CIBER Synergies

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CIBER Synergies:


A Comprehensive Review of Programs
Center for International Business Education and Research
Grant 3: 2006 2008












CIBER Website: http://www.cba.ufl.edu/ciber/

CIBER
PO Box 117140
Warrington College of Business
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611


(352) 392-3433







From the management team

The University of Florida (UF) CIBER currently stands at both a milestone and a
mid-point in its history. The milestone is its 10th Anniversary, October 1, 2008. The mid-
point is position in the current funding cycle, 2006-2010. Both provide opportunity to
reflect on accomplishments of the past and to address challenges of the future.

This volume of CIBER Synergies reports on activities October 1, 2006 through
September 30, 2008. Some are long-standing programs that first appeared in the earliest
editions of Synergies and have stood the test of time-the Multidisciplinary International
Business (IB) Research Workshop, the Business in Brazil summer program, annual
publication of the Latin American Business Environment Report. Others appeared early in
form, but have grown tremendously in scope-business language offerings that evolved
from Spanish to Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese and Arabic, and two-week overseas study
programs for faculty that initially offered a choice of two locales (Western Europe and
Sinmi America), but now offer eight (also Eastern Europe, China, Delhi,
Mumbai/Bangalore, Vietnam and Sub-Saharan Africa). Many initiatives were not even
imagined in the earliest years of CIBER a course on the anthropology of global trade
and finance, culture across the curriculum classes, research on the mobile TV industry or
on standards setting in cooperative technical organizations.

Three sets of initiatives particularly distinguish the current Synergies from those of
earlier reporting periods. First, Spring 2008 was the "Semester of Conferences" for UF
CIBER. In April, we hosted the 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference, the premier
annual national meeting for faculty engaged in teaching foreign languages to the
professions. Since the national gathering of CIBER Associate and Assistant Directors has
historically linked to that event, logistics for it were also managed by UF. Atypical of
history, we additionally organized the annual CIBER Directors Meeting, a consequence of
UF CIBER Director, Carol West, serving as President of the national association of
CIBERs in 2007-2008. The spate of April conferences was followed by a major
international event in May when UF CIBER and the UF Center for African Studies co-
hosted the 2008 International Academy of African Business and Development Conference.

While the "Semester of Conferences" was temporary, the other two sets of initiatives
are more permanent fixtures of the UF CIBER program. In comparison i ith previous
funding cycles, the current one calls for considerably enhanced initiative evaluation. In
addition, the May conference was not an isolated African-centered event, but part of a
broader effort to establish an African International Business (IB) program at UF. These
are noted in the present edition of Synergies by each section's having a "Highlight on
evaluation" and a "Focus on Africa" entry.

After reading through the current report on recent accomplishments and near-term
plans, help us celebrate the milestone, and take advantage of the mid-point, by offering
ideas for new CIBER IB programs and strategies to serve students, faculty and businesses
in the future.

Carol West Terry McCoy Isabelle Winzeler Nikki Kernaghan
Director Andy Naranjo Assistant Director Program Coordinator
Associate Directors










Serving students


Undergraduate programs provide a broad introduction to international business
(IB) for thousands of students and specialized, intensive opportunities for students
seeking more in-depth training. Graduate students receive advanced IB training through
formal coursework as well as CIBER-sponsored seminars, workshops and research
experiences abroad. Funding is additionally provided for their participation as graduate
assistants on a wide range of CIBER initiatives.

Undergraduate students

One credit Culture-Across-the-Curriculum (CAC) courses provide a new
opportunity for students to study the business cultures of different countries. Business
language classes have been the primary venue for teaching foreign business cultures, but
they preclude students not simultaneously enrolled in a foreign language course of study.
The English-based CAC allows more students to obtain critical cultural awareness
training for a foreign country or region. Topic coverage includes value systems, business
etiquette and effective negotiation techniques. CAC pilots on Japan and China were
developed in 2006-2007 and piloted in 2007-2008. (See Appendix 1 for a list of topics
covered in the Japanese Business Culture CAC.)

FLAC (Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum) courses provided the format
prototype for the CAC. A "FLAC" section is a one-credit discussion section conducted in
a foreign language in conjunction with a content course. The FLAC section is taught by a
foreign language graduate student who receives pedagogical training from his/her home
department and who works out reading/discussion materials in conjunction with the
content professor. Key to the program's success, and ability to expand it, is the fact the
content professor does not have to know the foreign language of the FLAC.

FLAC sections attached to international business (IB) courses, or which expand
IB aspects of non-business courses, provide unique opportunity to integrate IB content
training with foreign language training. The earliest CIBER-funded FLACs focused on
"obviously" IB classes-e.g., Spanish and Portuguese FLACs associated with the Latin
American Business Environment course offerings. A second phase extended them to
international political science, international public relations courses and EU food
marketing courses with readily identified IB components. The 2006-2008 period saw
extension to colleges and courses not normally associated with IB, but nonetheless
having global commerce and investment implications that could be drawn out in the
FLAC section-courses in Health and Human Performance, Health Professions, and
Urban Planning. A total of 16 CIBER-sponsored FLAC sections were offered in the
2006-07 and 2007-08 academic years.

Effective marketing of foreign language study to business students needs to
reach undergraduates early in their UF careers, allowing time for incorporation into the









four-year plan of study. A CIBER-funded eight minute video "The Business of Learning
Languages and Cultures" will play in the Undergraduate Program Office, be highlighted
on that office's web page and be available to faculty for showing in IB courses.

Less expensive compared with semester-long programs, the popular ST SA
(short-term study abroad) is increasingly the venue of choice for undergraduates seeking
an overseas experience in today's weak-dollar global economy. During 2006-2008,
CIBER sponsored development of new STSA opportunities based on two variants of the
basic concept. In the "tour model," students travel to various locales in a country or a
region. The 19-day summer 2008 Italian Food: From Production to Policy exemplifies
such a model. Supported by funding from CIBER, the tour was developed by the UF
IFAS departments of Food and Resource Economics and Horticultural Science in
partnership with the Italian Universities of Palermo and Bologna.

Students travelled extensively throughout Italy, visiting a variety of agricultural
areas including citrus, grape, wine, olive, vegetable, wheat and deciduous crop regions as
well as commercial fishing and cheese-making regions. The regulatory and trade policies
that govern production and export, and that shape the competitive environment for US
food products in Europe and European food products in the US, were studied along route
as well as at the headquarters of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United
Nations (FAO) in Rome. Students earned 3 credits for the course.

In the "university model" of the STSA, students go abroad to a specific facility
that is the center for lectures and visits (much like going on a semester abroad to a
particular foreign university). UF's Paris Research Center provides opportunity for UF
faculty to develop European STSA in this format. CIBER supported two such endeavors
in Spring 2007: International Leadership: Adopting Businesses and Governments to New
Realities (a 2-credit course offered over Spring Break in Paris by Director of UF's Public
Utility Research Center (PURC), Dr. Mark Jamison) and Commodities to Cafes -
Agricultural and Food Marketing in France (a 2-credit course offered over the May
Intersession period in Paris by Food and Resource Economics Associate Professor James
Sterns.)

Focus on Africa: Exposure to African issues was infused at all levels of the
undergraduate business curriculum through new courses, new modules and new student
project options. No business student avoids Principles of Macroeconomics, and indeed,
the course is required for a number of non-business majors at UF. Lack of examples
from Africa in parts of the course dealing with global macroeconomics can establish a
mindset of "discounting the continent" that is difficult to overcome in more advanced
course offerings. With CIBER support, African examples were developed for lecture
use-e.g., challenging students to use a basic supply/demand framework to understand
how developed nation subsidies of agricultural products traded in international markets
can adversely impact African suppliers and African participation in the global economy.

At the upper division level, classes with student projects were particularly
targeted for African infusion to encourage some individual intensive study of the region.









African countries fairly naturally fall out as project regions in the new course developed
by CIBER Advisory Council Member and UF Distinguished Service Professor, Dr.
Sanford Berg, Public Utility Economics: International Infrastructure.

The course innovatively integrates undergraduate education with UF's renowned
International Training Program on Utility Regulation and Strategy. The latter, a joint
project of PURC and the World Bank, has been delivered twice annually for over 10
years. The intensive two-week course teaches economic, technical and policy skills
required to design and manage sustainable regulatory systems for infrastructure sectors.
To date, more than 1800 delegates, representing over 130 nations, have attended the
program.

Assigned projects in Public Utilities paired students with foreign attendees at the
January 2007 program, providing an unusual opportunity for undergraduates to use
personal contacts and interviews as resources for a semester-long foreign market study. A
number of African nations emerge as potential study subjects as a consequence of
relatively high African representation among the Training Program participants.

More challenging was stimulation of student interest in African destinations for
semester-long foreign market entry projects in The Firm in the Global Economy, a 4000-
level economics/business elective. A tripartite approach was initiated in spring 2008: (1)
early introduction of Africa into the course through a semester-long lecture case study
involving the region (the global market in cut flowers); (2) careful explanation of
potential project destinations, including in particular, photographs of African cities that
dispel potential erroneous "mud hut" images; (3) linking of Africa destinations with firms
that interest students. While pieces of (1) (3) had been tried in the past, it was the three
together that proved successful. In particular, the proportion of student teams selecting a
foreign market entry project with an "African focus" rose from 12.5% in Fall 2007 to
35.7% in Spring 2008.

CIBER support of economist Dr. Renata Serra in the Center for African Studies
permits the offering of two undergraduate African business electives, Economic
Development of Africa and Africa in the Global Economy. Following a Fall 2006 class
size of 15 in the latter, enrollments jumped to 27 for Economic Development of Africa in
Spring 2007 and currently (Fall 2008), 24 students are enrolled in Africa in the Global
Economy.

Highlight on evaluation: Standard UF student course evaluations have long
been a key tool for CIBER assessment of new undergraduate IB course offerings.
However, current analyses augment these outcomes by (a) providing pertinent
professorial context of the ratings; (b) paying increased attention to the unrestricted
comments section of the evaluations; and (c) where feasible, administering pre- and post-
tests for explicit measurement of amount learned. For example, all three upper division
business electives with new or revised African content offered in Spring 2007 received
very high overall student evaluations-4.6 to 4.7 on a scale of one (poor) to five
(outstanding). However, it was observed that all three professors typically receive high









student evaluations, limiting the significance of such outcomes in assessing the impact of
the African content.

This was clearly illustrated by Public Utility Economics: International
Infrastructure which dropped substantially in student rating between Spring 2007 and
Spring 2008 when teaching responsibility for the course was re-assigned from Dr.
Sanford Berg, one of the college's recognized outstanding instructors and the pioneer of
the training program the course linked to. Clearly course content and format had not been
specified with sufficient transferability for the class to yet constitute a "prototype."

Augmenting student evaluations with instructor interviews and student interviews
can be helpful. When an "outstanding teacher" indicates "success" in experimental
module delivery, the generalization of the outcome to the "average teacher" context
remains questionable, but a personal assessment of "weakness" or "failure" by such an
instructor clearly indicates difficulty of conveying content.

Similarly, student interviews may reveal problems not evident from formal
student course evaluations. For example, discussions with students in the pilot of Public
Utility Economics: International Infrastructure reported some student concern and
confusion over project assignments, but a tendency to dismiss those on the formal student
evaluations because "Berg is so great."

A consistent comment on student evaluations of both pilot CAC classes was desire
for more content--in particular, request for a 3-credit course on the subject as opposed to
the limited 1-credit treatment. CIBER reallocated funding to accommodate such an
expansion. In addition, given the very specific topics of these classes, pre- and post-
testing for learning measurement is being implemented.

Upcoming undergraduate programs for UF students include in addition to
extended Japanese and Chinese CAC courses and eight 2008-09 FLAC sections, a new
one-credit CAC on the Business Culture of Africa. Anthropology Associate Professor Dr.
Brenda Chalfin will pilot a new course developed with CIBER funding, Anthropology
and the New Economy: Anthropological Perspectives on Finance, Commerce and
Neoliberalism. The class is intended both to encourage anthropology students to think
about IB aspects of their major and to introduce business students to anthropological
perspectives on global trade.

Also new in 2008-09 will be the Student Culture Consulting Corps (SCCC). The
program evolved from the observation that in IB classes, student teams with language and
cultural expertise produce better global market plans. Linking a business class with a
foreign language class and making combined student teams is one approach, and it has
been done at UF. As a general model, however, it over-constrains the choice of target
country of the IB projects. The experimental SCCC investigates an alternative. Students
in upper division foreign language/foreign culture programs are invited to sign up as
potential language and culture consultants to business projects. Depending on country
distribution of IB classroom projects, individual SCCC members will be selected for









basic training on the nature of global market entry business plans and be paid a stipend to
act as consultants to an IB project.

New CIBER-funded offerings will also impact undergraduates at colleges and
universities other than UF. As discussed below in the section on Serving Faculty, first
products of the EFIBI (Enhancing Florida's International Business Infrastructure)
program will upgrade IB offerings at six other Florida institutions of higher education:
Barry University, Edward Waters College, Florida Southern College, Polk Community
College, Southeastern University and University of West Florida.

In addition to recognizing the need to support IB development within its region as
well as in Gainesville, UF CIBER also responds to the need to enhance specialized
programs in areas of particular interest to national security wherever the expertise for
such program development resides. Hence, CIBER is supporting a particularly
innovative idea for teaching mid-east business culture proposed by Dr. Annie Higgins,
Assistant Professor of Arabic Language and Literature, Wayne State University, and
Secretary/Treasurer of the US Syrian Studies Association. The class will examine
currency as a key nexus between economy and culture in contemporary Arab and Islamic
contexts and will also consider the issue of usury/interest in religious and economic
terms, with a focus on Shari' a-based, interest-free banking.


Graduate students

Five graduate student short term study abroad (STSA) and summer study
abroad programs in Latin America received CIBER funding support over the 2006-08
period. The International Financial Markets Study Tour primarily serves UF students,
drawing participants from a variety of graduate programs including MBA, MAIB (Master
of Arts in International Business), MSF (Master of Science in Finance) and MALAS
(Master of Arts in Latin American Studies). The tour combines classroom instruction
with a week-long visit to financial institutions in Argentina, Brazil or Chile. The October
2006 tour went to Argentina and the October 2007 one visited Brazil. (See Appendix 2
for an itinerary of the 2007 Brazil tour.)

The STSA complements UF CIBER's signature Business in Brazil program by
providing an alternative overseas experience for UF graduate business students who lack
the time needed for an extended study abroad. The Business in Brazil four-week summer
program takes place in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, combining coursework on Brazilian
business practices, site visits to companies, training in Brazilian Portuguese and
immersion in Brazilian culture. Given the specialized and intensive nature of Business in
Brazil, it draws participation from a national pool of students. In the Summer 2007 and
Summer 2008 offerings, 53 percent of program enrollees were from universities other
than UF.

Business climate implications of judicial reform in Latin America were featured
in the new law seminar, Law and Policy in the Americas, delivered in the Spring 2007









semester. To complement the course offering, and also to complement the International
Financial Markets Study Tour with a new discipline-specific IB STSA, CIBER-supported
development and delivery of the March 9-17, 2007 program Legal Institutions of the
Americas Study Tour: Chile.

Both graduate students and undergraduate students attended the February
2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop. The program gave
students an opportunity to learn corporate perspectives on the region from representatives
of multiple industries and to gain insights on career experiences/opportunities in Latin
America from recent graduates working in the private sector, in government agencies and
in NGOs. (See Appendix 3 for the workshop agenda and speakers.)

Recognizing the importance of "training the future trainers," CIBER
programs targeting graduate student IB research, and providing graduate students
experience delivering IB programs, are key components for assuring impact of the grant
beyond the period of funding. Multiple initiatives address these goals: (a) funding of
graduate students as research assistants on IB projects led by faculty; (b) funding for
graduate students to travel abroad to conduct their own foreign IB research; (c)
scholarships for UF doctoral students to attend national CIBER seminars that acquaint
Ph.D. students with frontiers of IB research in their discipline. Graduate students from
business, journalism, agriculture, education and liberal arts and sciences benefitted from
CIBER initiatives in group (a). They worked on projects that included analyzing the
current Latin American business environment, econometrically estimating the impact of
immigration regulation on US agricultural labor markets, assessing US competitiveness
in global mobile media markets, and in global green-labeled food markets, organizing
national and international IB academic conferences and devising new evaluation
techniques for CIBER programs.

Primary recipients of funding under group (b) engaged in research on Africa (see
Focus on Africa below). CIBER additionally sponsored participation of two UF doctoral
students at national Ph.D. seminars-Jennifer Itzkowitz (Finance) and Gaurav Kapoor
(Information Systems and Operations Management). The Finance and Economics
workshop was held at Columbia University in July 2007 and the Information Systems
one was hosted at the University of Washington in June 2008. Each featured IB research
leaders in their disciplines. (For a complete list of students supported by CIBER
programs October 1, 2006 September 30, 2008, see Appendix 4.)

Focus on Africa: Microfinance institutions (MFIs) and entrepreneurship were
the nexus of Africa and IB for three CIBER travel grants supporting graduate student
research projects. MBA student Torrey Peace examined the use of technology (SMART
cards, ATMs, mobile phones, etc.) in Southern Africa (primarily Tanzania) by MFI's and
the impact of that usage on African society as well as its impact on the financial
institution. Study results will be compared with similar research conducted in Mexico.









Merise Jalali, Political Science, worked at Nyesigiso, the second largest MFI in
Mali, analyzing its prospects for self-sufficiency and evaluating impact of its financial
services program for women on gender equality. Anthropology doctoral student Michelle
Edwards used CIBER funding to pursue her dissertation research on The Effects of
Globalization on African-American and Ghanaian Entrepreneurs: A Case Study on
Ethnic Retail Niches in Atlanta, USA and Accra, Ghana.

Highlight on evaluation: The STSAs present particular evaluation challenges.
It is straightforward to ask participants to assess logistics and visit/lecture quality.
Indeed, this has been done for some time with both STSAs and Business in Brazil and an
accumulation of such reports formed the basis for a major program revision of the latter
in Fall 2007. More difficult is measuring what was actually learned or accomplished by
the tour experience per se. Rarely is the purpose of an STSA to learn "facts"-those are
covered in the classroom components prior to the tour or from materials distributed on
the tour. Nor is the purpose to collect data or develop ideas for a specific study or to
become part of a network that supports future research. These goals do characterize a
number of initiatives that CIBER undertakes, and existing evaluation instruments, both
indirect (e.g., dissertations produced, working papers produced and articles published)
and direct (e.g., post-program participant interview), capture information needed to
evaluate effectiveness. Again, however, these evaluation models have limited relevance
to STSA programs. Typically, the purpose of the STSA is to impact perceptions of doing
business in the country and perceptions are quite different from facts or research topics or
networks.

New pre- and post-trip surveys allow quantitative identification of changes in
student business perceptions of a country as a consequence of the trip per se. The surveys
were piloted in the Fall 2007 International Financial Markets Study Tour to Brazil. (See
Appendix 5 for the survey instrument.) On a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), the surveys
found an increase in mean and reduction in variance of perceived investment
opportunities in Brazil. A similar result characterized perceptions of the importance of
speaking Portuguese in doing business in the country. In contrast, the tour resulted in
little change in either bimodal responses to quality of the Brazilian legal environment or
normally distributed responses to challenges of the country's political environment. Such
outcomes go well beyond those of historical evaluation instruments which generally
simply documented that the tour was a "positive and memorable" experience. They
provide more insight into what may be the genuine value added of the tour and hence,
can usefully be the basis both for tour revision and for allocating scarce funding for
developing similar tours.

Upcoming for graduate students are the Spring 2009 International Financial
Markets Study Tour (to Chile), Summer 2009 Business in Brazil program, November 7-
8, 2008 fourth biennial Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop,
opportunities for participation as research assistants in new CIBER projects, and travel
funding for attendance at doctoral IB workshops and for conduct of IB dissertation
research.









New in format will be an African-focused faculty-student Research Tutorial
Abroad (RTA). The RTA concept arose as an alternative to current initiatives that fund
individual graduate research on the continent and to a potential African STSA or an
extended summer program in Africa modeled after Business in Brazil. The structured and
faculty-led STSA or Business in Brazil type programs attract graduate students interested
in the region, but not at the point of traveling and conducting research on their own
abroad. However, there is not a clear destination locale for "African business" analogous
to say, Sao Paulo for "Brazilian business" or Seoul for "South Korean business." In
addition, the vast size of the continent and its infrastructure limitations discourage travel
to multiple locations on a single trip. These constraints render highly questionable how
successful the STSA or Business in Brazil model might be if applied to the African
situation.

In the RTA program, faculty members submit proposals for taking 2-3 students
abroad to Africa to conduct research on a specific topic for 3-6 weeks. Successful
applicants receive $5,000 to subsidize the faculty member's participation and $5.000 to
subsidize student participation. The research topic defines specific African destination--
avoiding the destination selection problem of the STSA or Business in Brazil
approaches-but the faculty member's presence and organization provides the structure
absent in current CIBER programs subsidizing graduate student research on African IB
topics.

Serving faculty

Through a variety of initiatives, CIBER supports specific faculty projects and
study tours that enhance IB research and build IB teaching expertise. CIBER-sponsored
faculty development programs encourage UF faculty and instructors from other Florida
schools to develop IB aspects of their courses and their research agendas. A lecture series
brings distinguished speakers to campus and a multidisciplinary workshop brings
together faculty from diverse colleges, and from outside the UF campus, to learn from the
perspectives of other disciplines. Hosting and organizing scholarly IB conferences serve
faculty from across the nation and around the globe.

UF CIBER's oldest program, the Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop,
will celebrate its tenth anniversary this fall. Since its inception in October 1998, faculty
and graduate students from more than 18 departments and eight colleges across UF have
attended this monthly luncheon seminar series. Funded by the Warrington College of
Business Administration (WCBA) and organized by CIBER, the workshop provides a
forum for IB-interested faculty to gather from diverse locales across campus. Participants
discuss new research topics and teaching innovations and they learn from presentations
by leading IB scholars and business practitioners. (See Appendix 6 for a list of 2006-
2007 and 2007-2008 workshop presenters and topics.)

Exceptionally prestigious IB researchers are brought to the UF campus through
the annual Bradbury Distinguished Lecture on International Economics, co-sponsored by









the Bradbury endowment, CIBER and UF's Public Policy Research Center. The March
26, 2007 presentation featured Dr. Maurice Obstfeld, Professor of Economics, University
of California, Berkeley, speaking on the topic, "Financial Globalization in Historical
Perspective." Dr. Phillippe Aghion, Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics,
Harvard University, delivered the 2008 lecture on April 9, addressing the topic, "Growth
and the Financing and Governance of Higher Education."

Eight grants for faculty IB scholarly research were awarded, two in each of
the colleges of business, journalism and agriculture, one in the Center for African Studies
and one outside UF. Assistant Professor of Management, Dr. Gwendolyn Lee, examined
the issue of standards setting in cooperative technical organizations (CTOs). Standards
adoption is an important strategic goal of technology-intensive industries and
competitiveness of firms is enhanced if their innovations are adopted as global standard.
Relatively little, however, is understood about the intricacies of standards setting in an
open community as opposed to standards setting at more traditional organizations. Three
working papers were completed on (1) the effect of co-authoring networks on the spread
of developing internet standards; (2) cooperation vs. competition in standards setting; (3)
a network perspective on interface standardization.

