to attend the Florida International Summit (See Section III.A below). This provides
opportunity for IBS to compare activities and plan joint ventures with similar groups at
other Florida institutions of higher education.










In addition to serving students through IB courses offered in Florida classrooms, training
and research programs overseas, and networking connections, students gain IB
experience through working as assistants on CIBER teaching, research and outreach
grants to faculty and through assistantships in CIBER administration. Appendix 5 lists
students receiving funding support from UF CIBER over the grant period 2006-2010.
Total numbers of students impacted by the UF CIBER program measure in the thousands
when all enrollees in CIBER-sponsored courses are counted and spillovers to the
classroom of programs that develop faculty IB capacity are considered.

E. Upcoming for students

New IB course development at UF in the 2010-2014 period expands business foreign
language offerings to include Russian and medical French. It extends business foreign
culture courses to include Russia, Vietnam and a team-taught Asia and Africa class. New
FLACs include The Cuban Economy (in Spanish), Green Labeling ofAgricultural
Products in the EU (in French), Russian Business through Film (in Russian), Chinese
Literacy and Labor Market Development (in Chinese), Globalization and the Valuing and
Viewing ofArtistic Creations (in Italian), and Sustainable Building in Spanish Speaking
Countries (in Spanish). An additional mixed Arabic language-culture class will focus on
Mideast Gender and Language. The sustainable building and green labeling FLACs are
part of a new thematic emphasis that includes development of a course on Economic
Principles and Business Applications of Global Sustainability.

Two major course investments will particularly respond to the national resource mandate
of CIBERs by combining specialized areas of UF expertise to address national needs. The
first is in the area of retailing. Well-known examples and statistical rankings document
struggles of US retailers abroad: Wal-Mart's recent disinvestment from South Korea and
Germany and its failure after a decade to post a profit in China; the inability of Home
Depot and J.C. Penney to establish viable footholds in the thought-to-be-lucrative
Chilean retail sector, and; between 2007 and 2009, Sears being dropped off Deloitte's list
of Top 10 global retailers and replaced by Germany's Aldi.

IRET-Brazil (International Retail Education and Training-Brazil) addresses the need for
enhanced international retail training. It links exceptional UF industry expertise with UF
Latin American expertise and partners both with the Center for Retailing Excellence at
Fundacgo Getulio Vargas (FGV) in Sao Paulo. The team will produce multimedia
modules on retailing in Brazil that are appropriate for infusion into marketing and
retailing courses.

The second major initiative addresses an expressed priority of the 2009 CIBER
competition-to enhance training in particular foreign languages the US Department of
Education has identified as priority LCTLs (Less Commonly Taught Languages).
Geography has historically constrained development of US capacity in the 15 African
LCTLs that appear on the list; instruction is typically available only on site at a handful
of Title VI Centers for African Studies and a similar small number of non-Title VI









centers. Building national expertise in the languages requires harnessing technology to
provide wider geographical access to the centers of pedagogical expertise. The proposed
Web-basedBasic and Business Akan does this through combining UF expertise in web-
based business program delivery, web-based German and Chinese training, and Akan
language instruction.

Both business and journalism students at UF will benefit from a new class on IB
Reporting and the Research Tutorial Abroad program will be offered on a regular basis
for students interested in IB research in Africa. Students enrolled in Florida institutions of
higher education outside of UF will be offered new global business classes through
continuation of the EFIBI program. A second phase of the partnership with Valencia
Community College will add new prototypes for enhancing IB education at Hispanic-
serving institutions. Also continued from the 2006-2010 period will be the networking
programs and UF CIBER support for Business in Brazil and the International Financial
Markets Tour.

Five new STSAs will be available to students: Sustainable Agriculture in Central
America; EU Accounting and International Financial Reporting Standards; Retailing in
Brazil; Cuban Agricultural Markets, and; Fly i //h the Flowers. The latter introduces a
new STSA experience. While most focus on a particular world region (or region and
discipline), Fly with the Flowers focuses on a global market. It travels to Miami, Bogota
and Amsterdam teaching multidisciplinary perspectives on issues in global market
competition such as conflict and collaboration between developed and developing
economies, technology-based v. resource-based national comparative advantage, and
differing concepts of sustainability and ethics. It is being developed jointly by UF
academic experts in the business and science aspects of the global market in cut flowers,
CIBER Director Dr. Carol West and Chair of UF's Environmental Horticulture
Department, Dr. Terril Nell. They are joined by industry practitioners in the state who
handle the 40,000 boxes of cut flowers that arrive daily at Miami Airport and represent
approximately two thirds of the cut flowers sold in the US.

II. Serving faculty

UF CBER serves faculty on campus, regionally and nationally through IB course
development, delivery and research grants, through workshops and conferences, and
through other specialized IB faculty development programs.

A. IB course development, delivery and research grants

New courses serving students detailed in Sections I.A and I.B above were the products of
UF CIBER course (or course module) development grants. Typically, the Center does not
fund course delivery and in fact requires the grant recipient's department assure delivery
will be scheduled. However, numerous exceptions to this rule were made for foreign
language courses or culture courses taught by foreign language faculty. The global
"Great Recession" that dominated the last funding cycle diminished state revenues and
reduced educational endowments, creating fiscal crises that necessitated program









cutbacks in many institutions of higher education. News reports from around the country
suggested foreign language departments bore a disproportionate share of those cutbacks.
UF was no exception. In order to continue progress in foreign business language and
culture training, CIBER needed to provide some funding for new course delivery as well
as new course development in those units.

In addition to serving UF and regional Florida faculty through course development and
delivery grants, UF CIBER served business foreign language faculty nationwide by
participating in the multi-CIBER Business Language Research and Training (BLRT)
initiative. BLRT awards grants for proposed innovations in business foreign language
instruction through a national competitive process.

Major 2006-2010 CIBER research grants to faculty in journalism, business and
agriculture supported studies on determinants of competitiveness in global mobile and
media industries, impacts of Homeland Security policies on the supply of agricultural
labor, cross-country analysis of factors affecting advancement of women to leadership
positions in corporations, standards setting in cooperative technical organizations,
securing the global supply chain in different Asian markets, and strategies for diffusing
anti-American, anti-capitalism and anti-globalization sentiments in major Latin American
countries.

Two additional research awards were commissioned CIBER studies. Business language
pioneer, Dr. Christine Uber Grosse, was funded to update her classic 1980's survey of US
business language instruction as part of UF CIBER's hosting the 2008 CIBER Business
Language Conference (see Section II.B below). Dr. Renata Serra, economist with the UF
Center for African Studies and Coordinator of Cotton Research for the global African
Power andPolitics Program, prepared a background piece on child labor for use with IB
case studies on the subject.

Research grants often don't produce a final product in the same funding cycle. Long lags
in the academic research, review and publication process can push final publication dates
into the next grant period. Indeed, research products may continue to appear in even later
grant cycles as the faculty member pursues new questions that emerged in the initial
research. Hence, it can be difficult to determine when research products of a CIBER grant
end. Conservative estimates indicate a substantial body of B publications during 2006-
2010 attributable to UF CIBER research grants. They included articles in International
Journal on Media Management, Journal of Media Business Studies, International
Journal of Mobile Marketing, New Media and Society, Choices, Economics Letters,
Comparative Studies in Society and History, American Behavioral Scientist, Journal of
African Business, Journal of Labor Economics, ICFAI Journal of Mergers and
Acquisitions; Review of International Economics, Economic Theory, Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics, Emerging Markets Review, Journal of International
Money and Finance, Applied Economics Letters, American Journal ofAgricultural
Economics, International Review of Economics and Finance, and the Texas Intellectual
Property Law Journal. Additionally published were numerous book chapters and a case
study book supporting the teaching of Business Portuguese, Brazilians Wo king i th









Americans: Cultural Case Studies, by Orlando Kelm and Mary Risner (University of
Texas Press).

See Appendix 6 for a sample summary of CIBER-sponsored faculty research publications
and Appendix 7 for a sample abstract from UF CIBER-supported doctoral dissertation
research.

B. Workshops and conferences

One of the first programs launched by UF CIBER in 1998 was the CIBER
Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop and it continues to be a key initiative fostering
IB interest and development across campus. Faculty and graduate students from more
than 18 departments and eight colleges at UF have attended this monthly luncheon
seminar series. Funded by WCBA and organized by CIBER, the workshop keeps IB-
interested faculty from diverse locales networked and provides an informal forum for
feedback on CIBER plans. Its featuring of an external speaker from a new area has often
been the first step in expanding UF CIBER programs to additional disciplines.

Exceptionally prestigious IB researchers are brought to the UF campus through the
annual Bradbury Distinguished Lecture on International Economics, co-sponsored by the
Bradbury endowment, CIBER, and UF's Public Policy Research Center. During 2006-
2010, presentations were made on current topics of globalization and growth by four
distinguished scholars in the field: Dr. Maurice Obstfeld (University of California,
Berkekey); Dr. Phillippe Aghion (Harvard University); Dr. Robert Solow (MIT), and; Dr.
Dani Rodrik (Harvard University).

More than 150 language professionals from around the nation attended the 2008 CIBER
Business Language Conference, organized and hosted by UF CIBER in St. Petersburg,
Florida, April 9-11, 2008. The conference is the premier annual national meeting for
faculty engaged in teaching foreign languages to the professions. The unexpectedly high
attendance (up over 50% from 2007) reflected meticulous planning efforts of the Program
Chair, UF Senior Lecturer in Spanish, Dr. Greg Moreland, and careful attention to
logistics details provided by CIBER Assistant Director, Isabelle Winzeler.

Conference sessions addressed use of technology in business language instruction,
perspectives of business professionals and business professors, integrating culture and
language education, innovative applications of business case studies and advertisements,
and nine specific foreign languages-Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Russian,
Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, and Hindi (See Appendix 11 for a conference agenda.)

The UF Title VI Centers of African Studies and International Business Education and
Research jointly hosted the 2008 Annual Meetings of the International Academy of
African Business and Development (IAABD) at the University of Florida Hilton
Conference Center, May 20-24, 2008.









Total attendance was 158 academics from 19 countries, including 10 African nations.
Nine sets of four concurrent sessions accommodated 125 scholarly research presentations
that spanned a broad range of multi-disciplinary issues related to the conference theme of
"Global and Local Dynamics in African Business and Development." Plenary sessions
included presentations by two African Ambassadors to the US (Republic of Zambia and
Malawi) and the Director of the US Department of Commerce African Office.

C. Other specialized faculty IB development programs

Two-week study abroad faculty tours provide background on the business climate in a
major world region, create the personal overseas examples that make IB "come alive" in
the classroom, and offer networking opportunities for future IB teaching and research
projects. Each tour is a combination of lectures and site visits, organized by a lead
CIBER. Eight offerings were available during the last grant cycle: Western Europe
(University of Memphis CIBER); Eastern Europe (University of Pittsburgh CIBER);
MERCOSUR-Brazil, Argentina and Chile (FIU CIBER); China (University of Denver
CIBER), India-Delhi (University of Connecticut CIBER), India-Mumbai/Bangalore (FIU
CIBER); Sub-Saharan Africa (University of South Carolina CIBER); Vietnam
(University of Hawaii and University of Wisconsin CIBERs).

Each of the four Asian tours occurs in the first half of January, a time that conflicts with
teaching for many UF faculty. Consequently, UF CIBER generally co-sponsors and
funds participation in the late May Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa
and MERCOSUR tours. WCBA annually supports tour participation by four or five
business faculty (or staff) and CIBER funds at least one non-UF business faculty member
to participate on the Sub-Saharan Africa tour. (Sponsored faculty are identified in
Appendix 8 that lists all UF faculty receiving direct CIBER support 2006-2010.)

UF foreign language faculty from Romance language, Slavic language, Asian language
and African language programs benefitted from multiple smaller travel grants permitting
their participation in national conferences on business foreign language instruction.
Conference travel grants were also provided to faculty outside UF as part of the EFIBI
program (see Section I.B above and Appendix 9). Faculty from the University of West
Florida and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University received CIBER support for
participation in the MERCOSUR and Vietnam two-week study tours abroad and two
faculty from Valencia Community College were funded to travel to Puerto Rico to make
business and educational contacts there as part of the specially funded Hispanic-serving
institution (HSI) initiative. (See Section I.B above.)

On the UF campus, specialized FDIB (Faculty Development in International Business)
programs focused on enhancing ability of foreign language faculty to make greater use of
technology in teaching business foreign languages. Background workshops on the topic
were provided for all faculty and follow-up grants were awarded to those developing
specific plans for greater use of technology in their classes.









Among non-UF campuses in Florida, UF CIBER has concentrated on providing FDIB
opportunities to faculty at small and/or minority-serving institutions. Faculty course
development grants made through the EFIBI program, as well as travel grants noted
earlier in this section, have been significant components of this emphasis. Throughout
the four-year grant period, the Center also participated in the Globalizing Business
Schools CIBER consortium program. A joint endeavor of 10 CIBERs and the Institute for
International Public Policy, the initiative pairs each participating CIBER with one of the
Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Each CIBER assists its HBCU
partner in preparing an internationalization plan for its business curriculum and in writing
a BIE grant application to fund plan implementation. The CIBER also sponsors
participation of HBCU faculty in workshops for internationalizing business classes. UF
CIBER's most recent HBCU partner was Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona
Beach. Although plans for submitting a grant proposal proceeded on target in Fall 2006
and early Spring 2007, they subsequently faltered with the departure of a key faculty
member from Bethune-Cookman. Faculty from the university did, however, participate in
the internationalization workshops.

In Fall 2006, UF CIBER assisted faculty at Florida A&M University (FAMU) in the
preparation of an application for a second two-year BIE grant. FAMU was UF CIBER's
Globalizing Business Schools partner in the previous grant cycle. Its 2004 BIE
application was funded and the IB program implemented was recognized for excellence
in February 2007 when FAMU was designated a winner of the Andrew Heiskell Award
for Innovative International Education in the area of study abroad. The second FAMU
BIE application submitted with UF CIBER assistance in Fall 2006 was also funded.

D. Upcoming for faculty

New grants for faculty research stress topics emerging in the aftermath of the "Great
Recession" which saw the US unemployment rate double from 5% to 10%, consumer
confidence plunge 80% to a record low in more than 40 years of data collection, real
estate values plummet 20 to 30 percent, and $8 trillion in US stock market wealth vanish
in a year. Waves of Wall Street layoffs drowned business student career expectations and
those continuing in business programs increasingly look for non-monetary awards or
"doing good through business." The 2010-14 theme of sustainability (noted in Section I.E
above) carries over to research programs with specific focus on developing
multidisciplinary studies of African sustainable tourism.

The "Great Recession" also heightened interest in policy, regulatory, and institutional
frameworks as banking experts unraveled how systemic risk got built into financial
markets. New "IB frameworks" research pursues issues related to: (a) use of the United
Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) and
constraints on application of that convention; (b) the cost of dual compliance in US-EU
auditing and financial accounting; (c) an overview text/business reference, The European
Union for Americans: Law, Economics and Politics of Doing Business in the EU, and;
(d) implications for MNCs of conclusions emerging from the Africa Power and Politics
Program (APPP).










APPP is a 5-year global project with the mission of "discovering institutions that work
for poor people." Funded by the Overseas Development Institute in London, the study is
being carried out by a consortium of research organizations and policy think-tanks in
France, Ghana, Niger, Uganda, the UK and the US. UF's Center for African Studies is
the lead US institution on the project. Business aspects of APPP focus on government
institutions and indigenous firms. However, APPP institutional policy recommendations
will have implications for MNCs operating in Africa, including those designing
development-effective corporate social responsibility programs as part of the investment
agenda. UF CIBER will fund the additional research required to elucidate the
implications for MNCs.

Such linking of UF CIBER research funding to other studies also characterizes the CISG
and dual compliance investigations noted above. In particular, expensive primary data
collection has been financed by other organizations and the CIBER role is to fund
investigation of specific CIBER-relevant research questions these new data sets might be
able to address. A similar model, but one applied in a theoretical as opposed to empirical
context, underlies the proposed research study Heterogeneous Firms and US IB
Competitiveness. The new theoretical heterogeneous firm models, introduced in Elhanan
Helpman's seminal 2006 Journal of Economic Literature article, have potentially
profound implications for studying whether a particular policy or program contributes to
the "ability of US business to prosper in the global economy." While not funding the
extensive basic development of these models that is currently underway, CIBER does
plan funding study of the implications of such models for evaluation of US global
competitiveness in the wake of trade and sustainability policy changes.

In contrast, the research on African sustainable tourism takes a "seed funding" as
opposed to "follow-up" funding approach. Its purpose is to facilitate small
interdisciplinary studies of the topic that get UF faculty from diverse colleges interacting
with each other on analysis of issues. The small studies, and more importantly, the
established interaction, can then be the basis for attracting larger grants requiring such
integration of disciplines and perspectives. Proposed research on Converging Digital
Media Markets in Latin America and The Evolving Cuban Economy encourage UF
faculty to apply established research expertise on a topic in a particular world region, or
set of world regions, to a new geographical area of special CIBER emphasis.

UF CIBER will host two academic conferences in the new funding cycle, each associated
with a research or teaching initiative. With funding support from both CIBER and
WCBA, Business Law Professor Larry DiMatteo is finalizing plans for a 2011
conference of international CISG scholars to (1) produce an edited volume summarizing
current international issues and scholarly research findings on CISG application and; (2)
prepare business practitioner materials that address obstacles to wider application of the
CISG as revealed in the recent studies. In 2013, CIBER will fund African Language
Associate Professor James Essegbey to organize a conference on Access and
Effectiveness: Use of Technology in Teaching African LCTLs. It will bring together
African language academics from around the country to benchmark computerized









strategic African LCTL pedagogy, identify an agenda for future research, and provide
expert external evaluation of the Web-basedAkan initiative (see Section I.E above.)

Programs for faculty that continue in form from 2006-2010, but change in terms of
content and participants, include:(a) the monthly CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research
Workshop; (b) annual co-sponsorship of the CIBER Business Language Conference; (c)
annual funding for at least four business faculty to participate on CIBER-led two week
FDIB study tours abroad, and; (d) annual sponsorship of a non-business faculty member
to participate on the two-week Sub-Saharan Africa study tour.

Despite the fact the new funding cycle has just begun, (a) is already producing new
CIBER linkages across campus. In this case, the linkage is with the Ham Museum of
Art. In January 2011, Jeanne Steiner, Senior Vice President for Corporate Social
Responsibility and Art Outreach Manager, Bank of America, will speak to the workshop
on the topic "Corporate Art Collections and Corporate Global Social Responsibility."
Planning the jointly sponsored Harn-CIBER event has resulted in broader discussions of
potential future collaborations that address IB issues in one of the oldest global markets,
the market for artistic creations. Participants in (c) will have some new tour options:
Russia (led by the University of Connecticut CIBER) and MENA-Middle East and North
Africa (led by CIBERs at Brigham Young University, University of Colorado-Denver,
Temple University and the University of South Carolina).

Through continuation of the EFIBI grants program, typically underserved faculty at
smaller institutions of higher education in Florida will be given opportunity to develop IB
skills and to implement innovative IB training programs. EFIBI's flexibility in adjusting
to diverse institutional and programmatic constraints allows it to succeed where other
more structured internationalization programs would fail.

Faculty at Valencia Community College will be implementing Phase II of the HSI
Community College IB prototype development initiative. Both IB modules for
specialized career tracks and more in-depth IB experiences for business students are
being examined. As in Phase I, many faculty will benefit from special workshops on
how to incorporate IB modules into classes. Successful modules/programs will be
published on the UF CIBER web site for use by community college faculty nationwide,
especially those who serve Hispanic populations of Puerto Rican heritage.

High school and community college foreign language faculty will be the foci of a new
initiative, NOBLE (Network of Business Language Educators). It is predicated on the
observation that in today's economy, career satisfaction and success are often enhanced
by participation in networks of similar colleagues. B-interested foreign language faculty
in community colleges and high schools lack established, supportive professional
networks. While they may periodically attend national conferences such as the CIBER
Business Language Conference, sporadic funding support results in sporadic attendance,
preventing their becoming an integral part of networks emerging from such university-
oriented meetings. And they are only a small part of state foreign language teachers
associations that are dominated by instructors from standard (non-business) elementary









and intermediary foreign language classrooms. NOBLE creates a regional (statewide)
network for this business language group.

CIBER funding will support (1) web site development and facilitator compensation; (2)
travel to meet with the Florida Department of Education in developing foreign business
language initiatives that support high school IB and Finance Academy Programs; (3) an
annual meeting; (4) curriculum module development awards; and (5) professional
development conference travel.

III. Serving business

Business outreach programs fund publications and presentations that explain practical IB
implications of recent scholarly research and/or engage university research expertise to
address IB issues raised by businesses. Core programs are repeated on a regular basis;
other programs are one-time activities.

A. Core programs

While content of all business outreach programs varies year-to-year in response to
changing issues and new developments, some initiatives have been repeated regularly in
structure. These are the core UF CIBER business outreach programs. The signature core
program serving state, regional and national businesses for over a decade has been annual
publication of the Latin American Business Environment Report. The approximately 50-
page study, disseminated to over 2000 educators and businesses, provides a
comprehensive examination of Latin American business conditions. It tracks social,
political and economic trends both for the region as a whole and for its 20 largest markets
individually.

Core annual business conference programs 2006-2010 were the Legal and Policy in the
Americas annual conference (in collaboration with the UF Levin College of Law), the
Florida International Summit (in collaboration with other university globalization centers
in Florida and a consortium of state and local economic development agencies), and the
National Forum on Trade Policy (in collaboration with the other 30 CIBERs ). Target
audience of the first is legal scholars and legal practitioners in both the US and South
America. To serve such geographically dispersed constituencies, the conference location
alternates between Gainesville and a Latin American city. CIBER programmatic input
particularly concentrates on three of the conference's eight major sessions: The
Financial War Against Organized Crime and Terrorism; Lessons and Challenges of
MERCOSUR's Trade, Business and Dispute Settlement Systems; Agriculture, Forestry,
Environment and Sustainability.

Similarly, UF CIBER provides planning expertise, content expertise, and funding support
to the Florida International Summit. The 2007-2010 programs were held in Tampa or
Jacksonville and focused on the themes "Trade, Logistics and Transportation" (2007),
"The State of Global Finance and Trade (2008), "Florida Business Opportunities in Latin
America and the Caribbean" (2009), and "Opportunities in a Transformed Global









Economy" (2010). The National Forum on Trade Policy addressed regional differences
in the impact of national trade programs, each year emphasizing issues of significance to
businesses in the region of the conference locale. During the 2006-2010 grant period,
forums were held in Seattle, WA, Stamford, CT, and San Diego, CA. (A fourth
conference scheduled for Austin, TX was cancelled due to weather conditions.)

B. Special opportunities programs

The repeated formats and planning groups of core conference programs use CIBER funds
efficiently by minimizing organizational expense and, in addition, the conferences
provide valuable on-going networking forums for regular attendees. However, a one-
time conference addressing a timely topic for a new audience can yield high education
and training benefits. Hence, optimal use of CIBER business outreach funds includes
both core programs and programs that respond to special opportunities as they arise. UF
CIBER supported five such special opportunities conferences for business 2006-2010 and
was primary organizer of a sixth. (See Appendix 10.) The former group included three
on utility policy organized by UF's Public Utility Research Center. A fourth featured
representatives of the United Nations, the International Advertising Association, Latin
American foundations and global public relations agencies presenting case studies and
best practices on the topic Multi-Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications in
the Americas: Business, Community and Government. The two-day February 2008
program was organized and funded by UF's Center for Latin American Studies, College
of Journalism and Communications, and CIBER. In addition to the 175 live attendees,
many more viewed the conference by webcast in six Latin American countries (Brazil,
Colombia, Chile, Panama, Argentina, and Mexico) and three European ones (UK,
Portugal and Spain), as well as the US, Canada, and Puerto Rico.

Organized by the University of Maryland CIBER, UF CIBER co-sponsored the day and a
half long conference on Global Security: Challenges and Opportunities, June 16-17,
2008 in Washington, D.C. Keynote addresses were delivered by Jay M. Cohen, Under
Secretary for Science and Technology, US Department of Homeland Security, and
Ronald Knode, Leading Edge Forum Associate, Computer Sciences Corporation.
Panelists from business discussed technology, innovation and global security, doing
business with the Department of Homeland Security, and enterprise resilience in an age
of turbulence. June 17 featured a journalist panel discussing "America's War on
Terrorism and Implications for Business." Panelists included a former CNN White
House Correspondent, US Economic Correspondent of the Financial Times, Washington
Bureau Chief for Al-Safir (a Lebanese Daily) and a Reuters reporter.

Both attendance (75) and evaluations (9.5 average on a scale of 1 to 10) were higher than
anticipated for the October 2008 conference organized by UF CIBER and held in Tampa
on Doing Business n /ih Africa: Practice, Issues and Potential. Plenary sessions featured
World Bank and Global Insight, Inc. Africa experts. Concurrent workshops drew on
multiple Florida academic, government, and business sources for specialized African IB
expertise on cultural, regulatory, and logistics issues. Appendix 12 details the conference
agenda.










C. Upcoming for business


A second core annual outreach publication will be introduced in Spring 2011, the Sub-
Saharan Africa Business Environment Report, similar in format to the Latin American
Business Environment Report. Partnership with business faculty at the University of
South Carolina CIBER brings African IB expertise to the project that complements
expertise at UF. Multiple experts are needed to effectively cover the diverse continent
which lacks obvious regionalization, contains a large number of countries at low levels of
development, and is home to numerous different languages.

The new publication will be featured at a second Doing Business ni /ti Africa outreach
conference scheduled for Miami in the 2012-2013 grant year, beginning a potential move
of that event from the "special opportunity" category to the "core" category. Funding for
other special opportunity conferences and conference co-sponsorships has been budgeted,
but is not committed at the current time. These funds give UF CIBER future flexibility in
responding to need for business outreach programs on topics not foreseen at the current
time.

IV. Evaluating our service

On-going evaluation of UF CIBER programs is a critical component of serving students,
faculty and businesses effectively. UF CIBER has long had evaluation activities that (a)
monitor initiative progress by specifying intermediary products to be delivered or
milestones to be met and (b) address impact by collecting and summarizing available
indicators (e.g., number of students enrolled in a class, average student evaluations of a
class, and number of research presentations at professional conferences). While (a) has
continued, (b) has been replaced by first asking specific questions on outcome
significance and impact and then designing and implementing evaluation instruments that
address those questions. In addition, greater emphasis has been placed on making
evaluation outcomes useful to others.

A. Addressing new evaluation questions

Traditionally collected data on numbers of students enrolled in a program and the average
student evaluation of that program provide some indication of the impact of initiatives
serving students. They do not, however, address a basic question, "What, if anything, did
the students learn?" Pre/post program tests have been introduced to quantify learning.
While this is relatively straightforward when learning takes the form of knowledge
acquisition, not all learning is of that type. During 2006-2010, special attention was given
to defining and measuring learning in the context of short term study abroad (STSA)
programs.

