CIBER Synergies

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CIBER Synergies:


A Comprehensive Review of Programs
Center for International Business Education and Research
Grant 2: 2002-2006












CIBER Website: http://bear.cba.ufl.edu/centers/ciber/

CIBER
PO Box 117140
Warrington College of Business
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611

(352) 392-3433











From the directors


In May 2006, the US Department of Education awarded another Jbur years of
funding to the University of Florida (UF) CIBER. We fared well in the competitive
process, an outcome reflective both of the productivity of the UF CIBER under the
previous grant and the exciting, innovative and timely programs proposed for the 2006-
2010 period. This volume of CIBER Synergies presents a comprehensive four-year
perspective on UF CIBER achievements in the grant cycle that ended September 30, 2006
and plans for the new cycle that began on October 1, 2006.

UF CIBER offers both integrated programs and special topics programs. Both are
comprehensive / ith activities spanning teA'i hing,,, research, business outreach, and
faculty development in international business (FDIB). Integrated programs have a
common focus while special topics programs vary in subject, filling gaps in UF's
international business (IB) infrastructure and targeting underserved constituencies.

During the 2002-2006 grant cycle, the integrated Latin American IB program was
substantially enhanced by new research on trade policy in the hemisphere and the impact
ofpost-911 national security policies on US-Latin American economic relations. Students
benefited from a new financial market short-term study abroad and new courses, degree
programs and foreign language initiatives in Spanish and Portuguese that integrate Latin
American area studies and business training. Industry was updated on the Latin
American business climate through a variety of outreach programs and a new biennial
conference facilitated recruitment of Florida students by Latin American affiliates of US
firms. Special topics programs introduced a variety of new IB courses including Business
Japanese, International Sport Business and The Legal Environment of European
Business. CIBER funded research on global media markets, regulation and international
finance impacted both academic and policy-making audiences. CIBER outreach
programs provided IB development opportunities for faculty in secondary schools,
community colleges and Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

More exciting than the accomplishments of 2002-2006 are the new programs
upcoming for 2006-2010. These include an integrated program in African IB and UF
CIBER's hosting of major national and international IB conferences -IAABD
(International Academy of African Business Development), the CIBER Language
Conference, the National Forum on Trade Policy. Also look for a Student Culture
Consulting Corp, a States in the Global Economy program for secondary school
teachers, FDIB for Portuguese business language faculty, a course on the Anthropology
of Global Trade and Investment and research on competition in international wireless
markets and security in global supply chain management.

We're proud to share i ith you how CIBER has served and will continue to serve
students, faculty and businesses.









I Carol West Terry McCoy and Andy Naranjo, Isabelle Winzeler,
Director Associate Directors Assistant Director


I. Integrated Programs

Integrated programs identify international business (IB) "core competency" of a
university and develop multidisciplinary expertise and comprehensive programs of
interrelated curriculum, research and outreach that address a specific area of IB-e.g., an
industry, a global region, world trade institutions, etc. They are key to meeting the
CIBER mandate of being a "national resource," a place academics, policy makers and
industry practitioners look to for insight on emerging global issues in the program's topic
area.

Seed funding by the University of Florida (UF) Center for International Business
Education and Research (CIBER) has led to development of UF as a national resource on
Latin American business. For 2006-2010, the Center now looks to begin building a
similar national resource on emerging African business.

A. Key Accomplishments 2002-2006: Development of a Latin American
Integrated Center of International Business Excellence (ICIBE) was essentially
completed in the last funding cycle. Critical foundation programs from the 1998-2002
cycle were continued and enhanced and new, innovative programs were added.

1. Continued and enhanced Latin American programs: Reflective of the breadth
of the Latin American ICIBE, continued and enhanced initiatives spanned outreach,
overseas learning, on-campus curricula and faculty development in international business
(FDIB).

Four annual updates of The Latin American Business Environment Report
(LABER): Now a UF CIBER signature outreach publication, LABER is an approximately
50 page annual report, disseminated to over 2000 educators and businesses, that provides
a comprehensive examination of Latin American business conditions, tracking social,
political and economic trends in the region. It analyzes recent developments shaping
market outlooks generally and those of the 20 largest countries specifically.

Annual offerings of Business in Brazil: UF CIBER's six-week, six-credit
summer program in Rio de Janeiro combines language training in Portuguese, lectures
and field trips on Brazilian business practices, and cultural immersion. It is a unique
national program, drawing graduate business student participants from around the
country.