Funding support from the 2002-06 grant was continued for the "Pathways"
project, Pathuii uyfor Women to Obtain Positions of Organizational Leadership. The
ultimate goal of the research is identification of critical factors that promote or inhibit the
rise of women to positions of leadership in the multinational business context. Such
identification will potentially permit more effective facilitation of advancement in
situations where currently the "pathways" are blocked. The project's principal
researchers are senior scholars at UF (Dr. Virginia Maurer, Huber Hurst Professor in
Business Law and Legal Studies, and Dr. Angel Kwolek-Folland, Professor of History
and Women's Studies), University of Michigan and University of Indiana.

Dr. Sylvia Chan-Olmsted, Flanagan Professor of Telecommunication and
Associate Dean for Research, College of Journalism and Communications, collected and
analyzed primary data in four countries to determine factors contributing to a nation's
successful development of a mobile communications industry. Five refereed journal
articles (International Journal on Media Management (2), Journal of Media Business
Studies, International Journal of Mobile Marketing, New Media and Society) report first
results of the current research as well as final results of earlier CIBER-sponsored
investigations.

A Summer 2008 research grant permitted initiation of the multi-year study
Diffusing Anti-American, Anti-Capitalism and Anti-Globalization Sentiments in Major
Latin American Markets. Directed by College of Journalism and Communications
Associate Professors Dr. Juan-Carlos Molleda and Dr. Marilyn Roberts, the research
looks for effective models businesses can employ to counter growing "anti" sentiments
that raise risk and reduce opportunity for US firms in Latin America.









Econometric analysis of the NAWS (National Agricultural Worker Survey) data
has identified ways in which the US agricultural labor supply market changed in the post
9-11 era. Study results were the basis for the February 26, 2007 keynote address at the
Southern Seed Certification Association Annual Meeting delivered by research initiative
director, Dr. Robert Emerson, Professor of Food and Resource Economics. Material
covered in the talk was subsequently published in Choices and a second paper specific to
agricultural labor markets in the sugarcane industry in Florida was selected for
presentation at the American Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meetings in
Portland, OR, July 2007. Only preliminary analysis has been completed on the second
CIBER-supported agricultural research grant, EUREPGAP and GLOBALGAP
International Certification Standards and their Opportunities for Florida's Food Sector.

The final two research awards were commissioned CIBER studies. Renowned
business language pioneer, Dr. Christine Gross, was funded to update her classic 1980's
survey of US business language instruction as part of UF CIBER's hosting the 2008
CIBER Business Language Conference (see entry below). Dr. Renata Serra, economist
with the UF Center for African Studies and Coordinator of Cotton Research for the global
African Power and Politics Program, is preparing a background piece on child labor for
use with IB case studies on the subject. It will provide an updated look at humane issues
and business best practices, incorporating some of the very recent child-agent literature
on the subject.

Given long lags in the academic research, review and publication process, current
and recent CIBER research grants often yield only tables of data-or outlines of proofs--
while they are in effect. Working papers and conference presentations appear later and
actual publications often long post-date the period of grant support. In addition to articles
in International Journal on Media Management, Journal of Media Business Studies,
International Journal of Mobile Marketing, New Media and Society and Choices noted
above, scholarly publications in the 2006-2008 period reflective of past CIBER research
support include IB-related articles in Economics Letters, Comparative Studies in Society
and History, American Behavioral Scientist, Journal of African Business, Journal of
Labor Economics, Review of International Economics, Economic Theory, Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics, Emerging Markets Review, Applied Economics
Letters, American Journal ofAgricultural Economics, numerous book chapters, and a
case study book supporting the teaching of Business Portuguese, Brazilians Woi king I ith
Americans: Cultural Case Studies, by Orlando Kelm and Mary Risner (University of
Texas Press).

Course development grants to faculty extend beyond Gainesville and
encourage instructors at smaller institutions of higher education in Florida to upgrade and
expand IB offerings. Enhancing Florida's International Business Infrastructure (EFIBI)
is a multidisciplinary competitive small grants program to help fill gaps in funding
opportunities for IB education and training innovation. Such opportunities vary
considerably across Florida's complex higher education system with its 11 state
universities, 28 community colleges and 61 private colleges and universities. For faculty
in units with endowment funds and/or external profit-making programs, income from









these sources may provide needed funding for individual faculty initiatives. For others,
there is a critical mass of talent at the home institution that can be assembled to attract
national funding, allowing financing of a specific effort as part of a broader program. For
many educators in Florida, however, neither of these opportunities exists. Consequently,
initiatives that would yield high returns to the state's IB infrastructure growth go
unimplemented.

The EFIBI program specifically targets these missed opportunities by awarding
IB development grants to faculty at smaller institutions in the state. Two-page proposals
and simplified budgets keep applications manageable for such faculty. An EFIBI
Advisory Group of business, social science and foreign language faculty from the state's
smaller colleges and community colleges assists in disseminating grant information and
overseeing program implementation. Spanning the state from Pensacola to Miami, both
public and private institutions were represented in the 2008 awards. Funded projects
ranged from adding basic IB courses to the curriculum to adding unique IB
opportunities-e.g., a course on Religion, Spirituality and International Business. (See
Appendix 7 for a list of 2008 EFIBI award recipients and projects funded.)

Innovation in business language instruction is specifically targeted by the
national CIBER Business Language Research and Teaching (BLRT) program. Supported
by a consortium of CIBERs, the new competitive grant program gives three awards each
year to subsidize research leading to innovation in business language pedagogy.
Recipients of the first annual awards in 2007 were from the University of Pennsylvania,
University of Hawaii and Roger Williams University. Subjects of the winning proposals
were use of international business case studies in teaching business Japanese, a survey of
techniques for teaching business Chinese, and research on more effective methods for
teaching Chinese language and culture through Chinese commercials. 2008 awards went
to instructors at San Diego State University, George Washington University and Ohio
State University. Projects focused on integrating cases into business language instruction,
conceptualizing "face" in modern China and understanding how Asian second languages
are actually used in business careers.

Locally, 2006-2008 UF CIBER funds for UF IB course development were
relatively concentrated in the areas of business language and culture, supporting new
FLAC and new CAC development and technological enhancements to business Japanese
instruction.

More than 150 language professionals from around the nation attended the
2008 CIBER Business Language Conference, organized and hosted by UF CIBER at the
Hilton St.Pete Bayfront, St. Petersburg, Florida, April 9-11. The conference is the
premier annual national meeting for faculty engaged in teaching foreign languages to the
professions. The unexpectedly high attendance (up over 50% from 2007) reflected
meticulous planning efforts of the Program Chair, UF Senior Lecturer in Spanish, Dr.
Greg Moreland, and careful attention to logistics details provided by CIBER Assistant
Director, Isabelle Winzeler. Recent meeting evaluations were thoroughly studied and
acted on, introducing new content sessions and designing not just "sessions," but an









entire "conference experience" with an array of formal and informal learning, presenting
and networking opportunities. Planners reached out across different languages, different
aspects of teaching business foreign languages and to different types of persons engaged
in such teaching--university faculty, community college and secondary school faculty,
doctoral students in foreign languages and business practitioners.

Conference sessions addressed use of technology in business language instruction,
perspectives of business professionals and business professors, integrating culture and
language education, innovative applications of business case studies and advertisements,
and nine specific foreign languages-Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Russian,
Chinese, Japanese, Arabic and Hindi (See Appendix 8 for a conference agenda.)

Hosting the conference was a fitting kick-off to UF CIBER's celebration of its
tenth anniversary in 2008. At its inception in 1998, UF CIBER was on nobody's list for
planning a national conference on business language instruction. Indeed, it was a business
language backwater-not even offering business Spanish-only commercial French and
German. During the ensuing 10 years, a variety of talented and dedicated language
faculty, supported with relatively modest CIBER funding, dramatically altered that
landscape. The commercial French and German classes were augmented by business
Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, and Arabic; 8 business FLAC sections per year
were created and language faculty added business culture courses on China, Japan and
Africa. UF rose from a backwater to a national leader, noted for its creativity in course
design, linking business content and foreign language training, and effective use of
technology and cases in commercial language instruction. It is difficult to think of a
program that more dramatically illustrates the high potential impact of CIBER funding
than the growth in UF business language opportunities over the past 10 years.

Two-week study abroad faculty tours provide background on business climate
in a major world region, create the personal overseas examples that make IB "come
alive" in the classroom, and offer networking opportunities for future IB teaching and
research projects. Each tour is a combination of lectures and site visits, organized by a
lead CIBER: Western Europe (University of Memphis CIBER); Eastern Europe
(University of Pittsburgh CIBER); MERCOSUR-Brazil, Argentina and Chile (FIU
CIBER); China (University of Denver CIBER), India-Delhi (University of Connecticut
CIBER), India-Mumbai/Bangalore (FIU CIBER); Sub-Saharan Africa (University of
South Carolina CIBER); Vietnam (University of Hawaii and University of Wisconsin
CIBERs).

Each of the four Asian tours occurs in the first half of January, a time that
conflicts with teaching for many UF faculty. Consequently, UF CIBER generally co-
sponsors and funds participation in the late May Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Sub-
Saharan Africa and MERCOSUR tours. WCBA annually supports tour participation by
four business faculty (or staff) and CIBER funds at least one non-UF business faculty
member to participate on the Sub-Saharan Africa tour (either a non-business faculty
member at UF or a business faculty member not at UF). CIBER funding for tour
participation is also available to faculty at smaller colleges and universities in Florida









through the EFIBI competitive grants program. In 2007 and 2008, WCBA and UF
CIBER together sponsored ten faculty participants. (See Appendix 9 for participant-tour
details.)


Grant writing support for HBCU faculty is emphasized in the Globalizing
Business Schools CIBER consortium program. A joint endeavor of 10 CIBERs and the
Institute for International Public Policy, the initiative pairs each participating CIBER with
one of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Each CIBER assists its
HBCU partner in preparing an internationalization plan for its business curriculum and in
writing a BIE grant application to fund plan implementation. UF CIBER's HBCU partner
in the current funding cycle is Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach.
Although plans for submitting a grant proposal proceeded on target in Fall 2006 and early
Spring 2007, they have since faltered with the departure of the initial key faculty member
from Bethune-Cookman and the subsequent withdrawal of his replacement from the
project.

In Fall 2006, UF CIBER assisted faculty at Florida A&M University (FAMU)
prepare an application for a second two-year BIE grant. FAMU was UF CIBER's
Globalizing Business Schools partner in the previous grant cycle. Its 2004 BIE
application was funded and the IB program implemented was recognized for excellence
in February 2007 when FAMU was designated a winner of the Andrew Heiskell Award
for Innovative International Education in the area of study abroad. The second FAMU
BIE application submitted with UF CIBER assistance in Fall 2006 was also funded.

Focus on Africa: Several previous sections highlight CIBER support for
faculty African IB development through research grants, course development grants,
funded participation in the two-week study tour of Sub-Saharan Africa and the proposed
new Research Tutorial Abroad. The single major African IB program of the 2006-2008
period, however, was co-hosting the 9th Annual Conference of the International
Academy of African Business and Development (IAABD) at the University of Florida
Hilton Conference Center, May 20-24, 2008. UF's Center for African Studies joined
CIBER as co-host.

Total attendance was 158 academics from 19 countries, including 10 African
nations. Nine sets of four concurrent sessions accommodated 125 scholarly research
presentations that spanned a broad range of multi-disciplinary issues related to the
conference theme of "Global and Local Dynamics in African Business and
Development." Plenary sessions included presentations by two African Ambassadors to
the US (Republic of Zambia and Malawi) and the Director of the US Department of
Commerce African Office.

From the perspective of longer-term development of an African IB program at
UF, the most significant aspect of the conference was organizing and convening the UF
Faculty Conference Steering Committee. Considerable African IB experience and
interest exists in Gainesville, but it is scattered across numerous colleges, departments









and centers. Conference planning provided a focal point to bring key members of this
group together in a joint effort and begin building the cross-campus relationships
essential for longer run African IB program development. Steering Committee members
represented both junior and senior faculty from eight colleges (agriculture, business,
engineering, fine arts, health & human performance, journalism, law, and liberal arts &
sciences) and from a wider variety of specific disciplines. The Committee was headed by
Conference Chair, Dr. Anita Spring, Professor of Anthropology. (See Appendix 10 for a
complete list of Steering Committee members.)

Highlight on evaluation: Cost-effectiveness requires that evaluation consider
not just whether a program was "successful," but whether it was significantly more
effective than a less costly alternative. The open-ended, proposal-based EFIBI program is
clearly more cumbersome to administer than more structured programs. For example,
historically some CIBERs have supported regional faculty participation in specific
CIBER IB workshops such as the University of Memphis annual Globalization Seminars.
The latter provide instruction and materials for developing basic IB courses (Intro to IB,
International Marketing, International Management, International Finance and Global
Supply Chain Management). The application process for such a limited program is
simple, cost per award is known and implementation requires only one inter-CIBER fund
transfer.

Response to the first EFIBI call for proposals in Spring 2007 was disappointing
despite extensive sample materials illustrating what proposed initiatives and budgets
should look like. Follow-up evaluation by the EFIBI Advisory Group suggested three
potential problems: (1) insufficient lead time; (2) skepticism on the part of foreign
language and social science faculty that they could in fact compete successfully with
business faculty in the program; (3) too burdensome an application procedure. In
response to (1), lead time for the Spring 2008 competition was increased and concern (2)
was addressed by preparation of separate marketing materials for business, social science
and foreign language faculty. In addition, an alternative limited program, restricted to
funding attendance at an established CIBER globalization or business language
workshop, was introduced with an extremely simple application process.

Response increased substantially in Spring 2008. Twenty-seven percent of
applicants opted for an alternative limited program. For the other 73 percent, an
alternative program was not a useful option. Relatively few faculty at an institution, and
each with few degrees of freedom in teaching responsibilities, dictated that effective IB
enhancement be very specialized to institutional capacity and expertise. Particularly
interesting to note was that the 27 percent were all from universities within the public
State University System (only the smaller such universities since large institutions like
Florida State or University of South Florida were ineligible for program participation) or
from community colleges. There were no applications from these types of institutions to
the unrestricted program. In contrast, all applications from small private colleges and
universities were to the unrestricted program. These early evaluation results suggest a
simple "yes" or "no" answer will not be forthcoming on whether a limited program









would be just as effective, but cheaper to administrate, compared with the unrestricted
one. Indeed, the answer may well be dependent on target regional institution group.

Upcoming programs for faculty will primarily continue existing formats-the
monthly Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series, grants for research and new
course development, funding of participation in two-week study tours abroad, and
support for non-UF faculty through the BLRT, Globalizing Business Schools and EFIBI
programs. New will be the RTA (Research Tutorial Abroad) that will fund a faculty
member and two to three students to conduct African IB research abroad.

Funding preference balances a variety of considerations that include: (1) further
contribution to developing an African IB program; (2) responsiveness to priorities
specified by the US Department of Education for the 2006-2010 funding cycle-namely,
innovative approaches to teaching foreign languages (especially less commonly taught
ones) and programs addressing issues of national security and US global competitiveness;
(3) expected impact--innovation and potential to serve as a national prototype in new
course development and probability of final scholarly journal publication for academic
research; (4) stimulation of IB interests in future academic leaders--today's doctoral
students and junior faculty.

In addition, although we stand at the mid-point of the current 2006-2010 CIBER
funding cycle, the grant application for the 2010-2014 period will be submitted in
November 2009. Consequently, Spring and Summer 2009 are the times for pursuing new
partnerships and for seed funding of such partnership programs that may be a foundation
for more comprehensive initiatives in the next proposal.

Serving business

Annual publication of The Latin American Business Environment Report is a
signature UF CIBER program serving state, regional and national businesses. Other
business programs vary year-to-year in response to current issues and needs and include
conferences, forums, workshops, publications and presentations.

The Latin American Business Environment Report (LABER) is as an
approximately 50-page annual report, disseminated to over 2000 educators and
businesses, providing a comprehensive examination of Latin American business
conditions. It tracks social, political and economic trends both for the region as a whole
and for its 20 largest markets individually. The fall 2006 edition was augmented with
special analysis of judicial reform in South America and was featured in the November
2006 cover story of Florida Trend, the state's premier business magazine. (See Appendix
11 for an Executive Summary, Table of Contents and List of Tables for the 2007 edition
of LABER).

The annual Legal and Policy in the Americas Conference, co-sponsored by
CIBER, complements the new legal components of LABER. Held in Gainesville, FL,









April 11-12, the 2007 meeting featured sessions on such timely IB topics as Organized
Crime and Terrorism: Combating their Threat to Economic and Political Stability in the
Americas and Lessons and Challenges ofMERCOSUR's Trade, Business and Dispute
Settlement Systems. Featured speakers included former US Senator Bob Graham and
Minister Carlos Mario da Silva Velloso, Past President, Supreme Federal Tribunal of
Brazil. Held in Rio de Janeiro and Curitiba, Brazil, May 26-30, the 2008 meeting
examined IB-relevant topics of land tenure and property rights issues, and their
relationship to violence and instability, and the proposed Inter-American Ethanol
Alliance to create regional/global trading in biofuels.

The 2007 Florida International Summit, held in Jacksonville, February 6, was
attended by more than 150 business practitioners, policy makers and academics. Planned
by a consortium of state university globalization centers and state and local economic
entities, the conference examined global market opportunities for Florida goods and
logistics of taking advantage of those opportunities. Nearly 400 participated in the 2008
Summit which took place April 18 in Orlando and addressed the theme "The State of
Global Finance and Trade."

Trade and security issues were the focus of national conference co-
sponsorships. Approximately 135 persons attended the December, 2006 National Forum
on Trade Policy (NFTP). Co-sponsored by a consortium of CIBERs that included UF, the
day and a half long program in Seattle addressed the theme of "Trade and Regional
Prosperity" through keynote speakers, roundtables and case studies. The NFTP
emphasizes the non-homogeneous impact of national trade policy on sub-national areas
and the need to develop regional, state and sub-state planning capacity that can
effectively assist an area in adapting to the specific effects of globalization it is
experiencing. The December 2007 NFTP was held at the Stamford Marriott in Stamford,
CT and was organized around the theme "Free Trade: US Comparative Advantage in the
Global Market." It included extensive discussion of offshore outsourcing and linkages to
improve US competitiveness.

Organized by the University of Maryland CIBER, UF CIBER co-sponsored the
day and a half long conference on Global Security: Challenges and Opportunities, June
16-17, 2008 in Washington, D.C. Keynote addresses were delivered by Jay M. Cohen,
Under Secretary for Science and Technology, US Department of Homeland Security, and
Ronald Knode, Director, Leading Edge Forum Associate, Computer Sciences
Corporation. Panelists from business discussed technology, innovation and global
security, doing business with the Department of Homeland Security and enterprise
resilience in an age of turbulence. June 17 featured a journalist panel discussing
"America's War on Terrorism and Implications for Business." Panelists included a
former CNN White House Correspondent, US Economic Correspondent of the Financial
Times, Washington Bureau Chief for Al-Safir (a Lebanese Daily) and a Reuters reporter.
Attendance of over 80 reflected a variety of interested parties-academics, MBA
students, business executives, government officials, NGO staffers and journalists.









Representatives of the United Nations, the International Advertising
Association, Latin American foundations and global public relations agencies
presented case studies and best practices to 175 persons attending the February 8, 2008
conference on Multi-Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications in the Americas:
Business, Community and Government. The two-day program was organized and funded
by UF's Center for Latin American Studies, College of Journalism and Communications
and CIBER. In addition to the live attendees, many more viewed the conference by
webcast in six Latin American countries (Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Panama, Argentina,
and Mexico) and three European ones (UK, Portugal and Spain) as well as the US,
Canada and Puerto Rico. (See Appendix 12 for a conference agenda.)

PBS WUFT-TV on June 23, 2007 broadcast the CIBER-funded panel
discussion organized and recorded by students in the College of Journalism and
Communications on "Facing the Music? Microsoft, Apple and International Antitrust
Law in the EU." The expert panel included Dr. Andrew Chin, professor of antitrust,
intellectual property, and patent law at the University of North Carolina School of Law,
Dr. Jesper Stromback, Professor in Media and Communication from Mid-Sweden
University and Research Director at the Demokratiinstitutet Centre for Political
Communication Research, Dr. Clifford Jones, UF specialist in European Union
competition law and a visiting Fulbright scholar at the Max Planck Institute for
Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law in Munich, and Dr. Mark Jamison,
Director of PURC, UF.

In January 2007, the Daytona Beach PBS station broadcast a 30-minute segment
on "Cuba after Castro." It featured three panelists, including UF CIBER Associate
Director, Dr. Terry McCoy. Other Latin American outreach presentations of Dr. McCoy
included contributions to both the 2007 and 2008 Florida International Summits, a
February 2007 presentation at the Air Force Academy Assembly on "Continent at a
Crossroads: Prosperity, Justice and Security in South America," and analysis of "Latin
America's Turn to the Left: What does it Mean for Business?" for the Hispanic Bar
Association of Northeast Florida and the First Coast Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Focus on Africa: Plans are in process of being finalized for the African IB
conference, Doing Business i/th Africa: Problems, Practice and Potential, October 29,
2008 in Tampa. The half-day-plus-lunch program features plenary sessions on
understanding challenges to doing business with Africa, learning from African trade
experiences of Florida firms, and current trends in policy, development and competition.

Breakout sessions will accommodate diverse African IB interests of the Tampa
area business, education and public sectors. Participants can select in-depth coverage on
cultural issues of doing business with Africa, federal/state/local programs to promote
trade with the continent, or evaluating regional opportunities using country risk analysis
and tracking evolving regulatory environments.









The event is sponsored by CIBER and the Center for African Studies at UF and
by the International Affairs Office, the Department of Women Studies and the Patel
Center for Global Solutions at the University of South Florida.

Highlight on evaluation: Targeted external evaluation of key initiatives (as
opposed to broad overall UF CIBER program evaluation) was introduced in August
2007. UF CIBER's signature annual outreach publication, The Latin American Business
Environment Report was evaluated for form and content by Ambassador Myles R. R.
Frechette, a 35-year veteran of the region who served as US Ambassador to Colombia,
Assistant US Trade Representative for Latin America, director of two non-profit
organizations focused on Latin America and who currently is a trade and business
consultant specializing in the region.

The seven-page single-space evaluation report thoroughly examined each of the
first eight issues of LABER individually (1999 through 2006) as well as considering
elements common to all editions and trends in material presented. It applauded specific
format changes while warning of the potential negative impact on business readership of
creeping report length. It pointed to content enhancements that added significant value-
e.g., the paradigm shift of 2002, inclusion of regulatory regime starting in 2004 and the
legal environment added in 2006-but reminded the authors not to lose focus on key
broad issues such as growth sustainability.

The general conclusion on the eight issues of LABER: "They are exactly as
advertised; independent, objective and academically grounded analyses of the business
and investment environments in Latin America. . When you read all of these reports you
realize the magnificent contribution the LABERs have made to understanding
developments in the region from 1999 through 2006. Without a doubt the LABERs are
the most methodical, concise and objective analyses I have read about these
developments."