Absorbing factual information about the region visited cannot be the learning goal of an
STSA; facts can be learned from on-campus research. Nor can skill acquisition be the
goal (gaining expertise in conducting business in the country); the length of visit is too









short. Primary potential impact is changes in student perceptions of challenges to, and
opportunities for, doing business in the country or perceptions of how the conduct of
business differs from that in the US. Pre/post tests asking open-ended questions on what
students think are the most significant challenges, opportunities and/or differences can
measure this type of learning.

Although more difficult to analyze than simple quantitative rankings, qualitative
responses on the pre and post STSA questionnaires were exciting in what they revealed
about the nature of learning on these tours and how participant perceptions changed.
Evaluation of the 2008 International Financial Markets Study Tour to Brazil (see Section
I.C above) illustrates results. Three questions asked of students on the pre and post tests
were: (a) List in rank order (from highest to lowest) five reasons why you think Brazil
might be a good place to do business (1 = highest, 5 = lowest); (b) List in rank order
(from highest to lowest) what you think are five of the biggest business opportunities in
Brazil (1 = highest, 5 = lowest), and; (c) List in rank order (from highest to lowest) five
factors that you think are the biggest challenges for doing business in Brazil(1 = highest,
5 = lowest).

To analyze test results, responses were grouped into broad categories so changes in the
distribution of perceptions could be compared. For example, "high inflation," "lack of
monetary discipline," and "macroeconomic volatility" were similar responses that could
all be categorized as "economic instability." Judgment was required with regard to which
responses to use and how to use them. Beyond the highest ranks, responses were
considerably dispersed making grouping difficult. As a first approach for (b) and (c),
responses to ranks (1) and (2) were combined and used; only responses to rank (1) were
used for (a).

The analysis indicated substantial shifts as a consequence of the STSA in all three of (a)
to (c) above. For (a)-top reason Brazil is a good place to do business-pre and post
STSA responses were grouped into six categories: (1) high growth rate/emerging market;
(2) size (population and/or economy); (3) natural resources; (4) low risk/stable; (5) low
cost labor; and (6) other. Percent of responses for each of the six categories respectively
for the pre test (post test) were: 34.8% (19.0%); 13.0% (14.3%); 21.7% (4.8%); 13.0%
(42.9%); 8.7% (0.0%); 8.7% (19.0%). Categories (1) and (3)-high growth emerging
BRIC market with a lot of natural resources-is stereotypical Brazil and dominates in the
pre-test, the two categories combined accounting for 56.5% of the top ranked answers. In
contrast, there was some, but relatively little, appreciation for the stability and reliability
Brazil has achieved with category (4) accounting for only 13.0% of responses. In the
post test, (1) and (3) combined drop to less than 25% of responses and (4) mushroomed
to 42.9%.

However, stereotypes are not always moderated; they can also be reinforced. The most
common issue ranked (1) or (2) in response to greatest challenges to doing business in
Brazil was "lack of rule of law" which includes crime, corruption, lack of transparency in
the legal system, etc. While accounting for 20% of responses in the pre test, its share
climbed to 27.5% in the post test. Also increasing in importance in the post test relative









to the pre test were high taxes (0.0 % to 15%) and social infrastructure (6.7% to 17.5%),
the latter including income inequality, lack of education, etc. Reflecting pre/post shifts in
responses to (a), "economic instability" declined from 10% to 2.5%. In general,
perceptions concentrated on fewer items in the post test with the top five specific (non-
"other") categories accounting for 87.5% of responses while in the pre test, the top five
accounted for 64.4% of responses.

In terms of (b)-best Brazilian sectors to invest in-three sectors gained markedly
between the pre and post tests; oil and gas (7.0% of responses to 22.6%),
ethanol/alternative fuels (11.6% to 17.9%), finance and real estate (11.6% to 19.0%); and
two declined markedly, agriculture and forestry (20.9% to 4.8%) and
transport/trade/tourism (18.6% to 4.8%). The former decline is consistent with the sharp
drop between pre and post test in the ranking of natural resources as a reason Brazil is a
good place to do business in.

In general, perception changes measured in UF CIBER STSA programs were in the
direction IB professionals would agree with-negating outdated stereotypes and
emphasizing issues important for current and future US competitiveness in global
markets.

Administering pre/post tests is generally less feasible in the context of business outreach
programs and can detract from event delivery. However, some more precise information
on program value-added was obtained by adding open-ended questions on positive and
negative aspects of the program to the evaluation survey. Especially useful were similar
observations from different conferences. In particular, attendees at both the Latin
American Business Symposium and Career Workshop (Section I.D) and the Doing
Business n /ih Africa Conference (Section III.B) emphasized that major conference
strengths were diversity of the speaker backgrounds, the mix of presenters from
government, academia, business, business consulting and NGOs. Both conferences were
organized by CIBER staff and similar ones are scheduled for the 2010-2014 grant period.
The similar unprompted responses on format from two conferences differing in terms of
topic and target audience affirm value of the format. They also affirm the CIBER
estimate of appropriate mix of perspectives.

A second question not always directly addressed in pre-2006 evaluation was "How can
the program be improved?" Evaluation during 2006-2010 garnered considerably more
information by (a) adding the open-ended question directly to an evaluation survey; (b)
asking explicitly about program short-comings on the evaluation questionnaire; (c)
conducting post-program focus group interviews and; (d) requesting formal post program
evaluation by the initiative coordinator. Additional evaluation activities (c) and (d) were
especially useful when a new course or a new course module was introduced by a
pedagogically-adept instructor. Little is learned about success of the innovation (or how it
might be improved) from standard student evaluations when the professor typically
scores high on such evaluations in a variety of contexts. Follow-up focus group
discussions revealed some shortcomings not indicated by the standard evaluations
because students were otherwise enthusiastic about the professor. Simultaneously, many









pedagogically adept professors are sufficiently self-confident on teaching to freely share
problems they observe in their course design/delivery, making (d) also a potentially
valuable addition to evaluation materials in the context of innovations led by consistently
outstanding instructors.

Where possible, evaluation should also benchmark program benefits relative to a cheaper,
second-best alternative. Do benefits of a new program warrant additional new costs? This
question was particularly a concern with regard to the new EFIBI program of competitive
grants to fund internationalization of business programs at smaller institutions of higher
education in Florida. Limited capacity at these colleges and universities suggested
considerable flexibility and ingenuity would be needed to fit programs to institutional
constraints. However, the competitive grant application process that allows the flexibility
in funded programs is more difficult and costly to administer than a program that limits
the awards to a few specified alternatives. Popular among CIBERs have been awards to
faculty at regional schools to attend one of a specific and limited set of generic seminars
on internationalizing the business curriculum.

Whether such an easier-to-administer program would adequately serve the
internationalization needs of the EFIBI target population was examined by (a) offering it
as a much simpler application alternative within the EFIBI program and; (b) analyzing
whether proposed program development might reasonably have been served by the
simpler program even if the applicant did not opt for the alternative. Based on three years
of data, less than 15% of applicants opted for the much simpler application alternative
and the generic seminars would not have served the internationalization development
needs of any of the other applicants.

Expert external evaluation provides a check on other evaluation techniques in the case of
major Center programs or may be the only option when other techniques cannot
adequately address questions of program effectiveness. In 2007, UF CIBER's signature
business outreach publication, the Latin American Business Environment Report
(LABER), was evaluated for form and content by Ambassador Myles R. R. Frechette, a
35-year veteran of the region who served as US Ambassador to Colombia, Assistant US
Trade Representative for Latin America, director of two non-profit organizations focused
on Latin America and who currently is a trade and business consultant specializing in the
region.

The seven-page single-space evaluation report thoroughly examined each of the first
eight issues of LABER individually (1999 through 2006) as well as considering elements
common to all editions and trends in material presented. It applauded specific format
changes while warning of the potential negative impact on business readership of
creeping report length. It pointed to content enhancements that added significant value-
e.g., the paradigm shift of 2002, inclusion of regulatory regime starting in 2004 and the
legal environment added in 2006-but reminded the authors not to lose focus on key
broad issues such as growth sustainability.









The general conclusion on the eight issues of LABER: "They are exactly as advertised;
independent, objective and academically grounded analyses of the business and
investment environments in Latin America. . When you read all of these reports you
realize the magnificent contribution the LABERs have made to understanding
developments in the region from 1999 through 2006. Without a doubt the LABERs are
the most methodical, concise and objective analyses I have read about these
developments."


B. Making evaluation useful to others

Evaluation is intended to guide not only UF CIBER in its program design and
management; it is also intended to guide external stakeholders in use of UF CIBER
innovations. Making evaluation useful to others in general requires (a) storing data in a
transparent, readily accessible format and; (b) providing contextual information that
enhances interpretation of evaluation statistics.

Substantial expansion of the UF CIBER evaluation program during the 2006-2010 grant
period generated an overwhelming volume of new data. Without specific US Department
of Education formatting and reporting guidelines for evaluation results, initially new data
just accumulated without the ready accessibility desirable for a transparent and
accountable evaluation program. UF CIBER developed a unique comprehensive
framework for electronically storing, organizing, and accessing evaluation data, e-CIVAL
(Electronic CIBER Evaluation). The framework features (1) HTML-organized content
accessible through CD with a web browser; (2) easy storage and access to evaluative
materials in multiple formats-word, excel, Zoomerang, etc.; (3) scroll-down side-bar
menu organized by proposal initiative number with click-on indices listing evaluative
materials by year for the initiative, and; (4) primary data availability as well as tabular
and graphical summaries.

Expanded collection of contextual information first focused on program participants.
Were undergraduates in a new IB class business majors? social science majors? other
professional program majors? What was the background of attendees at a business
outreach conference? Were government policy makers or academics at the conference as
well as business practitioners? Such information is critical in deciding whether a UF
CIBER developed program has applicability in an alternative proposed situation. Further
collection of contextual information was added as need became apparent. For example,
the problem of evaluating IB course initiatives when delivered by pedagogically adept
instructors (discussed in Section IVA above) calls for providing some indication of
professorial context-e.g., average evaluation by students in other recent classes.

Indeed, whether such average evaluations are "good" or "bad" requires additional
context. For example, student evaluations of 20 CIBER-sponsored courses delivered in
Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 averaged 4.37 on a scale of l(poor) to 5(excellent). Nine of
the 20 were rated at 4.5 or higher and the only two that fell below the "very good" 4.0
mark were barely below it at 3.8 and 3.9. While the 4.37 average appears "high" on a









scale of 1 to 5, it was actually only 3.1 percent above the WCBA average for Spring
2009, 4.24. What distinguished the CIBER class ratings was their much lower standard
deviation, only 0.33 compared with the WCBA 0.88.

C. Upcoming for evaluation

Systematically applying the new data collection and evaluation instruments pioneered in
2006-2010 is a primary goal of the 2010-2014 evaluation program. Further development
work is scheduled for (1) defining "learning" in specialized contexts-e.g., FLAC
sections that are neither strictly language classes nor strictly content classes (see Section
I.A); (2) determining through surveys and focus groups how to measure the potential
benefits of the NOBLE network (see Section II.D); (3) researching databases and
establishing procedures for tracking of CIBER program participants to identifying long-
run program benefits; and (4) determining the set of initiatives that can realistically be
benchmarked to a cheaper, second-best alternative. Expert external evaluation is
scheduled for language and culture programs and for initiatives that serve Florida
business and academic constituencies. At a more conceptual level, initial analysis will be
done on how to aggregate across initiatives for program-wide evaluation.


























Appendices









List of Appendices


Page

1. CIBER Advisory Council Members 1

2. Courses Supported by CIBER Funding 3

3. Sample Syllabus: The Firm in the Global Economy 6

4. Sample Itinerary: International Business Study Tour to Argentina 9

5. Students Supported by CIBER Funding 11

6. Sample CIBER-Sponsored Faculty Research Publications 17

7. Sample CIBER-Sponsored PhD Student Research 19

8. UF Faculty Receiving CIBER Awards 20

9. Non-UF Faculty Receiving CIBER Awards 25

10. Conferences Supported by CIBER Funding 28

11. Sample Academic Outreach Conference Program:
CIBER Business Language Conference 31

12. Sample Business Outreach Conference Program:
Doing Business ii i/h Africa 36










Appendix 1: CIBER Advisory Council Members


Mr. Cesar Alvarez* President and CEO, Greenberg and Traurig/Attomeys at Law

Dr. Sanford V. Berg Director of Water Studies, Public Utility Research Center and
Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Economics,
Warrington College of Business Administration, University of
Florida
Dr. Roy Crum* Director, Center for International Economic and Business Studies
and Professor, Department of Finance, Insurance and Real Estate,
Warrington College of Business Administration, University of
Florida
Mr. Larry Bemaski** Director of International Trade and Business Development,
Jacksonville Field Office, Enterprise Florida, Inc.
Dr. Carmen Diana Deere Professor, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Mr. Ted Fernandez* President and CEO, Answer Think Consulting Group

Mr. Bill Heavener President, The Heavener Company, Winter Park, Florida

Dr. Dennis Jett* Dean, University of Florida International Center

Mr. Ed Johnson** Manager of Strategy and Operations, Deloitte Consulting USA,
LLP
Dr. Lynda Kaid** Professor, Telecommunication Department, College of Journalism
and Communications, University of Florida
Dr. Robert Knechel** Director of International Center for Research in Accounting and
Auditing, Fisher School of Accounting, Warrington College of
Business, University of Florida
Dr. John Kraft Dean, Warrington College of Business, University of Florida

Dr. Amie Kreppel* Director, Center for European Studies, Associate Professor,
Department of Political Science, University of Florida
Dr. Aubry Long** Dean, School of Business, Bethune-Cookman University

Mr. Buddy MacKay Former Governor and Former Lt. Governor, State of Florida

Mr. Bruce McEvoy** Consultant, Seald Sweet/Uni-Veg Group

Mr. Manny Mencia* Vice President, Enterprise Florida, Division of International Trade


CIBER Synergzes, Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 1: CIBER Advisory Council Members
















































*Retired
**New in 2010


CIBER Synergzes, Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 1: CIBER Advisory Council Members


Mr. William Messina Coordinator Economic Analysis, Department of Food and Resource
Economics, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University
of Florida
Mr. David Petty** President, Exactech, Inc.

Dr. David Pharies Associate Dean for the Humanities, College of Liberal Arts,
University of Florida
Dr. Stephen J. Powell Director, International Trade Law Program and Lecturer, Fredric
G. Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Dr. Marilyn Roberts* Professor, College of Journalism and Communications, University
of Florida
Dr. Sandra Russo Director of Program Development and Federal Relations,
University of Florida International Center
Dr. David Sammons** Dean, University of Florida International Center

Dr. Tom Spreen* Professor, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Dr. Henry Tosi* Professor Emeritus, Department of Management, Warrington
College of Business Administration, University of Florida
Dr. Leonardo Villalon Director and Professor, Center for African Studies, University of
Florida
Mr. Richard Wainio** Director, Tampa Port Authority

Dr. Ann Wehmeyer Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures,
University of Florida
Dr. Philip Williams** Director, Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida

Dr. Corinne B. Young Professor, Department of Management, St. Leo University and
Governor's Appointee to the CIBER Advisory Council










Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER 2006-2010

Grant Years: Yr.1 2006-07; Yr.2 2007-08; Yr.3 2008-09; Yr.4 2009-10
Course Grant Year On/Off Undergrad/
Campus Graduate
BUL 4443 Ethics in Global Business Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

GEB 6930 International Advertising Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

BUL 6441 International Business Ethics Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

ECO 3703 International Trade Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

ECO 4934 Public Utility Economics: International Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad
Infrastructure
ECO 4934 Africa in the Global Economy Yr. 1, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

ECS 4111 African Economic Development Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

ECO 4730 The Firm in the Global Economy Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

ECS 3403 Economic Development in Latin America Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

ECO 7706 Theory of International Trade Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

ECO 7716 International Economic Relations Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

FIN 6642 Global Entrepreneurship Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

GEB 6366: Fundamentals of International Business Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

FIN 6608 Managing Multinational Corporations Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

FIN 6930 International Markets Study Tour Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 Off-campus Graduate

FIN 6638 International Finance Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

AEB 4931 Commodities to Cafes Yr. 1, 2 Off-campus Undergrad

LAS 6295 Latin American Business Environment Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

MAN 6637 Global Strategic Management Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

MAR 6157 International Marketing Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

MAR 4156 International Marketing Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

GEB: International Leadership: Adapting Businesses and Yr. 1 Off-campus Undergrad
Governments to New Realities
LAW: Legal Institutions of the Americas Study Tour Yr. 1 Off-campus Graduate

LAW 6930: Legal Institutions of the Americas Yr. 1, 2, 3 On-campus Graduate


CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER










BUL 4903: International Business Law Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

GEB 6368: Globalization and the Business Environment Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

MAN 6617: International Operations and Logistics Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Graduate

LAW 6938: Free Trade Agreement of the Americas Yr. 2 On-campus Graduate

AEB: Italian Food-from Production to Policy Study Yr. 2, 3 Off-campus Undergrad
Abroad
LAS: Business in Brazil Study Abroad Program Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 Off-campus Undergrad/
Graduate
GEB 4930: PURC International Leadership Course: Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad
Adapting Business and Governments to New Realities

AFS: Anthropology and the New Economy Yr. 3 On-campus Graduate

LAS: Conservation Entrepreneurship Yr. 3 On-campus Graduate

CHI: Business Chinese Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

FRE: Business French Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

GER: Business German Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

POR: Business Portuguese Yr. 1, 4 On-campus Undergrad

JAP: Business Japanese Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

SPN: Business Spanish Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

FRE 3224 FLAC: Business and Culture in the Francophone Yr. 1, 2 On-campus Undergrad
World
FRE 3224 FLAC: Marketing US Food Products in the EU Yr. 1, 2, 3 On-campus Undergrad

POR 3224 FLAC: Cities of the Portuguese-Speaking World Yr. 3 On-campus Undergrad

SPN 3224 FLAC: Cities of the Spanish-Speaking World Yr. 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

SPN 3224 FLAC: Public Relations in the Spanish-Speaking Yr. 1, 2, 3 On-campus Undergrad
World
SPN 3224 FLAC: Latin American Business Environment Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

SPN 3224 FLAC: Business and Economics in Latin Yr. 1 On-campus Undergrad
America
SPN 3224 FLAC: Trade and Investment in Latin America Yr. 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

SPN 3224 FLAC: Generational Perspectives in Latin Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad
America
SPN 3224 FLAC: Sports in Spain and Latin America Yr. 1, 2 On-campus Undergrad

CHI 3224 FLAC: Asian Sports and Tourism Yr. 4 On-campus Undergrad

ARA 4905 FLAC: Arab Culture and Business Yr. 1, 2, 3 On-campus Undergrad

CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER











































































CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER


SPN 3224: Business and Culture of Sports in the Spanish- Yr. 1, 2 On-campus Undergrad
Speaking World
FRE 3224: Contemporary French Commerce Yr. 2 On-campus Undergrad

CHI 4905: Chinese Business Culture Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

JAP 4905: Japanese Business Culture Yr. 2, 3, 4 On-campus Undergrad

AFS 4905: African Business Culture Yr. 3 On-campus Undergrad









Appendix 3: Syllabus for Economics Course ECO 4730
"The Firm in the Global Economy," Spring 2010

Instructor: Carol T. West, Professor of Economics and
Director, Center for International Business Education and Research

Course Description: This course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the
production, investment and selling decisions of the firm operating in international
markets. The course surveys the richness and diversity of global economic and business
environments and emphasizes strategic economic decision making by established
international firms and by domestic firms contemplating entering the global arena.
Content is provided through lectures, case studies, problem sets, text and article readings,
and team projects and presentations. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 2023.

Required Course Materials:
(1) Textbook: Charles W.L. Hill, International Business: Competing in the
Global Marketplace, 7th edition, McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
(2) Case studies: A required packet of case studies will be available from Target
Copy.
(3) Articles: A list of articles that supplement the text and lectures in the second
half of the course is provided below. All are available as e-Journal articles through the
UF Library.

Course Assignments:
(1) Team project: Students must participate in a team project that will be worked
on throughout the semester. Each team is given a firm and a set of 5-7 countries the firm
does not yet operate in. The project determines first which of the countries it is most
logical for the firm to enter next and then designs an entry strategy. Detailed information
about the team project is available in a separate document.
(2) Case studies: Case studies provide an opportunity to examine a topic in depth
in a specific business context, to derive competitive strategies, and to learn from class
discussion that often there are very different reasonable interpretations of the same global
market information. There are five case studies assigned, but your overall case study
grade will be the average of your four highest grades, allowing you to miss one case. At
least 10 days prior to the case study due date, a set of questions will be posted for you to
think about as you read the case. Since case studies are designed to provoke thought, it is
important to remember that there are no "right" or "wrong" answers to case study
questions-only more or less thoughtful answers. On the days case studies are due, class
will begin with a short (about 15 minute) quiz based directly on the study questions.
Since the purpose of the quiz is only to verify that you have read the case and thought
about the questions, you are allowed to bring to the quiz up to two pages of case notes
(typed or handwritten) to refer to in the quiz.
(3) Tests: The course has two modular (non-cumulative) tests. The tests will be
short-answer, short-essay and problems. All tests allow for student choice on questions to
answer and a "study guide" for tests will be available.

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Appendix 3: Syllabus for The Firm in the Global Economy









(4) Problem sets: Sample problems with answers will be made available in order
to practice for tests. There is no requirement that you do the sample problems, but it is
difficult to do a problem on a test when you haven't practiced at all.
(5) Class participation: Students are expected to attend class and contribute to
class discussion. This does not mean you will be penalized for missing the occasional
class or that you must participate in all discussions. However, this is a class in which a
diversity of perspectives greatly enriches the learning experience and you are expected to
contribute to the perspectives presented. Participation can be by asking questions,
responding to questions during lecture, volunteering anecdotes or insights, contributing to
the case study discussions, listening attentively to student project presentations and
asking questions or offering suggestions. Since the "global economy" and "international
business" are continually in the news, we will try to allow some time each Thursday to
note recent news items pertinent to the issues being studied in class. Contributing such a
news item is also valuable class participation.

Course grading: The final course grade will be a weighted average as follows: Team
project (35%); case study quizzes (27%); Tests (30%); Class participation (8%).

Course case studies (available in a packet from Target Copy):
1. Euro Disney: The First 100 Days
2. Andres Galindo
3. Wal-Mart Stores: "Everyday Low Prices" in China
4. MontGras: Export Strategy for a Chilean Winery
5. The ITC eChoupal Initiative

Course supplementary articles (available in e-Journals at the UF library):
1. "Serving the World's Poor, Profitably," by C.K. Prahalad and Allen Hammond,
Harvard Business Review, September, 2002.
2. "The Mirage of Marketing to the Bottom of the Pyramid: How the Private Sector Can
Help Alleviate Poverty," by Aneel Karnani, California Management Review, Summer
2007.
3. "Offshoring: Political Myths and Economic Reality," by David Smith, World
Economy, March 2006.
4. "Proven Practices for Effectively Offshoring IT Work," by Joseph W. Rottman and
Mary C. Lacity, MIT Sloan Management Review, Spring 2006.
5. "Smarter Offshoring," by Diana Farrell, Harvard Business Review, June 2006.
6. "Values in Tension: Ethics Away from Home," by Thomas Donaldson, Harvard
Business Review, September 1996.

Critical due dates and tentative schedule of lectures: Attached is a tentative schedule
of lectures and corresponding text and article readings and afirm schedule of test, quiz
and project due dates. The team project assignments are described in a separate
document.



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Due Dates and Tentative Schedule of Lectures


Date Material Covered/Class Activity TC--Text Due*
Chapter
AR-Article*
Tues., Jan. 5 Introduction/course mechanics TC 1
Thurs., Jan. 7 Target country selection/project data TC 2
Tues., Jan. 12 Target country selection/project data
Thurs., Jan. 14 Target country selection/project data
Tues., Jan. 19 Differing economic environments/ TC 5 (pgs. 182-
differing cultures 194)
Thurs., Jan. 21 Finalize teams/sample case questions
Tues., Jan. 26 Euro Disney case Euro Disney
case quiz
Thurs., Jan. 28 Differing cultures TC 3
Tues., Feb. 2 Differing cultures
Thurs., Feb. 4 Differing cultures
Tues., Feb. 9 Andres Galindo case Andres Galindo
case quiz
Thurs., Feb. 11 Differing legal environments
Tues., Feb. 16 Political risk
Thurs., Feb. 18 Differing trade policy environments TC 6,7,8
Tues., Feb. 23 Wal-Mart case Wal-Mart
case quiz
Thurs., Feb. 25 Modes of entry TC 7, 14, 15 (pgs. Project Rpt. 1
553-555)
Tues., Mar. 2 Project Rpt. review/problem review
Thurs., Mar. 4 Test 1 Test 1
Tues., Mar. 9 Spring break-no class
Thurs., Mar. 11 Spring break-no class
Tues., Mar. 16 Test 1 review/entry strategies
Thurs., Mar. 18 MontGras case MontGras
case quiz
Tues., Mar. 23 Differing currencies TC 9-11
Thurs., Mar. 25 Hedging strategies
Tues., Mar. 30 Hedging problems Project Rpt. 2
Thurs., Apr. 1 Global business ethics TC 4, AR 6
Tues., Apr. 6 eChoupal case/"Base of the eChoupal case
pyramid" quiz
Thurs., Apr. 8 "Base of the pyramid"/Global AR 1,2
corporate social responsibility
Tues., Apr. 13 Offshoring AR 3, 4, 5
Thurs., Apr. 15 Project presentations
Tues., Apr. 20 Project presentations Written projects
Tues., Apr. 27 Test 2 at 7:30 a.m. Test 2
* See previous page for a list of case studies and articles.


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Appendix 3: Syllabus for The Firm in the Global Economy









Appendix 4: Itinerary for International Business Study Tour: Argentina

Instructor: Andy Naranjo, Emerson Merrill Lynch Professor of Finance
and CIBER Associate Director

Focus: This course provides a group of 25 students firsthand exposure to international
businesses, business practices, markets, and institutions. During the spring break period
(i.e., March 6-11), the class will visit important businesses, public institutions, and
cultural/historical sites in Argentina. Terry McCoy, Professor Emeritus and Director of
UF's Latin American Business Environment Program, will also accompany the group.
Argentina, A Leading Emerging Market: Argentina provides an interesting backdrop
for experiencing international business practices and operations. Argentina is one of Latin
America's most developed countries and has served as an important model of economic
reform for many developing economies around the world. The country has an interesting
blend of abundant natural resources, a reputation for strong institutions, an educated
workforce, and good infrastructure. Comprising almost the entire southern half of South
America, Argentina is the world's eighth largest country. Buenos Aires is a complex,
energetic, and seductive port city that stretches south-to-north along the Rio de la Plata.
The architecture and lifestyle of Buenos Aires is very European, including the heritage of
many of the city's inhabitants that have many Spanish, Italian, and German surnames. It
is also in a region filled with attractive sites and activities, and the surrounding area is the
heartland of many of Argentina's economic, financial, industrial, and cultural activities.
Course Description: The course (2 credits, 4th Module) consists of two parts a pre-trip
course component and the study tour. The pre-trip component will provide students with
background on Argentina and situate it in the context of emerging markets. The study
tour, which takes place March 6-11, 2010, includes the following tentative site visits:
* City Tour, Estancia, Southern Cross, Goldman Sachs Argentina, Sparrel, Boston
Consulting Group, Northia Laboratories, Google Argentina, Ford Argentina, Asociacion
Del Tejar, Frigorifico Amancay, Tango dinner/show, CIPPEC, and IAE Business School
Requirements:
* Two to three pre-trip class meetings and a brief post-trip paper
* Meaningful individual participation during the trip and class meetings
* Some background research on the companies/organizations that we will be visiting
Estimated Study Tour Course Costs and Course Enrollment:
Estimated budgeted course cost per student for the study trip component is approximately
$1,250, payable to the UF Office of Overseas Study. There is a non-refundable $350
deposit due by September 9, 2009, with the remainder due by October 1, 2009. The
budgeted cost includes hotel accommodations, some group meals, ground transportation
and miscellaneous fees, but it does not include airfare, UF tuition for GEB 6930, or
discretionary spending. Please note that the enrollment in this course is limited to 25
students. Please note that the demand for this course exceeds the available slots, so it is
important that you sign-up early by no later than September 1, 2009.