Integrative courses and curricula: Classes piloted in 1998-2002 were
institutionalized in 2002-2006 including Business Spanish, The Latin American Business
Environment, a Spanish FLAC (Foreign Language Across the Curriculum) attached to









the latter, Latin American Business Economics and a Latin American concentration in the
MBA program.

Faculty development in Latin American IB: Following sponsorship of nine
faculty in 1998-2002, UF CIBER sponsored four more in 2002-2006 to participate in a
two-week FDIB study program in Brazil, Argentina and Chile. Program format included
lectures on the Mercosur business climate, visits to firms in the region and participation
in cultural events.

2. Innovations in Latin American programs: New initiatives expanded the Latin
American IB capacity of business and non-business faculty, increased the range of
overseas and on-campus learning options for students, updated business practitioners on
developments in the hemisphere, and facilitated interaction of Latin American corporate
recruiters with graduating students trained and knowledgeable on the region.

Research programs focused on current critical issues such as hemispheric
economic integration, the impact of Homeland Security on US-Latin American trade, US
Latin American immigration policy and the supply of agricultural labor, the potential for
US-Cuban trade in agricultural goods, evolving Latin American economic policy, the
global sweeteners market, CARICOM trade patterns, competition policy dimensions of
the EU and NAFTA and dispute resolution mechanisms in the Americas. Faculty
contributing to the Latin American research program came from business, political
science, law, agriculture and journalism and they distributed findings through
publications, working papers, academic conferences and invited presentations to business
practitioners and policy makers, including invited testimony to the US Senate Finance
Committee.

A short-term study abroad (STSA) was developed to provide an international
experience for students without time to devote to a summer or semester-long program.
The International Financial Markets Study Tour combines classroom instruction with a
week-long visit to Latin American institutions. Relative to similar STSAs at peer
business schools, the distinctive design feature of UF's Financial Markets Study Tour is
accommodation of both business and non-business graduate students in the program,
including participants from other professional schools and from area studies. Such
participant heterogeneity permitted a rich sharing of different perspectives both in the
classroom and on the tour.

New undergraduate short-term overseas programs targeted the exceptionally
bright and motivated business undergraduates who participate in UF's Students in Free
Enterprise (SIFE) program. CIBER funding supported two trips to Nicaragua for SIFE
students to work with UF affiliates there providing training in basic business programs
and learning about potential business market linkages and private sector partnerships in
the country.

New language offerings included Commercial Portuguese, case studies
developed for the course, and additional Spanish IB FLAC (Foreign Language Across the









Curriculum) sections in the Warrington College of Business (WCB) and the College of
Journalism and Communication. (UF's IB FLAC program is explained in more detail in
Section II.B.2 below).

In addition, classes in Spanish on Marketing andAdvertising in the Spanish
Speaking World and The Business and Culture of Sports in the Spanish-Speaking World
were introduced. SPN 166, Teaching Spanish for the Professions, was developed and
will be piloted in 2006-2010. The course completes a three phase program of CIBER-
supported development of business Spanish at UF. When CIBER was founded in 1998,
there were no opportunities to study business Spanish at UF. Phase 1 of the CIBER
Spanish language program funded development of traditional business Spanish courses
that are now offered on an on-going basis. Phase 2 provided more substantive links
between foreign language and IB content through FLAC sections attached to
international courses in WCB and through scholarships for language students to attend
immersion programs abroad that emphasize commercial applications. Phase 3 recognizes
that to have a long-term impact on US IB capacity, it is critical to "train the future
trainers." SPN 166 is designed to excite graduate Spanish students about teaching
business Spanish and to train them how to do it effectively.

Drawing on expertise at WCB's Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
(CEI), faculty at the Center for Latin American Studies developed and offered LAS 6291:
Conservation and Entrepreneurship: Business and Management Practices in
International Environmental Conservation. Integration of business and area studies was
further enhanced by development of a Business Environment Concentration in the
MALAS degree (Master of Arts in Latin American Studies).

In addition to the annual updates ofLABER, agribusiness practitioners benefited
from over two dozen Latin American country-specific specialized export primers for
agriculture published on the Institute for Food and Agriculture Science (IFAS) electronic
EDIS network. Annual CIBER co-sponsorship of the Conference on Legal andPolicy
Issues in the Americas added topics on trade policy for legal scholars and Latin American
IB legal practitioners. CIBER researchers gave presentations focused on Latin American
IB to 20 diverse community, business and policy groups that ranged from regional
programs organized by local community colleges in the state's smaller metropolitan areas
to larger business forums in Orlando, Tampa and Miami to international audiences at the
Americas Business Forum in Quito, Ecuador and the Special Summit of the Americas in
Monterrey, Mexico.