Upcoming business outreach includes the 2008 Latin American Business
Environment Report (available in early October), Doing Business ni ith Africa: Problems,
Practice and Potential (October 29, 2008, Tampa, FL), the 2008 National Forum on
Trade Policy (October 2-3, 2008, San Diego) and the 2009 Florida International Summit
(February 18, 2009, Tampa). Planned activities each year constitute only a portion of
CIBER business outreach. The remainder is flexible, allowing response to critical new
topics as they emerge.


























Appendices









List of Appendices


Pages

1. Japanese Business Culture: Schedule of Topics 1-3

2. 2007 International Financial Markets Study Tour: Itinerary 4-5

3. 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop: 6-8
Agenda and Speakers

4. Students Supported by CIBER Funding 9-11

5. International Financial Markets Tour Evaluation Survey 12

6. CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Workshop Programs 13-14

7. Enhancing Florida's International Business Infrastructure (EFIBI): 15
2008 Awards

8. 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference: Agenda 16-20

9. Faculty Participants in Overseas FDIB Programs 21

10. 9th Annual Conference of the International Academy of African 22
Business and Development: UF Steering Committee Members

11. 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report: 23-26
Executive Summary, Table of Contents and List of Tables

12. 57th Annual Latin American Studies Conference Agenda: 27-30
Multi-Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications
in the Americas: Business, Community and Government









Appendix 1: Japanese Business Culture: Schedule of Topics
Instructor: Dr. Susan Kubota


COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed for students who wish to acquire a broader understanding of
prevailing values, attitudes, behavior patterns, and communication styles in modern
Japan, especially in regard to doing business with Japan. We will explore cross-cultural
issues by reading essays from the perspective of Japan itself as well as from an external
view, that of Western society and culture. We will discuss mutual assumptions,
unconscious strategies, and the different mechanics that form barriers to communication
between Japanese and non-Japanese, and how cultural differences can create
misunderstanding during negotiations between companies and countries. Specific areas
of Japanese business culture such as important cultural values, social relationships,
business etiquette, business communication, the structure and hierarchy of Japanese
companies, gender issues, and strategies for successful working relationships in Japan
will be explored.

COURSE MATERIALS

Required Textbook/Workbook/CDs:
1. The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture, edited by
Roger J. Davies and Osamu Ikeno. Tuttle Publishing, Rutland, VT, 2002. ISBN
978-0-8048-3295-3. (JM)
2. Japanese Business Culture and Practices: A Guide to Twenty-First Century
Japanese Business, by John P. Alston and Isao Takei. iUniverse, Inc., New York,
2005. ISBN 13-978-0-595-35547-1. (JBCP)
3. Different Games, Different Rules: Why Americans & Japanese Misunderstand
Each Other, by Haru Yamada. Oxford University Press, New York, 1997. ISBN
0-19-515485-1. (DG)


SCHEDULE OF TOPICS

1 General discussion about Japan overview of country, population, political
system, etc. Discussion about Western perceptions and stereotypes concerning
Japan and the Japanese, as well as Japanese business
2 JM: The Japanese Ie System, p. 119-126; Jitoko-Dori: Adopting Elements of
Foreign Culture p. 127-133; The Doo spirit of Japan, p. 71-82; Bigaku, The
Japanese Sense of Beauty, p. 35-50; Wabi-Sabi: Simplicity & Elegance as
Japanese Ideals of Beauty, p. 223-232.
JBCP: Introduction, p. xvii-xxi; The Significance of Belonging, 1.1, p. 1-8
DG: Ch. 1, "Two Stories, Two Games", p. 3-21
3 JM: /nui,/,an Ishiki: Japanese Group Consciousness, p. 195-199; Hedataru to
Najimu: Japanese Personal Space, p. 109-113; Kenkyo: The Japanese Virtue of


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 1: Japanese Business Culture









Modesty, p. 143-151; Aimai: Ambiguity & the Japanese, p. 9-16; Bushidoo: The
Way of the Warrior, p. 41-50; Giri: Japanese Social Obligations, p. 95-101.
JBCP: The On Society, 1.2, p. 8-9
4 JM: Sempai-Koohai: Seniority Rules in Japanese Relations, p. 187-194; Amae:
The Concept of Japanese Dependence, p. 17-21; Honne to Tatemae: Private vs.
Public Stance in Japan, p. 115-118; p. 26-27; p. 41-50; p. 95-102.
JBCP: Honne and Tatemae, 1.7, p. 19-22; Honne, Tatemae, and Negotiations,
4.18, p. 118; Trust, Benevolence, & Amae, 1.8, p. 20; Amae and Negotiations,
4.17, p. 117-118; The Japanese View of Time, 1.3, p. 9-13; Friendships, 1.9, and
The Hierarchical Society, 1.10, p. 22-25; Ageism in Japanese Society and at
Work, 1.11, p. 26-27
DG: Ch. 2, Communication Equipment, p. 23-35
5 JM: Uchi to Soto: Dual Meanings in Japanese Human Relations, p. 217-222;
Haragei: An Implicit Way of Communicating in Japan, p. 103-108
JBCP: Language, 1.5, p. 30-34; The Haiku Society, 1.6, p. 34-35; Polite
Restraint, 2.4, p. 42-43; Never Say "No", 2.5, p. 43-44; Conversational
Feedback, 2.6, p. 44-45.
DG: Ch. 3, Speak for Yourself, Listen to Others, p. 37-51
6 JM: Gambari: Japanese Patience & Determination, p. 83-93
JBCP: Be Patient, 4.25, p. 123; The Importance of Work in Japanese Culture,
1.14, p. 29-30; The Importance of Education, 1.13, p. 27-28; Work is Life, 3.1,
p. 71
7 JBCP: The First Meeting, 2.8, p. 48-49; Pointing and Other Gestures, 2.9, p. 49-
50; Laughter & Smiles, 2.10, p. 50-51; Titles & Names, 2.11, p. 51-52; General
Appearance, 2.12, p. 52-53; General Gift Giving, 2.13, p. 53-56
DG: Ch. 4, Taking Care of Business, p. 53-69 & Ch. 5, Open for Business, p.
71-81
8 JM: Chinmoku: Silence in Japanese Communication, p. 51-60; Zootoo: The
Japanese Custom of Gift-Giving, p. 233-243
JBCP: Ch. 4, Negotiations: p. 104-116 Introduction 4.1, The Negotiating
Mindset, 4.2, First Socialize, 4.3, Knowing the Priorities, 4.4, The Uses of
Silence, 4.5, Slow Decisions, 4.6, Preparations, 4.7, The Invisible Negotiators,
4.8, Gift Giving 4.9, Who Speaks First, 4.10, Never Interrupt, 4.11, Letters of
Understanding 4.12, Ask Questions, 4.13, Affirmative Responses 4.14, Dislike
of Certainty, 4.15
DG: Ch. 5, Open for Business, p. 71-81 continued
9 JM: Nemawashi: Laying the Groundwork in Japan, p. 159-164; Amakudari:
Descent from Heaven, p. 23-24
JBCP: Work is War, 3.2, p. 73-75; The Will to Work, 3.3, p. 76; The Five Ss
and the Search for Quality, 3.4, Decision-Making, 3.5, p. 77-79; Ch. 3, pp. 79-91
Loyalty, 3.6, Lifetime Employment, 3.7, Networking, 3.8, Open Offices, 3.9,
Written Materials, 3.10, Success is Incremental, 3.11, The Soomu Bu and
Kokusai Bu Divisions, 3.12
DG: Ch. 6, Scoring Points, p. 83-94
10 No class Spring Break
11 DG: Ch. 7, Support Network, p. 95-104


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 1: Japanese Business Culture































































CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 1: Japanese Business Culture


JBCP: Ch. 3, pp. 91-102 -Giving a Speech, 3.13, Holidays, 3.14, Meetings
Japanese Style, 3.15.1, Meetings Etiquette, 3.15.2, Pre-Meetings, 3.15.3, Formal
Meetings, 3.15.4, Preliminary Meetings, 3.15.5, "Large Meetings", 3.15.6, Long
Meetings, 3.15.7, p. 79-102; Proper Meetings Behavior, 3.15.8, Using
Interpreters & Translators, 3.15.9, Hosting a Business Party, 3.15.10. and Ch. 5,
"Working with Japanese", p. 129-146
12 DG: Ch. 8, The Truth About Teasing, Praising, and Repeating, p. 105-119
JBCP: Ch. 2, The Japanese Introduction, 2.1, p. 37-38; The Japanese Bow &
Handshake, 2.2, p. 38-41; Apologies, 2.3, p. 39-41; Expressing Complaints,
2.14, p. 56-57; The Japanese Business Card, 2.7, p. 45-48; Japanese Eating
Etiquette, 2.15, p. 57-61; Japanese Drinking Etiquette, 2.16, p. 61-66; Your Best
"Friends" in Japan, 2.17, p. 66-68; Who to Send to Japan, 2.18, p. 68-69; The
Search for Perfection, 1.4, p. 13; The Search for Harmony: Wa, 1.5, p. 13-17
13 JM: Danjyo Kankei: Male and Female Relationships in Japan, p. 61-70; Omiai:
Arranged Marriage in Japan, p. 165-169; Otogibanashi: Folktales of Japan, p.
171-177; Ryoosaikenbo: "Good Wives and Wise Mothers": The Social
Expectations of Women in Japan, p. 179-186; Ikuji: Childrearing Practices in
Japan, p. 135-141
DG: Ch. 9 Role Models: Working Man, Nurturing Mother, p. 121-137 & Ch.10,
You Are What You Speak, p. 139-148
14 Group Class Presentations Audience attendance and participation
required
15 Group Class Presentations Audience attendance and participation
required
16 Group Class Presentations Audience attendance and participation
required
Course wrap-up final observations









Appendix 2: 2007 International Financial Markets Study Tour
Destination: Brazil
Instructor: Dr. Andy Naranjo


Itinerary


Time Activity

Saturday, October 13
9:30 am Van pick-up at airport to the Hotel
1:30 pm Group lunch (Barra Brasa Churrascaria)
3:30 pm City Tour and Sugar Loaf
5:00 pm Van return to hotel
Free Evening/Dinner on your own

Sunday, October 14
10:30 am Van pick-up at hotel to the Marina
10:30 am Boat Tour with brunch
1:00 pm Van pick-up for transfer to Corcovado
Afternoon Visit to Corcovado and back to hotel
Free Evening/Dinner on your own

Monday, October 15
9:30 am Van pick-up at hotel to PUC Rio/IAG
Seminar: "Private Equity in Brazil" Prof. Luiz Felipe Jacques
da Motta (IAG/PUC-Rio)
12:00 pm lunch La Mole restaurant
2:00 pm Seminar/visit: "Business and Medical Ethics", Dr. Luiz Roberto
Londres President Clinica Sdo Vicente (www.clinicasaovicente.com)
4:00 pm Seminar/Visit: BNDES The Development Bank (www.bndes.gov)
"BNDEs and the competitiveness of the Brazilian Economy", Dr.
Raimundo Amora Ramos and Dr.Luiz Ferreira Xavier Borges
6:00 pm Van pick-up for transfer back to hotel

Tuesday, October 16
9.30 am Van pick-up at hotel for PROJAC
Seminar / Visit: PROJAC (TV Globo's studios)
11:00 am (www.redeglobo.com.br) Dr. Carlos Eduardo Veloso Project
management
3:00 pm Lunch at Couve Flor (PUC-Rio)


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 2: 2007 International Financial Markets Tour









4:00 pm Seminar: "The Brazilian Economy" Prof. Luiz Roberto Azevedo
Cunha
6:00 pm Seminar/visit: INSTITUTO GENESIS PUC'S Entrepreneurship
incubator (www.genesis.puc-rio.br/genesis/)
7:00 pm Van pick-up for transfer back to hotel

Wednesday, October 17
9:30 am Van pick-up at hotel for Visit
10:00 am Visit: CVRD (Mining) (www.cvrd.com.br)
12:00 pm Lunch downtown
1:00 pm Seminar/ Visit: PETROBRAS (www.petrobras.com), Dr. Lucas Mello -
Investment management
3:30 pm Seminar/Visit: "Technological Innovation as an Instrument for the
Social and Economic Development", Dr. Luis Manuel Rebelo
Fernandes, president FINEP Research and Projects Financing -
Brazilian Innovation Agency (www.finep.gov.br)
5:30 pm Van pick-up for transfer back to hotel
8:00 pm Van pick-up at hotel for Shopping Leblon
8:30 pm Seminar/Visit /dinner: OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE LEBLON
"Franchising in Brazil", proprietor Christiano Mattheis Londres
(www.outback.com.br)

Thursday, October 18
9:00 am Van pick-up at hotel for Visit
9:00 am Visit: HStern (jewelry) (www.hstern.net)
10:30 am Visit: ICATU HARTFORD (www.icatu.com.br)


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 2: 2007 International Financial Markets Tour









Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop


2007 University of Florida

LA TIN AMERICAN BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM
AND
CAREER WORKSHOP
Friday, January 26, 2007
Emerson Alumni Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Host
Latin American Business Environment Program
Center for Latin American Studies

Corporate Sponsors
Crowley Maritime Corporation
Econocaribe Consolidators, Inc.
FedEx Express Latin America and the Caribbean
Votorantim

Corporate Co-sponsors
Brooks Tropicals, Inc.
Porter-Novelli
Prudential Real Estate Investors
Seald Sweet LLC
Woodhouse Shannon P.A.

University Co-sponsors
Center for International Business Education and Research
University of Florida MBA Program
Master of Arts in International Business Program
Department of Food and Resource Economics
Hispanic MBA Association
Student Association of Latin American Studies
International Business Society









CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 6
Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop











Registration and Continental Breakfast (Florida MBA Program)


9:00 Opening
Terry McCoy, Director, Latin American Business Environment Program


Business Symposium
9:15 am Corporate Perspectives on the Region 1
Moderator: Carol West, Director, Center for International Business
Education and Research
Frank Santeiro, FedEx Express-Latin America and the Caribbean
Fernando Figueredo, Porter-Novelli Florida/Latin America
Paulo Gomes, Prudential Real Estate Investors-Latin America

10:45 Break

11:00 Corporate Perspectives on the Region 2
Moderator: Bill Messina, Department of Food and Resource Economics
Mayda Sotomayor, Seald Sweet LLC
Charles F. Woodhouse, Woodhouse Shannon, P.A.
Antonio Barretto, Votorantim

12:30 Luncheon
Moderator: Carmen Diana Deere, Director, Center for Latin American
Studies
Keynote Speaker: "Long Voyage to a Safe Harbor: U.S. Trade with
Cuba," Jay Brickman, Crowley Maritime Corporation


Career Workshop
2:00 pm Corporate Careers
Moderator: Alex Sevilla, Director, MBA Programs
Damon Kearney, Fidelity National Information Services (MA/Latin
American Studies)
Jose Rossignoli, Brooks Tropicals (MSAB)
Lance Rule, Econocaribe Consolidators, Inc.

Career Workshop (continued)

3:00 Government Careers
Moderator: Juan Carlos Molleda, Department of Public Relations
Larry Farris, US Commercial Service, Bogota (MS/Economics)
Chris Maxfield, United Nations (MA/Latin American Studies)


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 7
Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop


8:00 am









Maria Conchita Mendez, Alabama State Port Authority (BA/Economics &
Latin American Studies)

Careers in Non-Governmental Organizations
Moderator: Jon Dain, Center for Latin American Studies
Mariana Varese, Wildlife Conservation Society (MA/Latin American
Studies, PhD/Food and Resource Economics)
Evan George, Masliah & Soloway (JD/MALAS)
Tim Fogerty, Development Anthropology Consultant (PhD/Anthropology)


Planning Committee:


Terry McCoy, Center for Latin American Studies
Mary Risner, Center for Latin American Studies
Meredith Fensom, Levin College of Law
William Messina, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
Juan Carlos Molleda, College of Journalism and
Communication
Andy Naranjo, Warrington College of Business
Administration
Janet Bente Romero, University Foundation
Mary Mitchell, Graduate Assistant


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop


4:00









Appendix 4: Students Supported by CIBER Funding
October 2006 September 2008


I. Study Abroad: The following students have received funding that allowed them to
study abroad on various programs and internships.

Business in Brazil scholarship recipients
Jessica Bachay (University of Florida, MA Latin American Studies)
Michelle Knapp (University of Florida, MA Latin American Studies)
Luis Loyaza (University of Florida, BA Criminology/Law)
Sara Martin (University of Florida, BA Spanish/Latin American Studies)
Guy Morissette (University of Montreal, MBA)
Matt Quinlan (Yale University, MBA/MA Tropical Conservation)
Elizabeth Smith (University of Florida, MA Latin American Studies)
Tyler Tringas (University of Florida, BA Economics)
Sonya Williams, (Florida A&M University, MBA)
Mary Jordan, (Florida A&M University, MBA)
Cornell Guion, (Florida A&M University, MBA)
Joe Holecko (University of Florida, MBA)
Jessie Barriero (Valpariso University, MBA)
Mathew Hoge, (University of Kansas, MA Latin American Studies)
Angleliki Vovou (Fordham University, MBA)

International Financial Markets Tour scholarship recipients (University of Florida
students)
Tara Kim (MBA)
Albert Rodriguez (MBA)
Greg Eckels (MBA)
Kolaleh Torkaman (MBA)
Mario Fernandez (MBA)
Nick Anderson (MBA)
Cameron Buurma (MBA)
Alicia Riggins (MBA)
Chad Rice (MBA)
Joseph Holecko (MBA)
Rick Mason (MBA)
Grant Copeland (MBA)
Patrick Kinnan (MBA)
Abe Skellenger (MS Finance)
Chris Weber (MS Finance)
Phil Reagan (MS Finance)
Kyle Morabito (MS Finance)
Abe Ouano (MS Finance)


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 9
Appendix 4: Students Supported by CIBER Funding









Michael Peerson (MS Finance)
Park, Sang Wook (MS Finance)
Aashish Shukla (MS Finance)
Ang Li (MS Finance)
Kevin Fox (MA in International Business)
Dominique Lochridge (MA in International Business)
Sophie Grumelard (MA in International Business)
Jenny Chaim (MA in International Business)
Jonathan Frankel (MA in International Business)
Britta Nissinen (MA in International Business)
Lucas Elgie (MA in International Business)
Brandon Saltmarsh (MA in International Business)
Kevin Brown (MA in International Business)
Kathryn Ciano(MA in International Business)
Nico De Vries (MA in International Business)
James Lancelot (MA in International Business)
David Pierce (MA in International Business)
Donna Zill (MA in International Business)
Katherine Rodriguez (MS Real Estate)
Scott Ehrlich (JD/MBA)
Laura Gonzalez (Ph.D. Finance)
Mary Mitchell (MA Latin American Studies)
Jacob Schultz (MA Latin American Studies)

Italian Food: From Production to Policy scholarship recipients (University of Florida
students unless otherwise noted)
Leilani Velazquez (BA Food and Resource Economics)
Wesley Edwards (BA Food and Resource Economics)
Cheryl Salerno (BA Family, Youth, and Community Sciences)
Stephen Meek (BA Food and Resource Economics)
Jason Pereira (Florida Atlantic University, International Business)
Jordan Terry (BA Food Science)
David Taylor (BA Food and Resource Economics)
Arpan Patel (BA Pre-Med)
Venessa Longobardi (BA Animal Science)
Danielle Thomas (MA Food and Resource Economics)
John Alday (BA Food and Resource Economics)
Aaron Kremmer (BA Agriculture Education)
Cristina Zitoli (BA Food and Resource Economics)







CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 10
Appendix 4: Students Supported by CIBER Funding









II. Research: Between 2006 and 2008, the following students have received travel funds
from CIBER allowing them to present their own research, conduct research and learn
about the international dimensions of their disciplines at conferences, workshops and
seminars. (University of Florida students)

Torrey Peace (MBA)
Merise Jalali (BA Political Science)
Michelle L. Edwards (Ph.D. Anthropology)
Jennifer Itzkowitz (Ph.D. Finance)
Gaurav Kapoor (Ph.D. Information Systems and Operations Management)
Lureen Walters (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics)
Nobuyuki Iwai (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics)
Joseph C. DiPietro (Ph.D. Education)
Yang Jiao, (Ph.D. Anthropology)
Ronald Gordon (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics)
Naomi Moswete (Ph.D. Tourism and Development)
Mussa Idris (Ph.D. Anthropology)
Alison Ketter (Ph.D. Anthropology)
Afua Entsuah (Ph.D. Anthropology)
Youngsang Yun (BA Management)
Mary E. Mitchell (MA Latin American Studies)
Alison M. Boelter (MA Latin American Studies)
Matthew Schwarz (BA Political Science)
Russell R. Fullerton (BA Management)
Thomas J. Stevens III (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics)


III. IB Instruction and Outreach: Since 2006, the following students, from both
business and non-business programs, have worked on a variety of CIBER curriculum and
outreach projects. (University of Florida students)

Tyler E. Tringas (BA Economics)
Gabriella Filasky (BA Marketing)
Amanda Bowe (BA Finance)
Jordon P. Loh (BA Economics)
Elaine Cohen (BA Marketing)
Fahad Fahimullah (BA Economics)
Sharon F. Barkley (Ph.D. Latin American Studies)
Laurel J. Hodges (Ph.D. Spanish)
Deicy G. Jimenez (Ph.D. Spanish)
Susan Salazar (Ph. D. Spanish)
Belkis Suarez (Ph.D. Spanish)
Megan Silbert (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics)
Colin A. Knapp (Ph.D. Economics)


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 11
Appendix 4: Students Supported by CIBER Funding









Appendix 5: International Financial Markets Tour Evaluation Survey


Students who participated in the 2007 International Financial Markets Tour were asked
to complete a pre and post survey comprised of thirteen questions. Answers were ranked
on a scale of 1 -10 and captured the evolution in students' thinking before and after the
study tour.


SURVEY QUESTIONS

1. How would you rank the business opportunities in Brazil?

2. Compared to doing business in the US, how would you rank the business
opportunities in Brazil?

3. How would you rank the investment opportunities in Brazil?

4. How would you rank the investment opportunities in Brazil compared to the
US?

5. How would you rank the corporate expansion opportunities in Brazil?

6. How would you rank the corporate expansion opportunities in Brazil compared
to the US?

7. How would you rank the economic environment in Brazil?

8. How would you rank the political environment in Brazil?

9. How would you rank the resource environment in Brazil?

10. How would you rank the legal environment in Brazil?

11. Do you think Brazil is a good environment to do business?

12. How important do you think speaking Portuguese is to doing business in
Brazil?

13. How important is corporate social responsibility to business in Brazil?







CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 12
Appendix 5: International Financial Markets Tour Evaluation Survey









Appendix 6: CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Workshop Programs
and
Bradbury Distinguished Lecture in International Economics
Academic Years 2006 2008


Description: The CIBER Multidisciplinary Workshop Programs officially began in
September 1999. The forum promotes a systematic exchange of ideas and research
among a broad campus working group. Faculty from UF colleges and centers and from
other institutions participate in the programs featuring academic presentations on IB
research as well as IB presentations by guest speakers from business and government.

In addition to these workshops, CIBER co-sponsors the annual Bradbury Distinguished
Public Lecture on International Trade and Development. Descriptions of those lectures
appear in the table in italics.