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Itinerary for International Business Study Tour: Argentina, Spring 2010
Saturday, March 6 Sunday, March 7 Monday, March 8 Tuesday, March 9 Wednesday, March 10 Thursday, March 11
Arrival in Buenos Aires Argentina Estancia Buenos Aires Buenos Aires Buenos Aires Buenos Aires

Check-in to hotel Discovering Tigre by University Seminar: Asociaci6n Del Tejar, Ford Argentina Southern Cross
Sol Melia Buenos Aires kayak IAE Business School, Luis Kasdorf, VP and
Prof. Patricio Fay and Meeting with a leading Company presentation Northia Laboratories -
12:00 pm Tigre is a picturesque CIPPEC political agribusiness player on market entry Business projects in
Orientation meeting river town on the organization Miguel difficulties in South pharmaceutical sector.
outskirts of Buenos Braun Executive Goldman Sachs America for a foreign Case study of Southern
Aires. Enjoy Director Argentina multinational. Talk on Cross consulting project.
discovering the river Esteban Gorondi Ford's marketing
channels and islands by "Cultural Managing Director strategy in Argentina. The Boston Consulting
kayak Considerations of Doing Group
Business in Argentina: "The capital markets in Tour of Ford production Gustavo Loforte
Social, Government and Argentina and the facilities. BA Managing Partner
Political aspects" effects of the global and Overview of business
local crisis" strategy in Argentina and
in the region.
Lunch on your own Group lunch on Tigre Group Lunch at Pilara Group Lunch at Juana M Lunch at Ford Group lunch Bahia Madero
Island Country Club

Buenos Aires City Tour Visit to professional Terminal Zarate, Google Argentina Northia Laboratories Free afternoon in Buenos
soccer game: Antonio Zuidwijk Daniel Helft Aires
Highlights include: Independiente vs River General Assessor Senior Manager for Plant visit. Overview of
Recoleta Cemetery, Plate Product the production process. Travel back to US
Plaza de Mayo, Casa Visit to one of the largest Communications
Rosada Presidential OR industrial ports in "Google's decision to
Palace, The Obelisk, Argentina with business select Argentina for
La Boca, Puerto Madero, Cultural tour to the presentation and visit to their LA headquarters
and Palermo traditional Caf6 Tortoni, the operations and 3rd worldwide
MALBA Museum, office location"
Contemporary Art
Museum and Fortabat Norton Winery
Collection Business Presentation
and Wine tasting in
"Espacio Norton"
Dinner on your own Dinner on your own Dinner on your own Dinner on your own Viego Almacen Tango
Dinner: Show & Lessons


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Appendix 4: Itinerary for International Business Study Tour










Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding
October 2006 September 2010



I. Study Abroad
The following students have received funding that allowed them to study abroad on
various programs and internships.

A. Business in Brazil scholarship recipients
Student Degree Program/Department University
Jessica Bachay MA Latin American Studies University of Florida
Michelle Knapp MA Latin American Studies University of Florida
Luis Loyaza BA Criminology/Law University of Florida
Sara Martin BA Spanish/Latin American Studies University of Florida
Guy Morissette MBA University of Montreal
Matt Quinlan MBA/MA Tropical Conservation Yale University
Elizabeth Smith MA Latin American Studies University of Florida
Tyler Tringas BA Economics University of Florida
Sonya Williams MBA Florida A and M University
Mary Jordan MBA Florida A and M University
Cornell Guion MBA Florida A and M University
Joe Holecko MBA University of Florida
Jessie Barriero MBA Valpariso University
Mathew Hoge MA Latin American Studies University of Kansas
Angleliki Vovou MBA Fordham University
Ronnie Bailey MBA University of Florida
Chelsea Blake MA International Business University of Florida
Stephanie Goings BA Accounting University of Kansas
Gabrielle McMahan MA Marketing Florida A and M University
Amanda Perryman MA International Business University of Florida
Gregory Rose Huntsman Program University of Pennsylvania
Israel Interiano MA Accounting University of Kansas
Clay Rusch BS Finance/Accounting University of Florida
Daniel Urdaneta Huntsman Program University of Pennsylvania
Paola Urrea MA International Business University of Florida
Clayton Elliott BA Business Administration Florida A and M University
Michael Martin BS Finance/Accounting University of Florida
Vivian Felicio PhD College of Education University of Illinois
Bailey, Andrew MA Latin American Studies University of Kansas
Barton, Sarah BS Finance University of Florida
Black, Latina MBA Florida A and M University
Bright, Chris MBA University of Florida
Cerruto, Maria BS Advertising/ LAS/Portuguese University of Florida
Coyler, Brian MA International Business University of Florida
Correa, Cleber BS Business Administration University of Florida
Elfimova, Anastasiya BS Economics University of Pennsylvania
Herrera, Andres BS Business Administration/Finance University of Florida
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Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding










Nesrsta, Nicole MA International Business University of Florida
Perowicz, Paul MBA University of Pittsburgh
Redondo, Maria BS Finance University of Florida
Sheridan, Erin MA Latin American Studies University of Kansas
Sotomayor, Adam MA International Business University of Florida
Vasconcelos, Mirela BA Portuguese/Business University of Florida



B. International Financial Markets Tour Scholarship Recipients
(University of Florida students)
Tara Kim MBA
Albert Rodriguez MBA
Greg Eckels MBA
Kolaleh Torkaman MBA
Mario Fernandez MBA
Nick Anderson MBA
Cameron Buurma MBA
Alicia Riggins MBA
Chad Rice MBA
Joseph Holecko MBA
Rick Mason MBA
Grant Copeland MBA
Patrick Kinnan MBA
Abe Skellenger MS Finance
Chris Weber MS Finance
Phil Reagan MS Finance
Kyle Morabito MS Finance
Abe Ouano MS Finance
Michael Peerson MS Finance
Park, Sang Wook MS Finance
Aashish Shukla MS Finance
Ang Li MS Finance
Kevin Fox MA in International Business
Dominique Lochridge MA in International Business
Sophie Grumelard MA in International Business
Jenny Chaim MA in International Business
Jonathan Frankel MA in International Business
Britta Nissinen MA in International Business
Lucas Elgie MA in International Business
Brandon Saltmarsh MA in International Business
Kevin Brown MA in International Business
Kathryn Ciano MA in International Business
Nico De Vries MA in International Business
James Lancelot MA in International Business
David Pierce MA in International Business
Donna Zill MA in International Business
Katherine Rodriguez MS Real Estate
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Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding










Scott Ehrlich JD/MBA
Laura Gonzalez PhD Finance
Mary Mitchell MA Latin American Studies
Jacob Schultz MA Latin American Studies
John Atkinson MBA
Cameron Buurma MBA
Bill Chiles MBA
Robert Saracco MBA
Anne Wilhoite MBA
William Aitken MSF
Jonathan Luo MSF
Eleni Steinman MSF
Peter Zdebski MSF
Dave Brown MA International Business
Mark Mayleben MA International Business
Jamie Tolson MA International Business
Miguel Porras MA International Business
Ali Alkan MA International Business
Gabriel Reyes MA International Business
Alexie Labouze-Nasica MA International Business
Pete Macchione MA International Business
Joe Dal Santo MA International Business
Joel Koopman MA International Business
Richard Woods MA International Business
Alison Boelter MA Latin American Studies
Dave Harmel MA Latin American Studies
Rob Applebaum MBA
John Atkinson MBA
Michael Bailey MBA
Ronnie Bailey MBA
Trevor Gribble MBA
Nicolas Grandusky MBA
Drew Hendry MBA
Alec Landler MBA
Robert Saracco MBA
Jeremy Serkin MBA
William Gross MSF
Hadi Chammah MA International Business
Travis Damon MA International Business
Jacob Dubin MA International Business
Tricia Kyzar MA International Business
Justin Levine MA International Business
Monica Mejia MA International Business
Nicole Nesrsta MA International Business
Danielle Rodman MA International Business
Adam Sotomayor MA International Business
Catalina Parra MA International Business
Meredith Muller MA International Business
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Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding










Zach Cohen MA in Latin American Studies
Stephen Stewart MA in Latin American Studies

C. Italian Food From Production to Policy Scholarship Recipients
Leilani Velazquez BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Wesley Edwards BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Cheryl Salerno BA Family, Youth and Community University of Florida
Sciences
Stephen Meek BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Jason Pereira International Business Florida Atlantic University
Jordan Terry BA Food Science University of Florida
David Taylor BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Arpan Patel BA Pre-Med University of Florida
Venessa Longobardi BA Animal Science University of Florida
Danielle Thomas MA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
John Alday BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Aaron Kremmer BA Agriculture Education University of Florida
Cristina Zitoli) BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Alex Goralnik BA Sports Management University of Florida
Alison Fick BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Anjani Vyas BA Food Science and Human University of Florida
Nutrition
Ashley Miller BA Food Science and Human University of Florida
Nutrition
Christopher Sugiarto BA Psychology University of Florida
Danielle Pugh MA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida
Grace Tidwell BA Food Science and Human University of Florida
Nutrition
Rebecca Roberts BA Health and Human Performance University of Florida
Sara Hutton BA in Business Administration University of Florida


II. Research
Between 2006 and 2010, the following students have received travel funds from CIBER
allowing them to present their own research, conduct research, and learn about the
international dimensions of their disciplines at conferences, workshops and seminars.
(University of Florida students)

Torrey Peace MBA
Merise Jalali BA Political Science
Michelle L. Edwards PhD Anthropology
Jennifer Itzkowitz PhD Finance
Gaurav Kapoor PhD Information Systems and Operations
Management
Lureen Walters PhD Food and Resource Economics
Nobuyuki Iwai PhD Food and Resource Economics
Joseph C. DiPietro PhD Education
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Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding










Yang Jiao PhD Anthropology
Ronald Gordon PhD Food and Resource Economics
Naomi Moswete PhD Tourism and Development
Mussa Idris PhD Anthropology
Alison Ketter PhD Anthropology
Afua Entsuah PhD Anthropology
Youngsang Yun BA Management
Mary E. Mitchell MA Latin American Studies
Alison M. Boelter MA Latin American Studies
Matthew Schwarz BA Political Science
Russell R. Fullerton BA Management
Thomas J. Stevens III PhD Food and Resource Economics
Amanda Watson PhD Economics
Achala Acharya PhD Economics
Joseph Robert Kraus PhD Political Science
Levi Odera PhD Political Science
Malia Anne Billman PhD Anthropology
Rachel Guina lannelli PhD Anthropology
Jessica Snyder BA Finance
Veronique Theriault PhD Food and Resource Economics
Joshua Niederriter BA Economics/Mathematics
Nila Uthayakumar BA Business Administration/African Studies
Natacha Chater BA Food and Resource Economics
John Morris Laing BA Economics
Stephen Brown PhD Accounting
Lisa Howell PhD Anthropology
Ali Zuaiter BA Economics


III. IB Instruction and Outreach
In the 2006-2010 grant cycle, the following students, from both business and non-
business programs, have worked on a variety of CIBER curriculum and outreach projects.
(University of Florida students)

Tyler E. Tringas BA Economics
Gabriella Filasky BA Marketing
Amanda Bowe BA Finance
Jordon P. Loh BA Economics
Elaine Cohen BA Marketing
Fahad Fahimullah BA Economics
Sharon F. Barkley PhD Latin American Studies
Laurel J. Hodges PhD Spanish
Deicy G. Jimenez PhD Spanish
Susan Salazar PhD Spanish
Belkis Suarez PhD Spanish
Megan Silbert PhD Food and Resource Economics
Colin A. Knapp PhD Economics
C .. . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding










Alison M. Boelter MA Latin American Studies
Amanda Watson PhD Economics
Ana Portocarrero Director MAIB/MSM Program
Christian Ahihou PhD French
Jonathan Ciaccio BA Food and Resource Economics
Melanie Lynn D'Amico PhD Spanish
Renata de Godoy PhD Urban and Regional Planning
Stephanie Knouse PhD Spanish
Francisco Salgado-Robles PhD Spanish
Valerie Trujillo PhD Spanish
Ryan Tzu Wang PhD Sports Management
David Michael Harmel MA Latin American Studies
Claudia Garcia Ph.D. Spanish
Maria Ida Fionda Ph.D. Spanish
Katherine Honea Ph.D. Spanish


C . . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding









Appendix 6: Sample CIBER-Sponsored Faculty Research Publications
Dr. Sylvia Chan-Olmsted
Department of Telecommunications
College of Journalism and Communications


1. Title: "The deployment of third-generation mobile services: A multinational analysis
of contributing factors."
Author(s): Lee, S., Chan-Olmsted, S.M., and Kim, H.
Publication: Telecommunications Policy (under review).
Abstract: The provision of video communication, information, and entertainment via
the mobile platform will be impossible without the successful diffusion of 3G services.
The current deployment of 3G mobile services is significantly more advanced in some
countries than others. Through a multinational analysis of 55 countries, this study
explores the factors affecting such deployment. It was found that multiple standardization
policy, lower pricing, and a higher level of ICT use contribute to 3G mobile subscription
rates.

2. Title: "An examination of host country factors affecting the export of U.S. video
media goods."
Author(s): Chan-Olmsted, S.M., Cha, J., and Oba, G.
Publication: Journal of Media Economics, Vol. 21 (2008), No. 3, 191-216.
Abstract: The United States is by far the leading exporter of video media goods in the
world. It is also the biggest investor in theatrical films, spending over $63 million per
theatrical production and leading the world in box office receipts. This article investigates
the host country factors that have influenced the export of U.S.-based video media
products, including film and television programs. It was found that economic
environments, geographical proximity, technological infrastructure, and market size
influenced the purchase of motion pictures and video programming from the United
States. In addition, countries with better economic environments, implementation of
intellectual property rights, political rights, larger market size and cultural differences,
and language similarity seemed to import more heavily broadcasting content products
from the United States.

3. Title: "The emergence of mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs): An examination
of the business strategy in the global MVNO market."
Author(s): Lee, S., Chan-Olmsted, S.M., and Ho, H.
Publication: The International Journal on Media Management, Vol. 10 (2008), No. 1,
10-21.
Abstract: To assess the strategy adopted by the mobile virtual network operators
(MVNOs) and the factors that affect the development of this mobile market, this study
analyzes the MVNO sector from 2 perspectives: the exogenous factors including the
consumer, industry, regulation, and technology characteristics; and the generic strategies
that have been adopted by successful MVNOs in various Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development (OECD) markets. Although cost leadership was found to

C .. Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 6: Faculty Research Publications









be most prevalent initially, as the mobile market begins to be infused by high-capacity
networks and value-added services, MVNOs are more inclined to apply multiple generic
strategies and non-price competition. The strategies of differentiation and focus are
practiced in addition to, not in place of, the cost leadership strategy. This study also found
that countries with higher third-generation (3G) license fees tend to have higher levels of
MVNO development, suggesting that the economic pressure created by the high 3G
license fee might contribute to the deployment of MVNOs in a country.

4. Title: "Video strategy of transnational media corporations: A resource-based
examination of global alliances and patterns."
Author(s): Oba, G., and Chan-Olmsted, S.M.
Publication: Journal of Media Business Studies, Vol. 4 (2007), No. 2, 1-25.
Abstract: Subscribing to the resource-based framework for analyzing strategy and
employing a case study approach, this study investigates the most critical sectors for the
U.S.-based TNMCS in a global media marketplace and discusses how their resources
were aligned with their local counterparts' resources in the marketing of video-related
products. The alliances involving Time Warner, News Corporation, Disney, Viacom, and
NBC University were examined. Cross-case analysis identified six alliance patterns.

5. Title: "The development of mobile television: Examining the convergence of mobile
and broadcasting services in Korea."
Author(s): Lee, S., and Chan-Olmsted, S.M.
Publication: International Journal of Mobile Marketing, Vol. 1 (2006), No. 2.
Abstract: The convergence of mobile and broadcasting services may deliver a driver
for dramatic growth in the telecommunications sector. It is said that the Korean Digital
Multimedia Broadcast (DMB) system is the most commercially successful mobile
television service worldwide today. This study explores the factors that influence the
development of the Korean DMB market and their implications. It was found that the
combination of broadcasting and mobile telephone in the context of mobile television
presents a classic case of "complementary convergence."

Other related research products include Chan-Olmsted, S.M. and Chang, B.,
"Globalization through partnerships: Examining cross-border acquisitions and
international joint ventures in the world media markets," ICFAIJournal of Mergers and
Acquisitions (2006), plus two articles still in the publication process: Chan-Olmsted,
S.M., Lee, S., and Hee, J., "Examining the market and firm factors affecting the
development of a mobile television market: The case of South Korea" Cha, J., and Chan-
Olmsted, S.M., "Predictors of the adoption of entertainment, information,
communication, and transaction services on mobile phones."








C .. Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 6: Faculty Research Publications









Appendix 7: Sample CIBER-Sponsored PhD Student Research Abstract
Lurleen Michelle Walters, May 2008
Major: Food and Resource Economics
Chair: Robert D. Emerson

"Three Essays on Immigration Reform, Worker Self-Selectivity
and Earnings in the US Farm Labor Market"

The purpose of this study is to examine contemporary issues in US farm labor markets
and immigration policy via three stated objectives. Specifically, the study evaluates how
farm labor market outcomes have changed with the increasing presence of foreign
workers. In the wake of past immigration policies, it assesses the implications of legal
status for unauthorized workers' wages and employment, and it evaluates the potential
impact of immigration policy reform for farm workers' earnings.

The first essay evaluates the historical linkages between US immigration policy and U.S.
farm labor markets, and specifically how market outcomes have evolved following
previous legislation such as the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). This is
accomplished with a review of previous research on immigration policies from 1917
through 1986, and with an evaluation of detailed descriptive statistics on farm worker and
labor market characteristics from the National Agricultural Workers Survey (NAWS).
The descriptive statistics are used to characterize the US and Florida farm labor markets
in the post-IRCA period.

The implications of legal status for unauthorized workers' wages and employment are
assessed in the second essay. Foreign farm workers are found to jointly select into US
farm employment in an authorized or unauthorized status and into skilled or unskilled
jobs, and these choices are found to have certain earnings implications. The essay makes
a contribution to the literature by analyzing workers' joint selections into authorized and
unauthorized status and skilled and unskilled employment in the context of a double
selectivity framework. Previous studies have dealt with both of these issues but
separately.

The issue of legalization for unauthorized workers is addressed in the final essay. The
analytical approach uses a treatment effects approach which casts legalization as a
treatment (or policy intervention) under the assumption of heterogeneity. The results
show an overall positive impact of legalization on farm worker wage outcomes, and with
the expected positive sorting on the gains from legal status. The evaluation of
immigration policy implications for the farm labor market via the treatment effects
framework is a valuable contribution to the literature since this approach has not been
used in the context of farm labor before.

Given the current strong national and political interest in immigration reform and
attendant issues for the agricultural sector, the study is a timely contribution. It should
also be of considerable interest to agricultural economists, particularly those working in
areas of labor intensive agriculture where labor issues are prime concerns for growers.
C .. Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 7: PhD Student Research Abstract










Appendix 8: CIBER Awards to UF Faculty, 2006-2010


Award categories include 1) course development and delivery grants, 2) research grants,
3) participation in CIBER Faculty Development in International Business (FDIB) study
tours, 4) funding to attend professional conferences, and 5) conference development.

Faculty Department/ Course Research FDIB Conference Conference
Center Development Grants Attendance Development
&/or Delivery
Esameddin Alhadi Lecturer, Arabic, Department
of Languages, Literatures and V
Cultures, College of Liberal V
Arts & Sciences V
Haydun Aytug Professor, Information V
Systems & Operations V
Management, Warrington
College of Business
Administration
Charles Bwenge Professor, Linguistics, V
Swahili, Department of
Languages, Literatures and
Cultures, College of Liberal
Arts & Sciences
Janice Carrillo Professor, Information V
Systems & Operations
Management, Warrington
College of Business
Administration
Bernadette Cesar- Lecturer, French, Department V
Lee of Languages, Literatures and V
Cultures, College of Liberal V
Arts & Sciences
Brenda Chalfin Associate Professor, V V V
Anthropology, Center for
African Studies, College of
Liberal Arts & Sciences
Sylvia Chan- Associate Dean for Research V/ V
Olmsted & Professor Department of V V
Telecommunication, College V
of Journalism & V
Communications
Kenny Cheng Professor, Information V
Systems & Operations
Management, Warrington
College of Business
Administration
Nathalie Ciesco Lecturer, French, Department / V V
of Languages, Literatures and V V
Cultures, College of Liberal
Arts & Sciences
Larry DiMatteo Professor, Business Law, V V
Warrington College of
Business Administration

C . . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 8: CIBER Awards to UF Faculty










Robert Emerson Associate Professor, Food & "
Resource Economics,
Institute of Food & "
Agricultural Sciences
Selcuk Erenguc Associate Dean, Warrington V
College of Business
Administration
Meredith Fensom Director, Law & Policy in the
Americas Program, Levin
College of Law
Joan Flocks Social Policy Division Center V V
for Governmental V V
Responsibility, Levin
College of Law
Joanne Foss Associate Dean for Student V
& Academic Affairs, College
of Public Health & Health
Professions
Elinore Fresh Senior Lecturer, Chinese, V V
Department of Languages,
Literatures and Cultures, V V
College of Liberal Arts & V V
Sciences
Franz Professor, German, V V
Futterknecht Department of Languages, V V
Literatures and Cultures,
College of Liberal Arts &
Sciences
Heather Associate Professor, V
Gibson Sport, Leisure & Exercise
Science, College of
Health & Human
Performance
Anne Higgins Visiting Lecturer, Arabic, V V
Department of
Languages, Literatures
and Cultures, College of
Liberal Arts & Sciences
Susan Professor, Department of V
Jacobson Wildlife Ecology &
Conservation, Institute of
Food & Agricultural
Sciences
Clifford Jones Associate in Law & &
Lecturer, Center for
Governmental V
Responsibility, Levin
College of Law
Lynda Kaid Professor, Department of V
Telecommunications, V
College of Journalism & V
Communications


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Appendix 8: CIBER Awards to UF Faculty










Yong Jae Ko Associate Professor, V
Sports Management,
College of Health &
Human Performance
John Kraft Dean, Warrington
College of Business V
Administration
Mindy Kraft Program Director, V
MAIB/MSM, Warrington
College of Business
Administration
Susan Kubota Senior Lecturer, V V
Japanese, Department of V V
Languages, Literatures V V
and Cultures, College of V V
Liberal Arts & Sciences
Gwendolyn Assistant Professor, V
Lee Management, Warrington
College of Business
Administration
Paul Losch Assistant University V
Librarian, Latin
American Collection,
Smathers Library
Joseli Macedo Assistant Professor, V
Department of Urban &
Regional Planning,
College of Design,
Construction & Planning
Virginia Professor, Business Law, V
Maurer Warrington College of
Business Administration
Timothy Staff Attorney, Center for V V V
McClendon Governmental V V
Responsibility, Levin
College of Law
Terry McCoy Professor, Center for V V V
Latin American Studies, V V V
CIBER Associate V V
Director V V
Barbara Associate Professor, V V
McDade Geography, College of
Liberal Arts & Sciences
William Coordinator of Economic V V
Messina Analysis, Food & V
Resource Economics, V
Institute of Food &
Agricultural Sciences
Juan Carlos Associate Professor, V V
Molleda Department of Public V
Relations, College of
Journalism &
Communications


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Appendix 8: CIBER Awards to UF Faculty










Gregory Lecturer, Department of V V V
Moreland Spanish & Portuguese,
College of Liberal Arts & V V
Sciences V V
Andy Naranjo Associate Professor, V V
Finance, Warrington V V
College of Business V V
Administration V V
Mahendrarajah Professor, Finance, V
Nimalendran Warrington College of
Business Administration
Praveen Associate Professor, V
Pathak Information Systems &
Operations Management
Warrington College of
Business Administration
Anand Paul Associate Professor, V
Information Systems & V
Operations Management,
Warrington College of
Business Administration
Deanna Lecturer, Department of V
Pelfrey Public Relations, College
of Journalism &
Communications
Selwyn Associate Professor, V
Piramithu Information Systems &
Operations Management,
Warrington College of
Business Administration
Mary Risner Associate Director, V V
Outreach & Latin V V
American Business V V
Environment, Center for
Latin American Studies
Joseph Rojo Associate Director for V
International Programs, V
Warrington College of
Business Administration
Fred Royce Post Doc, Department of V V
Agricultural & Biological V
Engineering, Institute of
Food & Agricultural
Sciences
Alan Sawyer Professor, Marketing, V
Warrington College of
Business Administration
Renata Serra Lecturer in Development / V V
& Economics, Center for V V
African Studies
Benjamin Associate Professor, V V
Smith Political Science, College
of Liberal Arts &
Sciences
C . . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 8: CIBER Awards to UF Faculty










Stan Smith Professor, Economics & V
Director, Bureau of
Economic & Business
Research, Warrington
College of Business
Administration
Anita Spring Professor, Anthropology, "
College of Liberal Arts & V V
Sciences V

James Stems Associate Professor, V V
Food & Resource
Economics, Institute of
Food & Agricultural
Sciences
Brijesh Thapa Associate Professor, V V
Department of Tourism,
Recreation & Sport
Management & Director,
Center for Tourism
Research &
Development, College of
Health & Human
Performance
Robert Associate Professor, V
Thomas Business Law,
Warrington College of
Business Administration
Yasuo Uotate Lecturer, Japanese, V V
Department of
Languages, Literatures & V
Cultures, College of V
Liberal Arts & Sciences
Richard Professor, Food & V V
Weldon Resource Economics,
Institute of Food &
Agricultural Sciences
Carol West Professor, Economics & V V V V
Director, CIBER, V V
Warrington College of V V
Business Administration V V




Addendum
David Miller Professor, Research Dr. Miller consulted on the CIBER project, providing expert
Methods & Evaluation, evaluation and assessment advice.
Director, Collaborative
Assessment & Program
Evaluation Services,
College of Education


C . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 8: CIBER Awards to UF Faculty