Faculty development in Latin American IB was enhanced by (1) sponsorship of
four faculty to participate in the Mercosur two-week study abroad FDIB; (2) funding for
Spanish and Portuguese business language faculty to attend eight professional
conferences; (3) six Latin American presentations at the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB
Research Workshop series, an academic-year luncheon program attended by students,
faculty and staff from 15 departments, six colleges, four centers and three program units
across the UF campus and; (4) annual Latin American IB outreach programs to secondary









school educators delivered through established infrastructure in the Center for Latin
American Studies.

The new biennial Latin American Corporate and Careers Conference
introduced students to job opportunities in the region. The conference features sector-
specific presentations by industry representatives, round table discussions on career paths
and recruiting strategies in Latin American affiliates of US firms, and insights from
recent UF graduates working in the region.

B. Programs for 2006-2010: Building on a strong foundation laid in the first four
years of CIBER (1998-2002), initiatives in the last funding cycle (2002-2006)
successfully established the UF Latin American ICIBE. Funding for 2006-2010 continues
to support and enhance key Latin American programs and lays the foundation for an
African ICIBE.

1. Continued and expanded Latin American programs: Funding is earmarked
for updating seven initiatives: the Latin American Business Environment Report;
Business in Brazil; the International Financial Markets Tour; faculty development in
Latin American IB; new research on Latin American issues; transfer of university
research to business practice through regional, national and international presentations;
the Latin American Corporate and Careers Conference. In addition, Latin American
Spanish and Portuguese IB FLACs will be offered for the first time in the colleges of
Public Health and Health Professions and Design, Construction and Urban Planning.

2. Innovations in Latin American programs: Although the pace of innovation in
the Latin American IB program will slow relative to earlier funding cycles, three new
initiatives will extend its coverage and impact.

Faculty Development in Business and Culture (FDBC): The CIBER network
offers a selection of excellent two-week FDIB programs in various parts of the world.
While open to all faculty with IB interests, content is clearly oriented to business and
economics professors. As such, these programs do not necessarily serve well the
professional development needs of current and potential business language faculty. The
UF CIBER and University of Kansas (KU) CIBER will jointly develop an FDBC that
specifically targets this group. Like the traditional FDIB, the new program will combine
lectures and visits to firms in a 12-day to 2-week study abroad tour.

Lecture content of the FDBC will focus on basic issues of business culture-e.g.,
communication styles, cultural similarities/differences among linguistically similar
countries, cultural aspects of business strategy, cultural risk shift management. Current
economic events impacting the area will be introduced in basic terms and discussion
stimulated by thinking about how they shape, and are shaped by, cultural factors. Local
instructors of "commercial English" will explain the US-regional differences they stress.
Firm visits to multinationals will feature presentations by human resources (HR) and
marketing executives on the role of cultural adaptation in global competition and, at visits
to local firms, managers will speak on the language and culture of global business from a









non-US perspective. The program pilot is a Brazil tour for Portuguese language
instructors.

Cuban Agricultural Trade Newsletter: Historically, UF CIBER supported
incorporation of agribusiness IB topics into traditional Agricultural Extension Fact Sheets
and later into the EDIS electronic publication series. At present, the latter fully facilitates
transfer of UF IB agricultural research to agribusiness practitioners. Upcoming CIBER
support will focus on agribusiness IT-consolidation and interpretation of data on
specific topics for agribusiness. Passage of the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export
Enhancement Act (TSRA), allowing the sale of food, agricultural products and medical
supplies to Cuba, provided new opportunities for US agricultural exporters, but many
remain uncertain and uninformed about the potential. Given its expertise on Cuban
agricultural markets, UF is exceptionally prepared to fill this business information gap.
The quarterly report will present statistical updates compiled from the US Departments of
Commerce and Agriculture-basic information on the range of US agricultural products
being sold to Cuba, markets in which Cuba is becoming a major importer of US
agricultural goods, etc. It will also summarize current eco-political factors affecting trade
potential, synthesizing information gleaned from both US and Cuban sources, including
the network of Cuban agricultural contacts developed from on-going collaborative
research of faculty at UF's IFAS and faculty at the University of Havana.