Date Speaker Title of Presentation
10/13/06 Virginia Maurer, UF "The Pathways Paris Project": A Study of
Department of Management Women in the Corporate World
Angel Kwoleck-Folland, UF
Department of Women's History
11/3/06 Bob Kerrigan, Partner The Alien Tort Claims Act as a Tool to
Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin, Further Corporate Responsibility and
McLeod & Thompson, LLP Compliance with International Human
Rights Obligations
1/12/07 Clyde Stephens, formerly with Banana History and the United Fruit
United Fruit Company, Research Company
and Technical Services
2/9/07 Marcelo Rescende, Professor Developments in Brazilian Infrastructure
Institute de Economia, and Manufacturing: An Overview
Universidade Federal do Rio de
Janeiro
3/23/07 Olaf Halvorssen, Founder Authentix: Fighting Fraud and
Authentix and President of its Counterfeit Products World-Wide.
international division
3/26 07 Maurice Obstfeld, Professor Robert Bradbury Distinguished Lecture
University of California, on Int' Economics: Financial
Berkeley Globalization in Historical Perspective
4/6/07 Benjamin Smith, UF How Corrupt Do You Think This
Department of Political Science Country Is? Growth, Governance, and the
Perception of Corruption
9/28/07 Chip Withers, President Freight is Great
Withers Transfer & Storage of
Coral Gables, Inc., Withers
Worldwide Forwarders, Inc. and
Withers Transportation Systems
CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 13
Appendix 6: CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Workshop Programs









10/19/07 Mark Jamison, UF Understanding and Teaching
Public Utilities Research Center International Leadership

11/9/07 Renata Serra, UF Child Labor and Cocoa Production in
Center for African Studies West Africa: From International Labor
Standards to Child Agency
11/16/07 James Stems, UF EUREPGAP, GLOBALGAP,
Food and Resource Economics International Certification Standards, and
Opportunities for Florida's Agri-food
Sector
1/18/08 Beatrice Selotlegeng, former Creating Awareness of Africa's Business
CEO of Air Botswana and Potential
current Executive in Residence
Faculty at the College of
Business at Ohio University
2/22/08 Bob Emerson, UF Immigration Issues and Agricultural
Food and Resource Economics Labor Markets
2/29/08 Brenda Chalfin, UF Anthropology and the New Economy:
Anthropology Anthropological Perspectives on Finance,
Commerce and Neoliberalism
3/21/08 Michelle Edwards, PhD student Building Economic Bridges and Creating
Anthropology New Communities: Ghanaian and
African American Transnational
Entrepreneurs and the Ties that Bind
3/28/08 Chris Grosse, President What's New in Business Languages? A
Seaharp Learning Solutions and Fresh Look at the Field
Professor Emeritus
Thunderbird School of Global
Management
4/ u'. Philippe Aghion, Professor GI III th and the Financing and
Harvard University Governance of Higher Education


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 6: CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Workshop Programs









Appendix 7: Enhancing Florida's International Business Infrastructure (EFIBI)
2008 Awards


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 7: EFIBI Awards


Faculty Institution Project title/description
Richard Sjolander University of Participate in MERCOSUR study tour to
West Florida develop Latin American examples for IB
course

Fredric W. Rohm, Southeastern Modify/add courses to permit an IB major as
Jr. & University opposed to the current IB
Daniel Ibarrondo concentration

Manuel J. Tejeda Barry University Develop a course on Religion,
Spirituality and International Business

Samuel Adekunle Edward Waters Develop a course on African Societies,
College Gender and Microfinance

David A. Florida Develop a course for business majors on
Grossman & Southern College Conversational Chinese
Liming Macguire

Maria Lehoczky & Polk Community Attend Memphis CIBER Globalization
Sheila Rios College Seminar on Global Supply Chain Management
and attend 2009 Michigan State University
International Institute for Community College
Faculty








Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference: Agenda


Hosted by the University of Florida CIBER
St. Petersburg, Florida, April 9 10, 2008

The 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference provided for an exchange of ideas and
perspectives on how to most effectively train global leaders of the future. Participants
explored how students and educators can be equipped with the linguistic, multi-cultural
and managerial tools necessary for leadership in the 21st century. Conference attendees
participated in sessions devoted to business language instruction and ways to develop
successful interdisciplinary collaboration.

PROGRAM

Time Event
Wednesday, April 9
6:00-8:00 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open
6:00-8:00 p.m. Welcome Reception
Thursday, April 10
7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open
7:30-8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast
8:30-9:00 a.m. Welcome:
John Kraft (Dean, Warrington College of Business
Administration), Susanna Easton (Program Specialist, U.S.
Department of Education), Greg Moreland (Director, UF
Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum)
9:00-10:00 a.m. What's New in Business Languages: A Fresh Look at the
Field
Dr. Christine Uber Grosse (President, Seaharp Learning
Solutions and Professor Emeritus, Thunderbird School of
Global Management)
10:15-11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions I
Using 'Languages Across the Curriculum' to Expand
the Business Language Curriculum
Course Wikis: How Our Students of Today Can Teach
Our Students of Tomorrow
Student Assessments of Experiential Learning
Using Portfolios to Assist Students in Developing
Cultural Competence
Using Real-Time Technology in the Foreign Language
Classroom: Simulated Stock Portfolios
Combining Business and Culture in the GW-CIBER:
Discovering French Wine-Making
Teaching Culture in Business Spanish Classes
Applying the 'Automatic Speech Analysis System' in an
Online Business Chinese Course
Computer-Mediated Curriculum for Chinese-Heritage
MBA Students


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference








11:15-11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.


12:30-2:00 p.m.


2:15-3:15 p.m.


Beverage Break
Concurrent Sessions II
Interdisciplinary Collaboration and .\lih t-Term Study
Abroad
Site Visits, Standards and Scaffolding: Creating and
Teaching Cases for Business Language Learners ofAll
Levels
How to Better Prepare Future Business Leaders to Face
Environmental and Social Issues through Selected
Business Language Course Materials
Using Technology to Enhance Instruction: Guest
Speakers and Chats
Integrating and Using Schaubilder in the Business
German Class
Exploring French Culture through Advertising
Preparing Our Students for the 21st Century: Teamwork
in the Business Language Classroom
Synchronous Collaboration: An International Learning
Experience for Professors and Students
Entrepreneurship Simulations for Future International
Leaders
A Purdue University Initiative ofInterdisciplinary Study
Abroad Program in China
Putting Principles of Vocabulary Learning into
Practice: A Computer-Assisted Business Chinese
Vocabulary Program for Professionals
Lunch
A Lesson Plan for the Global Era's Next Wave
Jordan Colletta (Vice-President, UPS Technology Marketing)
Concurrent Sessions III
A Model Immersive Cultural Learning Environment:
Teaching Chinese Culture in Second Life
Leveraging Existing Resources to Create Dual-Degree
Programs: Language Culture Plus X
An Interdisciplinary International Business Degree
Preparing for the Global Business: Visiting an
International Company for a Class Project
The German Business Internship: Putting German to
Work
'La Francophonie and the Business French
Curriculum: Issues and Challenges
Podcasts and Pedagogy: Curricular Changes in the
Business Language Course
Lessons Learned from Business Spanish Students at the
University of Maryland
Undergraduate Research in Business Languages:
Strategic Plans for Campus and Student Success


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference








A Corpus-Based Investigation of Business Chinese
Textbooks and Pedagogy in Use
Using Commercials to Teach Chinese Languages and
Culture
3:15-3:30 p.m. Beverage Break


3:30-4:30 p.m.


4:30-5:30 p.m. Steering Committee Meeting: CIBER Business Language
Conference
6:00-9:00 p.m. Conference Gala & Awards Ceremony
Mahaffey Theater
Friday, April 11
7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open
7:30-9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast
9:00-10:00 a.m. Alumni Perspectives
Moderator: Alex Sevilla (Director, MBA Program, University of
Florida
UF Alumni Panelists:
Greg Bates (Attorney at Law, Miami)
Julianne lannarelli (Manager of Research, AACSB
International, Tampa)


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference


Concurrent Sessions IV
A leaningfil Activities, A leaningfidl Curriculum: A Small
University 's Efforts to Prepare Global Business Leaders
The Business of Language and the Language of Business
Across the Curriculum
Energizing the Discipline Nationally: Bridging
Differences Between Language for Specific Purposes
and Language for Literature
Using FL Outcomes Assessment and Effective Program
Evaluations for Grant-Getting Purposes
Expanding the Field: Introductory Business Language
and Culture Instruction
Entrepreneurship and Environmental Engagement in
Study Abroad
Students' Oral Presentations in the Business French
Classroom: Content, Techniques and Assessment
Task-Based Activities: Modules for Teaching an Upper-
Level Business French Course
Theory and Method in Teaching Business Spanish:
Successful Pedagogical Techniques
Topics and Techniques in the Design of Commercial
Cases for Business Spanish
Enriching the Lower-Division Language Curriculum:
Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration on Case Studies
Incorporating a Case Study in the Lower-Division
French Curriculum: The Auberge Project
Incorporating a Case Study in the Lower-Division
Chinese Curriculum: The Starco Project








Billy .\Nhiw / (Law Reporter, Miami Daily Business Review)
10:15-11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions V
Business Portuguese: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business Russian: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business Chinese: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business German: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business French: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business Spanish: Where Do We Go From Here?
Business Japanese: Where Do We Go From Here?
11:15-11:30 a.m. Beverage Break


11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.


12:30-2:00 p.m.


Concurrent Sessions VI
Business Hindi at the Linguistic Crossroads
Outsourcing to India? Understanding Indian
Communication Practices
Theory and Practice: An Adaptive Approach to Business
Language Course Design
The Formation of a CIBER Research Forum on the
State of the Art in the Teaching of Intercultural
Competence and Languages for Business
Communication
The Use ofPodcasts and Video-on-Demand in Business
German Courses
Screen Capture, Screen Recorder and Presentation
Software for Online Business Courses
What Can Happen When Business and Language
Faculty Cooperate Across an Ocean?
Economics of Soccer in the Classroom: What the Global
Business Leader Must Know
Training Students i/ ith Linguistic Tools: 'Addressing' in
Business Spanish
Language, Culture and International Competence: The
Hybrid Curriculum Model Using International Business
Cases
A Business and Cultural Introduction to the Middle East
Lunch
Business Language in the United States: Past, Present and
Future Possibilities
Ronald Cere (Eastern Michigan University)
Michael Doyle (University of North Carolina at Charlotte)
T. Bruce Fryer (University of .S,,ulh Carolina-Columbia and
University of .Suith Carolina-Beaufort)


2:15-3:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VII
Preparing for Discussions 11 ith Russian Partners:
Refining Oral Communications ,\kill,
Cultural Differences in Technology and Management:
Building U.S.-Russian Space Systems
Preparing Global Business Leaders: By Scrapping


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference




























3:15-3:30 p.m.
3:30-4:30 p.m.


Undoing the Past, and Re-energizing the Future of
Language Studies in Business
'Founding' a Company in a German-Speaking Country
Bringing the Smaller German Company into the
Classroom
Business Languages in Another Discipline: Challenges
and Opportunities
Languages for World Business at the College of
Charleston: A Model of Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Translating and Raising Awareness of Business
Language: Recruiting New Faculty and Graduate
Students
The Interview Project as an Integrated Approach to
Business Japanese
Acquisition of Culture: The Case of the Business
Japanese Language Curriculum
Beverage Break
Concurrent Sessions VIII
Integrating Business Language \kill // iith Language
.\kill, in the L2 Classroom
Designing Authentic Literacy Tasks for Business
Communication
Best Practices for Recruiting New Faculty and
Graduate Students for Global Business Leadership
Why We Teach: Training Two Kinds of Global Business
Leaders
Chamber of the Americas Education Task Force:
Creating Connections
Students and $$$: Methods and Techniques for
Expanding Business Language Programs
Carbon Footprint on Our World: Carrefour vs. Wal-
Mart
Seeds of Change: The Ashoka Model of Social
Entrepreneurship in France
An Innovative Way to Equip Students n ith Business
Language Exposure, Multicultural and Managerial
Tools in the International Context
Business Language Instruction in Rio de Janeiro
Doing Business in Latin America: Survival Spanish and
Cross-Cultural Training for Business Professionals
Universality of Cross-Cultural and Cross-Disciplinary
LMR Perspectives: Preparing Global Business Leaders
Bringing Rigor and Realty to Language Learning for
Business Purposes: Examples of Project-Based Action
Learning


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference









Appendix 9: Faculty Participants in Overseas FDIB Programs
Academic Years 2006 2008


2007 Faculty Participants in FDIB Programs (University of Florida faculty):
John Kraft, Dean
Economies in Development and Transition: The Balkans: Sofia, Bulgaria; Zagreb,
Croatia; Prague, Czech Republic
Janice Carrillo, Information Systems and Operations Management
Economies in Development and Transition: The Balkans: Sofia, Bulgaria; Zagreb,
Croatia; Prague, Czech Republic
Stan Smith, Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Understanding the Business Challenges of Africa: South Africa and Kenya
Brijesh Thapa, Tourism and Hospitality
Understanding the Business Challenges of Africa: South Africa and Kenya
Anand Paul, Information Systems and Operations Management
Business in a European Context: Strasbourg, France


2008 Faculty Participants in FDIB Programs (University of Florida faculty unless
otherwise noted):
Joseph Rojo, College of Business
Professional Development in International Business Mercosur 2008: Brazil,
Argentina and Chile
Virginia Maurer, Management
European Economies in Transition: Zagreb, Croatia; Sofia, Bulgaria; Warsaw,
Poland
M. Nimalendran, Finance
Professional Development in International Business Mercosur 2008: Brazil,
Argentina and Chile
Alan Sawyer, Marketing
Understanding the Business Challenges of Africa: South Africa, Botswana, Zambia
and Zimbabwe
Richard Sjolander, University of West Florida, Marketing and Economics
Professional Development in International Business Mercosur 2008: Brazil,
Argentina and Chile











CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2007 21
Appendix 9: Faculty Participants in FDIB Programs









Appendix 10: 9th Annual Conference of the International Academy of African
Business and Development (IAABD)
UF Steering Committee Members

Name Title College
Asare, Stephen K. Associate Professor of Accounting and Business
Deloitte Honor Roll Fellow
Bonzongo, Jean- Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering
Claude J. Engineering Sciences
Chalfin, Brenda H. Assistant Professor of Anthropology Lib. Arts &
Sciences
Crum. Roy L. Professor of Finance Business
Frosch, Joan Professor of Dance and Assistant Director of Fine Arts
the School of Theatre and Dance
Goldman, Abraham Associate Professor of Geography Lib. Arts &
C. Sciences
Jamison, Mark Director, Public Utility Research Center Business
Kane, Abdoulaye Assistant Professor of Anthropology Lib. Arts &
Sciences
Kernaghan, Nicola J. Outreach Coordinator, Office of Program International
Development and Evaluation Coordinator, Center and
CIBER Business
Knechel, W. R. Ernst & Young Professor of Accounting Business
Leslie, Agnes N. Outreach Director, Center for African Studies Lib. Arts &
Sciences
Leslie, Michael Associate Professor of Telecommunication Journalism &
Communication
McDade, Barbara Associate Professor of Geography Lib. Arts &
Sciences
Nunn, Kenneth Professor of Law Law
Bruce
Sammons, David Director, International Programs IFAS
(Agriculture)
Serra, Renata Lecturer, African Studies Program Lib. Arts &
Sciences
Spring, Anita Professor of Anthropology Lib. Arts &
(Conference Chair) Sciences
Sterns, James Associate Professor of Food and Resource IFAS
Economics
Thapa, Brijesh Associate Professor of Tourism and Health & Human
Commercial Recreation Performance
Thomas, Robert E. Associate Professor of Management and Business
Business Law
West, Carol T. Professor of Economics and CIBER Director Business
Winzeler, Isabelle CIBER Assistant Director Business


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 10: IAABD UF Steering Committee Members








Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report:
Executive Summary, Table of Contents and List of Tables
Terry L. McCoy



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Entering the last quarter of 2007 Latin America is in the midst of an economic expansion
unprecedented in recent decades. The outlook for 2008 is for continued growth and low
inflation. The major clouds threatening the region's business environment are the
growing volatility in global financial markets, faltering world trade negotiations and the
erratic course pursued by populist governments in the region. There are relatively few
elections scheduled over the next 15 months, the most important being in Argentina.

The table below classifies the 18 Latin American countries profiled in the 2007 LABER in
terms of the overall character of their business and investment environments in 2006 and
2007, and indicates the outlook for 2008. Within the three broad categories -
"Attractive," "Problematic," and "Mixed" an arrow indicates whether a country's
environment has improved (t) or weakened (4,) during the year. An "=" sign identifies
those countries that remained essentially unchanged. Of the 18 countries, eight improved
in 2007 and only two (Venezuela and Argentina) deteriorated. Based on sustained
improvements in recent years, we have upgraded three environments Panama, Peru and
Uruguay in 2007 from mixed to attractive.

Latin American Business Environments
2006 Environment 2007 Environment 2008
Attractive Problematic Mixed Attractive Problematic Mixed Outlook
Mexico 4,
Dom Rep
Costa Rica = ?
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Nicaragua = ?
Panama
Bolivia = ?
Colombia
Ecuador = ?
Peru =
Venezuela =4, 4
Brazil =
Argentina = =
Chile =
Paraguay = ?
Uruguay t 1
Totals 4 4 10 7 4 7


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report









CONTENTS

Preface

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................ 4


INTRODUCTION.................................................................................. 5

I. REGIONAL OVERVIEW.................................................................. 8

EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT.......................................................... 8

Global Developments
Regional Developments

DOMESTIC ENVIRONMENT......................................................10

Economic and Financial Performance
Social Environment
Political Environment
Policy Environment
Legal Environment


II. CO UNTRY PROFILES.....................................................................19

NAFTA REGION.........................................................................19

Mexico

DR-CAFTA COUNTRIES.............................................................21

Dominican Republic
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

ANDEAN SOUTH AMERICA........................................................28

Bolivia
Colombia
Ecuador
Peru


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 24
Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report








Venezuela

BRAZIL AND THE SOUTHERN CONE..........................................34

Brazil
Argentina
Chile
Paraguay
Uruguay


III OUTLOOK................................................................................ 41

OUTLOOK FOR THE REGION.....................................................41

External Environment
Domestic Environment


COUNTRY OUTLOOKS.............................................................43

Attractive Environments
Problematic Environments
Mixed Environments


TABLES...........................................................................................49

SELECTED SOURCES........................................................................64























CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 25
Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report









TABLES

Table 1 MEMBERSHIP IN MAJOR TRADE AGREEMENTS

Table 2 TERMS OF TRADE, 1997-2006

Table 3 NET FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT, 1997-2006

Table 4 GDP GROWTH, 1997-2007

Table 5 ANNUAL INFLATION, 1997-2007

Table 6 EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND CURRENT ACCOUNT BALANCE,
2003-2006

Table 7 GROSS DISBURSED EXTERNAL DEBT, 1997-2006

Table 8 DEBT/EXPORT RATIO, 1997-2006

Table 9 EXCHANGE RATES AND IMF AGREEMENTS, 2007

Table 10 SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007

Table 11 POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007

Table 12 FISCAL DEFICIT/SURPLUS, 1997-2006

Table 13 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007

Table 14 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007





















CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 26
Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report








Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Studies Conference Agenda:
Multi-Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications in the Americas: Business,
Community and Government


Hosted by the University of Florida's Center for Latin American Studies
and the College of Journalism and Communications
February 7 & 8, 2008

PROGRAM


Time Event
Thursday, February 7h

8:15 a.m. Registration
9:00 a.m. Welcome
Carmen Diana Deere, Director, Center for Latin American
Studies and Conference Co-chair
9:15 a.m. Opening remarks
Juan-Carlos Molleda, Associate Professor and Graduate
Coordinator of Public Relations, College of Journalism and
Communications and Conference Co-chair
9:30 a.m. Keynote
Social Partnering in Latin America: Lessons Drawn from
Collaborations of Businesses and Civic Society
Organizations
Roberto Gutierrez Poveda, Associate Professor, Universidad
de los Andes, Bogota, and General Coordinator of the Social
Enterprise Knowledge Network
10:30 a.m. Coffee break
10:45 a.m. Session I Strategic Plans North and Sn,,mh Aburrd Valley,
Department ofAntioquia, Colombia
Participants:
Francisco Correa Molina, Regional Director,
Fundaci6n Social Elsy Yolanda Jimenez Bedoya,
Community Representative
Martha Lucia Marin Herrera, Representative, Area
Metropolitan del Valle de Aburra
Fernando Mejia Jaramillo, Business Sector
Representative
Carlos Anibal Palacio, Business Sector
Representative
Moderator:
Pilar Useche, Assistant Professor, Food & Resource
Economics and Latin American Studies
12:15 p.m. Lunch break Exhibits
1:30 p.m. Session II World Quality Education for Puerto Rico


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference








Participants:
Nelson Colon, President, Fundaci6n Comunitaria de
Puerto Rico
Xiomara P. Caro, Public Relations, Fundaci6n
Comunitaria de Puerto Rico
Moderator:
Pilar Mendoza, Assistant Professor, Department of
Educational Administration & Policy
3:00 p.m. Coffee break Exhibits
3:15 p.m. Session III The Impact ofPolitical and Economic Factors
on Partnership Building
Participants:
Raul Romero, President, Bounty Fresh
Tim Scerba, COO Latin America and CEO Mexico,
Edelman
Moderator:
Terry McCoy, Director, Latin American Business
Environment program and Associate Director,
CIBER
4:45 p.m. Wrap-up:
Marilyn Roberts, Associate Professor of Advertising,
College of Journalism and Communications, and
Conference Co-chair
Friday, February 8th
9:00 a.m Opening Remarks
John W. Wright II, Dean, College of Journalism and
Communications
9:15 a.m. Session IV Assessing the Quality of Partnerships
Participants:
Jonas Haertle, Coordinator, United Nations Global
Compact Networks & Academic Initiatives
Miguel Angel Oliva, Vice President, Public
Relations & Corporate Affairs, HBO Latin America
Group
Moderator:
Dennis Jett, Dean, University of Florida
International Center
10:30 a.m. Coffee break Exhibits
10:45 a.m. Session V Lessons from Successful Partnerships
Participants:
John H. Holmes, Director, International Advertising
Association (IAA) Educational Programs and
Alliances
Claudia Gioia, Managing Director, Miami Office,
Burson-Marsteller
Moderator:
Linda Childers Hon, Senior Associate Dean, College


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference










1:30 p.m. Session VI Strategic Corporate Communication
Promoting Sustainable Relationships
Participants:
Mitsuru Yanaze, Professor, Universidade do Sdo
Paulo
Otavio Freire, Communication Consultant, Nivea,
Brazil
Maria Helena Sato, Internal Communication
Manager, Nestle, Brazil
Moderator:
Andy Naranjo, Professor, Warrington College of
Business Administration
3:00 p.m. Coffee break Exhibits
3:15 p.m. Session VII Strategic Communications and Partnership
Building: Theory and Research
Participants:
Belio Martinez, Assistant Professor of Public
Relations, College of Journalism and
Communications
Cynthia Morton, Associate Professor of Advertising,
College of Journalism and Communications
Mary Ann Ferguson, Professor of Public Relations,
College of Journalism and Communications
Michael Leslie, Associate Professor of
Telecommunication, College of Journalism and
Communications
Moderator:
Betty Cortina, Hearst Visiting Professional,
Department of Journalism, College of Journalism
and Communications
4:45 p.m. Closing remarks
Juan-Carlos Molleda
6:00 p.m. Reception, Emerson Alumni Hall
Performance of Latin American music by Carlos Beltran
Ensemble


CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 29
Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference


12:15 p.m.