Appendix 9: CIBER Awards to Non-UF Faculty, 2006-2010


Awards included Enhancing Florida's International Business Infrastructure (EFIBI) and
Business Language Research and Teaching (BLRT)
Faculty Institution Award Project title/description
Richard Sjolander Faculty, University of EFIBI Participation in MERCOSUR study tour
West Florida to develop Latin American examples for
IB course

Robert Anderson Entrepreneurship EFIBI Development of IB Module for high
Academy, Buchholz school finance and economics courses
High School,
Gainesville
Fredric W. Rohm, Faculty, Southeastern EFIBI Creation of IB Major by
Jr. and University modifying/adding courses to current IB
Daniel Ibarrondo concentration

Manuel J. Tejeda Faculty, Barry EFIBI Course development: Religion,
University Spirituality and International Business

Samuel Adekunle Faculty, Edward EFIBI Course development African Societies,
Waters College Gender and Microfinance

David A. Faculty, Florida EFIBI Course development for business majors
Grossman and Southern College on Conversational h, ',
Liming Macguire

Maria Lehoczky Faculty, Polk EFIBI Participation in Memphis CIBER
and Community Globalization Seminar on Global Supply
Sheila Rios College Chain Management
and in 2009 Michigan State University
International Institute for Community
College Faculty
Corinne Young Faculty, Saint Leo EFIBI Course development: Responsible
University Management and Sustainable
Development
Eshagh Faculty, Florida EFIBI Course development: International
Shehniyilagh Memorial Business Psychology
University
Karen Schreiner Director, Business EFIBI Planning a symposium: Connecting to
& Technology a Global Green Economy
Incubator, Indian
River State College
Michael Flota Faculty, Daytona EFIBI Planning a faculty colloquium:
State College Integrating International Business
into Your Curriculum
C . . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 9: CIBER Awards to Non-UF Faculty









Michael L. Faculty, Daytona EFIBI Participation in Globalizing Basic
Avery State College Business program at the University of
Memphis
Sunder Faculty, Embry- EFIBI Course development: international
Raghavan Riddle Aeronautical finance course specific to the aviation
University industry for ERAU MBA program
Charles Evans Faculty, FAMU EFIBI Participation in Memphis
Globalization Seminar

Angela Lewis Faculty, FAMU EFIBI Participation in Memphis
Globalization Seminar

Ric Rohm and Faculty, EFIBI Course development: Business as
Joseph Kilpatrick Southeastern Mission for business and non-
University business students. Also includes a
piece for one faculty to attend a
Memphis Globalization Seminar
Jing Faculty, New EFIBI Course development: Socializing in
Zhang College Chinese emphasizing forging,
building and repairing of professional
relationships in China
J. Antonio Dean, St. Thomas EFIBI Student competition in Global
Villamil University Entrepreneurship

Jose Garcia Faculty, Florida EFIBI Course development: Spanish for the
Southern University Healthcare Professions included an
experiential component of students
working with Hispanic patients at the
Lakeland Regional Medical Center
William Huth Faculty, University EFIBI Development of IB content for a new
of West Florida course on Principles of
Environmental Economics
Christopher Faculty, University EFIBI Course development: The Japanese
Burkart of West Florida Economy and Business Environment

Aijun Zhu Faculty, New EFIBI Course development: Readings in
College Modern Chinese, emphasizing
modern culture
Min Zhou and Faculty, Roger BLRT Research on more effective methods for
Miao Zhao Williams University teaching Chinese language and culture
through Chinese commercials

Haidan Wang Lecturer, University BLRT Survey of curricula and pedagogy used in
of Hawaii teaching Business Chinese, to identify
gaps between the existing programs and
real needs in the working environment
C . . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 9: CIBER Awards to Non-UF Faculty










Tomoko Takami Faculty, University of BLRT Development of learning materials for
Pennsylvania Business Japanese using international
business case studies
Pat McAloon PhD Student, Ohio BLRT Examination of non-natives use of
State University Chinese at work and evaluation of
advanced language use in China-related
careers
Margaret Faculty, George BLRT Exploration of the use of business cases
Gonglewski and Washington in the foreign language classroom: best
Anna Helm University practices across disciplines

Ruey-Jiuan Regina Faculty, San Diego BLRT A conversation-analytic study of the
Wu State University conceptualization of face in modern
China and its implications for business
Chinese education
Vivian Felicio PhD Student, BLRT Portuguese for Specific Purposes
University of Illinois
Urbana Champaign
Deborah Reisinger Faculty, Duke BLRT Women's Microfinance Programs in
University Francophone Africa

Elizabeth Ann Faculty, California BLRT A study of International E-Marketing
Martin State San Bemandino Strategies of US Multinational
Corporations and their Applications in
the Business French classroom
Steven Sacco Faculty, San Diego BLRT Multimedia Business Italian Case Studies
State University

Bo Zhu PhD Student, Ohio BLRT Analysis of Chinese Language Usage in
State Leisure Activities for Business Purposes

Irina Six Faculty, University of BLRT Mastering Business Case Discussion:
Kansas Data Driven Teaching Materials for
Intermediate Students of Russian
Mee-Jeong Faculty, BLRT Multimedia Online Module for Business
Park University of Korean
Hawaii at Manoa
Christine Seaharp Learning Other Research & Conference Development:
Grosse Solutions, Faculty CIBER Business Language Conference
Emeritus, Preparing Global Business Leaders
Thunderbird
Bij an Vasigh Faculty, Embry Other Participation in Africa FDIB
Riddle Aeronautical
University
Storm Russo, Valencia Community Other Develop integrated curriculum designed
Lana Powell College to infuse IB into VCC programs

Annie Higgins Faculty, Wayne State Other Reading the Quran and the Market
University


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C . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 9: CIBER Awards to Non-UF Faculty
28










Appendix 10: Conferences Supported by CIBER, 2006-2010


Conference Title Date Location Target Target
Region Audience

Paris Research Workshop on Sept. 2006 Paris, France International Academics,
Path\ a% s for Women Government,
NGO officials

Telecommunications Policy Oct. 30, Tallahassee, International Government,
Roundtable: Apples-Apples or 2006 FL Regulators,
Apples-Oranges? Asymmetric Academics,
Policies in Business
Telecommunications

Energy Roundtable: Oct. 31, Tallahassee, International Government,
Understanding Fuel Diversity 2006 FL Regulators,
Trade-offs and Risks -Making Academics,
Decisions for the Future Business

2006 National Forum on Trade Dec. 7-8, Seattle, WA International Business,
Policy: Trade and Regional 2006 Government,
Prosperity Academics

Latin American Business Jan. 27, Gainesville, Latin America Faculty,
Symposium and Career 2007 FL Students,
Workshop 2007 Business

3rd Annual Florida Feb. 6, Jacksonville, Florida, Business,
International Business 2007 FL International Government,
Summit: "Trade, Logistics and Academics
Transportation"

Facing the Music: Microsoft, Feb. 22, Gainesville, European Faculty,
Apple and Int'l Antitrust Law 2007 FL Union Students
in the EU

2007 CIBER Business Mar. 28- Columbus, International Faculty, PhD
Language Conference: 30, 2007 OH students, K-12
The Key to US Competitive
Edge: Bridging Language and
Business

8th Annual Conference on Apr. 11- Gainesville, Latin America Business,
Legal & Policy Issues in the 12, 2007 FL Government,
Americas Policy makers,
Academics
C .. . Volume IX, 2006-2010
Appendix 10: Conferences Supported by CIBER










5th Annual CIBER National Dec. 13- Stamford, CT International Academics,
Forum on Trade Policy 15, 2007 Business,
Free Trade: US Comparative Government
Advantage in the Global
Market

57th Annual Latin American Feb. 7-8, Gainesville, Latin America Business,
Conference: Uniting for 2008 FL Government,
Solutions Multi-Sector Policy makers,
Partnerships and Strategic Academics
Communications in the
Americas, Business,
Community, Government

2008 CIBER Business Apr. 9-11, St. International Faculty, PhD
Language Conference 2008 Petersburg, students, K-12
Preparing Global Business FL
Leaders

4th Annual Florida May 1, Tampa, FL Florida, Business,
International Business Summit 2008 International Government,
2008: The State of Global Academics,
Finance and Trade Students

2008 International Academy of May 20- Gainesville, Africa Academics,
African Business and 24, 2008 FL Government,
Development Conference: Business,
Global and Local Dynamics in NGO officials
African Business and
Development.

9th Annual Conference on May 26- Rio de Latin America Business,
Legal & Policy Issues in the 30, 2008 Janeiro, Government,
Americas Brazil Policy makers,
Academics
2008 Global Security: June 16- Washington, International Government,
C /hik 1gL, s and Opportunities 17, 2008 DC Academics,
Business

6th Annual CIBER National Oct. 2-3, San Diego, International Academics,
Forum on Trade Policy: 2008 CA Business,
Understanding U.S. Trade Government
Policy: Past, Present, and
Future

Doing Business With Africa: Oct. 29, Tampa, FL Africa Business,
Practice, Issues, Potential 2008 Government,
Academics


C .. . Volume IX, 2006-20 10
Appendix 10: Conferences Supported by CIBER










Latin American Business Nov. 7, Gainesville, Latin America Faculty,
Symposium and Career 2008 FL Students,
Workshop 2008 Business

5th Annual Florida Feb. 18, Tampa, FL Florida, Business,
International Business 2009 International Government,
Summit: Florida Business Academics
Opportunities in Latin America
and the Caribbean

2009 CIBER Business April 2-4, Kansas City, International Faculty, PhD
Language Conference: 2009 MO students, K-12
, 1g, mi ig the World of
Business Through Language
and Culture

Indian River State College Oct. 1, Stuart, FL International Faculty,
Symposium: Connecting to a 2009 Students,
Global Green Economy Business

7th Annual CIBER National Nov. 5, Kansas City, International Academics,
Forum on Trade Policy: 2009 MO Business,
Does North America Work? Government

Daytona State College Nov. 6, Daytona, FL International Faculty,
Symposium: Is America on the 2009 Students,
Decline? and other useful Business
topics for integrating IB into
the curriculum

Florida International Business Mar. 2, Jacksonville, International Business,
Summit: Opportunities in a 2010 FI Government,
Transformed Global Economy Academics,
Students

PURC: U.S. Energy Policy in Mar. 18- Gainesville, International Faculty,
Transition Conference 19, 2010 FL Government,
Regulators,
Business
2010 CIBER Business Mar. 24- Philadelphia, International Faculty, PhD
Language Conference: Global 26, 2010 PA students, K-12
Literacy Integrated
Approaches to Cross-Cultural
Training
10th Annual Conference on Apr. 15- Gainesville, Latin America Business,
Legal & Policy Issues in the 16, 2010 FL Government,
Americas Policy makers,
Academics


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Appendix 10: Conferences Supported by CIBER










Appendix 11: Academic Outreach Conference Program
CIBER Business Language Conference: Preparing Global Business Leaders
St. Petersburg, Florida, April 9 11, 2008


The 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference provided for an exchange of ideas and
perspectives on how to most effectively train global leaders of the future. Participants
explored how students and educators can be equipped with the linguistic, multi-cultural
and managerial tools necessary for leadership in the 21st century. Conference attendees
participated in sessions devoted to business language instruction and ways to develop
successful interdisciplinary collaboration.

PROGRAM

Time Event
Wednesday, April 9
6:00-8:00 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open
6:00-8:00 p.m. Welcome Reception
Thursday, April 10
7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open
7:30-8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast
8:30-9:00 a.m. Welcome:
John Kraft (Dean, Warrington College of Business Administration),
Susanna Easton (Program Specialist, U.S. Department of Education),
Greg Moreland (Director, UF Foreign Languages Across the
Curriculum)
9:00-10:00 a.m. What's New in Business Languages: A Fresh Look at the Field
Dr. Christine Uber Grosse (President, Seaharp Learning Solutions
and Professor Emeritus, Thunderbird School of Global Management)
10:15-11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions I
Using 'Languages Across the Curriculum' to Expand the
Business Language Curriculum
Course Wikis: How Our Students of Today Can Teach Our
Students of Tomorrow
Student Assessments of Experiential Learning
Using Portfolios to Assist Students in Developing Cultural
Competence
Using Real-Time Technology in the Foreign Language
Classroom: Simulated Stock Portfolios
Combining Business and Culture in the GW-CIBER:
Discovering French Wine-Making
Teaching Culture in Business Spanish Classes
Applying the 'Automatic Speech Analysis System' in an
Online Business ( hli,, ,'c Course
Computer-Mediated Curriculum for C lih, ,c-Heritage MBA
Students
11:15-11:30 a.m. Beverage Break
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions II
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12:30-2:00 p.m.


2:15-3:15 p.m.


3:15-3:30 p.m.


Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Short-Term Study
Abroad
Site Visits, Standards and Scaffolding: Creating and
Teaching Cases for Business Language Learners ofAll
Levels
How to Better Prepare Future Business Leaders to Face
Environmental and Social Issues ;1n, i,'gh Selected Business
Language Course Materials
Using Technology to Enhance Instruction: Guest Speakers
and Chats
Integrating and Using Schaubilder in the Business German
Class
Exploring French Culture ;n i igh A,1i' i, oiig
Preparing Our Students for the 21st Century: Teamwork in
the Business Language Classroom
Synchronous Collaboration: An International Learning
Experience for Professors and Students
Entrepreneurship Simulations for Future International
Leaders
A Purdue University Initiative of Interdisciplinary Study
Abroad Program in China
Putting Principles of Vocabulary Learning into Practice: A
Computer-Assisted Business ( lhi n.. Vocabulary Program
for Professionals
Lunch
A Lesson Plan for the Global Era's Next Wave
Jordan Colletta (Vice-President, UPS Technology Marketing)
Concurrent Sessions III
A Model Immersive Cultural Learning Environment:
Teaching ( lh,,i %,- Culture in Second Life
Leveraging Existing Resources to Create Dual-Degree
Programs: l 1, 1 ig. Culture Plus X
An Interdisciplinary International Business Degree
Preparing for the Global Business: FV/,,,,,g an International
Company for a Class Project
The German Business Internship: Putting German to Work
'La Francophonie' and the Business French Curriculum:
Issues and ( h,/li. ig %
Podcasts and Pedgogy Curricular ( hig., in the Business
Language Course
Lessons Learned from Business Spanish Students at the
University ofMaryland
Undergraduate Research in Business Languages: Strategic
Plans for Campus and Student Success
A Corpus-Based Investigatrio7 of Business ( h,,L ,'c Textbooks
and Pedtcigogy in Use
Using Commercials to Teach ( h,, i %.- Languages and Culture


Beverage Break


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3:30-4:30 p.m.


Concurrent Sessions IV
Meaningful Activities, Meaningful Curriculum: A Small
University's Efforts to Prepare Global Business Leaders
The Business of Language and the Language of Business
Across the Curriculum
Energizing the Discipline Nationally: Bridging Differences
Between Language for Specific Purposes and Language for
Literature
Using FL Outcomes Assessment and Effective Program
Evaluations for Grant-Getting Purposes
Expanding the Field: Introductory Business Language and
Culture Instruction
Entrepreneurship and Environmental Engagement in Study
Abroad
Students' Oral Presentations in the Business French
Classroom: Content, Techniques and Assessment
Task-Based Activities: Modules for Teaching an Upper-Level
Business French Course
Theory and Method in Teaching Business Spanish: Successful
Pedagogical Techniques
Topics and Techniques in the Design of Commercial Cases
for Business Spanish
Enriching the Lower-Division Language Curriculum: Cross-
Disciplinary Collaboration on Case Studies
Inworporating a Case Study in the Lower-Division French
Curriculum: The Auberge Project
Inuciporporting a Case Study in the Lower-Division ( h,, ,c
Curriculum: The Starco Proiect


4:30-5:30 p.m. Steering Committee Meeting: CIBER Business Language Conference
6:00-9:00 p.m. Conference Gala & Awards Ceremony
Mahaffey Theater
Friday, April 11
7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open
7:30-9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast
9:00-10:00 a.m. Alumni Perspectives
Moderator: Alex Sevilla (Director, MBA Program, University of
Florida
UF Alumni Panelists:
Greg Bates (Attorney at Law, Miami)
Julianne lannarelli managerr of Research, AACSB International,
Tampa)
Billy Shields (Law Reporter, Miami Daily Business Review)
10:15-11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions V
Business Portuguese: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business Russian: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business ( / hm ,M Where Do We Go From Here?
Business German: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business French: Where Do We Go From Here?


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Business Spanish: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business Japanese: Where Do We Go From Here?
11:15-11:30 a.m. Beverage Break
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VI
Business Hindi at the Linguistic Crossroads
Outsourcing to India? Understanding Indian Communication
Practices
Theory and Practice: An Adaptive Approach to Business
Language Course Design
The Formation of a CIBER Research Forum on the State of
the Art in the Teaching ofIntercultural Competence and
Languages for Business Communication
The Use ofPodcasts and Video-on-Demand in Business
German Courses
Screen Capture, Screen Recorder and Presentation Software
for Online Business Courses
What Can Happen When Business and Language Faculty
Cooperate Across an Ocean?
Economics of Soccer in the Classroom: What the Global
Business Leader Must Know
Training Students with Linguistic Tools: 'Addressing' in
Business Spanish
Language, Culture and International Competence: The
Hybrid Curriculum Model Using International Business
Cases
A Business and Cultural Introduction to the Middle East
12:30-2:00 p.m. Lunch
Business Language in the United States: Past, Present and Future
Possibilities
Ronald Cere (Eastern Michigan University)
Michael Doyle (University of North Carolina at Charlotte)
T. Bruce Fryer (University of South Carolina-Columbia and
University of South Carolina-Beaufort)
2:15-3:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VII
Preparing for Discussions with Russian Partners: Refining
Oral Communications Skills
Cultural Differences in Technology and Management:
Building U.S.-Russian Space Systems
Preparing Global Business Leaders: By Scrapping
Languages for Business' Courses?
Undoing the Past, and Re-energizing the Future ofLanguage
Studies in Business
'Founding' a Company in a German-Speaking Country
Bringing the Smaller German Company into the Classroom
Business Languages in Another Discipline: C( /hi/ ii g and
Opportunities
Languages for World Business at the College of( Ih i, i/ 1 i i,
A Model of Interdisciplinary Collaboration


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Translating and Raising Awareness of Business Language:
Recruiting New Faculty and Graduate Students
The Interview Project as an Integrated Approach to Business
Japanese
Acquisition of Culture: The Case of the Business Japanese
Language Curriculum
3:15-3:30 p.m. Beverage Break


3:30-4:30 p.m.


Concurrent Sessions VIII
Integrating Business Language Skills with Language Skills in
the L2 Classroom
Designing Authentic Literacy Tasks for Business
Communication
Best Practices for Recruiting New Faculty and Graduate
Students for Global Business Leadership
Why We Teach: Training Two Kinds of Global Business
Leaders
Chamber of the Americas Education Task Force: Creating
Connections
Students and $$$: Methods and Techniques for Expanding
Business Language Programs
Carbon Footprint on Our World: Carrefour vs. Wal-Mart
Seeds of( /Ih, lg The Ashoka Model of Social
Entrepreneurship in France
An Innovative Way to Equip Students with Business
Language Exposure, Multicultural and Managerial Tools in
the International Context
Business Language Instruction in Rio de Janeiro
Doing Business in Latin America: Survival Spanish and
Cross-Cultural Training for Business Professionals
Universality of Cross-Cultural and Cross-Disciplinary LMR
Perspectives: Preparing Global Business Leaders
Bringing Rigor and Realty to Language Learning for
Business Purposes: Examples of Project-Based Action
Learning


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Appendix 12: Business Outreach Conference Program
Doing Business with Africa: Practice, Issues and Potential
Tampa, Florida, October 29, 2008


PROGRAM


Time Event
8:15-8:30 Check In (Continental Breakfast)
8:30-8:40 Welcome: Dr. Maria Crummett, Dean of International Affairs,
University of South Florida
8:40-9:30 Session I: Overview: Risks and Opportunities in the Emerging
Economic Landscape of Africa, Dr. Karanta Kalley, Regional
Managing Director, Country Intelligence Africa Group, Global
Insight, Inc.
Introduction by Dr. Carol West, Director, Center for International
Business Education and Research, University of Florida
9:30-10:30 Session II: Practice: Learning from African Trade Experiences of
Florida Firms.
Mr. Newton Owi, President, Technology Frontiers Inc.
Ms. Nadia Rehman, Vice-President, A Linen Valley
Ms. Christine Boldt, Executive Vice President, Association of Floral
Importers of Florida (AFIF)
Mr. Bruce McEvoy, former CEO, Seald Sweet
Introduction by Mr. Bryant Salter, Director, African Trade
Expansion Program, Enterprise Florida.
10:30-10:40 Break
10:40-11:55 Concurrent African issues workshops: Six sessions each with 35-
minute segments 20 minutes of presentation by a segment leader
followed by 15 minutes question and answer. Session 3b will be a
panel discussion facilitated by Mr. Earnest Williams. There is a 5-
minute break between each 35-minute segment so participants may
move to a different topical group if desired.
1. Culture and Communication:
Workshop chair: TBA
la: (10:40-11:15) Understanding Gender Issues and Gender Policies:
Dr. Linda E. Lucas, Visiting Professor, Department of Women's
Studies, University of South Florida.
lb: (11:20-11:55) Adjiusting to "Africa Time ": Dr. Charles Bwenge,
African Language Coordinator, Center for African Studies, University
of Florida
2. Sectors and Support:
Workshop chair: Mr. Fassil Gabremariam, President and Founder,
U.S. Africa Free Enterprise Education Foundation.
2a. (10:40-11:15) What Sectors to Watch Where: Dr. Kwabena
Gyimah-Brempong, Chair and Professor, Department of Economics,
University of South Florida.
2b. (11:20-11:55) Government resources: Dr. Cynthia Johnson,
Senior Manager, Pinellas County Economic Development; Mr.
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George Martinez, Director, International Trade
Administration, Tampa Bay US Export Assistance Center,
US Department of Commerce; Ms. Eileen Rodriguez,
Interim Director, University of South Florida Small Business
Development Center; Ms. Rebecca Torres, Regional
Manager, Tampa, Enterprise Florida.
3. Regulation and Regional Highlight:
Workshop chair: Mr. Earnest Williams, former Councilman, City of
St. Petersburg, and owner, Earnest Williams Insurance Agency.
3a. (10:40-11:15) Tracking the Evolving Regulatory Environment: Dr.
Mark Jamison, Director, Public Utility Research Center, University of
Florida.
3b. (11:20-11:55) Focus on South Africa: Ms. Tongila Manly,
Director, Enterprise Florida, Office South Africa (invited); Mr. Bruce
McEvoy, former CEO, Seald Sweet; Dr. Lilia Abron,
President and Founder, PEER Consultants, P.C. (invited);
Ms. Nadia Rehman, Vice-President, A Linen Valley.


11:55-12:25


Session III: Issues Wrap-Up: US ( lu/h 1,g to Enhancing Trade
with Africa, Ms. Beatrice M. Selotlegeng, former CEO, Air
Botswana, and current Executive in Residence Faculty, College of
Business, Ohio University.
Introduction by Dr Linda E. Lucas, Visiting Professor of Women's
Studies, University of South Florida.


12:30-1:45 Lunch (buffet) and Session IV: Potential: Developing Sound Legal
and Regulatory Frameworks for Financial and Private Sector
Development in Africa, Dr. Kenneth Mwenda, Senior Counsel, Legal
Vice-Presidency, World Bank.
Introduction by Dr. Leonardo Villal6n, Director, Center for African
Studies, University of Florida.
1:45 Conference adjournment


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Full Text

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Serving Students, Faculty and Business Center for International Business Education and Research Warrington College of Business Administration University of Florida Four Year Report Grant 3 : October 200 6 September 20 10

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CIBER Synergies: A Comprehensive Review of Programs Grant 3: 2006 2010 and An Overview of Programs Grant 4: 2010 2014 Center for International Business Education and Research CIBER Website: http://warrington.ufl.edu/ciber/ CIBER PO Box 117140 Warrington College of Business University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 32611 (352) 392 3433

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From the management team 2010 was a year of renewal and retirement for The University of Florida (UF) CIBER. The Center was successful in its application for a fourth cycle of funding from the US Department of Education. The new $1.5 million four year a ward permits continuation of 2010 grant and also allows implementation of a host of new initiatives that address international business (IB) The excitement of new funds and new programs was tempered by the sobering prospect of managing them without the assistance of long time CIBER Associate Director, Dr. ry was instrumental in designing a UF CIBER plan that resulted in the first successful grant application in 1998. He had a vision of integrating business, area studies and foreign language expertise across campus that would indeed make UF a national resour ce for improving IB training and enhancing competitiveness of US firms in global markets. During his twelve years of dedicated service, Terry grew the vision by expanding CIBER reach at UF and he assured successful grant performance by diligent oversight o f Center activities, his retirement from Center administration leaves leadership and management gaps that will be challenging to fill. With 2010 marking the end of th e 2006 2010 grant and the beginning of the 2010 2014 program, the current volume of CIBER Synergies contains both a detailed report on accomplishments of the former and a comprehensive overview of plans for the latter. P articularly notable achievements of 2006 2010 include successful initiation of an African business environment program, significant innovation and expansion of business foreign language and culture offerings, implementation of three programs supporting development of IB training capacity at smaller and minority serving institutions of higher education in Florida, and a sharp ratcheting up in sophistication and relevance of program evaluation. These activities are scheduled for continuation and expansion in the 2010 2014 grant cycle. However significantly altered the IB training environment. New CIBER programs reflecting themes of sustainability and understanding the institutional frameworks of global trade and investme nt respond to the changed environment. And as in past renewal proposals, new initiatives reflect new UF CIBER partnerships. As noted in the application abstract, while (WCBA), it was in fact the concerted effort of talented faculty from 10 colleges, 18 departments and 12 centers at UF, plus a host of other regional, national and international institutions of higher education. We take this opportunity to thank those faculty mem bers and also to express our appreciation to the UF CIBER Advisory Council (report Appendix 1) for input that improves the effectiveness of the Center in serving students, faculty and businesses. Carol West Andy Naranjo I sabelle Winzeler N ikki Kernaghan Director Associate Directo r Assistant Director Evaluation Coordinator

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1 I Serving students UF CIBER programs for students offer innovative international business (IB) training in Florida classrooms and overseas. Simultaneously, they recognize the importance of developing the IB research skills of both graduate and undergradu ate studen ts. And in professional groups that can be on going IB research and employment resources A. In UF classroom s Earlier UF CIBER funding cycles supporte d basic IB course and IB course module development E xamples includ ed the addition of international dimensions to core economics and business classes Foreign language initiatives stressed development and delivery of basic Business Spanish, Business Port uguese, Business Japanese and Business Chinese. Some FLAC (Foreign Language a cross the Curriculum) courses were introduced that interacted foreign language training with business class content. The 2006 2010 cycle focused on (1) provid ing foreign business cu lture training to students without corresponding foreign language expertise; (2) expanding IB training to students outside the Warrington College of Business Administration (WCBA) and; (3) developing UF regional IB expertise, specifically through cour ses focused on Africa and Latin America. A complete list of courses supported by UF CIBER, 2006 2010, is provided in Appendix 2. Historically, business language classes such as Business Chinese or Business Japanese were the primary venue for teaching for eign business cultures. While this traditional approach is perhaps theoretically ideal in melding language and culture, it has notable practical limitations Students cannot study all the languages corresponding to the major cultures they will need to int eract with in future global trade and investment. Consequent ly, UF CIBER funded foreign language faculty to develop and deliver courses in English on key foreign business cultures. Initial pilots were one credit classes on the Business Culture of China an d the Business Culture of Japan. Enthusiastic student evaluations consistently requested more in depth three credit courses which were developed and piloted in the second half of the grant period. Augmenting the Asian offerings was a one credit course on the Business Culture of Africa followed by development of a three credit version of the material. Escalating enrollments in Arabic language courses encouraged funding development of Business Arabic. However, most of that enrollment increase was in firs t year courses that, given the complexity of the language, do not prepare students for a business language class taught solely in Arabic Business Arabic was designed to encourage more advanced study of the language (especially by busi ness students). It has more emphasis on language than a strictly business culture course, but augments instruction in Arabic with instruction in English It allows beginners in the language to supplement language training with education on business practic es of Arabic speaking countries of the world.

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2 In the current world economy characterized by globalization of almost all markets, IB training needs to reach students in professional and academic programs outside business colleges. UF CIBER responded to t his need by enhancing resources for IB classes serving both busi ness and non business students and by sponsoring FLAC sections targeting students outside WCBA. Anthropology Assistant Professor Dr. Brenda Chalfin piloted a new course on Anthropology and t he New Economy: Anthropological Perspectives on Finance, Commerce and Neoliberalism. The class encourage s anthropology students to think about IB aspects of their major and introduce s business students to anthropological perspectives on global trade. CIB The Firm in the Global Economy has an enrollment that is approximately equally divided between students from WCBA and students from Liberal Arts and Sciences. Thirty five percent of the work in the clas s is a team project designing a foreign market entry strategy for a firm. CIBER support for this important training in IB market analysis included subsidizing the purchase of cross country databases and funding a student assistant to research potential pr oject topics. (A syllabus for the Spring 2010 offering of The Firm in the Global Economy is provided in Appendix 3 as an example of CIBER supported on campus IB course offerings). n a model for integrating foreign language training with business content. In its traditional credit discussion section conducted in a foreign language in conjunction with a content course It is taught by a foreign language graduate student who receives pedagogical training and who works out reading/discussion materials in conjunction with the content course professor (who need not speak the language). Recent CIBER modifications of this traditional FLAC model include: (a) e limination of association with a particular course; (b) instruction by a foreign language professor with business interests and ; (c) instruction by a content professor with foreign language skills. Variant (a) is used for multidisciplinary, cross colleg e current business topics Modification (b) allows foreign foreign language teaching without commitment to a formal 3 credit course Variant (c) augments stretched language staffs and builds a foreign language tra ining constituency in non language departments. The modifications have allowed CIBER to extend the FLAC concept to less commonly taught languages and also to target non business student s as potential enrollees Piloted in 2006 2010 were Asian Sports Mark ets (taught in Chinese targeting students in the College of Health and Human Performance), Marketing of Agricultural Products in the European Union (taught in French targeting students in agriculture) Generational Perspectives o n Latin American Healthcare Delivery (taught in Spanish targeting students in the College of Public Health and Health Professions) and Cities of the Spanish Speaking World and Cities of the Portuguese Speaking World (taught in Spanish and Portuguese respectively and targeting studen ts in the College of Design, Construction and Urban Planning)

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3 Like the FLAC program, global regional focus on Latin America has been part of the UF CIBER program since the Center was first funded in 1998. A goal of the 2006 2010 agenda was to initiate d evelopment of a UF specialization in Africa n business. Given burgeoning Asian economies and established major US trading partners in Europe and lies in the purposes for the CIBER program outlined in the enabling Title VI Higher Education Act. national resource for the teaching of improved business techniques, strategies and methodologies which emphasize the international context in which busin national resource implies developing unique IB specializations not readily duplicated at other institutions. In the case of UF, CIBER has been able to partner with world class Centers housing African business ex pertise (including the Center for African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Public Utility Research Center (PURC) in WCBA), ma k ing African business a natural focus for creation of a national IB resource at UF Need for a nation al resource in African IB has been amply demonstrated by surveys, anecdotes and foreign trade and investment statistics. The Higher Education Act requires the Secretary of Education to consult with Federal agency heads in order to receive recommendations regarding areas of national need for expertise in foreign languages and world regions. In the most recent survey conducted in September 2009 Africa was the most commonly cited region. Anecdotal evidence from campuses confirms common misunderstanding o f the continent ignorance inhibits commerce. Trade and investment data verify that the US lags the rest of the world in establishing commercial ties with Africa and benefitting from recently improved b usiness climates. Despite the fact that the US direct investment position in Africa has posted a compound annual growth rate that appear s healthy during this decade (5 10%), and that the share of US merchandise exports destined for Africa has increased d uring the same period, those rates and shares remain approximately half non US global norms. During 2006 2010, UF CIBER sponsored the infusion of African business into core courses (particularly Principles of Macroeconomics ) and IB courses (particularly The Firm in the Global Economy ) and also sponsored development and delivery of entire c las ses focused on IB potential of the region e.g., Economic Development of Africa and Africa in the Global Economy. B. In non UF Florida classrooms Funding opportun ities for IB education and training innovation vary considerably across education system with its 11 state universities, 28 community /state colleges and more than 6 0 private colleges and universities. For faculty in units with endo wment funds and/or external profit making programs, income from these sources may provide needed financial support for individual faculty initiatives. For others, there is a critical mass of talent at the home institution that can be assembled to attract national funding, allowing financing of a specific effort as part of a broader program. For many educators in Florida, however, neither of these opportunities exists.

PAGE 7

4 Consequently, initiatives that c growth go unimplemented. EFIBI It serves non UF higher education students through grants to develop IB programs meeti ng the specialized needs and structures of these institutions To date, 21 IB development grants have been awarded under the EFIBI program the majority for course development They include classes delivered in business, in the social sciences and in foreign l anguage departments and they have impacted students at 14 non UF institutions of higher education that span the state from Pensacola to Miami. Supplemental 2009 2010 CIBER funding targeted IB course enhancement at minority serving institutions. Having al ready supported program development at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) through the Globalizing Business Schools CIBER consortium (See Section II. C below), the UF Center focused the new funds on program development at the major Hispani c serving institution (HSI) Valencia Community College. The latter is an excellent partner for developing national prototype IB modules that serve Hispanic population of Puerto Rican heritage. It represents the higher education venue through which US Hisp anic population is most effectively reached. Forty eight percent of HSIs are community colleges compared with only 12% of HBCUs and 60% of Hispanics in higher education enroll in community colleges, a rate disproportionate to all other demographic groups. And Valencia is a major HSI. It ranks third nationally in associate degrees awarded to Hispanics 27% of its 50,000 students are Hispanic, drawn primarily from the Orlando metropolitan area population in which over 50% of the Hispanic population is of Puert o Rican heritage. IB modules were developed for basic business courses that serve the dual tracks typical of institutions awarding associate degrees, terminal career programs and preparation for transfer into a four year institution. C. Overseas traini ng Annual offering of the summer Business in Brazil program, conducted in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, was continued throughout the most recent four year grant period. The six credit program combines training in Portuguese, lectures and field trips on Br azilian business practices and cultural immersion. The unique national program has attracted students from universities as diverse as San Diego State, Northwestern, Kansas, NYU, UCLA, Michigan and Harvard, and has regularly resulted in follow up internsh ips in the country. For students more limited by time and/or funds, the short term study abroad (STSA) has increased in popularity. A key feature of CIBER funded programs is that they be open to students from multiple disciplines, allowing students to le arn from each other as well as from formal program activities. Two variants of the basic STSA model typically consists of some background classroom work followed by 10 14 day s overseas travel to a variety of locales in a country o r a region During 2006 2010,

PAGE 8

5 CIBER subsidized seven such tour model STSA programs: four offerings of the International Financial Markets STSA which rotates in overseas destinations among Argentina, Brazil and Chile ; two deliveries of the agriculture focu sed STSA to Italy, Italian Food From Production to Policy and ; one offering of the law focused Legal Institutions of the Americas Study Tour Chile (See Appendix 4 for a sample STSA itinerary .) In addition to providing an overseas learning experience for studen ts, the International Financial Markets STSA had a broad impact on WCBA offerings by serving as a prototype for other degree specific tours. The model, in conjunction with the advice of its developer, CIBER Associate Director Andy Naranjo, spawned a variet y of destinations in Eastern Europe, Asia, the Mideast and Latin America. o a specific facility that is the c enter for lectures and visits (much like a semester abroad to a particular foreign university, but shorter in duration) UF faculty to develop European based STSA s in th is format. CIBER supported two such program s: International Leadership: Adopting Businesses and Governments to New Realities (a 2 credit course offered over Spring Break in Paris by PURC Director, Dr. Mark Jamison) and Commodities to Cafes Agricultural and Food Marketing in France (a 2 credit course offered over the May Intercession period in Paris by Food and Resource Economics Associate Professor James Sterns) Three programs funded research experiences abroad for students with particular focus on Africa : (1) the Microfinance Travel Grant initiative; (2) the Doctoral Dissertation Overseas Research program and ; (3) the Research Tutorial Abroad. Under (1), two students per year we re awarde d travel grants through a competitive application process to pursu e research overseas on a microfinance topic. The students funded to date have come from diverse UF programs including undergraduate, MBA, and graduate Political Science and they have focused on a variety of African countries such as Tanzania, Kenya, and Mali T he se students have pursued a range of microfinance research topics e.g., how rules, terms and conditions of microfinance institutions (MFI) affect business performance in the informal sector, use of technology (SMART cards, ATMs, mobile phones, et and effects of MFI services for women on African gender equality. Travel grants for doctoral dissertation research not focused on microfinance supported anthropolog ical study of Ghanaian entrepreneurship and political science analysis of corporate social responsibility as a competitive strategy in Equ a torial Guinea. Students conduct research on their own overseas in both the Microfinance Travel Grant and Doctoral Dissertation Overseas Research programs However, f or many students (and their parents) th is is a daunting format when the destination is Africa. Their initial exposure to the con tinent needs to be in a more structured group venue. The structured and faculty led STSA or Business in Brazil type programs provide models for students interested in a region, but not at the point of traveling and conducting research on their own abroad. However, there is not a clear

PAGE 9

6 discourage travel to multiple locations on a single trip. These constraints render highly questionable how successful the STSA or Bu siness in Brazil model might be if applied to the African situation. Consequently, UF CIBER developed the Research Tutorial Abroad (RTA) concept for initial student exposure to research in Africa. In the RTA program, faculty members submit proposals for t aking 2 3 students abroad to Africa to conduct research on a specific IB topic for 3 6 weeks. Successful applicants receive $5,000 to subsidize the research topic defines th e specific African destination thereby avoiding the destination selection problem of the STSA or Business in Brazil approaches but the faculty programs subsidizing student rese arch on African IB topics. Two proposals were funded for a pilot of the program in Summer 2009. Dr. Julie Silva, Assistant Professor of Geography, supervised field research of an undergraduate in Namibia He exa min ed differences in applied stringency of eco tourism regulations as a Professor of Anthropology, supervised a graduate and an undergraduate student in Tanzania addressing the potential for US private investment in tha tourism development. D. IB networking Three UF CIBER programs have linked students with networks promot ing their IB development. For doctoral students in business, workshops organized by a consortium of CIBERs bring together nation al academic IB research leaders in a discipline from various universities to meet with students at the dissertation planning stage of their graduate education. Students receive guidance in formulating potential IB dissertation topics and become part of a n ational network of peers and intellectual leaders that can support subsequent work on the topics During 2006 2010, UF CIBER sponsored participation of UF doctoral students in such specialized workshops in finance, i nformation s ciences and o perations m anag ement (ISOM) and accounting. The biennial Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop has serv ed students from around the state, as well as from UF They learn corporate perspectives on the region from representatives of multiple industries and they gain insights on career experiences and opportunities in Latin America from recent graduates working in the private sector, in government agencies and in NGOs. Approximately 200 students attended the 2008 program. CIBER funds representatives of th e undergraduate International Business Society (IBS) to attend the Florida International Summit ( See Section III.A below). This provides opportunity for IBS to compare activities and plan joint ventures with similar groups at other Florida institutions of higher education.

PAGE 10

7 In addition to serving students through IB courses offered in Florida classroom s training and research program s overseas, and networking connections, students gain IB experience through working as assistants on CIBER teaching, research and outreach grants to faculty and through assistantships in CIBER administration. Appendix 5 lists students receiving funding support from UF CIBER over the grant period 2006 2010. Total numbers of students impacted by the UF CIBER program measure in the thousands when all enrollees in CIBER sponsored courses are counted and spillovers to the classroom of programs that develop faculty IB capacity are considered. E. Upcoming for students New IB course development at UF in the 2010 2014 period expands bus iness foreign language offerings to include Russian and medical French It extends business foreign culture courses to include Russia, Vietnam and a team taught Asia and Africa class. New FLACs include The Cuban Economy (in Spanish), Green Labeling of Agri cultural Products in the EU (in French), Russian Business through Film (in Russian), Chinese Literacy and Labor Market Development (in Chinese), Globalization and the Valuing and Viewing of Artistic Creations (in Italian), and Sustainable Building in Spani sh Speaking Countries (in Spanish). An additional mixed Arabic language culture class will focus on Mideast Gender and Language The sustainable building and green labeling FLACs are part of a new thematic emphasis that includes development of a course on Economic Principles and Business Applications of Global Sustainability Two major course investments will particularly respond to the national resource mandate of CIBERs by combining specialized areas of UF expertise to address national needs. The first is in the area of retailing. Well known examples and statistical rankings document struggles of US retailers abroad: Wal disinvestment from South Korea and Germany and its failure after a decade to post a profit in China; the inability of Ho me Depot and J.C. Penney to establish viable footholds in the thought to be lucrative Chilean retail sector and ; between 2007 and 2009, Sears being of Top 10 global retailers and IRET Brazil (Inte rnational Retail Education and Training Brazil) addresses the need for enhanced international retail training It link s exceptional UF industry expertise with UF Latin American expertise and partner s both with the Center for Retailing Excellence at Funda o Getulio Vargas (FGV) in Sao Paulo The team will produce multimedia modules on retailing in Brazil that are appropriate for infusion into marketing and retailing courses The second major initiative addresses an expressed priority of the 2009 CIBER com petition to enhance training in particular foreign languages the US Department of Education has identified as priority LCTLs (Less Commonly Taught Languages). Geography has historically constrained development of US capacity in the 15 African LCTLs that ap pear on the list; instruction is typically available only on site at a handful of Title VI Centers for African Studies and a similar small number of non Title VI

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8 centers. Building national expertise in the languages requires harnessing technology to provid e wider geographical access to the centers of pedagogical expertise. The proposed Web based Basic and Business Akan does this through combin ing UF expertise in web based business program delivery, web based German and Chinese training and Akan language i nstruction. Both business and journalism students at UF will benefit from a new class on IB Reporting and the Research Tutorial Abroad program will be offered on a regular basis for students i nterest ed in IB research in Africa Students enrolled in Florid a institutions of higher education outside of UF will be offered new global business classes through continuation of the EFIBI program A second phase of the partnership with Valencia Community College will add new prototypes for enhancing IB education a t Hispanic serving institutions Also continued from the 2006 2010 period will be the networking programs and UF CIBER support for Business in Brazil and the International Financial Markets Tour. Five new STSAs will be available to students: Sustaina ble Agriculture in Central America; EU Accounting and International Financial Reporting Standards; Retailing in Brazil; Cuban Agricultural Markets and ; Fly with the Flowers. The latter introduces a new STSA experience. While most focus on a particular w orld region (or region and discipline), Fly with the Flowers focuses on a global market It travels to Miami, Bogota and Amsterdam teaching multidisciplinary perspectives on issues in global market competition such as conflict and collaboration between dev eloped and developing economies, technology based v. resource based national comparative advantage, and differing concepts of sustainability and ethics. It is being developed jointly by UF academic experts in the business and science aspects of the globa l market in cut flowers Department, Dr. Terril Nell. They are joined by industry practitioners in the state who handle the 40,00 0 boxes of cut flowers that arrive daily at Miami Ai rport and represent approximately two thirds of the cut flowers sold in the US. II. Serving faculty UF CIBER serves faculty on campus regionally and nationally through IB course development delivery and research grants, through workshops and conference s, and through other specialized IB faculty development programs. A. IB course development, delivery and research grants New courses serving students detailed in Sections I.A and I.B above were the products of UF CIBER course (or course module) developme nt grants. Typically, the Center does not will be scheduled. However, numerous exceptions to this rule were made for foreign language courses or culture courses taug ht by foreign language faculty. The global dominated the last funding cycle diminished state revenues and reduced educational endowments creating fiscal cris e s that necessitated program

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9 cutbacks in many institutions of higher educa tion. News reports from around the country suggested foreign language departments bore a disproportionate share of those cutbacks. UF was no exception In order to continue progress in foreign business language and culture training, CIBER needed to provide some funding for new course delivery as well as new course development in those units. In addition to serving UF and r egional Florida faculty through course development and delivery grants, UF CIBER served business foreign language faculty nationwide by participat ing in the multi CIBER Business Language Research and Training (BLRT) initiative. BLRT awards grants for proposed innovations in business foreign language instruction through a national competitive process. Major 2006 2010 CIBER research grants to faculty in journalism, business and agriculture supported studies on determinants of competitiveness in global mobile and media industries, impacts of Homeland Security policies on the supply of agricultural labor, cross country analysis of factors affe cting a dvancement of women to leadership positions in corporations standards setting in cooperative technical organizations securing the global supply chain in different Asian markets, and strategies for diffusing anti American, anti capitalism and anti globalization sentiments in major Latin American countrie s. Two additional research awards were commissioned CIBER studies. Business language pioneer, Dr. Christine Uber Gross e business language instr 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference (see Section II.B below). Dr. Renata Serra, economist with the UF Center for African Studies and Coordinator of Cotton Research for the global African Power and Politics Progr am prepared a background piece on child labor for use with IB case studies on the subject. in the academic research, review and publication process can push final p ublication dates into the next grant period. Indeed, research products may continue to appear in even later grant cycles as the faculty member pursues new questions that emerged in the initial research. H ence, i t can be difficult to determine when research products of a CIBER grant end. Conservative estimates indicate a substantial body of IB publications during 2006 2010 attributable to UF CIBER research grants They includ ed articles in International Journal on Media Management, Journal of Media Business Studies, International Journal of Mobile Marketing, New Media and Society, C hoices, Economics Letters, Comparative Studies in Society and History, American Behavioral Scientist, Journal of African Business, Journal of Labor Economics, ICFAI Journal of Merg ers and Acquisitions; Review of International Economics, Economic Theory, Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Emerging Markets Review, Journal of International Money and Finance, Applied Economics Letters, American Journal of Agricultural Econom ics In ternational Review of Economics and Finance, and the Texas Intellectual Property Law Journal Additionally published were numerous book chapters and a case study book supporting the teaching of Business Portuguese, Brazilians Working with

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10 Americans: Cultural Case Studies, by Orlando Kelm and Mary Risner (University of Texas Press). See Appendix 6 for a sample summary of CIBER sponsored faculty research publications and Appendix 7 for a sample abstract from UF CIBER supported doctoral dissertation research. B. Workshops and conferences One of the first programs launched by UF CIBER in 1998 was the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop and it continues to be a key initiative fostering IB interest and development across campus. Faculty and graduate students from more than 18 departments and eight colleges at UF have attended this monthly luncheon seminar series. Funded by WCBA and organized by CIBER, the workshop keeps IB interested faculty from diverse locales networked and provides a n inf ormal forum for feedback on CIBER plans Its featuring of an external speaker from a new area has often been the first step in expanding UF CIBER programs to additional disciplines. Exceptionally prestigious IB researchers are brought to the UF campus th rough the annual Bradbury Distinguished Lecture on International Economics, co sponsored by the Bradbury endowment, CIBER and 2010, presentations were made on current topics of globalization and growth by f our distinguished scholars in the field: Dr. Maurice Obstfeld (University of California, Berkekey); Dr. Phillippe Aghion (Harvard University); Dr. Robert Solow (MIT) and ; Dr. Dani Rodrik (Harvard University). More than 150 language professionals from a round the nation attended the 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference, organized and hosted by UF CIBER in St. Petersburg, Florida, April 9 11, 2008. The conference is the premier annual national meeting for faculty engaged in teaching foreign languages to the professions. The unexpectedly high attendance (up over 50% from 2007) reflected meticulous planning efforts of the Program Chair, UF Senior Lecturer in Spanish, Dr. Greg Moreland, and careful attention to logistics details provided by CIBER Assistant Director, Isabelle Winzeler. Conference sessions addressed use of technology in business language instruction, perspectives of business professionals and business professors, integrating culture and language education, innovative applications of busines s case studies and advertisements, and nine specific foreign languages Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic and Hindi (See Appendix 11 for a conference agenda.) The UF Title VI Centers of African Studies and Internatio nal Business Education and Research jointly hosted the 2008 Annual Meetings of the International Academy of African Business and Development (IAABD) at the University of Florida Hilton Conference Center, May 20 24, 2008.

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11 Total attendance was 158 academics from 19 countries, including 10 African nations. Nine sets of four concurrent sessions accommodated 125 scholarly research presentations that spanned a broad range of multi disciplinary issues related to the conference theme of sessions included presentations by two African Ambassadors to the US (Republic of Zambia and Malawi) and the Director of the US Department of Commerce African Office. C. Other specialized faculty IB develop ment programs Two week study abroad faculty tours provide background on the business climate in a the classroom, and offer networking opportunities for future IB teachi ng and research projects. Each tour is a combination of lectures and site visits, organized by a lead CIBER. Eight offerings were available during the last grant cycle: Western Europe (University of Memphis CIBER); Eastern Europe (University of Pittsburgh CIBER); MERCOSUR Brazil, Argentina and Chile (FIU CIBER); China (University of Denver CIBER), India Delhi (University of Connecticut CIBER), India Mumbai/Bangalore (FIU CIBER); Sub Saharan Africa (University of South Carolina CIBER); Vietnam ( University of Hawaii and University of Wisconsin CIBER s ). Each of the four Asian tours occurs in the first half of January, a time that conflicts with teaching for many UF faculty. Consequently, UF CIBER generally co sponsors and funds participation in the late May W estern Europe, Eastern Europe, Sub Saharan Africa and MERCOSUR tours. WCBA annually supports tour participation by four or five business faculty (or staff) and CIBER funds at least one non UF business faculty member to participate on the Sub Saharan Afric a tour. (Sponsored faculty are identified in Appendix 8 that lists all UF faculty receiving direct CIBER support 200 6 201 0. ) UF foreign language faculty from Romance language, Slavic language, Asian language and African language programs benefitted from m ultiple smaller travel grants permitting their participation in national conferences on business foreign language instruction. Conference travel grants were also provided to faculty outside UF as part of the EFIBI program (see Section I.B above and Appendi x 9 ) F aculty from the University of West Florida and Embry Riddle Aeronautical University received CIBER support for participation in the MERCOSUR and Vietnam two week study tours abroad and two faculty from Valencia Community College were funded to trave l to Puerto Rico to make business and educational contacts there as part of the specially funded Hispanic serving institution (HSI) initiative (Se e Section I.B above.) On the UF campus, specialized FDIB (Faculty Development in International Business) pr ograms focused on enhancing ability of foreign language faculty to make greater use of technology in teaching business foreign languages. Background workshops on the topic were provided for all faculty and follow up grants were awarded to those developing specific plans for greater use of technology in their classes.

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12 Among non UF campuses in Florida, UF CIBER has concentrated on providing FDIB opportunities to faculty at small and/or minority serving institutions. Faculty course development grants ma de through the EFIBI program as well as travel grants noted earlier in this section have been significant components of this emphasis. Throughout the four year grant period, the Center also participated in the Globalizing Business Schools CIBER consorti um program. A joint endeavor of 10 CIBERs and the Institute for International Public Policy, the initiative pairs each participating CIBER with one of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Each CIBER assists its HBCU partner in preparin g an internationalization plan for its business curriculum and in writing a BIE grant application to fund plan implementation The CIBER also sponsor s participation of HBCU faculty in workshops for internationalizing business classes. UF t HBCU partner was Bethune Cookman University in Daytona Beach. Although plans for submitting a grant proposal proceeded on target in Fall 2006 and early Spring 2007, they subsequently faltered with the departure of a key faculty member from Bethune Cookm an F aculty from the university did, however, participate in the internationalization workshops. In Fall 2006, UF CIBER assisted faculty at Florida A&M University (FAMU) in the prepar ation of an application for a second two year BIE grant. FAMU was UF C Globalizing Business Schools partner in the previous grant cycle. Its 2004 BIE application was funded and the IB program implemented was recognized for excellence in February 2007 when FAMU was designated a winner of the Andrew Heiskell Award for I nnovative International Education in the area of study abroad. The second FAMU BIE application submitted with UF CIBER assistance in Fall 2006 was also funded. D. Upcoming for faculty New grants for faculty research stress topics emerging in the aftermat confidence plunge 80% to a record low in more than 40 years of data collection, real estate values plummet 20 to 30 percent, and $8 trillion in US stock market we alth vanish in a year. Waves of Wall Street layoffs drowned business student career expectations and those continuing in business programs increasingly look for non monetary awards or 14 theme of sustainability (note d in Section I.E above) carries over to research programs with specific focus on developing multidisciplinary studies of African sustainable tourism. frameworks as ban king experts unraveled how systemic risk got built into financial Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) and constraints on applicati on of that convention; (b) the cost of dual compliance in US EU auditing and financial accounting; (c) an overview text/business reference, The European Union for Americans: Law, Economics and Politics of Doing Business in the EU and; ( d ) implications f or MNCs of conclusions emerging from the Africa Power and Politics Program (APPP).