Lunch break Exhibits








Corporate and institutional sponsors:
Bounty Fresh
Burson-Marsteller
Edelman
Florida Consortium of Latin American and Caribbean Studies
HBO Latin America Group
International Advertising Association
Miami-Dade County
United Nations Office for Partnerships
UF Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER)
UF International Center
UF Research and Graduate Programs
USDE Title VI Program









































CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008
Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference




Full Text

PAGE 1

CIBER Synergies: A Comprehensive Review of Programs Center for International Business Education and Research Grant 3: 2006 2008 CIBER Website: http://www.cba.ufl.edu/ciber/ CIBER PO Box 117140 Warrington College of Business University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 32611 (352) 392-3433

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From the management team The University of Florida (UF) CIBER currently stands at both a milestone and a mid-point in its history. Th e milestone is its 10th Anni versary, October 1, 2008. The midpoint is position in the current funding cycle, 2006-2010. Both provide opportunity to reflect on accomplishments of the past and to address challenges of the future. This volume of CIBER Synergies reports on activities October 1, 2006 through September 30, 2008. Some are long -standing programs that first appeared in the earliest editions of Synergies and have stood the test of timethe Multidisciplinary International Business (IB) Research Workshop, the Business in Brazil summer program, annual publication of the Latin American Business Envi ronment Report. Others appeared early in form, but have grown tremendously in scope business language offerings that evolved from Spanish to Portuguese, Chinese, Japane se and Arabic, and two-week overseas study programs for faculty th at initially offered a choice of two locales (Western Europe and South America), but now offer eight (a lso Eastern Europe, China, Delhi, Mumbai/Bangalore, Vietnam and Sub-Saharan Afri ca). Many initiatives were not even imagined in the earliest years of CIBERa course on the anthropology of global trade and finance, culture across the curriculum classe s, research on the mobile TV industry or on standards setting in cooperati ve technical organizations. Three sets of initiatives particularly disti nguish the current Syne rgies from those of earlier reporting periods. First, Spring 2008 wa s the Semester of Conferences for UF CIBER. In April, we hosted the 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference, the premier annual national meeting for faculty engaged in teaching foreign languages to the professions. Since the national gathering of CIBER Associate and Assistant Directors has historically linked to that event, logistics fo r it were also managed by UF. Atypical of history, we additionally organized the annual CI BER Directors Meeting, a consequence of UF CIBER Director, Carol West, serving as President of the natio nal association of CIBERs in 2007-2008. The spate of April conferences was followed by a major international event in May when UF CIBER and the UF Center for African Studies cohosted the 2008 International Academy of African Business and Development Conference. While the Semester of Conferences was tem porary, the other two sets of initiatives are more permanent fixtures of the UF CIBER program. In comparison with previous funding cycles, the current one calls for cons iderably enhanced initiative evaluation. In addition, the May conference was not an isolated African-centered event, but part of a broader effort to establish an African Interna tional Business (IB) program at UF. These are noted in the present edition of Synergie s by each sections having a Highlight on evaluation and a Focus on Africa entry. After reading through the current report on recent accomplishments and near-term plans, help us celebrate the milestone, and take advantage of the mid-point, by offering ideas for new CIBER IB programs and strategies to serve students, faculty and businesses in the future. Carol West Terry McCoy Isabelle Winzeler Nikki Kernaghan Director Andy Naranjo Assistant Director Program Coordinator Associate Directors

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Serving students Undergraduate programs provide a broad introduction to international business (IB) for thousands of students and speci alized, intensive oppo rtunities for students seeking more in-depth training. Graduate st udents receive advanced IB training through formal coursework as well as CIBER-spons ored seminars, workshops and research experiences abroad. Funding is additionally pr ovided for their partic ipation as graduate assistants on a wide rang e of CIBER initiatives. Undergraduate students One credit Culture-Across-th e-Curriculum (CAC) courses provide a new opportunity for students to study the business cu ltures of different countries. Business language classes have been the primary venue for teaching foreign business cultures, but they preclude students not simultaneously enroll ed in a foreign language course of study. The English-based CAC allows more student s to obtain critical cultural awareness training for a foreign country or region. Topic coverage incl udes value systems, business etiquette and effective negotia tion techniques. CAC pilots on Japan and China were developed in 2006-2007 and piloted in 2007-200 8. (See Appendix 1 for a list of topics covered in the Japanese Business Culture CAC.) FLAC (Foreign Languages Across the Curri culum) courses provided the format prototype for the CAC. A FLAC section is a one-credit discussion section conducted in a foreign language in conjunction with a cont ent course. The FLAC s ection is taught by a foreign language graduate student who rece ives pedagogical traini ng from his/her home department and who works out reading/discus sion materials in conjunction with the content professor. Key to the programs success, and ability to expand it, is the fact the content professor does not have to know the foreign language of the FLAC. FLAC sections attached to internatio nal business (IB) courses, or which expand IB aspects of non-business courses, provide unique opportunity to integrate IB content training with foreign language training. The earliest CIBER-funded FLACs focused on obviously IB classese.g., Spanish and Portuguese FLACs associated with the Latin American Business Environment course offerings. A second phase extended them to international political science, international public relations courses and EU food marketing courses with readily identified IB components. The 2006-2008 period saw extension to colleges and courses not norma lly associated with IB, but nonetheless having global commerce and investment impli cations that could be drawn out in the FLAC sectioncourses in Health and Huma n Performance, Health Professions, and Urban Planning. A total of 16 CIBER-sponsored FLAC sec tions were offered in the 2006-07 and 2007-08 academic years. Effective marketing of foreign lang uage study to business students needs to reach undergraduates early in th eir UF careers, allowing time for incorporation into the 1

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four-year plan of study. A CIBERfunded ei ght minute video The Business of Learning Languages and Cultures will play in the Undergraduate Program Office, be highlighted on that offices web page and be available to faculty for showing in IB courses. Less expensive compared with semester-long programs, the popular STSA (short-term study abroad) is increasingly the venue of choice for undergraduates seeking an overseas experience in todays we ak-dollar global economy. During 2006-2008, CIBER sponsored development of new STSA opportunities based on tw o variants of the basic concept. In the tour model, students travel to various loca les in a country or a region. The 19-day summer 2008 Italian Food: From Production to Policy exemplifies such a model. Supported by funding from CI BER, the tour was developed by the UF IFAS departments of Food and Resource Ec onomics and Horticultural Science in partnership with the Italian Univ ersities of Palermo and Bologna. Students travelled extensively throughout Italy, visiting a vari ety of agricultural areas including citrus, grape, wine, olive, vegetable, wheat and deciduous crop regions as well as commercial fishing and cheese-making regions. The regulatory and trade policies that govern production and export, and that shape the competitive environment for US food products in Europe and European food pr oducts in the US, were studied along route as well as at the headquarter s of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome. Students earned 3 credits for the course. In the university model of the STSA, students go abroad to a specific facility that is the center for lect ures and visits (much like going on a semester abroad to a particular foreign university). UFs Paris Research Center provides opportunity for UF faculty to develop European STSA in this format. CIBER supported two such endeavors in Spring 2007: International Leadership: Adopting Businesses and Governments to New Realities (a 2-credit course offered over Spring Break in Paris by Director of UFs Public Utility Research Center (PURC), Dr. Mark Jamison) and Commodities to Cafs Agricultural and Food Marketing in France (a 2-credit course offered over the May Intersession period in Paris by Food and Resource Economics Associate Professor James Sterns.) Focus on Africa: Exposure to African issues was infused at all levels of the undergraduate business curriculum through new courses, new modules and new student project options. No business student avoids Principles of Macroeconomics, and indeed, the course is required for a number of non-bus iness majors at UF. Lack of examples from Africa in parts of the c ourse dealing with global m acroeconomics can establish a mindset of discounting the continent that is difficult to overcome in more advanced course offerings. With CIBER support, Afri can examples were developed for lecture usee.g., challenging students to use a basi c supply/demand framework to understand how developed nation subsidies of agricultura l products traded in international markets can adversely impact African suppliers and African participation in the global economy. At the upper division level, classes with student projects were particularly targeted for African infusion to encourage so me individual intensive study of the region. 2

PAGE 5

Af rican countries fairly naturally fall out as project regions in th e new course developed by CIBER Advisory Council Member and UF Distinguished Service Professor, Dr. Sanford Berg, Public Utility Economics: Inte rnational Infrastructure. The course innovatively inte grates undergraduate edu cation with UFs renowned International Training Program on Utility Regulation and Strategy. The latter, a joint project of PURC and the World Bank, has b een delivered twice annually for over 10 years. The intensive two-week course t eaches economic, technical and policy skills required to design and manage sustainable regulatory systems for infrastructure sectors. To date, more than 1800 delegates, repr esenting over 130 nations, have attended the program. Assigned projects in Public Utilities paired students with foreign attendees at the January 2007 program, providing an unusual opportunity for underg raduates to use personal contacts and interviews as resources for a semester-long foreign market study. A number of African nations emerge as poten tial study subjects as a consequence of relatively high African representation among the Training Program participants. More challenging was stimulation of student interest in African destinations for semester-long foreign market entry projects in The Firm in the Global Economy, a 4000level economics/business elective. A tripartite approach was initiated in spring 2008: (1) early introduction of Africa into the cour se through a semester-long lecture case study involving the region (the global market in cut flowers); (2) care ful explanation of potential project destinations, including in particular, photographs of African cities that dispel potential errone ous mud hut images; (3) linking of Africa destinations with firms that interest students. While pieces of (1) (3 ) had been tried in the past, it was the three together that proved successful. In particul ar, the proportion of student teams selecting a foreign market entry project with an Afr ican focus rose from 12.5% in Fall 2007 to 35.7% in Spring 2008. CIBER support of economist Dr. Renata Se rra in the Center for African Studies permits the offering of two undergra duate African business electives, Economic Development of Africa and Africa in the Global Economy. Following a Fall 2006 class size of 15 in the latter, enrollments jumped to 27 for Economic Development of Africa in Spring 2007 and currently (Fall 2008 ), 24 students are enrolled in Africa in the Global Economy. Highlight on evaluation: Standard UF student cour se evaluations have long been a key tool for CIBER assessment of new undergraduate IB course offerings. However, current analyses augment these outcomes by (a) providing pertinent professorial context of the ratings; (b) paying increased a ttention to the unrestricted comments section of the evaluations; and (c) wh ere feasible, administ ering preand posttests for explicit measurement of amount learne d. For example, all three upper division business electives with new or revised African content offered in Spring 2007 received very high overall student evaluations.6 to 4.7 on a scale of one (poor) to five (outstanding). However, it was obs erved that all three professors typically receive high 3

PAGE 6

student evaluations, lim iting the significance of such outcomes in assessing the impact of the African content. This was clearly illustrated by Public Utility Econom ics: International Infrastructure which dropped substantially in st udent rating between Spring 2007 and Spring 2008 when teaching responsibility for the course was re-assigned from Dr. Sanford Berg, one of the colleges recognized outstanding instructors and the pioneer of the training program the course linked to. Clearly course cont ent and format had not been specified with sufficient transf erability for the class to yet constitute a prototype. Augmenting student evaluations with instru ctor interviews and student interviews can be helpful. When an outstanding teacher indicates success in experimental module delivery, the generalization of the outcome to the average teacher context remains questionable, but a personal assessm ent of weakness or failure by such an instructor clearly indicates di fficulty of conveying content. Similarly, student interviews may reveal problems not evident from formal student course evaluations. For example, discussions with students in the pilot of Public Utility Economics: International Infrastructure reported some student concern and confusion over project assignmen ts, but a tendency to dismiss those on the formal student evaluations because Berg is so great. A consistent comment on student evaluations of both pilot CAC classes was desire for more content--in particular, request for a 3-credit course on the subject as opposed to the limited 1-credit treatment. CIBER reallocated funding to accommodate such an expansion. In addition, given the very specifi c topics of these classes, preand posttesting for learning measurement is being implemented. Upcoming undergraduate programs for UF students include in addition to extended Japanese and Chinese CAC courses and eight 2008-09 FLAC sections, a new one-credit CAC on the Business Culture of Africa. Anthropology Associate Professor Dr. Brenda Chalfin will pilot a new c ourse developed with CIBER funding, Anthropology and the New Economy: Anthropological Pe rspectives on Finance, Commerce and Neoliberalism. The class is intended both to encour age anthropology students to think about IB aspects of their major and to in troduce business students to anthropological perspectives on global trade. Also new in 2008-09 will be the Student Culture Consulting Corps (SCCC). The program evolved from the observation that in IB classes, student te ams with language and cultural expertise produce better global market plans. Linking a business class with a foreign language class and making combined student teams is one approach, and it has been done at UF. As a general model, howev er, it over-constrains the choice of target country of the IB projects. The experimental SCCC investigates an alternative. Students in upper division foreign language/foreign cu lture programs are invited to sign up as potential language and culture consultants to business projects. Depending on country distribution of IB classroom projects, individual SCCC members will be selected for 4

PAGE 7

basic training on the nature of global m arket entry business plans and be paid a stipend to act as consultants to an IB project. New CIBER-funded offerings will also impact undergraduates at colleges and universities other than UF. As discussed below in the section on Serving Faculty first products of the EFIBI ( Enhancing Floridas Internati onal Business Infrastructure ) program will upgrade IB offerings at six other Florida institutions of higher education: Barry University, Edward Waters College, Florida Southern College, Polk Community College, Southeastern University an d University of West Florida. In addition to recognizing the need to support IB development within its region as well as in Gainesville, UF CIBER also re sponds to the need to enhance specialized programs in areas of particular interest to national security wherever the expertise for such program development resides. He nce, CIBER is supporting a particularly innovative idea for teaching mid-east busine ss culture proposed by Dr. Annie Higgins, Assistant Professor of Arabic Language a nd Literature, Wayne State University, and Secretary/Treasurer of the US Syrian St udies Association. The class will examine currency as a key nexus between economy and culture in contemporary Arab and Islamic contexts and will also consider the issue of usury/interest in religious and economic terms, with a focus on Shari` a-based, interest-free banking. Graduate students Five graduate student short term st udy abroad (STSA) and summer study abroad programs in Latin America receive d CIBER funding support over the 2006-08 period. The International Financial Markets Study Tour primarily serves UF students, drawing participants from a variety of graduate programs including MBA, MAIB (Master of Arts in International Bu siness), MSF (Master of Science in Finance) and MALAS (Master of Arts in Latin American Studies). The tour combines classroom instruction with a week-long visit to financial institutions in Argentina, Brazil or Chile. The October 2006 tour went to Argentina and the October 2007 one visited Brazil. (See Appendix 2 for an itinerary of the 2007 Brazil tour.) The STSA complements UF CIBERs signature Business in Brazil program by providing an alternative overseas experience fo r UF graduate business students who lack the time needed for an extended study abroad. The Business in Brazil four-week summer program takes place in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, combining coursework on Brazilian business practices, site visits to compan ies, training in Brazilian Portuguese and immersion in Brazilian culture. Given th e specialized and in tensive nature of Business in Brazil, it draws participation from a national pool of student s. In the Summer 2007 and Summer 2008 offerings, 53 percent of program enrollees were from universities other than UF. Business climate implications of judicial reform in Latin America were featured in the new law seminar, Law and Policy in the Americas, delivered in the Spring 2007 5

PAGE 8

sem ester. To complement the course offering, and also to complement the International Financial Markets Study Tour with a new discipline-speci fic IB STSA, CIBER-supported development and delivery of the March 9-17, 2007 program Legal Institutions of the Americas Study Tour: Chile. Both graduate students and undergraduate students attended the February 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop. The program gave students an opportunity to lear n corporate perspectives on th e region from representatives of multiple industries and to gain insights on career experiences/opportunities in Latin America from recent graduates working in the private sector, in government agencies and in NGOs. (See Appendix 3 for the workshop agenda and speakers.) Recognizing the importance of training the future trainers, CIBER programs targeting graduate student IB research, and pr oviding graduate students experience delivering IB programs, are key co mponents for assuring impact of the grant beyond the period of funding. Multiple initiat ives address these goals: (a) funding of graduate students as research assistants on IB projects led by faculty; (b) funding for graduate students to travel abroad to conduct their own foreign IB research; (c) scholarships for UF doctoral students to at tend national CIBER seminars that acquaint Ph.D. students with frontiers of IB research in their discip line. Graduate students from business, journalism, agriculture, education a nd liberal arts and sciences benefitted from CIBER initiatives in group (a). They worked on projects that included analyzing the current Latin American business environment, econometrically estimating the impact of immigration regulation on US agricultural labor markets, assessing US competitiveness in global mobile media markets, and in global green-labeled food markets, organizing national and international IB academic conferences and devising new evaluation techniques for CIBER programs. Primary recipients of funding under group (b) engaged in research on Africa (see Focus on Africa below). CIBER additionally sponsored participation of two UF doctoral students at national Ph.D. seminarsJennife r Itzkowitz (Finance) and Gaurav Kapoor (Information Systems and Operations Mana gement). The Finance and Economics workshop was held at Columbia University in July 2007 and the Information Systems one was hosted at the University of Washingt on in June 2008. Each f eatured IB research leaders in their disciplines. (For a complete list of students supported by CIBER programs October 1, 2006 September 30, 2008, see Appendix 4.) Focus on Africa: Microfinance institutions (MFIs) and entrepreneurship were the nexus of Africa and IB for three CIBER travel grants supporting graduate student research projects. MBA student Torrey P eace examined the use of technology (SMART cards, ATMs, mobile phones, etc.) in Southern Africa (primarily Ta nzania) by MFIs and the impact of that usage on African societ y as well as its impact on the financial institution. Study results will be compared with similar research conducted in Mexico. 6

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Merise Jalali, Political Science, worked at Nysigiso, the second largest MFI in Mali, analyzing its prospects fo r self-sufficiency and evalua ting impact of its financial services program for women on gender equa lity. Anthropology doctoral student Michelle Edwards used CIBER funding to pur sue her dissertation research on The Effects of Globalization on African-American and Ghanaian Entrepreneurs: A Case Study on Ethnic Retail Niches in Atlanta, USA and Accra, Ghana. Highlight on evaluation: The STSAs present particular evaluation challenges. It is straightforward to ask participants to assess logistics and visit/lecture quality. Indeed, this has been done fo r some time with both STSAs and Business in Brazil and an accumulation of such reports formed the basis for a major program revision of the latter in Fall 2007. More difficult is measuring wh at was actually learned or accomplished by the tour experience per se Rarely is the purpose of an STSA to learn factsthose are covered in the classroom components prior to the tour or from ma terials distributed on the tour. Nor is the purpose to collect data or develop ideas for a specific study or to become part of a network that supports futu re research. These goa ls do characterize a number of initiatives that CIBER undertakes, and existing evaluation instruments, both indirect (e.g., dissertations produced, working papers produced and articles published) and direct (e.g., post-program participant in terview), capture information needed to evaluate effectiveness. Again, however, thes e evaluation models have limited relevance to STSA programs. Typically, the pu rpose of the STSA is to impact perceptions of doing business in the country and perceptions are quite different from facts or research topics or networks. New preand post-trip surveys allow quantitative identification of changes in student business perceptions of a count ry as a consequence of the trip per se. The surveys were piloted in the Fall 2007 International Financial Markets Study Tour to Brazil. (See Appendix 5 for the survey instrument.) On a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), the surveys found an increase in mean and reduction in variance of perceived investment opportunities in Brazil. A simila r result characterized percep tions of the importance of speaking Portuguese in doing busin ess in the country. In cont rast, the tour resulted in little change in either bimodal responses to quality of the Brazilian legal environment or normally distributed responses to challenges of the countrys political environment. Such outcomes go well beyond those of historical evaluation instrume nts which generally simply documented that the tour was a positive and memorable experience. They provide more insight into what may be the genuine value added of the tour and hence, can usefully be the basis both for tour re vision and for allocating scarce funding for developing similar tours. Upcoming for graduate students are the Spring 2009 International Financial Markets Study Tour (to Chile), Summer 2009 Business in Brazil program, November 78, 2008 fourth biennial Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop, opportunities for participation as research assi stants in new CIBER projects, and travel funding for attendance at docto ral IB workshops and for c onduct of IB dissertation research. 7

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New in format will be an African-focused faculty-student Research Tutorial Abroad (RTA). The RTA concept arose as an alternative to current in itiatives that fund individual graduate research on the continent an d to a potential African STSA or an extended summer program in Africa modeled after Business in Brazil. The structured and faculty-led STSA or Business in Brazil type programs attract graduate students interested in the region, but not at the point of tr aveling and conducting research on their own abroad. However, there is not a clear destin ation locale for African business analogous to say, Sao Paulo for Brazilian business or Seoul for South Korean business. In addition, the vast size of the continent and it s infrastructure limitations discourage travel to multiple locations on a single trip. These constraints render highly questionable how successful the STSA or Business in Brazil model might be if applied to the African situation. In the RTA program, faculty members submit proposals for taking 2-3 students abroad to Africa to conduct research on a specific topic for 3-6 weeks. Successful applicants receive $5,000 to subsidize the faculty membe rs participation and $5.000 to subsidize student participation. The research topic defines specific African destination-avoiding the destination selec tion problem of the STSA or Business in Brazil approachesbut the faculty members presen ce and organization provides the structure absent in current CIBER programs subsidizing graduate student research on African IB topics. Serving faculty Through a variety of initiatives, CIBER supports specific faculty projects and study tours that enhance IB research and build IB teaching expertise. CIBER-sponsored faculty development programs encourage UF f aculty and instructors from other Florida schools to develop IB aspects of their courses and their research age ndas. A lecture series brings distinguished speakers to campus and a multidisciplinary workshop brings together faculty from diverse colleges, and fr om outside the UF campus, to learn from the perspectives of other disciplines. Hosting and organizing scholarly IB conferences serve faculty from across the nation and around the globe. UF CIBERs oldest program, the Multid isciplinary IB Research Workshop, will celebrate its tenth annive rsary this fall. Since its inception in October 1998, faculty and graduate students from more than 18 depa rtments and eight colleges across UF have attended this monthly luncheon seminar series. Funded by the Warrington College of Business Administration (WCBA) and organized by CIBER, the workshop provides a forum for IB-interested faculty to gather from diverse locales across campus. Participants discuss new research topics and teaching innovations and they learn from presentations by leading IB scholars and business practit ioners. (See Appendix 6 for a list of 20062007 and 2007-2008 workshop presenters and topics.) Exceptionally prestigious IB researchers are brought to the UF campus through the annual Bradbury Distinguished Lecture on International Economics, co-sponsored by 8