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13 APPP is a 5 d iscovering institutions that work Funded by the Overseas Development Institute in London, the st udy is being carried out by a consortium of research organizations and policy think tanks in the lead US institution on the project. Business aspects of APPP focus on gove rnment institutions and indigenous firms. However, APPP institutional policy recommendations will have implications for MNCs operating in Africa, including those designing development effective corporate social responsibility programs as part of the invest ment agenda. UF CIBER will fund the additional research required to elucidate the implications for MNCs. Such linking of UF CIBER research funding to other studies also characterizes the CISG and dual compliance investigations noted above. In particular, expensive primary data collection has been financed by other organizations and the CIBER role is to fund investigation of specific CIBER relevant research questions these new data sets might be able to address. A similar model, but one applied in a theoret ical as opposed to empirical context, underlies the proposed research study Heterogeneous Firms and US IB Competitiveness. The new theoretical heterogeneous firm models, introduced in Elhanan Journal of Economic Literature article, have potentially profound implications for studying whether a particular policy or program contributes to extensive basic development of these models that is currently und erway, CIBER does pl an funding study of the implications of such models for evaluation of US global competitiveness in the wake of trade and sustainability policy changes. s interdisciplinary studies of the topic that get UF faculty from diverse colleges interacting with each other on analysis of issues. The small studies, and more importantly, the established interaction, can then be the basis for attracting larger grants requiring such integration of disciplines and perspectives. Proposed research on Converging Digital Media Markets in Latin America and The Evolving Cuban Economy encourage UF facul ty to apply established research expertise on a topic in a particular world region, or set of world regions, to a new geographical area of special CIBER emphasi s. UF CIBER will host two academic conferences in the new funding cycle, each associated with a research or teaching initiative. With funding support from both CIBER and WCBA, Business Law Professor Larry DiMatteo is finalizing plans for a 2011 conference of international CISG scholars to (1) produce an edited volume summarizing current internationa l issues and scholarly research findings on CISG application and; (2) prepare business practitioner materials that address obstacles to wider application of the CISG as revealed in the recent studies. In 2013, CIBER will fund African Language Associate Pro fessor James Essegbey to organize a conference on Access and Effectiveness: Use of Technology in Teaching African LCTLs. It will bring together African language academics from around the country to benchmark computerized

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14 strategic African LCTL pedagogy, identify an agenda for future research, and provide expert external evaluation of the Web based Akan initiative (see Section I.E above.) Programs for faculty that continue in form from 2006 2010, but change in terms of content and participants, include :(a ) the monthly CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop; (b) annual co sponsorship of the CIBER Business Language Conference ; (c) annual funding for at least four business faculty to participate on CIBER led two week FDIB study tours abroad and ; (d) a nnual sponsorship of a non business faculty member to participate on the two week Sub Saharan Africa study tour. Despite the fact the new funding cycle has just begun, (a) is already producing new CIBER linkages across campus. In this case, the linkage i s with the Harn Museum of Art. In January 2011, Jeanne Steiner, Senior Vice President for Corporate Social Responsibility and Art Outreach Manager, Bank of America, will speak to the workshop Planning the jointly sponsored Harn CIBER event has resulted in broader discussions of potential future collaborations that address IB issues in one of the oldest global markets, the market for artistic creations. Participants in (c) w ill have some new tour options: Russia (led by the University of Connecticut CIBER) and MENA Middle East and North Africa (led by CIBERs at Brigham Young University, University of Colorado Denver, Temple University and the University of South Carolina). Through continuation of the EFIBI grants program, typically underserved faculty at smaller institutions of higher education in Florida will be given opportunity to develop IB skills and to implement innovative IB training programs. flexibility in a djusting to diverse institutional and programmatic constraints allows it to succeed where other more structured internationalization programs would fail. Faculty at Valencia Community College will be implementing Phase II of the HSI Community College IB prototype development initiative. Both IB modules for specialized career tracks and more in depth IB experiences for business students are being examined. As in Phase I, many faculty will benefit from special workshops on how to incorporate IB modules int o classes. Successful modules/programs will be published on the UF CIBER web site for use by community college faculty nationwide especially those who serve Hispanic populations of Puerto Rican heritage. High school and community college foreign languag e faculty will be the foci of a new initiative, NOBLE ( Network of Business Language Educators). It is predicated on the by participation in networks of similar colleagu es. IB interested foreign language faculty in community colleges and high schools lack established, supportive professional networks. While they may periodically attend national conferences such as the CIBER Business Language Conference sporadic funding s upport results in sporadic attendance, preventing their becoming an integral part of networks emerging from such university oriented meetings. And they are only a small part of state foreign language teachers associations that are dominated by instructors from standard (non business) elementary

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15 and intermediary foreign language classrooms. NOBLE creates a regional (statewide) network for this business language group. CIBER funding will support (1) web site development and facilitator compensation; (2) trav el to meet with the Florida Department of Education in developing foreign business language initiatives that support high school IB and F inance Academy Programs; (3) an annual meeting; (4) curriculum module development awards; and (5) professional developm ent conference travel. III. Serving business Business outreach programs fund publications and presentations that explain practical IB implications of recent scholarly research and /or engage university research expertise to address IB issues raised by b usinesses Core programs are repeated on a regular basis; other programs are one time activities. A Cor e programs While content of all business outreach programs varies year to year in response to changing issues and new d evelopments, some initiatives h ave been repeated regularly in structure These are the core UF CIBER business outreach programs. The signature core program serving state, regional and national businesses for over a decade has been annual publication of the Latin American Business Enviro nment Report. The approximately 50 page study, disseminated to over 2000 educators and businesses, provides a comprehensive examination of Latin American business conditions. It tracks social, political and economic trends both for the region as a whole an d for its 20 largest markets individually. Core annual business conference programs 2006 2010 were the Legal and Policy in the Americas annual conference (in collaboration with the UF Levin College of Law), the Florida International Summit (in collaborat ion with other university globalization centers in Florida and a consortium of state and local economic development agencies) and the National Forum on Trade Policy (in collaboration with the other 30 CIBERs ). Target audience of the first is legal schol ars and legal practitioners in both the US and South America. To serve such geographically dispersed constituencies, the conference location alternates between Gainesville and a Latin American city. CIBER programmatic input particularly concentrates on thr The Financial War Against Organized Crime and Terrorism; Lessons and Challenges of Environment and Sustainability. Similarly, U F CIBER provides planning expertise, content expertise and funding support to the Florida International Summit. T he 200 7 2010 programs were held in Tampa or Jacksonville and focused on the themes 2007 ) f Global Finance and Trade ( 2008 ) ,

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16 The National Forum on Trade Policy addresse d regional differences in the impact of na tional trade programs each year emphasiz ing issues of significance to businesses in the region of the conference locale. During the 2006 2010 grant period, forums were held in Seattle, WA, Stamford, CT and San Diego, CA. (A fourth conference scheduled f or Austin, TX was cancelled due to weather conditions.) B. Special opportunities programs The repeated formats and planning groups of core conference programs use CIBER funds efficiently by minimizing organizational expense and in addition, the confer ences provide valuable on going networking forums for regular attendees. H owever, a one time conference addressing a timely topic for a new audience can yield high education and training benefits. Hence, optimal use of CIBER business outreach funds inclu des both core programs and programs that respond to special opportunities as they arise. UF CIBER supported five such special opportunities conferences for business 2006 2010 and was primary organizer of a sixth. (See Appendix 10 ) The former group incl uded three on utility policy A fourth featured r epresentatives of the United Nations, the International Advertising Association, Latin American foundations and global public relations agencies present ing ca se studies and best practices on the topic Multi Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications in the Americas: Business, Community and Government. The two day February 2008 lege of Journalism and Communications and CIBER. In addition to the 175 live attendees, many more viewed the conference by webcast in six Latin American countries (Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Panama, Argentina, and Mexico) and three European ones (UK, Portu gal and Spain) as well as the US, Canada and Puerto Rico. Organized by the University of Maryland CIBER, UF CIBER co sponsored the day and a half long conference on Global Security: Challenges and Opportunities June 16 17, 2008 in Washington, D.C. Ke ynote addresses were delivered by Jay M. Cohen, Under Secretary for Science and Technology, US Department of Homeland Security, and Ronald Knode, Leading Edge Forum Associate Computer S ciences C orporation P anelists from business discussed tech nology, innovation and global security, doing business with the Department of Homeland Security and enterprise resilience in an age Panelists included a former CNN White House Correspondent, US Economic Correspondent of the Financial Times, Washington Bureau Chief for Al Safir (a Lebanese Daily) and a Reuters reporter. Both attendance (75) and evaluations (9.5 average on a scale of 1 to 10) were higher than anticipated for the October 2008 conference organized by UF CIBER and held in Tampa on Doing Business with Africa: Practice, Issues and Potential. Plenary sessions featured World Bank and Global Insight, Inc. Africa experts C onc urrent workshops drew on multiple Florida academic, government, and business sources for specialized African IB expertise on cultural, regulatory, and logistics issues. Appendix 12 details the conference agenda.

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17 C. Upcoming for business A second core ann ual outreach publication will be introduced in Spring 2011, the Sub Saharan Africa Business Environment Report similar in format to the Latin American Business Environment Report. Partnership with business faculty at the University of South Carolina CIBER brings African IB expertise to the project that complements expertise at UF Multiple experts are needed to effectively cover the diverse continent which lacks obvious regionalization, contains a large number of countries at low levels of development, and is home to numerous different languages. The new publication will be featured at a second Doing Business with Africa outreach conference scheduled for Miami in the 2012 2013 grant year, beginning a potential move of that event from the category to the category. Funding for other special opportunity conferences and conference co sponsorships has been budgeted, but is not committed at the current time. These funds give UF CIBER future flexibility in responding to need for busi ness outreach programs on topics not foreseen at the current time. IV. Evaluating our service On going evaluation of UF CIBER programs is a critical component of serving students, faculty and businesses effectively. UF CIBER has long had evaluation act ivities that (a) monitor initiative progress by specifying intermediary products to be delivered or milestones to be met and (b) address impact by collecting and summarizing available indicators (e.g., number of students enrolled in a class, average studen t evaluations of a class, and number of research presentations at professional conferences). While (a) has continued, (b) has been replaced by first asking specific questions on outcome significance and impact and then designing and implementing evaluation instruments that address those questions. In addition, greater emphasis has been placed on making evaluation outcomes useful to others. A. Addressing new evaluation questions Traditiona lly collected data on numbers of students enrolled in a program and the average student evaluation of that program provide some indication of the impact of initiatives serving students. They do not however, the students learn program tests have been introduced to quantify learning. While this is relatively straightforward when learning takes the form of knowledge acquisition not all learning is of that type. During 2006 2010, special attention was given to defining and measuring learning in the context of shor t term study abroad (STSA) pro grams. A bsorbing factual information about the region visited cannot be the learning goal of an STSA; facts can be learned from on campus research. Nor can skill acquisition be the goal (gaining expertise in conducting busin ess in the country); the length of visit is too

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18 short. Primary potential impact is changes in student perceptions of challenges to, and opportunities for, doing business in the country or perceptions of how the conduct of business differs from that in the US. Pre/post tests asking open ended questions on what students think are the most significant challenges, opportunities and/or differences can measure this type of learning. A lthough more difficult to analyze than simple quantitative rankings, qualitati ve responses on the pre and post STSA questionnaires were exciting in what they revealed about the nature of learning on these tou r s and how participant perceptions changed. Evaluation of the 2008 International Financial Markets Study Tour to Brazil ( see S ection I.C above) illustrates results. T hree questions asked of students on the pre and post tests we re: (a) List in rank order (from highest to lowest) five reasons why you think Brazil might be a good place to do business (1 = highest, 5 = lowest); (b) List in rank order (from highest to lowest) what you think are five of the biggest business opportunities in Brazil (1 = highest, 5 = lowest) and ; (c) List in rank order (from highest to lowest) five factors that you think are the biggest challenges for doing business in Brazil(1 = highest, 5 = lowest). To analyze test results, responses we re grouped into broad categories so changes in the distribution of perceptions could be compared. For example, were similar responses that c ould Ju dgment wa s required with regard to which responses to use and how to use them. B eyond the highest ranks, responses were considerabl y dispers ed makin g grouping difficult. As a first approach for (b) and (c), responses to ranks (1) and (2) were combined and us ed; only responses to rank (1) were used for (a). The analysis indicated substantial shifts as a consequence of the STSA in all three of (a) to (c) above. For (a) top reason Brazil is a good place to do business pre and post STSA responses were grouped into six categories: (1) high growth rate/emerging market; (2) size (population and/or economy); (3) natural resources; (4) low risk/stable; (5) lo w cost labor; and (6) other. Percent of responses for each of the six categories respectively for the pre test (post test) were: 34.8% (19.0%); 13.0% (14.3%); 21.7% (4.8%); 13.0% (42.9%); 8.7% (0.0%); 8.7% (19.0%). Categories (1) and (3) high growth emer ging BRIC market with a lot of natural resources is stereotypical Brazil and dominates in the pre test, the two categories combined accounting for 56.5% of the top ranked answers. In contrast, there was some, but relatively little, appreciation for the st ability and reliability Brazil has achieved with category (4) accounting for only 13.0% of responses. In the post test, (1) and (3) combined drop to less than 25% of responses and (4) mushroomed to 42.9%. However, stereotypes are not always moderated; t hey can also be reinforced. The most common issue ranked (1) or (2) in response to greatest challenges to doing business in the legal system, etc. While accountin g for 20% of responses in the pre test, its share climbed to 27.5% in the post test. Also increasing in importance in the post test relative

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19 to the pre test were high taxes (0.0 % to 15%) and social infrastructure (6.7% to 17.5%), the latter including inc ome inequality, lack of education, etc. Reflecting pre/post shifts in perceptions concentrated on fewer items in the post test with the top five specific (non ries accounting for 87.5% of responses while in the pre test, the top five accounted for 64.4% of responses. In terms of (b) b est Brazilian sectors to invest in t hree sectors gained markedly between the pre and post tests ; oil and gas (7.0% of responses to 22.6%), ethanol/alternative fuels (11.6% to 17.9%), finance and real estate (11.6% to 19.0%) ; and two declined markedly, agriculture and forestry (20.9% to 4.8%) and transport/trade/tourism (18.6% to 4.8%). The former decline is consistent with the sha rp drop between pre and post test in the ranking of natural resources as a reason Brazil is a good place to do business in. In general, perception changes measured in UF CIBER STSA programs were in the direction IB professionals would agree with negating outdated stereotypes and emphasizing issues important for current and future US competitiveness in global markets. Administering pre/post tests is generally less feasible in the context of business outreach programs and can detract from event delivery. Ho wever, some more precise information on program value added was obtained by adding open ended questions on positive and negative aspects of the program to the evaluation survey Especially useful were similar observations from different conferences. In par ticular, attendees at both the Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop (Section I.D) and the Doing Business with Africa Conference (Section III.B) emphasized that major conference strengths were diversity of the speaker backgrounds, the mix o f presenters from government, academia, business, business consulting and NGOs. Both conferences were organized by CIBER staff and similar ones are scheduled for the 2010 2014 grant period. The similar unprompted responses on format from two conferences di ffering in terms of topic and target audience affirm value of the format. They also affirm the CIBER estimate of appropriate mix of perspectives. A second question not always directly addressed in pre the program be improved Evaluation d uring 2006 2010 garnered considerably more information by (a) adding the open ended question directly to an evaluation survey; (b) asking explicitly about program short comings on the evaluation questionnaire; ( c) conducting post program fo cus group interviews and; (d) requesting formal post program evaluation by the initiative coordinator. Additional evaluation activit ies (c) and (d) were especially useful when a new course or a new course module was introduced by a pedagogically adept ins tructor Little is learned about success of the innovation (or how it might be improved) from standard student evaluations when the professor typically scores high on such evaluations in a variety of contexts. Follow up focus group discussions revealed som e shortcomings not indicated by the standard evaluations because students were otherwise enthusiastic about the professor. Simultaneously, many

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20 pedagogically adept professors are sufficiently self confident on teaching to freely share problems they observ e in their course design/delivery, making (d) also a potentially valuable addition to evaluation materials in the context of innovations led by consistently outstanding instructors. Where possible, evaluation should also benchmark program benefits relativ e to a cheaper second best alternative. Do benefits of a new program warrant additional new cost s ? This question was particularly a concern with regard to the new EFIBI program of competitive grants to fund internationalization of business programs at sma ller institutions of higher education in Florida. Limited capacity at these colleges and universities suggested considerable flexibility and ingenuity would be needed to fit programs to institutional constraints. However, the competitive grant application process that allows the flexibility in funded programs is more difficult and costly to administer than a program that limits the awards to a few specified alternatives. Popular among CIBERs have been awards to faculty at regional schools to attend one of a specific and limited se t of generic seminars on internationalizing the business curriculum. Whether such an easier to administer program would adequately serve the internationalization needs of the EFIBI target population was examined by (a) offering i t as a much simpler application alternative within the EFIBI program and; (b) analyzing whether proposed program development might reasonably have been served by the simpler program even if the applicant did not opt for the alternative. Based on three year s of data, less than 15% of applicants opted for the much simpler application alternative and the generic seminars would not have served the internationalization development needs of any of the other applicants. Expert external evaluation provides a chec k on other evaluation techniques in the case of major Center programs or may be the only option when other techniques cannot adequately address questions of program effectiveness. In 2007, business outreach publication, the Latin Ameri can Business Environment Report ( LABER ) was evaluated for form and content by Ambassador Myles R. R. Frechette, a 35 year veteran of the region who served as US Ambassador to Colombia, Assistant US Trade Representative for Latin America, director of two non profit organizations focused on Latin America and who currently is a trade and business consultant specializing in the region. The seven page single space evaluation report thoroughly examined each of the first eight issues of LABER individually (1999 through 2006) as well as considering elements common to all editions and trends in material presented. It applauded specific format changes while warning of the potential negative impact on business readership of creeping report length. It pointed to con tent enhancements that added significant value e.g., the paradigm shift of 2002, inclusion of regulatory regime starting in 2004 and the legal environment added in 2006 but reminded the authors not to lose focus on key broad issues such as growth sustainab ility.

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21 The general conclusion on the eight issues of LABER: independent, objective and academically grounded analyses of the business and investment environments in Latin America. . When you read all of these reports y ou realize the magnificent contribution the LABERs have made to understanding developments in the region from 1999 through 2006. Without a doubt the LABERs are the most methodical, concise and objective analyses I have read about these B. Making evaluation useful to others Evaluation is intended to guide not only UF CIBER in its program design and management; it is also intended to guide external stakeholders in use of UF CIBER innovations. Making evaluation useful to others in gen eral requires (a) stor ing data in a transparent, readily accessible format and; (b) providing contextual information that enhances interpretation of evaluation statistics. Substantial expansion of the UF CIBER evaluation program during the 2006 2010 grant period generated an overwhelming volume of new data. Without specific US Department of Education formatting and reporting guidelines for evaluation results, initially new data just accumulated without the ready accessibility desirable for a transparent a nd accountable evaluation program. UF CIBER developed a unique comprehensive framework for electronically storing, organizing, and accessing evaluation data, e CIVAL ( Electronic CIBER Evaluation ). The framework features (1) HTML organized content accessi ble through CD with a web browser; (2) e asy storage and access to evaluative materials in multiple formats word, excel, Zoomerang, etc.; (3) s croll down side bar menu organized by proposal initiative number with click on indices listing evaluative material s by year for the initiative and ; (4) p rimary data availab ility as well as tabular and graphical summaries Expanded collection of contextual information first focused on program participants. Were undergraduates in a new IB class business majors? soci al science majors? other professional program majors ? What was the background of attendees at a business outreach conference? Were government policy makers or academic s at the conference as well as business practitioners ? Such information is critical in de ciding whether a UF CIBER developed program has applicability in an alternative proposed situation. Further collection of contextual information was added as need became apparent. For example, the problem of evaluating IB course initiatives when delivered by pedagogically adept instructors (discussed in Section IVA above) calls for providing some indication of professorial context e.g., average evaluation by students in other recent classes. equires additional context. For example, student evaluations of 20 CIBER sponsored courses delivered in Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 averaged 4.37 on a scale of 1(poor) to 5(excellent). Nine of the 20 were rated at 4.5 or higher and the only two that fell be

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22 scale of 1 to 5, it was actually only 3.1 percent above the WCBA average for Spring 2009, 4.24. What distinguished the CIBER class ratings was the ir much lower standard deviation, only 0.33 compared with the WCBA 0.88. C. Upcoming for evaluation Systemati cally applying the new data collection and evaluation instruments pioneered in 2006 2010 is a primary goal of the 2010 2014 evaluation program. F urther development e.g., FLAC sections that are neither strictly language classes nor strictly content classes (see Section I.A) ; (2) determining through surveys and focus groups how to measure the potential benefits of the NOBLE network (see Section II.D) ; (3) researching databases and establishing procedures for tracking of CIBER program participants to identifying long run program benefits ; and ( 4 ) determining the set of initiatives t hat can realistically be benchmarked to a cheaper, second best alternative. Expert external evaluation is scheduled for language and culture programs and for initiatives that serve Florida business and academic constituencies. At a more conceptual level, i nitial analysis will be done on how to aggregate across initiatives for program wide evaluation.

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Appendices

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List of Appendices Page 1. CIBER Advisory Council Members 1 2 Courses Supported by CIBER Funding 3 3. Sample Syllabus : The Firm in the Global Economy 6 4. Sample Itinerary : International Business Study Tour to Argentina 9 5. Students Supported by CIBER Funding 11 6. Sample CIBER Sponsored Faculty Research Publications 17 7 Sample CIBER Sponsored PhD Student Research 19 8 UF Faculty Receiving CIBER Awards 20 9 Non UF Faculty Receivin g CIBER Awards 25 1 0 Conferences Supported by CIBER Funding 28 11 Sample Academic Outreach Conference Program: CIBER Business Language Conference 31 12 Sample Business Outreach Conference Program: Doing Bu siness with Africa 36

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1: CIBER Advisory Council Members 1 Appendix 1: CIBER Advisory Council Members Mr. Cesar Alvarez* President and CEO, Greenberg and Traurig/Attorneys at Law Dr. Sanford V. Berg Director of Water Studies, Public Utility Research Center and Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Econo mics, Warrington College of Business Administration University of Florida Dr. Roy Crum* Director, Center for International Economic and Business Studies and Professor, D epartment of Finance, Insurance and Real Estate, Warrington College of Business Administration University of Florida Mr. Larry Bernaski ** Director of International Trade and Business Development, Jacksonville Field Office, Enterprise Florida, Inc. Dr. Car men Diana Deere Professor, Department of Food and Resource Economics Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida Mr. Ted Fernandez President and CEO, Answer Think Consulting Group Mr. Bill Heavener President, The Heavener Company, Winter Park, Florida Dr. Dennis Jett* Dean, University of Florida International Center Mr. Ed Johnson ** Manager of Strategy and Operations, Deloitte Consulting USA, LLP Dr. Lynda Kaid ** Professor, Telecommunication Department, College of Journalism an d Communications, University of Florida Dr. Robert Knechel ** Director of International Center for Research in Accounting and Auditing Fisher School of Accou nting, Warrington College of Business, University of Florida Warrington College of Business Administration Dr. John Kraft Dean, Warrington College of Business, University of Florida Dr. Amie Kreppel* Director, Center for European Studies, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science University of Florida Dr. Aubry Long ** Dean, School of Business, Bethune Cookman University Mr. Buddy MacKay Former Governor and Former Lt. Governor, State of Florida Mr. Bruce McEvoy ** Consultant, Seald Sweet/Uni Veg Group Mr. Manny Mencia Vice President, Enterprise Florida, Division of International Trade

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1: CIBER Advisory Council Members 2 Mr. William Messina Coordinator Economic Analysis, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Unive rsity of Florida Mr. David Petty ** President, Exactech, Inc. Dr. David Pharies Associate Dean for the Humanities College of Liberal Arts, University of Florida Dr. Stephen J. Powell Director, International Trade Law Program and Lecturer, Fredric G. Le vin College of Law, University of Florida Dr. Marilyn Roberts Professor, College of Journalism and Communications, University of Florida Dr. Sandra Russo D irector of Program Development and Federal Relations, University of Florida International Center Dr David Sammons ** Dean, University of Florida International Center Dr. Tom Spreen Professor, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida Dr. Henry Tosi* Professor Emeritus, Department of Management, Warrington College of Business Administration, University of Florida Dr. Leonardo Villalon Director and Professor, Center for African Studies, University of Florida Mr. Richard Wainio** Director, Tampa Port Authority Dr. Ann Wehmeyer Profe ssor Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, University of Florida Dr. Philip Williams ** Director, Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida Dr. Corinne B. Young Professor, Department of Management, St. Leo University and Gover *Retired **New in 2010

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CIBER Sy nergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER 3 Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER 2006 2010 Grant Years: Yr.1 2006 07; Yr.2 2007 08; Yr.3 2008 09; Yr.4 2009 10 Course Grant Year On/Off Campus Undergrad/ Graduate BUL 4443 Ethics in Global Business Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus U ndergrad GEB 6930 International Advertising Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate BUL 6441 International Business Ethics Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate ECO 3703 International Trade Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad ECO 4934 Public Utility Economic s: International Infrastructure Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad ECO 4934 Africa in the Global Economy Yr. 1, 3 4 On campus Undergrad ECS 4111 African Economic Development Yr. 2, 3 4 On campus Undergrad ECO 4730 The Firm in the Global Econ omy Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad ECS 3403 Economic Development in Latin America Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad ECO 7706 Theory of International Trade Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate ECO 7716 International Economic Relations Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate FIN 6642 Global Entrepren e urship Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate GEB 6366: Fundamentals of International Business Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate FIN 6608 Managing Multinational Corporations Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate FIN 6930 International Markets Study Tour Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 Off campus Graduate FIN 6638 International Finance Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate AEB 4931 Commodities to Cafes Yr. 1, 2 Off campus Undergrad LAS 6295 Latin Amer ican Business Environment Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate MAN 6637 Global Strategic Management Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate MAR 6157 International Marketing Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate MAR 4156 International Marketing Yr. 1, 2 3, 4 On campus Undergrad GEB: International Leadership: Adapting Businesses and Governments to New Realities Yr. 1 Off c ampus Undergrad LAW: Legal Institutions of the Americas Study Tour Yr. 1 Off campus Graduate LAW 6930: Legal Institutions of the Americas Yr. 1, 2, 3 On campus G raduate

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CIBER Sy nergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER 4 BUL 4903: International Business Law Yr. 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate GEB 6368: Globalization and the Business Environment Yr. 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate MAN 6617: International Operations and Logistics Yr. 2, 3, 4 On campus Graduate LAW 6938: Free Trade Agreement of the Americas Yr. 2 On campus Graduate AEB: Italian Food from Production to Policy Study Abroad Yr. 2, 3 Off campus Undergrad LAS: Business in Brazil Study Abroad Program Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 Off c ampus Undergrad/ Graduate GEB 4930: PURC International Leadership Course: Adapting Business and Governments to New Realities Yr. 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad AFS: Anthropology and the New Economy Yr. 3 On campus Graduate LAS: Conservatio n Entrepreneu rship Yr. 3 On campus Graduate CHI: Business Chinese Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad FRE: Business French Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad GER: Business German Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad POR: Business Portuguese Yr. 1, 4 On campus Un dergrad JAP: Business Japanese Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad SPN: Business Spanish Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad FRE 3224 FLAC: Business and Culture i n the Francophone World Yr. 1, 2 On campus Undergrad FRE 3224 FLAC: Marketing US Foo d Pro ducts in the EU Yr. 1, 2, 3 On campus Undergrad POR 3224 FLAC: Cities of the Portuguese S peaking World Yr. 3 On campus Undergrad SPN 32 24 FLAC: Cities of the Spanish S peaking World Yr. 3, 4 On campus Undergrad SPN 3224 FLAC: Public Relations in th e Spanish S peaking World Yr. 1, 2, 3 On campus Undergrad SPN 3224 FLAC: Latin American Business Environment Yr. 1, 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad SPN 3224 FLAC: Business and Economics in Latin America Yr. 1 On campus Undergrad SPN 3224 FLAC: Trade and I nvestment in Latin America Yr. 3, 4 On campus Undergrad SPN 3224 FLAC: Generational Perspectives in Latin America Yr. 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad SPN 3224 FLAC: Sports in Spain and Latin America Yr. 1, 2 On campus Undergrad CHI 3224 FLAC: Asian Sports and Tourism Yr. 4 On campus Undergrad ARA 4905 FLAC: Ar ab Culture and Business Yr. 1, 2, 3 On campus Undergrad

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CIBER Sy nergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 2: Courses Supported by UF CIBER 5 SPN 3224: Business and Culture of Sports in the Spanish Speaking World Yr. 1, 2 On campus Undergrad FRE 3224: Conte mporary French Commerc e Yr. 2 On campus Undergrad CHI 4905: Chinese Business Culture Yr. 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad JAP 4905: Japanese Business Culture Yr. 2, 3, 4 On campus Undergrad AFS 4905: African Business Culture Yr. 3 On campus Undergrad

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 3: Syllabus for The Firm in the Global Economy 6 Appendix 3: Syllabus for Economics Course ECO 4730 Spring 2010 Instructor : Carol T. West, Professor of Economics and Director, Center for International Business Education and Research Course Description : This course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the production, investment and selling decisions of the firm operating in international markets. The course surveys the richness and diversity of global economic and business environments and e mphasizes strategic economic decision making by established international firms and by domestic firms contemplating entering the global arena. Content is provided through lectures, case studies, problem sets, text and article readings, and team projects an d presentations. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 2023. Required Course Materials : (1) Textbook: Charles W.L. Hill, International Business: Competing in the Global Marketplace 7th edition, McGraw Hill/Irwin. (2) Case studies: A required packet of case studies will be available from Target Copy. (3) Articles: A list of articles that supplement the text and lectures in the second half of the course is provided below. All are available as e Journal articles through the UF Library. Course Assignments : (1) Team project: Students must participate in a team project that will be worked on throughout the semester. Each team is given a firm and a set of 5 7 countries the firm does not yet operate in. The project determines first which of the countries it is most logical for the firm to enter next and then designs an entry strategy. Detailed information about the team project is available in a separate document. (2) Case studies: Case studies provide an opportunity to examine a topic in depth in a specific b usiness context, to derive competitive strategies, and to learn from class discussion that often there are very different reasonable interpretations of the same global market information. There are five case studies assigned, but your overall case study gr ade will be the average of your four highest grades, allowing you to miss one case. At least 10 days prior to the case study due date, a set of questions will be posted for you to think about as you read the case. Since case studies are designed to provoke thought, it is questions only more or less thoughtful answers. On the days case studies are due, class will begin with a short (about 15 minute) quiz based directly on the s tudy questions. Since the purpose of the quiz is only to verify that you have read the case and thought about the questions, you are allowed to bring to the quiz up to two pages of case notes (typed or handwritten) to refer to in the quiz (3) Tests: The c ourse has two modular (non cumulative) tests. The tests will be short answer, short essay and problems. All tests allow for student choice on questions to

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 3: Syllabus for The Firm in the Global Economy 7 (4) Problem sets: Sample problems with ans wers will be made available in order to practice for tests. There is no requirement that you do the sample problems, but it is (5) Class participation: Students are expected to atten d class and contribute to class discussion. This does not mean you will be penalized for missing the occasional class or that you must participate in all discussions. However, this is a class in which a diversity of perspectives greatly enriches the lear ning experience and you are expected to contribute to the perspectives presented. Participation can be by asking questions, responding to questions during lecture, volunteering anecdotes or insights, contributing to the case study discussions, listening at tentively to student project presentations and note recent news items pertinent to the issues being studied in class. Contributing such a news item is also valuable class participation. Course grading : The final course grade will be a weighted average as follows: Team project (35%); case study quizzes (27%); Tests (30%); Class par ticipation (8%). Course case studies (available in a packet from Target Copy): 1. Euro Disney: The First 100 Days 2. Andres Galindo 3. Wal 4. MontGras: Export Strategy for a Chilean Winery 5. The ITC eChoupal Initiative Course supplementary articles (available in e Journals at the UF library): Harvard Business Review September, 2002. e Pyramid: How the Private Sector Can Help Alleviate Poverty, by Aneel Karnani, California Management Review, Summer 2007. World Economy, March 2006. Mary C. Lacity, MIT Sloan Management Review, Spring 2006. Harvard Business Review June 2006. Harvard Business Review, September 1996. Critical due dates and tentative schedule of lectures : Attached is a tentative schedule of lectures and corresponding text and article readings and a firm schedule of test, quiz and project due dates. The team project assignments are described in a separate document.

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 3: Syllabus for The Firm in the Global Economy 8 Due Dates and Tentative Schedule of Lectures Date Material C overed/ C lass A ctivity TC -Text C hapter AR Article Due Tues., Jan. 5 Introduction/course mechanics TC 1 Thurs., Jan. 7 Target country selection/project data TC 2 Tues., Jan. 12 Target country selection/project data Thurs., Jan. 14 Target country selection/project data Tues., Jan. 19 Differing economic environments/ differing cultures TC 5 (pgs. 182 194) Thurs., Jan. 21 Finalize teams/sample case questions Tues., Jan. 26 Euro Disney case Euro Disney case quiz Thurs., Jan. 28 Differing cultures TC 3 Tues., Feb. 2 Differing cultures Thurs., Feb. 4 Differing cultures Tues., Feb. 9 Andres Galindo case Andres Galindo case quiz Thurs., Feb.11 Differing legal environments Tues., Feb. 16 Political risk Thurs., Feb. 18 Differing trade policy environments TC 6,7,8 Tues., Feb. 23 Wal Mart case Wal Mart case quiz Thurs., Feb. 25 Modes of entry TC 7, 14, 15 (pgs. 553 555) Project Rpt. 1 Tues., Mar. 2 Project Rpt. review/problem review Thurs., Mar. 4 Test 1 Test 1 Tues., Mar. 9 Spring break no class Thurs., Mar. 11 Spring break no class Tues., Mar. 16 Test 1 review/entry strategies Thurs., Mar. 18 MontGras case MontGras case quiz Tues., Mar. 23 Differing currencies TC 9 11 Thurs., Mar. 25 Hedging strategies Tues., Mar. 30 Hedging problems Project Rpt. 2 Thurs., Apr. 1 Global business ethics TC 4, AR 6 Tues., Apr. 6 eChoupal case/ Base of the eChoupal case quiz Thurs., Apr. 8 corporate social responsibility AR 1,2 Tues., Apr. 13 Offshoring AR 3, 4, 5 Thurs., Apr. 15 Project presentations Tues., Apr. 20 Project presentations Written projects Tues., Apr. 27 Test 2 at 7:30 a.m. Test 2 See previous page for a list of case studies and articles.

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 4: Itinerary for International Business Study Tour 9 Appendix 4: Itinerary for International Business Study Tour: Argentina Instructor: Andy Naranjo, Emerson Merrill Lynch Professor of Finance a n d C I B E R Associate Director Focus: T his course provides a group of 2 5 students firsthand exposure to international businesses, business practices, markets, and institutions. During the spring break period (i.e., March 6 1 1 ), the class will visit important businesses, public institutions, and cultural/historical sites in Argent ina. Terry McCoy, Professor Emeritus and Director of Argentina, A Leading Emerging Market: Argentina provides an interesting backdrop for experiencing international business p ractices and operations. Argentina is one of Latin c o u n t r i e s and has served as an important model of economic reform for many developing economies around the world. The country has an interesting blend of abundant natural resource s a reputation for strong institutions, an educated workforce, and good infrastructure. Comprising almost the entire southern half of South energetic, and seductive po rt city that stretches south to north along the Rio de la Plata. The architecture and lifestyle of Buenos Aires is very European, including the heritage of is also in a region filled with attractive sites and activities, and the surrounding a r e a is the Course Description: The course (2 credits, 4th Module) consists of two parts a pre trip course component and the study tour. The pre trip component will provide students with background on Argentina and situate it in the context of emerging markets. The study tour, which takes place March 6 11 2010, includes the following t entative site visits: City Tour, Estancia, Southern Cross, Goldman Sachs Argentina, Sparrel, Boston Consulting Group, Northia Laboratories, Google Argentina, Ford Argentina, Asociacion Del Tejar, Frigorifico Amancay, Tango dinner/show, CIPPEC, and IAE Bu siness School Requirements: Two to three pre trip class meetings and a brief post trip paper Meaningful individual participation during the trip and class meetings Some background research on the companies/organizations that we will be visiting Est imated Study Tour Course Costs and Course Enrollment: Estimated budgeted course cost per student for the study trip component is approximately $1,250, payable to the UF Office of Overseas Study. There is a non refundable $350 deposit due by September 9, 20 09, with the remainder due by October 1, 2009. The budgeted cost includes hotel accommodations, some group meals, ground transportation and miscellaneous fees, but it does not include airfare, UF tuition for GEB 6930 or discretionary spending. Please note that the enrollment in this course is limited to 25 students. Please note that the demand for this course exceeds the available slots, so it is important that you sign up early by no later than September 1, 2009.

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 4: Itinerary for International Business Study Tour 10 Itinerary for International Business Study Tour: Argentina, Spring 2010 Saturday, March 6 Arrival in Buenos Aires Sunday, March 7 Argentina Estancia Monday, March 8 Buenos Aires Tuesday, March 9 Buenos Aires Wednesday, March 10 Buenos Aires Thursday, March 11 Buenos Aires Check in to hotel Sol Melia Buenos Aires 12:00 pm Orientation meeting Discovering Tigre by kayak Tigre is a picturesque river town on the outskirts of Buenos Aires. Enjoy discovering the river channels and islands by kayak University Seminar : IAE Business School Prof. Patricio Fay and CIPPEC political organization Miguel Braun Executive Director Considerations of Doing Business in Argentina: Social, Government and Asociacin Del Tejar Luis Kasdorf, VP Meeting with a leading agribusiness player Goldman Sachs Argentina Esteban Gorondi Managing Director Argentina and the effects of the global and Ford Argentina Company presentation on market entry difficulties in South America for a foreign multinational. Talk on strategy in Argentina. Tour of Ford production facilities Southern Cross and Northia Laboratories ~ B usiness projects in pharmaceutical sector C ase study of Southern Cross consulting project. The Boston Consulting Group Gustavo Loforte BA Managing Par t ner O verview of business strategy in Argentina and in the region. Lunch on your own Group lunch on Tigre Island Group Lunch at Pilara Country Club Group Lunch at Juana M Lunch at Ford Group lunch Bahia Madero Buenos Aires City Tour Highlights include: Recoleta Cemetery, Plaza de Mayo, Casa Rosada Presidential Palace, The Obelisk, La Boca, Puerto Madero, and Palermo Visit to professional soccer game : Independiente vs River Plate OR Cultural tour to the traditional Caf Tortoni, MALBA Museum, Contemporary Art Museum and Fortabat Collection Terminal Zrate Antonio Zuidwijk General Assessor Visit to one of the largest industrial ports in Argentina with business presentation and visit to the operations Google Argentina Daniel Helft Senior Manager for Product Communications select Argentina for their LA headquarters and 3rd worldwide Norton Winery Business Presentation and Wine tasting in Northia Laboratories Plant visit. Overview of the production process. Free afternoon in Buenos Aires Travel back to US Dinner on your own Dinner on your own Dinner on your own Dinner on your own Viego Almacen Tango Dinner:Show & Lessons

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2 010 Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 11 Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding October 2006 September 2010 I. Study Abroad The following students have received funding that allowed them to study abroad on various programs and internships. A. B usiness in Brazil scholarship recipien ts Student Degree Program/Department University Jessica Bachay MA Latin American Studies University of Florida Michelle Knapp MA Latin American Studies University of Florida Luis Loyaza BA Criminology/Law University of Florida Sara Martin BA Spani sh/Latin American Studies University of Florida Guy Morissette MBA University of Montreal Matt Quinlan MBA/MA Tropical Conservation Yale University Elizabeth Smith MA Latin American Studies University of Florida Tyler Tringas BA Economics Universit y of Florida Sonya Williams MBA Florida A and M University Mary Jordan MBA Florida A and M University Cornell Guion MBA Florida A and M University Joe Holecko MBA University of Florida Jessie Barriero MBA Valpariso University Mathew Hoge MA Latin A merican Studies University of Kansas Angleliki Vovou MBA Fordham University Ronnie Bailey MBA University of Florida Chelsea Blake MA I nternational B usiness University of Florida Stephanie Goings BA Accounting University of Kansas Gabrielle McMahan M A Marketing Florida A and M University Amanda Perryman MA I nternational B usiness University of Florida Gregory Rose Huntsman Program University of Pennsylvania Israel Interiano MA Accounting University of Kansas Clay Rusch BS Finance /Accounting Univers ity of Florida Daniel Urdaneta Huntsman Program University of Pennsylvania Paola Urrea MA I nternational B usiness University of Florida Clayton Elliott BA Business Administration Florida A and M University Michael Martin BS Finance /Accounting University of Florida Vivian Felicio PhD College of Ed ucation University of Illinois Bailey, Andrew MA Lat in Am erican Studies University of Kansas Barton, Sarah BS Finance University of Florida Black, Latina MBA Florida A and M University Bright, Chris MBA Univ ersity of Florida Cerruto, Maria BS Advertising/ LAS/Portuguese University of Florida Coyler, Brian MA I nternational B usiness University of Florida Correa, Cleber BS Business Administration University of Florida Elfimova, Anastasiya BS Economics Univer sity of Pennsylvania Herrera, Andres BS Business Administration/Finance University of Florida

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2 010 Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 12 Nesrsta, Nicole MA I nternational B usiness University of Florida Perowicz, Paul MBA University of Pittsburgh Redondo, Maria BS Finance University of Florida S heridan, Erin MA Latin American Studies University of Kansas Sotomayor, Adam MA International Business University of Florida Vasconcelos, Mirela BA Portuguese/Business University of Florida B. International Financial Markets Tour Scholarship Recipients (University of Florida students) Tara Kim MBA Albert Rodriguez MBA Greg Eckels MBA Kolaleh Torkaman MBA Mario Fernandez MBA Nick Anderson MBA Cameron Buurma MBA Alicia Riggins MBA Chad Rice MBA Joseph Holecko MBA Rick Mason MBA Grant Copeland MBA Patrick Kinnan MBA Abe Skellenger MS Finance Chris Weber MS Finance Phil Reagan MS Finance Kyle Morabito MS Finance Abe Ouano MS Finance Michael Peerson MS Finance Park, Sang Wook MS Finance Aashish Shukla MS Finance Ang Li MS Financ e Kevin Fox MA in International Business Dominique Lochridge MA in International Business Sophie Grumelard MA in International Business Jenny Chaim MA in International Business Jonathan Frankel MA in International Business Britta Nissinen MA in International Business Lucas Elgie MA in International Business Brandon Saltmarsh MA in International Business Kevin Brown MA in International Business Kathryn Ciano MA in International Business Nico De Vries MA in International Business Jame s Lancelot MA in International Business David Pierce MA in International Business Donna Zill MA in International Business Katherine Rodriguez MS Real Estate

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2 010 Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 13 Scott Ehrlich JD/MBA Laura Gonzalez Ph D Finance Mary Mitchell MA Latin American Studies Jacob Schultz MA Latin American Studies John Atkinson MBA Cameron Buurma MBA Bill Chiles MBA Robert Saracc o MBA Anne Wilhoite MBA William Aitken MSF Jonathan Luo MSF Eleni Steinman MSF Peter Zdebski MSF Dave Brown MA International Business Mark Mayleben MA International Business Jamie Tolson MA International Business Miguel Porras MA International Business Ali Alkan MA Inter national Business Gabriel Reyes MA International Business Alexie Labouze Nasica MA International Business Pete Macchione MA International Business Joe Dal Santo MA International Business Joel Koopman MA International Business Richard Woods MA International Business Alison Boelter MA Latin American Studies Dave Harmel MA Latin American Studies Rob Applebaum MBA John Atkinson MBA Michael Bailey MBA Ronnie Bailey MBA Trevor Gribble MBA Nicolas Grandusky MBA Drew Hendry MBA Alec Landler MBA Robert Saracco MBA Jeremy Serkin MBA William Gross MSF Hadi Chammah MA International Business T ravis Damon MA International Business Jacob Dubin MA International Business Tricia Kyzar MA International Business Justin Levine MA International Business Monica Mejia MA International Business Nicole Nesrsta MA International Business Dani elle Rodman MA International Business Adam Sotomayor MA International Business Catalina Parra MA International Business Meredith Muller MA International Business

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2 010 Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 14 Zach Cohen MA in Latin American Studies Stephen Stewart MA in Latin American S tudies C. Italian Food From Production to Policy Scholarship Recipients Leilani Velazquez BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida Wesley Edwards BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida Cheryl Salerno BA Family, Youth and Co mmunity Sciences University of Florida Stephen Meek BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida Jason Pereira International Business Florida Atlantic University Jordan Terry BA Food Science University of Florida David Taylor BA Food and Re source Economics University of Florida Arpan Patel BA Pre Med University of Florida Venessa Longobardi BA Animal Science University of Florida Danielle Thomas MA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida John Alday BA Food and Resource Econ omics University of Florida Aaron Kremmer BA Agriculture Education University of Florida Cristina Zitoli) BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida Alex Goralnik BA Sports Management University of Florida Aliso n Fick BA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida Anjani Vyas BA Food Science and Human Nutrition University of Florida Ashley Miller BA Food Science and Human Nutrition University of Florida Christopher Sugiarto BA Psychology University of Florida Danielle Pugh MA Food and Resource Economics University of Florida Grace Tidwell BA Food Science and Human Nutrition University of Florida Rebecca R oberts BA Hea lth and Human Performance University of Florida Sara Hutton BA in Business Administration University of Florida II. Research Between 2006 and 2010, the following students have received travel funds from CIBER allowing them to present their own research, conduct research and learn about the international dimensions of their disciplines at conferences, workshops and seminars. (University of Florida students) Torrey Peace MBA Merise Jalali BA Political Science Michel le L. Edwards PhD Anthropology Jennifer Itzkowitz PhD Finance Gaurav Kapoor Ph D Information Systems and Operations Management Lureen Walters PhD Food and Resource Economics Nobuyuki Iwai Ph D Food and Resource Economics Joseph C. DiPietro PhD Edu cation

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2 010 Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 15 Yang Jiao Ph D Anthropology Ronald Gordon PhD Food and Resource Economics Naomi Moswete Ph D Tourism and Development Mussa Idris PhD Anthropology Alison Ketter PhD Anthropology Afua Entsuah PhD Anthropology Youngsang Yun BA Management M ary E. Mitchell MA Latin American Studies Alison M. Boelter MA Latin American Studies Matthew Schwarz BA Political Science Russell R. Fullerton BA Management Thomas J. Stevens III Ph D Food and Resource Economics Amanda Watson PhD Economics Achal a Acharya Ph D Economics Joseph Robert Kraus PhD Political Science Levi Odera Ph D Political Science Malia Anne Billman PhD Anthropology Rachel Guina Iannelli Ph D Anthropology Jessica Snyder BA Finance Veronique Theriault PhD Food and Resource Economic s Joshua Niederriter BA Economics/Mathematics Nila Uthayakumar BA Business Administration/African Studies Natacha Chater BA Food and Resource Economics John Morris Laing BA Economics Stephen Brown Ph D Accounting Lisa Howell PhD Anthropology Ali Zuai ter BA Economics III. IB Instruction and Outreach In th e 2006 2010 grant cycle, the following students, from both business and non business programs, have worked on a variety of CIBER curriculum and outreach projects. (University of Florida students) Tyler E. Tringas BA Economics Gabriella Filasky BA Marketing Amanda Bowe BA Finance Jordon P. Loh BA Economics Elaine Cohen BA Marketing Fahad Fahimullah BA Economics Sharon F Barkley PhD Latin American Studies Laurel J. Hodges Ph D Spanish Deicy G. Jimenez PhD Spanish Susan Salazar Ph D Spanish Belkis Suarez PhD Spanish Megan Silbert Ph D Food and Resource Economics Colin A. Knapp PhD Economics

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2 010 Appendix 5: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 16 Alison M. Boelter MA Latin American Studies Amanda Watson Ph D Economics Ana Portocarr ero Director MAIB/MSM Program Christian Ahihou PhD French Jonathan Ciaccio BA Food and Resource Economics Ph D Spanish Renata de Godoy Ph D Urban and Regional Planning Stephanie Knouse PhD Spanish Francisco Salgado Robles Ph D Spanish Valerie Trujillo PhD Spanish Ryan Tzu Wang Ph D Sports Management David Michael Harmel MA Latin American Studies Claudia Garcia Ph.D. Spanish Maria Ida Fionda Ph.D. Spanish Katherine Honea Ph.D. Spanish

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 6: Faculty Research Publications 17 Appendix 6 : Sample CIBER Sponsored Faculty Research Publications Dr. Sylvia Chan Olmsted Department of Telecommunications College of Journalism and Communications The deployment of third generation mobile services: A multinational analysis of Author(s): Lee, S., Chan Olmsted, S.M., and Kim, H. Publication: Telecommunications Policy (under review). Abstract : The provision of video communication, information, and entertainment via the mobile platform will be i mpossible without the successful diffusion of 3G services. The current deployment of 3G mobile services is significantly more advanced in some countries than others. Through a multinational analysis of 55 countries, this study explores the factors affectin g such deployment. It was found that multiple standardization policy, lower pricing, and a higher level of ICT use contribute to 3G mobile subscription rates. An examination of host country factors affecting the export of U.S. video media good Author(s): Chan Olmsted, S.M., Cha, J., and Oba, G. Publication: Journal of Media Economics, Vol. 21 (2008), No. 3, 191 216. Abstract : The United States is by far the leading exporter of video media goods in the world. It is also the bigge st investor in theatrical films, spending over $63 million per theatrical production and leading the world in box office receipts. This article investigates the host country factors that have influenced the export of U.S. based video media products, includ ing film and television programs. It was found that economic environments, geographical proximity, technological infrastructure, and market size influenced the purchase of motion pictures and video programming from the United States. In addition, countries with better economic environments, implem en tation of intellectual property rights, political rights, larger market size and cultural differences, and language similarity seemed to import more heavily broadcasting content products from the United States. The emergence of mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs): An examination Author(s): Lee, S., Chan Olmsted, S.M., and Ho, H. Publication: The International Journal on Media Manage ment, Vol. 10 (2008), No. 1, 10 21. Abstract : To assess the strategy adopted by the mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs) and the factors that affect the development of this mobile market, this study analyzes the MVNO sector from 2 perspectives: th e exogenous factors including the consumer, industry, regulation, and technology characteristics; and the generic strategies that have been adopted by successful MVNOs in various Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) markets. Althoug h cost leadership was found to

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 6: Faculty Research Publications 18 be most prevalent initially, as the mobile market begins to be infused by high capacity networks and value added services, MVNOs are more inclined to apply multiple generic strategies and non price competition. The strategies of differentiation and focus are practiced in addition to, not in place of, the cost leadership strategy. This study also found that countries with higher third generation (3G) license fees tend to have higher levels of MVNO development, suggesting that t he economic pressure created by the high 3G license fee might contribute to the deployment of MVNOs in a country. Video strategy of transnational media corporations: A resource based Author(s): Oba, G., and Chan Olmsted, S.M. Publication: Journal of Media Business Studies, Vol. 4 (2007), No. 2, 1 25. Abstract : Subscribing to the resource based framework for analyzing strategy and employing a case study approach, this study investigates the most critical sectors for the U.S. based TNMCS in a global media marketplace and discusses how their resources related products. The alliances involving Time Warner, News C orporation, Disney, Viacom, and NBC University were examined. Cross case analysis identified six alliance patterns. The development of mobile television: Examining the convergence of mobile Author(s): Le e, S., and Chan Olmsted, S.M. Publication: International Journal of Mobile Marketing, Vol. 1 (2006), No. 2. Abstract : The convergence of mobile and broadcasting services may deliver a driver for dramatic growth in the telecommunications sector. It is said that the Korean Digital Multimedia Broadcast (DMB) system is the most commercially successful mobile television service worldwide today. This study explores the factors that influence the development of the Korean DMB market and their implications. It was found that the combination of broadcasting and mobile telephone in the context of mobile television Other related research products include Chan Olmsted, S.M. and Chang, B., rough partnerships: Examining cross border acquisitions and ICFAI Journal of Mergers and Acquisitions (2006), plus two articles still in the publication process: Chan Olmsted, S.M., Lee, S., and Hee development of a mobile television market: The case of South Korea communication, and transaction serv

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 7: PhD Studen t Research Abstract 19 Appendix 7 : Sample CIBER Sponsored PhD Student Research Abstract Lurleen Michelle Walters, May 2008 Major: Food and Resource Economics Chair: Robert D. Emerson T hree Essays on Immigration Reform, Worker Self Selectivity and Earnings in the US Farm Labo r Market The purpose of this study is to examine contemporary issues in US farm labor markets and immigration policy via three stated objectives. Specifically, the study evaluates how farm labor market outcomes have changed with the increasing presence o f foreign workers I n the wake of past immigration policies, it assesses the implications of legal status for unauthorized impact of immigration policy The f irst essay evaluates the historical linkages between US immigration policy and U.S. farm labor markets, and specifically how market outcomes have evolved following previous legislation such as the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). This is accompli shed with a review of previous research on immigration policies from 1917 through 1986, and with an evaluation of detailed descriptive statistics on farm worker and labor market characteristics from the National Agricultural Workers Survey (NAWS). The desc riptive statistics are used to characterize the US and Florida farm labor markets in the post IRCA period. assessed in the second essay. Foreign farm workers are found t o jointly select into US farm employment in an authorized or unauthorized status and into skilled or unskilled jobs, and these choices are found to have certain earnings implications. The essay makes oint selections into authorized and unauthorized status and skilled and unskilled employment in the context of a double selectivity framework. Previous studies have dealt with both of these issues but separately. The issue of legalization for unauthorized workers is addressed in the final essay. The analytical approach uses a treatment effects approach which casts legalization as a treatment (or policy intervention) under the assumption of heterogeneity. The results show an overall positive impact of legal ization on farm worker wage outcomes, and with the expected positive sorting on the gains from legal status. The evaluation of immigration policy implications for the farm labor market via the treatment effects framework is a valuable contribution to the l iterature since this approach has not been used in the context of farm labor before. Given the current strong national and political interest in immigration reform and attendant issues for the agricultural sector, the study is a timely contribution. It sh ould also be of considerable interest to agricultural economists, particularly those working in areas of labor intensive agriculture where labor issues are prime concerns for growers.