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the Bradbury endowm ent, CIBER and UFs Pub lic Policy Research Center. The March 26, 2007 presentation featured Dr. Maurice Obstfeld, Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley, speaking on the topic, Financial Globalization in Historical Perspective . Dr. Phillippe Aghion, Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics, Harvard University, delivered the 2008 lectur e on April 9, addressi ng the topic, Growth and the Financing and Governance of Higher Education. Eight grants for faculty IB scholarly research were awarded, two in each of the colleges of business, journalism and agriculture, one in the Center for African Studies and one outside UF. Assistant Professor of Management, Dr. Gwendolyn Lee, examined the issue of standards setting in cooperative technical orga nizations (CTOs). Standards adoption is an important strategic goal of technology-intensive industries and competitiveness of firms is enhanced if their innovations are adopted as global standard. Relatively little, however, is understood about the intricacies of standards setting in an open community as opposed to standards setting at more traditional organizations. Three working papers were completed on (1) the eff ect of co-authoring networks on the spread of developing internet standards; (2) coopera tion vs. competition in standards setting; (3) a network perspective on interface standardization. Funding support from the 2002-06 grant was continued for the Pathways project, Pathways for Women to Obtain Positions of Organizational Leadership. The ultimate goal of the research is identification of critical factors that promote or inhibit the rise of women to positions of leadership in the multinational business context. Such identification will potentially permit more effective facilitation of advancement in situations where currently the pathways are blocked. The projects principal researchers are senior scholar s at UF (Dr. Virginia Maurer, Huber Hurst Professor in Business Law and Legal Studies, and Dr. A ngel Kwolek-Folland, Professor of History and Womens Studies), University of Mi chigan and University of Indiana. Dr. Sylvia Chan-Olmsted, Flanagan Professor of Telecommunication and Associate Dean for Research, College of J ournalism and Communica tions, collected and analyzed primary data in four countries to determine factors cont ributing to a nations successful development of a mobile communi cations industry. Five refereed journal articles ( International Journal on Me dia Management (2), Jour nal of Media Business Studies, International Journal of Mo bile Marketing, New Media and Society ) report first results of the current research as well as final results of earlier CIBER-sponsored investigations. A Summer 2008 research grant permitted in itiation of the multi-year study Diffusing Anti-American, Anti-Capitalism and Anti-Globalization Sentiments in Major Latin American Markets. Directed by College of Jour nalism and Communications Associate Professors Dr. Juan-Carlos Molleda and Dr. Marilyn Roberts, the research looks for effective models businesses can em ploy to counter growing anti sentiments that raise risk and reduce opportunity for US firms in Latin America. 9

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Econom etric analysis of the NAWS (National Agricultural Worker Survey) data has identified ways in which the US agricultu ral labor supply market changed in the post 9-11 era. Study results were the basis for the February 26, 2007 keynote address at the Southern Seed Certification Association Annual Meeting deliv ered by research initiative director, Dr. Robert Emerson, Professor of Food and Resource Economics. Material covered in the talk was subsequently published in Choices and a second paper specific to agricultural labor mark ets in the sugarcane industry in Florida was selected for presentation at the American Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meetings in Portland, OR, July 2007. Only preliminary analysis has been completed on the second CIBER-supported agricultural research grant, EUREPGAP and GLOBALGAP International Certification Standards and thei r Opportunities for Floridas Food Sector. The final two research awards were commissioned CIBER studies. Renowned business language pioneer, Dr. Christine Gro ss, was funded to update her classic 1980s survey of US business language instruct ion as part of UF CIBERs hosting the 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference (see entry below). Dr Renata Serra, economist with the UF Center for African Studies and Coordinator of Cotton Research for the global African Power and Politics Program, is preparing a background piece on child labor for use with IB case studies on the subject. It will provide an updated look at humane issues and business best practices, incorporating some of the very recent ch ild-agent literature on the subject. Given long lags in the academic researc h, review and publication process, current and recent CIBER research grants often yield on ly tables of dataor outlines of proofs-while they are in effect. Working papers a nd conference presentations appear later and actual publications often long post-date the peri od of grant support. In addition to articles in International Journal on Media Management Journal of Media Business Studies, International Journal of Mobile Marketing, New Media and Society and Choices noted above, scholarly publications in the 2006-2008 period reflectiv e of past CIBER research support include IB-rela ted articles in Economics Letters, Compara tive Studies in Society and History, American Behaviora l Scientist, Journal of African Business, Journal of Labor Economics, Review of International Economics, Economic Theory, Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Emerging Markets Review, Applied Economics Letters, American Journal of Agricultural Economics numerous book chapters, and a case study book supporting the teaching of Business Portuguese, Brazilians Working with Americans: Cultural Case Studies, by Orlando Kelm and Mary Risner (University of Texas Press). Course development grants to faculty extend beyond Gainesville and encourage instructors at smaller institutions of higher education in Florida to upgrade and expand IB offerings. Enhancing Floridas Internati onal Business Infrastructure ( EFIBI ) is a multidisciplinary competitive small gran ts program to help fill gaps in funding opportunities for IB education and trai ning innovation. Such opportunities vary considerably across Floridas complex higher education system with its 11 state universities, 28 community colleges and 61 priv ate colleges and universities. For faculty in units with endowment funds and/or exte rnal profit-making programs, income from 10

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these sources m ay provide needed funding for individual faculty initia tives. For others, there is a critical mass of talent at the home institution that can be assembled to attract national funding, allowing financing of a specific effort as part of a broader program. For many educators in Florida, however, neither of these opportunities exists. Consequently, initiatives that would yield high returns to the states IB infrastructure growth go unimplemented. The EFIBI program specifically targets th ese missed opportunities by awarding IB development grants to faculty at smaller in stitutions in the stat e. Two-page proposals and simplified budgets keep applications manageable for such faculty. An EFIBI Advisory Group of business, social science a nd foreign language faculty from the states smaller colleges and community colleges assi sts in disseminating gr ant information and overseeing program implementation. Spanning the state from Pensacola to Miami, both public and private instituti ons were represented in the 2008 awards. Funded projects ranged from adding basic IB courses to the curriculum to adding unique IB opportunitiese.g., a course on Religion, Spirituality and International Business. (See Appendix 7 for a list of 2008 EFIBI award recipients and projects funded.) Innovation in business language in struction is specifically targeted by the national CIBER Business Language Research and Teaching (BLRT) program. Supported by a consortium of CIBERs, the new competitive grant program gives three awards each year to subsidize research leading to innovation in business language pedagogy. Recipients of the first annual awards in 2007 were from the University of Pennsylvania, University of Hawaii and Roger Williams Univ ersity. Subjects of the winning proposals were use of international business case studies in teaching business Japanese, a survey of techniques for teaching business Chinese, a nd research on more effective methods for teaching Chinese language and culture through Chinese commercials. 2008 awards went to instructors at San Diego State University, George Washington University and Ohio State University. Projects focused on integrat ing cases into business language instruction, conceptualizing face in m odern China and understanding how Asian second languages are actually used in business careers. Locally, 2006-2008 UF CIBER funds for UF IB course development were relatively concentrated in the areas of business language and culture, supporting new FLAC and new CAC development and technolog ical enhancements to business Japanese instruction. More than 150 language professionals from around the nation attended the 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference organized and hosted by UF CIBER at the Hilton St.Pete Bayfront, St. Petersburg, Florida, April 9-11. The conference is the premier annual national meeting for faculty e ngaged in teaching foreign languages to the professions. The unexpectedly hi gh attendance (up over 50% from 2007) reflected meticulous planning efforts of the Program Chair, UF Senior Lecturer in Spanish, Dr. Greg Moreland, and careful attention to logi stics details provided by CIBER Assistant Director, Isabelle Winzeler. Recent meeti ng evaluations were thoroughly studied and acted on, introducing new content sessions and designing not just sessions, but an 11

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entire conf erence experience with an array of formal and informal learning, presenting and networking opportunities. Planners reached out across different languages, different aspects of teaching business foreign languages and to different types of persons engaged in such teaching--university faculty, comm unity college and secondary school faculty, doctoral students in foreign la nguages and business practitioners. Conference sessions addressed use of t echnology in business language instruction, perspectives of business professionals and business professors, in tegrating culture and language education, innovative a pplications of business case studies and advertisements, and nine specific foreign languagesSpan ish, French, German, Portuguese, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic and Hindi (S ee Appendix 8 for a conference agenda.) Hosting the conference was a fitting kick -off to UF CIBERs celebration of its tenth anniversary in 2008. At its incepti on in 1998, UF CIBER wa s on nobodys list for planning a national conference on business langu age instruction. Indeed, it was a business language backwaternot even offering busin ess Spanishonly commercial French and German. During the ensuing 10 years, a va riety of talented a nd dedicated language faculty, supported with rela tively modest CIBER funding, dr amatically altered that landscape. The commercial French and Ge rman classes were augmented by business Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, and Ar abic; 8 business FLAC sections per year were created and language faculty added bus iness culture courses on China, Japan and Africa. UF rose from a backwater to a natio nal leader, noted for its creativity in course design, linking business content and foreign la nguage training, and effective use of technology and cases in commercial language in struction. It is difficult to think of a program that more dramatically illustrates the high potenti al impact of CIBER funding than the growth in UF business language opportunities over the past 10 years. Two-week study abroad faculty tours provide background on business climate in a major world region, create the persona l overseas examples that make IB come alive in the classroom, and offer networ king opportunities for future IB teaching and research projects. Each tour is a combinati on of lectures and site visits, organized by a lead CIBER: Western Europe (Univers ity of Memphis CIBE R); Eastern Europe (University of Pittsburgh CIBER); MERCO SURBrazil, Argentina and Chile (FIU CIBER); China (University of Denver CIBER) India-Delhi (University of Connecticut CIBER), India-Mumbai/Bangalore (FIU CI BER); Sub-Saharan Africa (University of South Carolina CIBER); Vietnam (University of Hawaii and University of Wisconsin CIBERs). Each of the four Asian tours occurs in the first half of January, a time that conflicts with teaching for many UF facult y. Consequently, UF CIBER generally cosponsors and funds participation in the late May Western Europe, Eastern Europe, SubSaharan Africa and MERCOSUR tours. WCBA annually supports tour participation by four business faculty (or staff) and CIBER funds at le ast one non-UF business faculty member to participate on the Sub-Sahara n Africa tour (either a non-business faculty member at UF or a business faculty memb er not at UF). CIBER funding for tour participation is also available to faculty at smaller colleges and universities in Florida 12

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through the EFIBI com petitive grants program. In 2007 and 2008, WCBA and UF CIBER together sponsored ten faculty participants. (See Appendix 9 for participant-tour details.) Grant writing support for HBCU faculty is emphasized in the Globalizing Business Schools CIBER consortium program. A joint endeavor of 10 CIBERs and the Institute for International Public Policy, the initiative pairs each participating CIBER with one of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Each CIBER assists its HBCU partner in preparing an internationalization plan for its business curriculum and in writing a BIE grant application to fund plan implementation. UF CIBERs HBCU partner in the current funding cycle is Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach. Although plans for submitting a grant proposal proceeded on target in Fall 2006 and early Spring 2007, they have since faltered with the departure of the initia l key faculty member from Bethune-Cookman and the subsequent w ithdrawal of his replacement from the project. In Fall 2006, UF CIBER assisted faculty at Florida A&M University (FAMU) prepare an application for a second two-year BIE grant. FAMU was UF CIBERs Globalizing Business Schools partner in the previous gr ant cycle. Its 2004 BIE application was funded and the IB program implemented was recognized for excellence in February 2007 when FAMU was designated a winner of the Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovative International Education in the area of study abroad. The second FAMU BIE application submitted with UF CIBER assistance in Fall 2006 was also funded. Focus on Africa: Several previous sections highlight CIBER support for faculty African IB development through research grants, course development grants, funded participation in the two-week study t our of Sub-Saharan Af rica and the proposed new Research Tutorial Abroad. The single major African IB program of the 2006-2008 period, however, was co-hosting the 9th A nnual Conference of the International Academy of African Business and Development (IAABD) at the University of Florida Hilton Conference Center, May 20-24, 2008. UFs Center for African Studies joined CIBER as co-host. Total attendance was 158 academics from 19 countries, including 10 African nations. Nine sets of four concurrent sessions accommodated 125 scholarly research presentations that spanned a broad range of multi-disciplinary issues related to the conference theme of Global and Local Dynamics in African Business and Development. Plenary se ssions included presentations by two African Ambassadors to the US (Republic of Zambia and Malawi) a nd the Director of the US Department of Commerce African Office. From the perspective of l onger-term development of an African IB program at UF, the most significant aspect of the c onference was organizing and convening the UF Faculty Conference Steering Committee. Considerable African IB experience and interest exists in Gainesville, but it is scattered across numerous colleges, departments 13

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and centers. Conference planning provided a focal point to bring key m embers of this group together in a jo int effort and begin building the cross-campus relationships essential for longer run African IB program development. Steering Committee members represented both junior and senior faculty from eight colleges (agriculture, business, engineering, fine arts, health & human performance, journali sm, law, and liberal arts & sciences) and from a wider variety of specific disciplines. The Committee was headed by Conference Chair, Dr. Anita Spring, Profe ssor of Anthropology. (See Appendix 10 for a complete list of Steering Committee members.) Highlight on evaluation: Cost-effectiveness requires that evaluation consider not just whether a program was successful, but whether it was significantly more effective than a less costly altern ative. The open-ended, proposal-based EFIBI program is clearly more cumbersome to administer than more structured programs. For example, historically some CIBERs ha ve supported regional faculty participation in specific CIBER IB workshops such as the University of Memphis annual Globalization Seminars. The latter provide instruction and materials for developing basic IB courses (Intro to IB, International Marketing, Inte rnational Management, Intern ational Finance and Global Supply Chain Management). The applicati on process for such a limited program is simple, cost per award is known and implem entation requires only one inter-CIBER fund transfer. Response to the first EFIBI call for proposals in Spri ng 2007 was disappointing despite extensive sample materials illust rating what proposed initiatives and budgets should look like. Follow-up evaluation by the EFIBI Advisory Group suggested three potential problems: (1) insufficient lead time; (2) skepticism on the part of foreign language and social science faculty that they could in fact comp ete successfully with business faculty in the program; (3) too bur densome an application procedure. In response to (1), lead time for the Spring 2008 competition was increased and concern (2) was addressed by preparation of separate mark eting materials for busin ess, social science and foreign language faculty. In addition, an alternative limited pr ogram, restricted to funding attendance at an es tablished CIBER globalizati on or business language workshop, was introduced with an extrem ely simple application process. Response increased substantially in Spring 2008. Twenty-seven percent of applicants opted for an alternative limite d program. For the other 73 percent, an alternative program was not a useful option. Relatively few faculty at an institution, and each with few degrees of freedom in teaching re sponsibilities, dictated that effective IB enhancement be very specialized to institu tional capacity and expertise. Particularly interesting to note was that the 27 percent we re all from universi ties within the public State University System (only the smaller such universities since large institutions like Florida State or University of South Florida were ineligible for program participation) or from community colleges. There were no applications from these types of institutions to the unrestricted program. In contrast, all ap plications from small private colleges and universities were to the unres tricted program. These early evaluation results suggest a simple yes or no answer will not be forthcoming on whether a limited program 14

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would be just as effective, but cheaper to adm inistrate, compared with the unrestricted one. Indeed, the answer may well be dependent on target regional institution group. Upcoming programs for faculty will primarily continue existing formatsthe monthly Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series, grants for research and new course development, funding of participat ion in two-week study tours abroad, and support for non-UF faculty through the BLRT, Globalizing Business Schools and EFIBI programs. New will be the RTA (Research Tutorial Abroad) that will fund a faculty member and two to three students to conduct African IB research abroad. Funding preference balances a variety of c onsiderations that include: (1) further contribution to developing an African IB program; (2) responsiveness to priorities specified by the US Department of Education for the 2006-2010 funding cyclenamely, innovative approaches to teaching foreign languages (especially less commonly taught ones) and programs addressing issues of national security and US global competitiveness; (3) expected impact--innovation and potential to serve as a national prototype in new course development and probability of final scholarly journal publication for academic research; (4) stimulation of IB interests in future academic leaders--todays doctoral students and junior faculty. In addition, although we stand at the mid-point of the current 2006-2010 CIBER funding cycle, the grant a pplication for the 2010-2014 period will be submitted in November 2009. Consequently, Spring and Summer 2009 are the times for pursuing new partnerships and for seed funding of such partnership programs th at may be a foundation for more comprehensive initiatives in the next proposal. Serving business Annual publication of The Latin American Business Environment Report is a signature UF CIBER program serving state, regional and national businesses. Other business programs vary year-to-year in res ponse to current issues and needs and include conferences, forums, workshops, publications and presentations. The Latin American Business Environment Report (LABER) is as an approximately 50-page annual report, di sseminated to over 2000 educators and businesses, providing a comprehensive ex amination of Latin American business conditions. It tracks social, political and econom ic trends both for the region as a whole and for its 20 largest markets individua lly. The fall 2006 edition was augmented with special analysis of judicial reform in South America and wa s featured in the November 2006 cover story of Florida Trend, the states premier business magazine. (See Appendix 11 for an Executive Summary, Table of Contents and List of Tables for the 2007 edition of LABER ). The annual Legal and Policy in the Americas Conference, co-sponsored by CIBER, complements the new legal components of LABER. Held in Gainesville, FL, 15

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April 11-12, the 2007 meeting featured se ssions on such tim ely IB topics as Organized Crime and Terrorism: Combating their Threat to Economic and Political Stability in the Americas and Lessons and Challenges of MERCOSURs Trade, Business and Dispute Settlement Systems. Featured speakers included form er US Senator Bob Graham and Minister Carlos Mrio da S ilva Velloso, Past President, Supreme Federal Tribunal of Brazil. Held in Rio de Janeiro and Cu ritiba, Brazil, May 26-30, the 2008 meeting examined IB-relevant topics of land te nure and property rights issues, and their relationship to violence and instability, and the proposed Inter-American Ethanol Alliance to create regional/global trading in biofuels. The 2007 Florida International Summit, held in Jacksonville, February 6, was attended by more than 150 bus iness practitioners, policy make rs and academics. Planned by a consortium of state university globaliz ation centers and state and local economic entities, the conference examined global market opportunities for Florida goods and logistics of taking advantage of those opportuni ties. Nearly 400 part icipated in the 2008 Summit which took place April 18 in Orlando and addressed the theme The State of Global Finance and Trade. Trade and security issues were the focus of national conference cosponsorships. Approximately 135 persons attended the December, 2006 National Forum on Trade Policy (NFTP). Co-sponsored by a consortium of CIBERs that included UF, the day and a half long program in Seattle a ddressed the theme of Trade and Regional Prosperity through keynote speakers, r oundtables and case studies. The NFTP emphasizes the non-homogeneous impact of na tional trade policy on sub-national areas and the need to develop regional, state and sub-state planning capacity that can effectively assist an area in adapting to the specific effects of globalization it is experiencing. The December 2007 NFTP was held at the Stamford Ma rriott in Stamford, CT and was organized around the theme Free Trade: US Comparative Advantage in the Global Market. It included extensive disc ussion of offshore outsourcing and linkages to improve US competitiveness. Organized by the University of Maryland CIBER, UF CIBER co-sponsored the day and a half long conference on Global Security: Challenges and Opportunities June 16-17, 2008 in Washington, D.C. Keynote addresses were delivered by Jay M. Cohen, Under Secretary for Science and Technology, US Department of Homeland Security, and Ronald Knode, Director, Leading Edge Forum Associate, Computer Sciences Corporation. Panelists from business discussed technology, innovation and global security, doing business with the Department of Homeland Security and enterprise resilience in an age of turbulence. June 17 featured a journalist panel discussing Americas War on Terrorism and Implications for Business. Panelists included a former CNN White House Correspondent US Economic Correspondent of the Financial Times, Washington Bureau Chief for Al-Safir (a Lebanese Daily) and a Reuters reporter. Attendance of over 80 reflected a variety of interested partiesacademics, MBA students, business executives government officials, NGO staffers and journalists. 16

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Representatives of the United Nati ons, the International Advertising Association, Latin American foundations and global public relations agencies presented case studies and best practices to 175 persons attending the February 8, 2008 conference on Multi-Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications in the Americas: Business, Community and Government. The two-day program was organized and funded by UFs Center for Latin American Studies College of Journalism and Communications and CIBER. In addition to the live atte ndees, many more viewed the conference by webcast in six Latin American countries (B razil, Colombia, Chile, Panama, Argentina, and Mexico) and three European ones (UK, Portugal and Spain) as well as the US, Canada and Puerto Rico. (See Appe ndix 12 for a conference agenda.) PBS WUFT-TV on June 23, 2007 broadcast the CIBER-funded panel discussion organized and recorded by students in the College of Journalism and Communications on Facing the Music? Microsoft, Apple a nd International Antitrust Law in the EU. The expert panel included Dr. Andrew Chin, professor of antitrust, intellectual property, and patent law at the University of North Carolina School of Law, Dr. Jesper Stromback, Professor in Media and Communication from Mid-Sweden University and Research Director at the Demokratiinstitutet Centre for Political Communication Research, Dr. Clifford Jones, UF specialist in European Union competition law and a visiting Fulbright sc holar at the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law in Munich, and Dr. Mark Jamison, Director of PURC, UF. In January 2007, the Daytona Beach PBS station broadcast a 30-minute segment on Cuba after Castro. It featured thr ee panelists, including UF CIBER Associate Director, Dr. Terry McCoy. Other Latin Amer ican outreach presentations of Dr. McCoy included contributions to both the 2007 and 2008 Florida International Summits, a February 2007 presentation at the Air Force Academy Assembly on Continent at a Crossroads: Prosperity, Justic e and Security in South Ameri ca, and analysis of Latin Americas Turn to the Left: What does it Mean for Business? for the Hispanic Bar Association of Northeast Florida and the Fi rst Coast Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Focus on Africa: Plans are in process of being finalized for the African IB conference, Doing Business with Africa: Problems, Practice and Potential, October 29, 2008 in Tampa. The half-day-plus-lunch program features plenary sessions on understanding challenges to doing business wi th Africa, learning from African trade experiences of Florida firms, and current tr ends in policy, development and competition. Breakout sessions will accommodate diverse African IB interests of the Tampa area business, education and public sectors. Participants can select in-depth coverage on cultural issues of doing busine ss with Africa, federal/state/local programs to promote trade with the continent, or evaluating regional o pportunities using country risk analysis and tracking evolving regul atory environments. 17

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18 The event is sponsored by CIBER and th e Center for African Studies at UF and by the International Affairs Office, the De partment of Women Studies and the Patel Center for Global Solutions at th e University of South Florida. Highlight on evaluation: Targeted external evaluation of key initiatives (as opposed to broad overall UF CIBER program evaluation) was introduced in August 2007. UF CIBERs signature annual outreach publication, The Latin American Business Environment Report was evaluated for form and content by Ambassador Myles R. R. Frechette, a 35-year veteran of the region w ho served as US Ambassador to Colombia, Assistant US Trade Representative for La tin America, director of two non-profit organizations focused on Latin America a nd who currently is a trade and business consultant specializing in the region. The seven-page single-space evaluati on report thoroughly examined each of the first eight issues of LABER individually (1999 through 2006) as well as considering elements common to all editions and trends in material presented. It applauded specific format changes while warning of the potential negative impact on bus iness readership of creeping report length. It point ed to content enhancements that added significant value e.g., the paradigm shift of 2002, inclusion of regulatory regime starting in 2004 and the legal environment added in 2006but reminded the authors not to lose focus on key broad issues such as growth sustainability. The general conclusion on the eight issues of LABER: They are exactly as advertised; independent, objective and academi cally grounded analyses of the business and investment environments in Latin America. . When you read all of these reports you realize the magnificent contribution th e LABERs have made to understanding developments in the region from 1999 th rough 2006. Without a doubt the LABERs are the most methodical, concis e and objective analyses I have read about these developments. Upcoming business outreach includes the 2008 Latin American Business Environment Report (available in early October), Doing Business with Africa: Problems, Practice and Potential (October 29, 2008, Tampa, FL), the 2008 National Forum on Trade Policy (October 2-3, 2008, San Diego) and the 2009 Florida International Summit (February 18, 2009, Tampa) Planned activities each year constitute only a portion of CIBER business outreach. The remainder is flexible, allowing response to critical new topics as they emerge.