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 8 : CIBER Awards to UF Faculty 20 Appendix 8 : CIBER Awards to UF Faculty 2006 2010 Award categories include 1) course development and delivery grants, 2) research grants, 3) participation in CIBER Faculty Development in International Business (FDIB) study tours, 4) funding to attend prof essional conferences, and 5) conference development. Faculty Department/ Center Course Development &/or Delivery Research Grants FDIB Conference Attendance Conference Developmen t Esameddin Alhadi Lecturer, Arabic, Department of Languages, Literatures an d Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Haydun Aytug Professor, Information Systems & Operations Management, Warrington College of Business Administration Charles Bwenge Professor, Linguistics, Swahili, Department of Languages, Li teratures and Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Janice Carrillo Professor, Information Systems & Operations Management, Warrington College of Business Administration Bernadette Cesar Lee Lecturer, French, Department of Languages, L iteratures and Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Brenda Chalfin Associate Professor, Anthropology, Center for African Studies College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Sylvia Chan Olmsted Associate Dean for Research & Professor Departm ent of Telecommunication C ollege of Journalism & Communication s Kenny Cheng Professor, Information Systems & Operations Management, Warrington College of Business Administration Nathalie Ciesco Lecturer, French, Department of Languages, L iteratures and Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Larry DiMatteo Professor, Business Law, Warrington College of Business Administration

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 8 : CIBER Awards to UF Faculty 21 Robert Emerson Associate Professor, Food & Resource Economics, Institute of Food & Agricultura l Sciences Selcuk Erenguc Associate Dean, Warrington College of Business Administration Meredith Fensom Director, Law & Policy in the Americas Program, Levin College of Law Joan Flocks Social Policy Division Center for Governmental Resp onsibility Levin College of Law Joanne Foss Associate Dean for Student & Academic Affairs, College of Public Health & Health Professions Elinore Fresh Senior Lecturer, Chinese, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Franz Futterknecht Professor, German, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Heather Gibson Associate Professor, Sport, Leisure & Exercise Science C ollege of Heal th & Human Performance Anne Higgins Visiting Lecturer, Arabic, Department of L anguages, Literatures and Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Susan Jacobson Professor Department of Wildlife Ecology & Conservation, Institute of Food & Ag ricultural Sciences Clifford Jones Associate i n Law & Lecturer Center for Governmental Responsibility Levin College of Law Lynda Kaid Professor, Department of Telecommunications, C ollege of Journalism & Communication s

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 8 : CIBER Awards to UF Faculty 22 Yong Jae Ko Associate Professor, Sports Management, College of Health & Human Performance John Kraft Dean, Warrington College of Business Admin i stration Mindy Kraft Program Director, MAIB/MSM Warrington College of Business Admin i stration Su san Kubota Senior Lecturer, Japanese, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Gwendolyn Lee Assistant Professor, Management, Warrington College of Business Admin i stration Paul Losch Assistant University Librarian, Latin American Collection, Smathers Library Joseli Macedo Assistant Professor, Department of Urban & Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction & Planning Virginia Maurer Professor, Business Law, Warrington Coll ege of Business Admin i stration Timothy McClendon Sta ff Attorney, Center for Governmental Responsibility Levin College of Law Terry McCoy Professor, Center for Latin American Studies, CIBER Associate Director Barbara McDade Assoc iate Professor, Geography College of Liberal Arts & Sciences William Messina Coordinator of Economic Analysis, Food & Resource Economics, Institute of Food & Agricultural Sciences Juan Carlos Molleda Associate Professor Department of Publ ic Relations C ollege of Journalism & Communication s

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 8 : CIBER Awards to UF Faculty 23 Gregory Moreland Lecturer, Department of Spanish & Portuguese College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Andy Naranjo Associate Professor, Finance, Warrington College of Business Adminis tration Mahendraraja h Nimalendran Professor, Finance, Warrington College of Business Administration Praveen Pathak Associate Professor, Information Systems & Operations Management Warrington College of Business Administration Anand Paul Associate Professor, Information Systems & Operations Management, Warrington College of Business Administration Deanna Pelfrey Lecturer, Department of Public Relations, C ollege of Journalism & Communication s Selwyn P iramithu Associate P rofessor, Information Systems & Operations Management, Warrington College of Business Administration Mary Risner Associate Director, Outreach & Latin American Business Environment Center for Latin American Studies Joseph Rojo Associate Director for International Programs, Warrington College of Business Administration Fred Royce Post Doc, Department of Agricultural & Biological Engineering, Institute of Food & Agricultural Sciences Alan Sawyer Professor, Marketing, W arringt on College of Business Administration Renata Serra Lecturer in Development & Economics, Center for African Studies Benjamin Smith Associate Professor, Political Science College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 8 : CIBER Awards to UF Faculty 24 Stan Smith Professor, Ec onomics & Director, B ureau of E conomic & B usiness R esearch Warrington College of Business Administration Anita Spring Professor, Anthropology College of Liberal Arts & Sciences James Sterns Associate Professor, Food & Resource Economics, Institute of Food & Agricultural Sciences Brijesh Thapa Associate P rofessor De partment of Tourism, Recreation & Sport Management & Director Center for Tourism Research & D evelopment College of Health & Human Performance Robert Thomas Associate Professor, Business Law, Warrington College of Business Admin i stration Yasuo Uotate Lecturer, Japanese, Department of Languages, Lit eratures & Cultures College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Richard Weldon Professor, Food & Resource Economics, I nstitute of Food & Agricultural Sciences Carol West Professor, Economics & Director, CIBER, Warrington College of Business Admin i stration Addendum David Miller Professor Research Methods & Evaluation Director Collaborative Assessment & Program Evaluation Services College of Education Dr. Miller consulted on the CIBER project, providing expert evaluation an d assessment advice.

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 9 : CIBER Awards to Non UF Faculty 25 Appendix 9 : CIBER Awards to Non UF Faculty 2006 2010 Business Language Research and Teaching (BLRT) Faculty Institution Award Project title/description Richard Sjola nder Faculty, University of West Florida EFIBI Participat ion in MERCOSUR study tour to develop Latin American examples for IB course Robert Anderson Entrepreneurship Academy Buchholz High School, Gainesville EFIBI Development of IB Module for high scho ol finance and economics courses Fredric W. Rohm, Jr. and Daniel Ibarrondo Faculty, Southeastern University EFIBI Creation of IB Major by m odif ying/adding courses to current IB concentration Manuel J. Tejeda Faculty, Barry University EFIBI Course d evel op ment: Religion, Spirituality and International Business Samuel Adekunle Faculty, Edward Waters College EFIBI Course d evelop ment African Societies, Gender and Microfinance David A. Grossman and Liming Macguire Faculty, Florida Southern College EFIBI Course d evelop ment for business majors on Conversational Chinese Maria Lehoczky and Sheila Rios Faculty, Polk Community College EFIBI Participation in Memphis CIBER Globalization Seminar on Global Supply Chain Management and in 2009 Michigan State Univer sity International Institute for Community College Faculty Corinne Young Faculty, Saint Leo University EFIBI Course development: Responsible Management and Sustainable Development Eshagh Shehniyilagh Faculty, Florida Memorial University EFIBI Course development: International Business Psychology Karen Schreiner Director, Business & Technology Incubator, Indian River State College EFIBI Planning a symposium: Connecting to a Global Green Economy Michael Flota Faculty, Daytona State College EFIBI Pl anning a faculty colloquium: Integrating International Business into Your Curriculum

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 9 : CIBER Awards to Non UF Faculty 26 Michael L. Avery Faculty, Daytona State College EFIBI Participation in Globalizing Basic Business program at the University of Memphis Sunder Raghavan Faculty, Embry R iddle Aeronautical University EFIBI Course development: international finance course specific to the aviation industry for ERAU MBA program Charles Evans Faculty, FAMU EFIBI Participation in Memphis Globalization Seminar Angela Lewis Faculty, FAMU EFI BI Participation in Memphis Globalization Seminar Ric Rohm and Joseph Kilpatrick Faculty, S outheastern University EFIBI Course development: Business as Mission for business and non business students. Also includes a piece for one faculty to attend a Mem phis Globalization Seminar Jing Zhang Faculty, New College EFIBI Course development: Socializing in Chinese emphasizing forging, building and repairing of professional relationships in China J. Antonio Villamil Dean, St. Thomas University EFIBI Stude nt competition in Global Entrepreneurship Jose Garcia Faculty, Florida Southern University EFIBI Course development: Spanish for the Healthcare Professions included an experiential component of students working with Hispanic patients at the Lakeland Reg ional Medical Center William Huth Faculty, University of West Florida EFIBI Development of IB content for a new course on Principles of Environmental Economics Christopher Burkart Faculty, University of West Florida EFIBI Course development: The Japanes e Economy and Business Environment Aijun Zhu Faculty, New College EFIBI Course development: Readings in Modern Chinese, emphasizing modern culture Min Zhou and Miao Zhao Faculty, Roger Williams University BLRT Research on more effective methods for tea ching Chinese language and culture through Chinese commercials Haidan Wang Lecturer, University of Hawaii BLRT Survey of curricula and pedagogy used in teaching Business Chinese, to identify gaps between the existing programs and real needs in the workin g environment

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 9 : CIBER Awards to Non UF Faculty 27 Tomoko Takami Faculty, University of Pennsylvania BLRT Development of learning materials for Business Japanese using international business case studies Pat McAloon PhD Student, Ohio State University BLRT Examination of non natives use of Chinese at work and evaluat ion of advanced language use in China related careers Margaret Gonglewski and Anna Helm Faculty, George Washington University BLRT Exploration of the use of business cases in the foreign language classroom: best practices acros s disciplines Ruey Jiuan Regina Wu Faculty, San Diego State University BLRT A conversation analytic study of the conceptualization of face in modern China and its implications for business Chinese education Vivian Felicio PhD Student, University of Ill i nois Urbana Champaign BLRT Portuguese for Specific Purposes Deborah Reisinger Faculty, Duke University BLRT Women s Microfinance Programs in Francophone Africa Elizabeth Ann Martin Faculty, Cal i fornia State San Berna n dino BLRT A study of International E Marketing Strategies of US Multinational Corporations and their Applications in the Business French classroom Steven Sacco Faculty, San Diego State University BLRT Multimedia Business Italian Case Studies Bo Zhu PhD Student, Ohio State BLRT Analysis of Chinese Language Usage in Leisure Activities for Business Purposes Irina Six Faculty, University of Kansas BLRT Mastering Business Case Discussion: Data Driven Teaching Materials for Intermediate Students of Russian Mee Jeong Park Faculty, Universit y of Hawaii at Manoa BLRT Multimedia Online Module for Business Korean Christine Grosse Seaharp Learning Solutions, Faculty Emeritus, Thunderbird Other Research & Conference Development: CIBER Business Language Conference Preparing Global Business Leaders Bijan Vasigh Faculty, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Other Participation in Africa FDIB Storm Russo, L ana Powell Valencia Community College Other Develop integrated curriculum designed to infuse IB into VCC programs Annie Higgins Faculty, Wayne State University Other Reading the Quran and the Market

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 9 : CIBER Awards to Non UF Faculty 28

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CIBER Syner gies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 0 : Conferences Supported by CIBER 28 Appendix 1 0 : Conferences Supported by CIBER 2006 2010 Conference Title Date Location Target Region Target Audience Paris Research Workshop on Pathways for Women Sept. 2006 Paris, France International Academics, G overnment, NGO officials Telecommun i cations Policy Roundtable: Apples Apples or Apples Oranges? Asymmetric Policies in Telecommunications Oct. 30, 2006 Tallahassee, FL International Government, R egulators, A cademics, B usiness Energy Roundtable: Understanding Fuel Diversity Trade offs an d Risks Making Decisions for the Future Oct. 31, 2006 Tallahassee, FL International Government, R egulators, A cademics, B usiness 2006 National Forum on Trade Policy: Trade and Regional Prosperity Dec. 7 8, 2006 Seattle, WA International Business, Gove rnment, Academics Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop 2007 Jan. 27, 2007 Gainesville, FL Latin America Faculty, Students Business 3 rd Annual Florid a International Business Trade, Logistics and Transportation Feb. 6, 2007 J acksonville, FL Florida, International Business, Government, Academics Facing the Music: Microsoft, Apple and Int'l Antitrust Law in the EU Feb. 22, 2007 Gainesville, FL European Union Faculty, Students 2007 CIBER Business Language Conference: The Key to US Competitive Edge: Bridging Language and Business Mar 28 30, 2007 Columbus, OH International Faculty, PhD students, K 12 8 th Annual Conference on Legal & Policy Issues in the Americas Apr. 11 12, 2007 Gainesville, FL Latin America Business, Govern ment, Po licy makers A cademics

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CIBER Syner gies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 0 : Conferences Supported by CIBER 29 5 th Annual CIBER National Forum on Trade Policy Free Trade: US Comparative Advantage in the Global Market Dec. 13 15 20 07 Stamford, CT International Academics, Business, G overnment 57 th Annual Latin American Conference: Uniting for Solutions Multi Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications in the Americas, Business, Community, Government Feb. 7 8, 2008 Gainesville, FL Latin America Business, Government, Policy makers, A cademics 2008 CIBER Business Language Con ference Preparing Global Business Leaders Apr. 9 1 1 20 08 St. Petersburg, FL International Faculty, PhD students, K 12 4 th Annual Florida International Business Summit 2008: The State of Global Finance and Trade May 1, 2008 Tampa, FL Florida, Internatio nal Business, Government, Academics Students 2008 International Academy of African Business and Development Conference : Global and Local Dynamics in African Business and Development. May 20 24, 2008 Gainesville, FL Africa Academics, Government, Business NGO officials 9 th Annual Conference on Legal & Policy Issues in the Americas May 26 30 20 08 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Latin America Business, Government, Policy makers, A cademics 2008 Global Security: Challenges and Opportunities June 16 17, 2008 Washi ngton, DC International Government, Academics, Business 6th Annual CIBER National Forum on Trade Policy : Understanding U.S. Trade Policy: Past, Present, and Future Oct. 2 3, 2008 San Diego, CA International Academics, Business, G overnment Doing Busi ness With Africa: Practice, Issues, Potential Oct. 29, 2008 Tampa, FL Africa Business, Government, Academics

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CIBER Syner gies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 0 : Conferences Supported by CIBER 30 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop 2008 Nov. 7, 2008 Gainesville, FL Latin America Faculty, Students Business 5 th A nnual F lorida I nternational B usiness S ummit: F lorida B usiness O pportunities in L atin America and the Caribbean Feb 18, 2009 Tampa, FL Florida, International Business, Government, Academics 2009 CIBER Business Language Conference : Navigating the World of Busi ness Through Language and Culture April 2 4 2009 Kansas City, MO International Faculty, PhD students, K 12 Indian River State College Symposium: Connecting to a Global Green Economy Oct. 1, 2009 Stuart, FL International Faculty, Students, Business 7t h Annual CIBER National Forum on Trade Policy : Does North America Work? Nov. 5, 2009 Kansas City, MO International Academics, Business, G overnment Daytona State College Symposium: Is America on the Decline? and other useful topics for integrating IB into the curriculum Nov. 6, 2009 Daytona, FL International Faculty, Students, Business Florida International Business Summit : Opportunities in a Transformed Global Economy Mar. 2, 2010 Jacksonville, Fl International Business, Government, Academics Students PURC: U.S. Energy Policy in Transition Conference Mar. 18 19, 2010 Gainesville, FL International Faculty, Government, Regulators, Business 2010 CIBER Business Language Conference : Global Literacy Integrated A pproaches to Cross Cultural Training Mar. 24 26, 2010 Philadelphia, PA International Faculty, PhD students, K 12 10 th Annual Conference on Legal & Policy Issues in the Americas Apr. 15 16, 2010 Gainesville, FL Latin America Business, Government, Policy makers, Academics

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 1 : 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference 31 Appendix 1 1 : Academic Outreach Conference Program CIBER Business Language Conference: Preparing Global Business Leaders St. Petersburg, Florida, April 9 11, 2008 The 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference provided for an exchange of ideas and perspect ives on how to most effectively train global leaders of the future. Participants explored how students and educators can be equipped with the linguistic, multi cultural and managerial tools necessary for leadership in the 21 st century. Conference attendees participated in sessions devoted to business language instruction and ways to develop successful interdisciplinary collaboration. PROGRAM Time Event Wednesday, April 9 6:00 8:00 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open 6:00 8:00 p.m. Welcome Recepti on Thursday, April 10 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open 7:30 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast 8:30 9:00 a.m. Welcome: John Kraft (Dean, Warrington College of Business Administration), Susanna Easton (Program Specialist, U.S. Depart ment of Education), Greg Moreland (Director, UF Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum) 9:00 10:00 a.m. Dr. Christine Uber Grosse (President, Seaharp Learning Solutions and Professor Emeritus, T hunderbird School of Global Management) 10:15 11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions I Business Language Curriculum Course Wikis: How Our Students of Today Can Teach Our Students of Tomorrow Student Assessme nts of Experiential Learning Using Portfolios to Assist Students in Developing Cultural Competence Using Real Time Technology in the Foreign Language Classroom: Simulated Stock Portfolios Combining Business and Culture in the GW CIBER: Discovering Frenc h Wine Making Teaching Culture in Business Spanish Classes Online Business Chinese Course Computer Mediated Curriculum for Chinese Heritage MBA Students 11:15 11:30 a.m. Beverage Break 11:30 a.m. 12:3 0 p.m. Concurrent Sessions II

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 1 : 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference 32 Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Short Term Study Abroad Site Visits, Standards and Scaffolding: Creating and Teaching Cases for Business Language Learners of All Levels How to Better Prepare Future Business Leaders to Fa ce Environmental and Social Issues through Selected Business Language Course Materials Using Technology to Enhance Instruction: Guest Speakers and Chats Integrating and Using Schaubilder in the Business German Class Exploring French Culture through Adverti sing Preparing Our Students for the 21st Century: Teamwork in the Business Language Classroom Synchronous Collaboration: An International Learning Experience for Professors and Students Entrepreneurship Simulations for Future International Leaders A Purdue University Initiative of Interdisciplinary Study Abroad Program in China Putting Principles of Vocabulary Learning into Practice: A Computer Assisted Business Chinese Vocabulary Program for Professionals 12:30 2:00 p.m. Lunch A Lesson Plan for the Globa Jordan Colletta (Vice President, UPS Technology Marketing) 2:15 3:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions III A Model Immersive Cultural Learning Environment: Teaching Chinese Culture in Second Life Leveraging Existing Resources to Create Dual Degre e Programs: Language/Culture Plus X An Interdisciplinary International Business Degree Preparing for the Global Business: Visiting an International Company for a Class Project The German Business Internship: Putting German to Work Business French Curriculum: Issues and Challenges Podcasts and Pedagogy: Curricular Changes in the Business Language Course Lessons Learned from Business Spanish Students at the University of Maryland Undergraduate Research in Business Languages: Strategi c Plans for Campus and Student Success A Corpus Based Investigation of Business Chinese Textbooks and Pedagogy in Use Using Commercials to Teach Chinese Languages and Culture 3:15 3:30 p.m. Beverage Break

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 1 : 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference 33 3:30 4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions IV Meaningful Activities, Meaningful Curriculum: A Small The Business of Language and the Language of Business Across the Curriculum Energizing the Discipline Nationally: Bridging Differences Between Language for Specific Purposes and Language for Literature Using FL Outcomes Assessment and Effective Program Evaluations for Grant Getting Purposes Expanding the Field: Introductory Business Language and Culture Instruction Entrepreneurship and Environmental Engagemen t in Study Abroad Classroom: Content, Techniques and Assessment Task Based Activities: Modules for Teaching an Upper Level Business French Course Theory and Method in Teaching Business Spanish: Successful Pedagogical Techniques Topics and Techniques in the Design of Commercial Cases for Business Spanish Enriching the Lower Division Language Curriculum: Cross Disciplinary Collaboration on Case Studies Incorporating a Case Study in the Lower Division French Curriculum: The Auberge Project Incorporating a Case Study in the Lower Division Chinese Curriculum: The Starco Project 4:30 5:30 p.m. Steering Committee Meeting: CIBER Business Language Conference 6:00 9:00 p.m. Conference Gala & Awards Ceremony Maha ffey Theater Friday, April 11 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open 7:30 9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast 9:00 10:00 a.m. Alumni Perspectives Moderator: Alex Sevilla (Director, MBA Program, University of Florida UF Alumni Panelists: Greg Bates (Attorney at Law, Miami) Julianne Iannarelli (Manager of Research, AACSB International, Tampa) Billy Shields (Law Reporter, Miami Daily Business Review) 10:15 11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions V Business Portuguese: Where Do We Go From Here? Bus iness Russian: Where Do We Go From Here? Business Chinese: Where Do We Go From Here? Business German: Where Do We Go From Here? Business French: Where Do We Go From Here?

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 1 : 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference 34 Business Spanish: Where Do We Go From Here? Business Japanese: Where Do We Go From He re? 11:15 11:30 a.m. Beverage Break 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VI Business Hindi at the Linguistic Crossroads Outsourcing to India? Understanding Indian Communication Practices Theory and Practice: An Adaptive Approach to Business Langua ge Course Design The Formation of a CIBER Research Forum on the State of the Art in the Teaching of Intercultural Competence and Languages for Business Communication The Use of Podcasts and Video on Demand in Business German Courses Screen Capture, Screen Recorder and Presentation Software for Online Business Courses What Can Happen When Business and Language Faculty Cooperate Across an Ocean? Economics of Soccer in the Classroom: What the Global Business Leader Must Know Training Students with Linguistic T Business Spanish Language, Culture and International Competence: The Hybrid Curriculum Model Using International Business Cases A Business and Cultural Introduction to the Middle East 12:30 2:00 p.m. Lunch Business Language in the U nited States: Past, Present and Future Possibilities Ronald Cere (Eastern Michigan University) Michael Doyle (University of North Carolina at Charlotte) T. Bruce Fryer (University of South Carolina Columbia and University of South Carolina Beaufort) 2:15 3:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VII Preparing for Discussions with Russian Partners: Refining Oral Communications Skills Cultural Differences in Technology and Management: Building U.S. Russian Space Systems Preparing Global Business Leaders: By Scrapping Undoing the Past, and Re energizing the Future of Language Studies in Business Speaking Country Bringing the Smaller German Company into the Classroom Business Languages in Another Discipl ine: Challenges and Opportunities Languages for World Business at the College of Charleston: A Model of Interdisciplinary Collaboration

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 1 : 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference 35 Translating and Raising Awareness of Business Language: Recruiting New Faculty and Graduate Students The Interview Proje ct as an Integrated Approach to Business Japanese Acquisition of Culture: The Case of the Business Japanese Language Curriculum 3:15 3:30 p.m. Beverage Break 3:30 4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VIII Integrating Business Language Skills with Language Sk ills in the L2 Classroom Designing Authentic Literacy Tasks for Business Communication Best Practices for Recruiting New Faculty and Graduate Students for Global Business Leadership Why We Teach: Training Two Kinds of Global Business Leaders Chamber of the Americas Education Task Force: Creating Connections Students and $$$: Methods and Techniques for Expanding Business Language Programs Carbon Footprint on Our World: Carrefour vs. Wal Mart Seeds of Change: The Ashoka Model of Social Entrepreneurship in Fra nce An Innovative Way to Equip Students with Business Language Exposure, Multicultural and Managerial Tools in the International Context Business Language Instruction in Rio de Janeiro Doing Business in Latin America: Survival Spanish and Cross Cultural Tr aining for Business Professionals Universality of Cross Cultural and Cross Disciplinary LMR Perspectives: Preparing Global Business Leaders Bringing Rigor and Realty to Language Learning for Business Purposes: Examples of Project Based Action Learning

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 2 : Doing Business in Africa Conference 36 Appendix 1 2 : Business Outreach Conference Program Doing Business with Africa: Practice, Issues and Potential Tampa Florida, October 29 2008 PROGRAM Time Event 8:15 8:30 Check In (Continental Breakfast) 8:30 8:40 Welcome : Dr. Maria Crummett, Dean of International Affairs, University of South Florida 8:40 9:30 Session I: Overview: Risks and Opportunities in the Emerging Economic Landscape of Africa, Dr. Karanta Kalley, Regional Managing Director, Country Intelligence Africa Group, Global Insight, Inc Introduction by Dr. Carol West, Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, University of Florida 9:30 10:30 Session II: Practice: Learning from African Trade Experiences of Florida Firms Mr. Newton Owi, President, Technology Frontiers Inc. Ms. Nadia Rehman, Vice President, A Linen Valley Ms. Christine Boldt, Executive Vice President, Association of Floral Importers of Florida (AFIF) Mr. Bruce McEvoy, former CEO, Seald Sweet Introduction by Mr. Bryant Salter, Director, African Trade Expansion Program, Enterprise Florida. 10:30 10:40 Break 10:40 11:55 Concurrent African issues workshops : Six sessions each with 35 minute segments 20 minutes of presentation by a segment leader followed by 15 minutes question and answer. Session 3b will be a panel discussion facilitated by Mr. Earnest Williams. There is a 5 minute break between each 35 minute segment so participants may move to a different topical group if desired. 1. Culture and Communication : Workshop chair: TBA 1a: (10 :40 11:15) Understanding Gender Issues and Gender Policies : Studies, University of South Florida. 1b: (11:20 11:55) : Dr. Charles Bwenge, African Language Coordinator, Center for African Studies, University of Florida 2. Sectors and Support : Workshop chair: Mr. Fassil Gabremariam, President and Founder, U.S. Africa Free Enterprise Education Foundation. 2a. (10:40 11:15) What Sectors to Watch Where: Dr. Kwabena Gyimah Brempong, Chair and Professor, Department of Economics, University of South Florida. 2b. (11:20 11:55) Government resources: Dr. Cynthia Johnson, Senior Manager, Pinellas County Economic Development; Mr.

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CIBER Synergies, Volume IX, 2006 2010 Appendix 1 2 : Doing Business in Africa Conference 37 George Martinez, Director, International Trad e Administration, Tampa Bay US Export Assistance Center, US Department of Commerce; Ms. Eileen Rodriguez, Interim Director, University of South Florida Small Business Development Center; Ms. Rebecca Torres, Regional Manager, Tampa, Enterprise Florida. 3. R egulation and Regional Highlight : Workshop chair: Mr. Earnest Williams, former Councilman, City of St. Petersburg, and owner, Earnest Williams Insurance Agency. 3a. (10:40 11:15) Tracking the Evolving Regulatory Environment : Dr. Mark Jamison, Director, Pub lic Utility Research Center, University of Florida. 3b. (11:20 11:55) Focus on South Africa : Ms. Tongila Manly, Director, Enterprise Florida, Office South Africa (invited); Mr. Bruce McEvoy, former CEO, Seald Sweet; Dr. Lilia Abron, President and Founder, PEER Consultants, P.C. (invited); Ms. Nadia Rehman, Vice President, A Linen Valley. 11:55 12:25 Session III: Issues Wrap Up : US Challenges to Enhancing Trade with Africa, Ms. Beatrice M. Selotlegeng, former CEO, Air Botswana, and current Executive in Residence Faculty, College of Business, Ohio University. Studies, University of South Florida. 12:30 1:45 Lunch (buffet) and Session IV: Potential: Developing Sound Legal and Regulatory Fram eworks for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa, Dr. Kenneth Mwenda, Senior Counsel, Legal Vice Presidency, World Bank. Introduction by Dr. Leonardo Villaln, Director, Center for African Studies, University of Florida. 1:45 Conference adjournment