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Appendices

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List of Appendices Pages 1. Japanese Business Culture: Schedule of Topics 1-3 2. 2007 International Financial Markets Study Tour : Itinerary 4-5 3. 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop: 6-8 Agenda and Speakers 4. Students Supported by CI BER Funding 9-11 5. International Financial Markets Tour Evaluation Survey 12 6. CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Workshop Programs 13-14 7. Enhancing Floridas Internati onal Business Infrastructure (EFIBI): 15 2008 Awards 8. 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference : Agenda 16-20 9. Faculty Participants in Overseas FDIB Programs 21 10. 9th Annual Conference of the International Academy of African 22 Business and Development: UF Steering Committee Members 11. 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report: 23-26 Executive Summary, Table of Contents and List of Tables 12. 57th Annual Latin American Studi es Conference Agenda: 27-30 Multi-Sector Partnerships and Strategic Communications in the Americas: Business, Community and Government

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Appendix 1 : Japanese Business Culture: Schedule of Topics Instructor: Dr. Susan Kubota COURSE OBJECTIVES This course is designed for students who wish to acquire a broader understanding of prevailing values, attitudes, behavior patte rns, and communication styles in modern Japan, especially in regard to doing business with Japan. We will explore cross-cultural issues by reading essays from the perspective of Japan itself as well as from an external view, that of Western society and culture. We will discuss mutual assumptions, unconscious strategies, and the different mech anics that form barriers to communication between Japanese and non-Japanese, a nd how cultural differences can create misunderstanding during negotiatio ns between companies and countries. Specific areas of Japanese business culture such as impor tant cultural values, social relationships, business etiquette, business communication, th e structure and hier archy of Japanese companies, gender issues, and strategies for successful working re lationships in Japan will be explored. COURSE MATERIALS Required Textbook/Workbook/CDs: 1. The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture edited by Roger J. Davies and Osamu Ikeno. Tuttle Publishing, Rutland, VT, 2002. ISBN 978-0-8048-3295-3. (JM) 2. Japanese Business Culture and Practices: A Guide to Twenty-First Century Japanese Business by John P. Alston and Isao Takei. iUniverse, Inc., New York, 2005. ISBN 13-978-0-595-35547-1. (JBCP) 3. Different Games, Different Rules: Why Americans & Japanese Misunderstand Each Other, by Haru Yamada. Oxford Univer sity Press, New York, 1997. ISBN 0-19-515485-1. (DG) SCHEDULE OF TOPICS 1 General discussion about Japan ove rview of country, population, political system, etc. Discussion about Western perceptions and stereotypes concerning Japan and the Japanese, as well as Japanese business 2 JM : The Japanese Ie System, p. 119-126; Iitoko-Dori : Adopting Elements of Foreign Culture p. 127-133; The Doo spirit of Japan, p. 71-82; Bigaku The Japanese Sense of Beauty, p. 35-50; Wabi-Sabi : Simplicity & Elegance as Japanese Ideals of Beauty, p. 223-232. JBCP : Introduction, p. xvii-xxi; The Si gnificance of Belonging, 1.1, p. 1-8 DG : Ch. 1, Two Stories, Two Games, p. 3-21 3 JM : Shuudan Ishiki : Japanese Group Consciousness, p. 195-199; Hedataru to Najimu: Japanese Personal Space, p. 109-113; Kenkyo : The Japanese Virtue of CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 Appendix 1: Japanese Business Culture 1

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Modesty, p. 143-151; Aimai : Am biguity & the Japanese, p. 9-16; Bushidoo: The Way of the Warrior, p. 41-50; Giri : Japanese Social Obligations, p. 95-101. JBCP : The On Society, 1.2, p. 8-9 4 JM : Sempai-Koohai : Seniority Rules in Japa nese Relations, p. 187-194; Amae : The Concept of Japanese Dependence, p. 17-21; Honne to Tatemae: Private vs. Public Stance in Japan, p. 115-118; p. 26-27; p. 41-50; p. 95-102. JBCP : Honne and Tatemae, 1.7, p. 19-22; Honne Tatemae and Negotiations, 4.18, p. 118; Trust, Benevolence, & Amae 1.8, p. 20; Amae and Negotiations, 4.17, p. 117-118; The Japanese View of Time, 1.3, p. 9-13; Friendships, 1.9, and The Hierarchical Society, 1.10, p. 22-25; Ageism in Japanese Society and at Work, 1.11, p. 26-27 DG : Ch. 2, Communication Equipment, p. 23-35 5 JM : Uchi to Soto : Dual Meanings in Japane se Human Relations, p. 217-222; Haragei : An Implicit Way of Communicating in Japan, p. 103-108 JBCP : Language, 1.5, p. 30-34; The Hai ku Society, 1.6, p. 34-35; Polite Restraint, 2.4, p. 42-43; Never Sa y No, 2.5, p. 43-44; Conversational Feedback, 2.6, p. 44-45. DG : Ch. 3, Speak for Yourself, Listen to Others, p. 37-51 6 JM : Gambari : Japanese Patience & Determination, p. 83-93 JBCP : Be Patient, 4.25, p. 123; The Importance of Work in Japanese Culture, 1.14, p. 29-30; The Importance of Educa tion, 1.13, p. 27-28; Work is Life, 3.1, p. 71 7 JBCP: The First Meeting, 2.8, p. 48-49; Pointi ng and Other Gestures, 2.9, p. 4950; Laughter & Smiles, 2.10, p. 50-51; Ti tles & Names, 2.11, p. 51-52; General Appearance, 2.12, p. 52-53; Gene ral Gift Giving, 2.13, p. 53-56 DG : Ch. 4, Taking Care of Business, p. 53-69 & Ch. 5, Open for Business, p. 71-81 8 JM : Chinmoku : Silence in Japanese Communication, p. 51-60; Zootoo: The Japanese Custom of Gift-Giving, p. 233-243 JBCP : Ch. 4, Negotiations: p. 104-116 Introduction 4.1, The Negotiating Mindset, 4.2, First Socialize, 4.3, Know ing the Priorities, 4.4, The Uses of Silence, 4.5, Slow Decisions, 4.6, Preparations, 4.7, The Invisible Negotiators, 4.8, Gift Giving 4.9, Who Speaks First, 4.10, Never Interrupt, 4.11, Letters of Understanding 4.12, Ask Questions, 4.13, Affirmative Responses 4.14, Dislike of Certainty, 4.15 DG : Ch. 5, Open for Business, p. 71-81 continued 9 JM : Nemawashi : Laying the Groundwork in Japan, p. 159-164; Amakudari : Descent from Heaven, p. 23-24 JBCP : Work is War, 3.2, p. 73-75; The W ill to Work, 3.3, p. 76; The Five Ss and the Search for Quality, 3.4, Decision-Making, 3.5, p. 77-79; Ch. 3, pp. 79-91 Loyalty, 3.6, Lifetime Employment 3.7, Networking, 3.8, Open Offices, 3.9, Written Materials, 3.10, Success is Incremental, 3.11, The Soomu Bu and Kokusai Bu Divisions, 3.12 DG : Ch. 6, Scoring Points, p. 83-94 10 No class Spring Break 11 DG : Ch. 7, Support Network, p. 95-104 CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 Appendix 1: Japanese Business Culture 2

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 Appendix 1: Japanese Business Culture 3 JBCP : Ch. 3, pp. 91-102 -Giving a Speech, 3.13, Holidays, 3.14, Meetings Japanese Style, 3.15.1, Meetings Etiquette, 3.15.2, Pre-Meetings, 3.15.3, Formal Meetings, 3.15.4, Preliminary Meetings 3.15.5, Large Meetings, 3.15.6, Long Meetings, 3.15.7, p. 79-102; Proper M eetings Behavior, 3.15.8, Using Interpreters & Translators, 3.15.9, Ho sting a Business Party, 3.15.10. and Ch. 5, Working with Japanese, p. 129-146 12 DG : Ch. 8, The Truth About Teasin g, Praising, and Repeating, p. 105-119 JBCP : Ch. 2, The Japanese Introduction, 2.1, p. 37-38; The Japanese Bow & Handshake, 2.2, p. 38-41; Apologies, 2.3, p. 39-41; Expressing Complaints, 2.14, p. 56-57; The Japanese Business Card, 2.7, p. 45-48; Japanese Eating Etiquette, 2.15, p. 57-61; Japanese Drinking Etiquette, 2.16, p. 61-66; Your Best Friends in Japan, 2.17, p. 66-68; Who to Send to Japan, 2.18, p. 68-69; The Search for Perfection, 1.4, p. 13; The Search for Harmony: Wa 1.5, p. 13-17 13 JM : Danjyo Kankei: Male and Female Relationships in Japan, p. 61-70; Omiai : Arranged Marriage in Japan, p. 165-169; Otogibanashi : Folktales of Japan, p. 171-177; Ryoosaikenbo : Good Wives and Wise Mothers: The Social Expectations of Women in Japan, p. 179-186; Ikuji : Childrearing Practices in Japan, p. 135-141 DG : Ch. 9 Role Models: Working Man, Nurturing Mother, p. 121-137 & Ch.10, You Are What You Speak, p. 139-148 14 Group Class Presentations Audi ence attendance and participation required 15 Group Class Presentations Audi ence attendance and participation required 16 Group Class Presentations Audi ence attendance and participation required Course wrap-up final observations

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 4 Appendix 2: 2007 International Financial Markets Tour Appendix 2: 2007 International Financial Markets Study Tour Destination: Brazil Instructor: Dr. Andy Naranjo Itinerary Time Activity Saturday, October 13 9:30 am Van pick-up at airport to the Hotel 1:30 pm Group lunch (Barra Brasa Churrascaria) 3:30 pm City Tour and Sugar Loaf 5:00 pm Van return to hotel Free Evening/Dinner on your own Sunday, October 14 10:30 am Van pick-up at hotel to the Marina 10:30 am Boat Tour with brunch 1:00 pm Van pick-up for transfer to Corcovado Afternoon Visit to Corcovado and back to hotel Free Evening/Dinner on your own Monday, October 15 9:30 am Van pick-up at hotel to PUC Rio/IAG 10:00 am Seminar: Private Equity in Brazil Prof. Luiz Felipe Jacques da Motta (IAG/PUC-Rio) 12:00 pm lunch La Mole restaurant 2:00 pm Seminar/visit: Business and Medical Ethics, Dr. Luiz Roberto Londres President Clinica So Vicente ( www.clinicasaovicente.com ) 4:00 pm Seminar/Visit: BNDES The Development Bank ( www.bndes.gov ) BNDEs and the competitiveness of the Brazilian Economy, Dr. Raimundo Amora Ramos and Dr.Luiz Ferreira Xavier Borges 6:00 pm Van pick-up for transfer back to hotel Tuesday, October 16 9.30 am Van pick-up at hotel for PROJAC 11:00 am Seminar / Visit: PROJAC (TV Globos studios) ( www.redeglobo.com.br ) Dr. Carlos Eduardo Veloso Project management 3:00 pm Lunch at Couve Flor (PUC-Rio)

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 5 Appendix 2: 2007 International Financial Markets Tour 4:00 pm Seminar: The Brazilian Economy Prof. Luiz Roberto Azevedo Cunha 6:00 pm Seminar/visit: INSTITUTO GENESIS PUCS Entrepreneurship incubator ( www.genesis.puc-rio.br/genesis/ ) 7:00 pm Van pick-up for transfer back to hotel Wednesday, October 17 9:30 am Van pick-up at hotel for Visit 10:00 am Visit: CVRD (Mining) ( www.cvrd.com.br ) 12:00 pm Lunch downtown 1:00 pm Seminar/ Visit: PETROBRS ( www.petrobras.com ), Dr. Lucas Mello Investment management 3:30 pm Seminar/Visit: Technological I nnovation as an Instrument for the Social and Economic Development, Dr. Luis Manuel Rebelo Fernandes, president FINEP Res earch and Projects Financing Brazilian Innovation Agency ( www.finep.gov.br ) 5:30 pm Van pick-up for transfer back to hotel 8:00 pm Van pick-up at hotel for Shopping Leblon 8:30 pm Seminar/Visit /dinner: OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE LEBLON Franchising in Brazil, proprie tor Christiano Mattheis Londres ( www.outback.com.br ) Thursday, October 18 9:00 am Van pick-up at hotel for Visit 9:00 am Visit: HStern (jewelry) ( www.hstern.net ) 10:30 am Visit: ICATU HARTFORD (www.icatu.com.br )

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Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop 2007 University of Florida LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM AND CAREER WORKSHOP Friday, January 26, 2007 Emerson Alumni Hall University of Florida Gainesville, Florida Host Latin American Business Environment Program Center for Latin American Studies Corporate Sponsors Crowley Maritime Corporation Econocaribe Consolidators, Inc. FedEx Express Latin America and the Caribbean Votorantim Corporate Co-sponsors Brooks Tropicals, Inc. Porter-Novelli Prudential Real Estate Investors Seald Sweet LLC Woodhouse Shannon P.A. University Co-sponsors Center for International Busi ness Education and Research University of Florida MBA Program Master of Arts in Inte rnational Business Program Department of Food and Resource Economics Hispanic MBA Association Student Association of Latin American Studies International Business Society CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 6 Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop

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Program 8:00 am Registration and Continental Breakfast (Florida MBA Program) 9:00 Opening Terry McCoy, Director, Latin American Business Environment Program Business Symposium 9:15 am Corporate Perspectives on the Region 1 Moderator: Carol West, Director, Center for International Business Education and Research Frank Santeiro, FedEx Express-La tin America and the Caribbean Fernando Figueredo, Porter-Novelli Florida/Latin America Paulo Gomes, Prudential Real Es tate Investors-Latin America 10:45 Break 11:00 Corporate Perspectives on the Region 2 Moderator: Bill Messina, Department of Food and Resource Economics Mayda Sotomayor, Seald Sweet LLC Charles F. Woodhouse, Woodhouse Shannon, P.A. Antonio Barretto, Votorantim 12:30 Luncheon Moderator: Carmen Diana Deere, Di rector, Center for Latin American Studies Keynote Speaker: Long Voyage to a Safe Harbor: U.S. Trade with Cuba, Jay Brickman, Crowley Maritime Corporation Career Workshop 2:00 pm Corporate Careers Moderator: Alex Sevill a, Director, MBA Programs Damon Kearney, Fidelity National In formation Services (MA/Latin American Studies) Jose Rossignoli, Brooks Tropicals (MSAB) Lance Rule, Econocaribe Consolidators, Inc. Career Workshop (continued) 3:00 Government Careers Moderator: Juan Carlos Molleda Department of Public Relations Larry Farris, US Commercial Se rvice, Bogota (MS/Economics) Chris Maxfield, United Nations (MA/Latin American Studies) CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 7 Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 8 Appendix 3: 2007 Latin American Business Symposium and Career Workshop Maria Conchita Mendez, Alabama St ate Port Authority (BA/Economics & Latin American Studies) 4:00 Careers in Non-Governmental Organizations Moderator: Jon Dain, Center for Latin American Studies Mariana Varese, Wildlife Conservation Society (MA/Latin American Studies, PhD/Food and Resource Economics) Evan George, Masliah & Soloway (JD/MALAS) Tim Fogerty, Development Anthropo logy Consultant (PhD/Anthropology) Planning Committee: Terry McCoy, Center for Latin American Studies Mary Risner, Center for Latin American Studies Meredith Fensom, Levin College of Law William Messina, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Juan Carlos Molleda, College of Journalism and Communication Andy Naranjo, Warrington College of Business Administration Janet Bente Romero, Un iversity Foundation Mary Mitchell, Graduate Assistant

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Appendix 4 : Students Support ed by CIBER Funding October 2006 September 2008 I. Study Abroad: The following students have received funding that allowed them to study abroad on various programs and internships. Business in Brazil scholarship recipients Jessica Bachay (University of Flor ida, MA Latin American Studies) Michelle Knapp (University of Flor ida, MA Latin American Studies) Luis Loyaza (University of Florida, BA Criminology/Law) Sara Martin (University of Florida, BA Spanish/Latin American Studies) Guy Morissette (Univers ity of Montreal, MBA) Matt Quinlan (Yale University, MB A/MA Tropical Conservation) Elizabeth Smith (University of Flor ida, MA Latin American Studies) Tyler Tringas (University of Florida, BA Economics) Sonya Williams, (Florida A&M University, MBA) Mary Jordan, (Florida A&M University, MBA) Cornell Guion, (Florida A&M University, MBA) Joe Holecko (University of Florida, MBA) Jessie Barriero (Valpariso University, MBA) Mathew Hoge, (University of Kans as, MA Latin American Studies) Angleliki Vovou (Fordham University, MBA) International Financial Markets Tour scholarship recipients (University of Florida students) Tara Kim (MBA) Albert Rodriguez (MBA) Greg Eckels (MBA) Kolaleh Torkaman (MBA) Mario Fernandez (MBA) Nick Anderson (MBA) Cameron Buurma (MBA) Alicia Riggins (MBA) Chad Rice (MBA) Joseph Holecko (MBA) Rick Mason (MBA) Grant Copeland (MBA) Patrick Kinnan (MBA) Abe Skellenger (MS Finance) Chris Weber (MS Finance) Phil Reagan (MS Finance) Kyle Morabito (MS Finance) Abe Ouano (MS Finance) CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 Appendix 4: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 9

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Michael Peerson (MS Finance) Park, Sang Wook (MS Finance) Aashish Shukla (MS Finance) Ang Li (MS Finance) Kevin Fox (MA in International Business) Dominique Lochridge (MA in Inte rnational Business) Sophie Grumelard (MA in International Business) Jenny Chaim (MA in International Business) Jonathan Frankel (MA in Internat ional Business) Britta Nissinen (MA in International Business) Lucas Elgie (MA in International Business) Brandon Saltmarsh (MA in International Business) Kevin Brown (MA in International Business) Kathryn Ciano (MA in International Business) Nico De Vries (MA in International Business) James Lancelot (MA in International Business) David Pierce (MA in International Business) Donna Zill (MA in International Business) Katherine Rodriguez (MS Real Estate) Scott Ehrlich (JD/MBA) Laura Gonzalez (Ph.D. Finance) Mary Mitchell (MA Latin American Studies) Jacob Schultz (MA Latin American Studies) Italian Food: From Production to Policy scholarship recipients (University of Florida students unless otherwise noted) Leilani Velazquez (BA Food and Resource Economics) Wesley Edwards (BA Food and Resource Economics) Cheryl Salerno (BA Family, Y outh, and Community Sciences) Stephen Meek (BA Food and Resource Economics) Jason Pereira (Florida Atlantic University, International Business) Jordan Terry (BA Food Science) David Taylor (BA Food and Resource Econom ics) Arpan Patel (BA Pre-Med) Venessa Longobardi (BA Animal Science) Danielle Thomas (MA Food and Resource Economics) John Alday (BA Food and Resource Economics) Aaron Kremmer (BA Agriculture Education) Cristina Zitoli (BA Food and Resource Economics) CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 Appendix 4: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 10

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 Appendix 4: Students Supported by CIBER Funding 11 II. Research: Between 2006 and 2008, the following students have received travel funds from CIBER allowing them to present thei r own research, conduct research and learn about the international dimensions of thei r disciplines at conferences, workshops and seminars. (University of Florida students) Torrey Peace (MBA) Merise Jalali (BA Political Science) Michelle L. Edwards (Ph.D. Anthropology) Jennifer Itzkowitz (Ph.D. Finance) Gaurav Kapoor (Ph.D. Information Systems and Operations Management) Lureen Walters (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics) Nobuyuki Iwai (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics) Joseph C. DiPietro (Ph.D. Education) Yang Jiao, (Ph.D. Anthropology) Ronald Gordon (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics) Naomi Moswete (Ph.D. Tourism and Development) Mussa Idris (Ph.D. Anthropology) Alison Ketter (Ph.D. Anthropology) Afua Entsuah (Ph.D. Anthropology) Youngsang Yun (BA Management) Mary E. Mitchell (MA Latin American Studies) Alison M. Boelter (MA Latin American Studies) Matthew Schwarz (BA Political Science) Russell R. Fullerton (BA Management) Thomas J. Stevens III (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics) III. IB Instruction and Outreach: Since 2006, the following students, from both business and non-business programs, have work ed on a variety of CIBER curriculum and outreach projects. (University of Florida students) Tyler E. Tringas (BA Economics) Gabriella Filasky (BA Marketing) Amanda Bowe (BA Finance) Jordon P. Loh (BA Economics) Elaine Cohen (BA Marketing) Fahad Fahimullah (BA Economics) Sharon F. Barkley (Ph.D. Latin American Studies) Laurel J. Hodges (Ph.D. Spanish) Deicy G. Jim enez (Ph.D. Spanish) Susan Salazar (Ph. D. Spanish) Belkis Suarez (Ph.D. Spanish) Megan Silbert (Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics) Colin A. Knapp (Ph.D. Economics)

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 12 Appendix 5: International Financial Markets Tour Evaluation Survey Appendix 5: International Financial Markets Tour Evaluation Survey Students who participated in the 2007 International Financial Markets Tour were asked to complete a pre and post survey comprised of thirteen questions. Answers were ranked on a scale of 1 -10 and captured the evoluti on in students thinking before and after the study tour. SURVEY QUESTIONS 1. How would you rank the business opportunities in Brazil? 2. Compared to doing business in th e US, how would you rank the business opportunities in Brazil? 3. How would you rank the invest ment opportunities in Brazil? 4. How would you rank the investment opportu nities in Brazil compared to the US? 5. How would you rank the corporate e xpansion opportunities in Brazil? 6. How would you rank the corporate expans ion opportunities in Brazil compared to the US? 7. How would you rank the economic environment in Brazil? 8. How would you rank the political environment in Brazil? 9. How would you rank the resource environment in Brazil? 10. How would you rank the legal environment in Brazil? 11. Do you think Brazil is a good environment to do business? 12. How important do you think speaking Po rtuguese is to doing business in Brazil? 13. How important is corporate social responsibility to business in Brazil?

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 13 Appendix 6: CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Workshop Programs Appendix 6: CIBER Multidiscipl inary IB Workshop Programs and Bradbury Distinguished Lecture in International Economics Academic Years 2006 2008 Description: The CIBER Multidisciplinary Workshop Programs officially began in September 1999. The forum promotes a system atic exchange of ideas and research among a broad campus working group. Faculty from UF colleges and centers and from other institutions par ticipate in the programs featuri ng academic presentations on IB research as well as IB pres entations by guest speakers fr om business and government. In addition to these workshops, CIBER co-sponsors the annual Bradbury Distinguished Public Lecture on International Trade and Development. Descriptions of those lectures appear in the table in italics. Date Speaker Title of Presentation 10/13/06 Virginia Maurer, UF Department of Management Angel Kwoleck-Folland, UF Department of Womens History The Pathways Paris Project: A Study of Women in the Corporate World 11/3/06 Bob Kerrigan, Partner Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin, McLeod & Thompson, LLP The Alien Tort Claims Act as a Tool to Further Corporate Responsibility and Compliance with International Human Rights Obligations 1/12/07 Clyde Stephens, formerly with United Fruit Company, Research and Technical Services Banana History and the United Fruit Company 2/9/07 Marcelo Rescende, Professor Instituto de Economia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Developments in Brazilian Infrastructure and Manufacturing: An Overview 3/23/07 Olaf Halvorssen, Founder Authentix and President of its international division Authentix: Fighting Fraud and Counterfeit Products World-Wide. 3/26/07 Maurice Obstfeld, Professor University of California, Berkeley Robert Bradbury Distinguished Lecture on Int'l Economics: Financial Globalization in Historical Perspective 4/6/07 Benjamin Smith, UF Department of Political Science How Corrupt Do You Think This Country Is? Growth, Governance, and the Perception of Corruption 9/28/07 Chip Withers, President Withers Transfer & Storage of Coral Gables, Inc., Withers Worldwide Forwarders, Inc. and Withers Transportation Systems Freight is Great

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 14 Appendix 6: CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Workshop Programs 10/19/07 Mark Jamison, UF Public Utilities Research Center Understanding and Teaching International Leadership 11/9/07 Renata Serra, UF Center for African Studies Child Labor and Cocoa Production in West Africa: From International Labor Standards to Child Agency 11/16/07 James Sterns, UF Food and Resource Economics EUREPGAP, GLOBALGAP, International Certific ation Standards, and Opportunities for Floridas Agri-food Sector 1/18/08 Beatrice Selotlegeng, former CEO of Air Botswana and current Executive in Residence Faculty at the College of Business at Ohio University Creating Awareness of Africa's Business Potential 2/22/08 Bob Emerson, UF Food and Resource Economics Immigration Issues and Agricultural Labor Markets 2/29/08 Brenda Chalfin, UF Anthropology Anthropology and the New Economy: Anthropological Perspectives on Finance, Commerce and Neoliberalism 3/21/08 Michelle Edwards, PhD student Anthropology Building Economic Bridges and Creating New Communities: Ghanaian and African American Transnational Entrepreneurs and the Ties that Bind 3/28/08 Chris Grosse, President Seaharp Learning Solutions and Professor Emeritus Thunderbird School of Global Management Whats New in Busi ness Languages? A Fresh Look at the Field 4/9/08 Philippe Aghion, Professor Harvard University Growth and the Financing and Governance of Higher Education

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Appendix 7 : Enhancing Floridas Interna tional Business Infrastructure (EFIBI) 2008 Awards Faculty Institution Project title/description Richard Sjolander University of West Florida Participate in MERCOSUR study tour to develop Latin American examples for IB course Fredric W. Rohm, Jr. & Daniel Ibarrondo Southeastern University Modify/add courses to permit an IB major as opposed to the current IB concentration Manuel J. Tejeda Barry University Develop a course on Religion, Spirituality and International Business Samuel Adekunle Edward Waters College Develop a course on African Societies, Gender and Microfinance David A. Grossman & Liming Macguire Florida Southern College Develop a course for business majors on Conversational Chinese Maria Lehoczky & Sheila Rios Polk Community College Attend Memphis CIBER Globalization Seminar on Global Supply Chain Management and attend 2009 Michigan State University International Institute for Community College Faculty CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 15 Appendix 7: EFIBI Awards

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Appendix 8 : 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference: Agenda Hosted by the University of Florida CIBER St. Petersburg, Florida, April 9 10, 2008 The 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference provided for an exchange of ideas and perspectives on how to most effectively trai n global leaders of the future. Participants explored how students and educators can be equipped with the linguistic, multi-cultural and managerial tools necessary for leadership in the 21st century. Conference attendees participated in sessions devoted to busine ss language instruction and ways to develop successful interdiscip linary collaboration. PROGRAM Time Event Wednesday, April 9 6:00-8:00 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open 6:00-8:00 p.m. Welcome Reception Thursday, April 10 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open 7:30-8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast 8:30-9:00 a.m. Welcome: John Kraft (Dean, Warrington College of Business Administration), Susanna Easton (Program Specialist, U.S. Department of Education), Greg Moreland (Director, UF Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum) 9:00-10:00 a.m. Whats New in Business Languages: A Fresh Look at the Field Dr. Christine Uber Grosse (President, Seaharp Learning Solutions and Professor Emer itus, T hunderbird School of Global Management) 10:15-11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions I Using Languages Across the Curriculum to Expand the Business Language Curriculum Course Wikis: How Our St udents of Today Can Teach Our Students of Tomorrow Student Assessments of E xperiential Learning Using Portfolios to Assist Students in Developing Cultural Co mpetence Using Real-Time Technology in the Foreign Language Classroom: Simulated Stock Portfolios Combining Business and Culture in the GW-CIBER: Discovering French Wine-Making Teaching Culture in Business Spanish Classes Applying the Automatic Speech Analysis Sys tem in an Online Business Chinese Course Computer-Mediated Curriculum for Chinese-Heritage MBA Students CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 16 Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference

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11:15-11:30 a.m. Beverage Break 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions II Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Short-Term Study Abroad Site Visits, Standards and Scaffolding: Creating and Teaching Cases for Business Language Learners of All Levels How to Better Prepare Future Business Leaders to Face Environmental and Social Issues through Selected Business Language Course Materials Using Technology to Enhance Instruction: Guest Speakers and Chats Integrating and Using Schaubilder in the Business German Class Exploring French Culture through Advertising Preparing Our Students for th e 21st Century: Teamwork in the Busin ess Language Classroom Synchronous Collaboration: An International Learning Experience for Professors and Students Entrepreneurship Simulations for Future International Leaders A Purdue University Initiati ve of Interdisciplinary Study Abroad Program in China Putting Principles of Vocabulary Learning into Practice: A Computer-Assi sted Business Chinese Vocabulary Program for Professionals 12:30-2:00 p.m. Lunch A Lesson Plan for the Global Eras Next Wave Jordan Colletta (Vice-President, UPS Technology Marketing) 2:15-3:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions III A Model Immersive Cultural Learning Environment: Teaching Chinese Culture in Second Life Leveraging Existing Resources to Create Dual-Degree Programs: Language/Culture P lus X An Interdisciplinary Inte rnational Business Degree Preparing for the Global Business: Visiting an International Company for a Class Project The German Business Internship: Putting German to Work La Francophonie and the Business French Curriculum: Issues and Challenges Podcasts and Pedagogy: Curricular Changes in the Business Language Course Lessons Learned from Business Spanish Students at the University of Maryland Undergraduate Research in Business Languages: Strategic Plans for Campus and Student Success CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 17 Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference

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A Corpus-Based Investigation of Business Chinese Textbooks and Pedagogy in Use Using Commercials to Teach Chinese Languages and Culture 3:15-3:30 p.m. Beverage Break 3:30-4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions IV Meaningful Activities, Meaningf u l Curriculum: A Small Universitys Efforts to Pr epare Global Business Leaders The Business of Language and the Language of Business Across the C urriculum Energizing the Disciplin e Nationally: Bridging Differ ences Between Language for Specific Purposes and Language for Literature Using FL Outcomes Assessm ent and Effective Program Evaluations for Grant-G etting Purposes Expanding the Field: Introductory Business Language and Culture Instruction Entrepreneurship and Environmental Engagement in Study Abroad Students Oral Presentations in the Business French Classroom: Content, Techniques and Assessment Task-Based Activities: Modul es for Teaching an UpperLevel Busin ess French Course Theory and Method in Teaching Business Spanish: Successful P edagogical Techniques Topics and Techniques in the Design of Commercial Cases for B usiness Spanish Enriching the Lower-Divi sion Language Curriculum: Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration on Case Studies Incorporating a Case Study in the Lower-Division French Curriculum: The Auberge Project Incorporating a Case Study in the Lower-Division Chinese Curriculum: Th e Starco Project 4:30-5:30 p.m. Steering Committee Meeting: CIBER Business Language Conference 6:00-9:00 p.m. Conference Gala & Awards Ceremony Mahaffey Theater Friday, April 11 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Registration/Information Desk Open 7:30-9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast 9:00-10:00 a.m. Alumni Perspectives Moderator: Alex Sevilla (Director MBA Program, University of Florida UF Alumni Panelists: Greg Bates (Attorney at Law, Miami) Julianne Iannarelli (Man ager of Research, AACSB Interna tional, Tampa) CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 18 Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference

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Billy Shields (Law Reporter, Miami Daily Business Review) 10:15-11:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions V Business Portuguese: Where Do We Go From Here? Business Russian: Where Do We Go From Here? Business Chinese: Where Do We Go From Here? Business German: Where Do We Go From Here? Business French: Where Do We Go From Here? Business Spanish: Where Do We Go From Here? Business Japanese: Where Do We Go From Here? 11:15-11:30 a.m. Beverage Break 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VI Business Hindi at the Linguistic Crossroads Outsourcing to India? Understanding Indian Communication Practices Theory and Practice: An Adaptive Approach to Business Language Course Design The Formation of a CIBER Research Forum on the State o f the Art in the Teaching of Intercultural Competence and Languages for Business Communication The Use of Podcasts and Video-on-Demand in Business German Courses Screen Capture, Screen Recorder an d Presentation Software for Online Business Courses What Can Happen When Business and Language Faculty Cooperate Across an Ocean? Economics of Soccer in the Classroom: What the Global Business Leader Must K now Training Students with Linguist ic Tools: Addressing in Business Spanish Language, Culture and International Competence: The Hybrid Curriculum Model Using International B usiness Cases A Business and Cultural Intr oduction to the Middle East 12:30-2:00 p.m. Lunch Business Language in the United States: Past, Present and Future Possibilities Ronald Cere (Eastern Michigan University) Michael Doyle (University of North Carolina at Charlotte) T. Bruce Fryer (University of South Carolina-Columbia and University of South Carolina-Beaufort) 2:15-3:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VII Preparing for Discussions with Russian Partners: Refining Oral Communications Skills Cultural Differences in Technology and Management: Building U.S.-Russian Space Systems Preparing Global Business Leaders: By Scrapping CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 19 Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 20 Appendix 8: 2008 CIBER Business Language Conference Undoing the Past, and Re-energizing the Future of Language Studies in Business Founding a Company in a German-Speaking Country Bringing the Smaller German Company into the Classroom Business Languages in Another Discipline: Challenges and Opportunities Languages for World Business at the College of Charleston: A Model of Inte rdis ciplinary Collaboration Translating and Raising Awareness of Business Language: Recruiting New Faculty and Graduate Students The Interview Project as an Integrated Approach to Business Japanese Acquisition of Culture: The Case of the Business Japanese Language Curriculum 3:15-3:30 p.m. Beverage Break 3:30-4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions VIII Integrating Business Language Skills with Language Skills in the L2 Classroom Designing Authentic Literacy Tasks for Business Communication Best Practices for Recruiting New Faculty and Graduate Students for G lobal Business Leadership Why We Teach: Training Two Kinds of Global Business Leaders Chamber of the Americas Education Task Force: Creating Connections Students and $$$: Methods and Techniques for Expanding Business Language Programs Carbon Footprint on Our World: Carrefour vs. WalMart Seeds of Change: The Ashoka Model of Social Entrepreneu rship in France An Innovative Way to Equip Students with Business Language Exposure, Multicultural and Managerial Tools in th e International Context Business Language Instruction in Rio de Janeiro Doing Business in Latin America: Survival Spanish and Cross-Cultural Training for Business Professionals Universality of Cross-Cultural and Cross-Disciplinary LMR Perspectives: Preparing Global Business L eaders Bringing Rigor and Realty to Language Learning for Business Purposes: Examples of Project-Based A ction Learning

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2007 21 Appendix 9: Faculty Participants in FDIB Programs Appendix 9: Faculty Participants in Overseas FDIB Programs Academic Years 2006 2008 2007 Faculty Participants in FDIB Progr ams (University of Florida faculty): John Kraft, Dean Economies in Development and Transition: The Balkans: Sofia, Bulgaria; Zagreb, Croatia; Prague, Czech Republic Janice Carrillo, Information System s and Operations Management Economies in Development and Transition: The Balkans: Sofia, Bulgaria; Zagreb, Croatia; Prague, Czech Republic Stan Smith, Bureau of Economic and Business Research Understanding the Business Challenges of Africa: South Africa and Kenya Brijesh Thapa, Tourism and Hospitality Understanding the Business Challenges of Africa: South Africa and Kenya Anand Paul, Information Systems and Operations Management Business in a European Context: Strasbourg, France 2008 Faculty Participants in FDIB Program s (University of Florida faculty unless otherwise noted): Joseph Rojo, College of Business Professional Development in International Business Mercosur 2008: Brazil, Argentina and Chile Virginia Maurer, Management European Economies in Transition: Zagreb, Croatia; Sofia, Bulgaria; Warsaw, Poland M. Nimalendran, Finance Professional Development in International Business Mercosur 2008: Brazil, Argentina and Chile Alan Sawyer, Marketing Understanding the Business Challenges of Africa: South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe Richard Sjolander, University of We st Florida, Marketing and Economics Professional Development in International Business Mercosur 2008: Brazil, Argentina and Chile

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 22 Appendix 10: IAABD UF Steering Committee Members Appendix 10: 9th Annual Conference of the International Academy of African Business and Development (IAABD) UF Steering Committee Members Name Title College Asare, Stephen K. Associate Professor of Accounting and Deloitte Honor Roll Fellow Business Bonzongo, JeanClaude J. Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering Sciences Engineering Chalfin, Brenda H. Assistant Prof essor of Anthropology Lib. Arts & Sciences Crum. Roy L. Professor of Finance Business Frosch, Joan Professor of Dan ce and Assistant Director of the School of Theatre and Dance Fine Arts Goldman, Abraham C. Associate Professor of Geography Lib. Arts & Sciences Jamison, Mark Director, Public Utility Research Center Business Kane, Abdoulaye Assistant Professo r of Anthropology Lib. Arts & Sciences Kernaghan, Nicola J. Outreach Co ordinator, Office of Program Development and Evaluation Coordinator, CIBER International Center and Business Knechel, W. R. Ernst & Young Professor of Accounting Business Leslie, Agnes N. Outreach Director, Ce nter for African Studies Lib. Arts & Sciences Leslie, Michael Associate Professor of Telecommunication Journalism & Communication McDade, Barbara Associate Professor of Geography Lib. Arts & Sciences Nunn, Kenneth Bruce Professor of Law Law Sammons, David Director, In ternational Programs IFAS (Agriculture) Serra, Renata Lecturer, African Studies Program Lib. Arts & Sciences Spring, Anita (Conference Chair) Professor of Anthropology Lib. Arts & Sciences Sterns, James Associate Professor of Food and Resource Economics IFAS Thapa, Brijesh Associate Professor of Tourism and Commercial Recreation Health & Human Performance Thomas, Robert E. Associate Professor of Management and Business Law Business West, Carol T. Professor of Econom ics and CIBER Director Business Winzeler, Isabelle CIBER Assistant Director Business

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Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report: Executive S ummary, Table of Contents and List of Tables Terry L. McCoy EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Entering the last quarter of 2007 Latin America is in the midst of an economic expansion unprecedented in recent decades. The outlook for 2008 is for continued growth and low inflation. The major clouds threatening th e regions business environment are the growing volatility in global financial markets, faltering world trade negotiations and the erratic course pursued by popu list governments in the region. There are relatively few elections scheduled over the ne xt 15 months, the most impor tant being in Argentina. The table below classifies the 18 Latin American countries profiled in the 2007 LABER in terms of the overall character of their busin ess and investment environments in 2006 and 2007, and indicates the outlook for 2008. Within the three broad categories Attractive, Problematic, and Mixed an arrow indicates whether a countrys environment has improved ( ) or weakened ( ) during the year. An = sign identifies those countries that remained essentially unchanged. Of the 18 countries, eight improved in 2007 and only two (Venezuela and Argentin a) deteriorated. Based on sustained improvements in recent years, we have upgrad ed three environments Panama, Peru and Uruguay in 2007 from mixed to attractive. Latin American Business Environments 2006 Environment 2007 Environment 2008 Attractive Problematic Mixed Attractive Problematic Mixed Outlook Mexico Dom Rep = Costa Rica = ? El Salvador = Guatemala = = Honduras = = Nicaragua = ? Panama Bolivia = ? Colombia = = Ecuador = ? Peru = Venezuela = Brazil = = Argentina = = Chile = = Paraguay = ? Uruguay Totals 4 4 10 7 4 7 CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 23 Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report

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CONTENTS Preface EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...4 INTRODUCTION ...5 I. REGIONAL OVERVI EW ......8 EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT.......8 Global Developments Regional Developments DOMESTIC ENVIRONMENT..10 Economic and Financial Performance Social Environment Political Environment Policy Environment Legal Environment II. COUNTRY PROFILES ....................19 NAFTA REGION............19 Mexico DR-CAFTA COUNTRIES......... Dominican Republic Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras Nicaragua Panama ANDEAN SOUTH AMERICA..........28 Bolivia C olombia Ecuador Peru CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 24 Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report

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V enezuela BRAZIL AND THE SOUTHERN CONE.....34 Brazil Argentina Chile Paraguay Uruguay III. OUTLOOK ....41 OUTLOOK FOR THE REGION... External Environment Domestic Environment COUNTRY OUTLOOKS...43 Attractive Environments Problematic Environments Mixed Environments TABLES SELECTED SOURCES..64 CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 25 Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 26 Appendix 11: 2007 Latin American Business Environment Report TABLES Table 1 MEMBERSHIP IN MA JOR TRADE AGREEMENTS Table 2 TERMS OF TRADE, 1997-2006 Table 3 NET FOREIGN DIRE CT INVESTMENT, 1997-2006 Table 4 GDP GROWTH, 1997-2007 Table 5 ANNUAL INFLATION, 1997-2007 Table 6 EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND CURRENT ACCOUNT BALANCE, 2003-2006 Table 7 GROSS DISBURSED EXTERNAL DEBT, 1997-2006 Table 8 DEBT/EXPORT RATIO, 1997-2006 Table 9 EXCHANGE RATES AND IMF AGREEMENTS, 2007 Table 10 SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007 Table 11 POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007 Table 12 FISCAL DEFI CIT/SURPLUS, 1997-2006 Table 13 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007 Table 14 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT, 2007

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Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Studies Conference Agenda: Multi-Secto r Partnerships and Strategic Communications in the Americas: Business, Community and Government Hosted by the University of Floridas Center for Latin American Studies and the College of Journalism and Communications February 7 & 8, 2008 PROGRAM Time Event Thursday, February 7th 8:15 a.m. Registration 9:00 a.m. Welcome Carmen Diana Deere, Director, Center for Latin American Studies and Conference Co-chair 9:15 a.m. Opening remarks Juan-Carlos Molleda, Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator of Public Relati ons, College of Journalism and Communications and Conference Co-chair 9:30 a.m. Keynote Social Partnering in Latin America: Lessons Drawn from Collaborations of Businesses and Civic Society Organizations Roberto Gutirrez Poveda, Asso ciate Professor, Universidad de los Andes, Bogot, and Gene ral Coordinator of the Social Enterprise Knowledge Network 10:30 a.m. Coffee break 10:45 a.m. Session I Strategic Plans North and South Aburr Valley, Department of Antioquia, Colombia Participants: Francisco Correa Molina, Regional Director, Fundacin Social Elsy Yolanda Jimnez Bedoya, Community Representative Martha Luca Marn Herrera, Representative, Area Metropolitana del Valle de Aburr Fernando Meja Jaramillo, Business Sector Representative Carlos Anbal Palacio, Business Sector Representative Moderator: Pilar Useche, Assistant Pr ofessor, Food & Resource Economics and Latin American Studies 12:15 p.m. Lunch break Exhibits 1:30 p.m. Session II World Quality Educatio n for Puerto Rico CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 27 Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference

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Participan ts: Nelson Coln, President, Fundacin Comunitaria de Puerto Rico Xiomara P. Caro, Public Relations, Fundacin Comunitaria de Puerto Rico Moderator: Pilar Mendoza, Assistant Pr ofessor, Department of Educational Administration & Policy 3:00 p.m. Coffee break Exhibits 3:15 p.m. Session III The Impact of Political and Economic Factors on Partnership Building Participants: Ral Romero, President, Bounty Fresh Tim Scerba, COO Latin America and CEO Mexico, Edelman Moderator: Terry McCoy, Director, La tin American Business Environment program a nd Associate Director, CIBER 4:45 p.m. Wrap-up : Marilyn Roberts, Associate Professor of Advertising, College of Journalism and Communications, and Conference Co-chair Friday, February8th 9:00 a.m Opening Remarks John W. Wright II, Dean, Co llege of Journalism and Communications 9:15 a.m. Session IV Assessing the Quality of Partnerships Participants: Jonas Haertle, Coordinator, United Nations Global Compact Networks & Academic Initiatives Miguel Angel Oliva, Vice President, Public Relations & Corporate Affairs, HBO Latin America Group Moderator: Dennis Jett, Dean, University of Florida International Center 10:30 a.m. Coffee break Exhibits 10:45 a.m. Session V Lessons from Successful Partnerships Participants: John H. Holmes, Director, International Advertising Association (IAA) Educational Programs and Alliances Claudia Gioia, Managing Director, Miami Office, Burson-Marsteller Moderator: Linda Childers Hon, Senior Associate Dean, College CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 28 Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference

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12:15 p.m. Lunch break Exhibits 1:30 p.m. Session VI Strategic Corporate Communication Promoting Sustainable Relationships Participants: Mitsuru Yanaze, Professor, Universidade do So Paulo Otavio Freire, Communication Consultant Nivea, Brazil Maria Helena Sato, Internal Communication Manager Nestl, Brazil Moderato r: Andy Naranjo, Professor, Warrington College of Business Administration 3:00 p.m. Coffee break Exhibits 3:15 p.m. Session VII Strategic Communications and Partnership Building: Theory and Research Participants: Belio Martinez, Assistan t Professor of Public Relations, College of Journalism and Communications Cynthia Morton, Associate Pr ofessor of Advertising, College of Journalism and Communications Mary Ann Ferguson, Professor of Public Relations, College of Journalism and Communications Michael Leslie, Asso ciate Professor of Telecommunication, College of Journalism and Communications Moderator: Betty Cortina, Hearst Visiting Professional, Department of Journalism, College of Journalism and Communications 4:45 p.m. Closing remarks Juan-Carlos Molleda 6:00 p.m. Reception Emerson Alumni Hall Performance of Latin American music by Carlos Beltrn Ensemble CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 29 Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference

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CIBER Synergies, Volume VIII, 2006-2008 30 Appendix 12: 57th Annual Latin American Conference Corporate and institutional sponsors: Bounty Fresh Burson-Marsteller Edelman Florida Consortium of Latin American and Caribbean Studies HBO Latin America Group International Advertising Association Miami-Dade County United Nations Office for Partnerships UF Center for International Busine ss Education and Research (CIBER) UF International Center UF Research and Graduate Programs USDE Title VI Program