Funding is available for a potential second multidisciplinary Latin American
STSA, this one emphasizing agriculture or retailing/marketing or technology
competitiveness.

3. Initial development of an African ICIBE: While continuing and deepening the
Latin American ICIBE remain central focuses of the UF CIBER, 2006-2010 is also a
time to apply the lessons learned in a new context. Foundation building for an African
ICIBE is an ambitious new program.

Why African IB? Internal African partnerships such as NEPAD (the New
Partnership for Africa's Development) and the East African Customs Union are
improving the continent's business climate by reforming regulatory practices, reducing
notorious administrative red tape that inhibits establishment of business enterprises and
increasing regional integration. As Africa begins joining the global economy, there is
corresponding emerging need for African IB training in the US. UF has unique resources
to respond to this need:

UF's Title VI Center for African Studies is one of the oldest in the US,
and the only one in the southeast. Its 140 affiliate faculty support outstanding programs
including course offerings on Economic Development of Africa and Africa in the Global
Economy: Trade, Aid andDebt and organization of sessions on growth and trade at
meetings of the regional organization it founded in 2000, The S.n,,,ewat Africanist
Network.









WCB African expertise has been developed at its Public Utility
Research Center (PURC). Eighteen offerings of its International Training Program on
Utility Regulation and Strategy have trained nearly 1500 industry and government
officials from 128 countries, including 445 from 34 African countries. Case study reports
include utility regulation in developing African economies; on-site seminars have been
conducted in Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia.

African expertise exists in critical social science business-supporting
disciplines and includes co-authors of the book, African Entrepreneurship: Theory and
Reality (2000, University of Florida Press), author of the forthcoming NSF-funded book
Working the Border: Navigating Sovereignty in West Africa, a former President of the US
African Studies Association and a former US Ambassador to Mozambique who also
served as the National Security Council's Senior Director for African Affairs.

Complementing these IB basics are law school expertise on Africa and scientific
expertise in the continent's evolving resource base. UF has outstanding raw material for
an African business program, but realization of the potential IB synergy of the pieces
requires engaging and coordinating faculty, students and regional resources.

The plan for laying the foundation for an African ICIBE parallels the strategy that
developed UF's successful Latin American program.

Interest students by infusing Africa into business course offerings and
fund development of lIB courses and modules by African specialists outside WCB: The
thousands of business and non-business students who annually take Principles of
Macroeconomics will have a "broad brushstroke" introduction to the continent as
examples from the region are explicitly integrated into lectures. Upper division
undergraduate and MBA business students will work on African market entry projects
and both business and non-business students will benefit from a new course on the
Anthropology of Global Trade and Finance.

Get faculty exposed and involved: Jointly with UF's Center for African
Studies, UF CIBER will host the 9th annual conference of IAABD, the International
Academy of African Business and Development, at Gainesville in Spring 2008. IAABD
is one of the pre-eminent global professional organizations focused on analyzing and
advancing solutions to the challenges facing development of African business. It
publishes the Journal of African Business and its annual meeting attracts approximately
175 scholars from around the world. UF business and African Studies faculty will be
engaged as program and session organizers. A follow-up business outreach conference in
the Tampa area will leverage African business acumen at the academic conference and
will involve African specialists at other institutions of higher education in Florida in the
planning network.

Fund faculty FDIB: CIBER will sponsor two faculty per year, one
business and one non-business, to participate in a two-week study abroad in Africa,
similar to the Mercosur program noted above under the Latin American ICIBE program.









In addition, faculty will be exposed to current topics in African IB through presentations
at the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series.

Engage the brightest undergraduates: Targeting the brightest and most
motivated undergraduates can effectively "jump start" a program since these students
typically lead their colleagues. Such elite students can be reached through programs that
focus on honors papers topics and/or the competitive University Scholars Program
(summer faculty-mentored research that pays a stipend to student researchers). A series
of CIBER workshops will identify African-related topics in microfinance and developing
country entrepreneurship appropriate for honors papers and/or the University Scholars
competition, assist students in preparing research proposals and pair students with faculty
mentors to conduct the research.

Initiate foreign language programs: While UF's Department of African
and Asian Languages and Literatures, in conjunction with the Center for African Studies,
offers training in a large number of African languages, few are viable candidates for a
business program. An exception is Arabic. Program development started this past year
with piloting of Arabic Business Culture, a one-credit course for Arabic language
students and heritage Arabic speakers that introduces students to the complexities
involved in negotiating the Arab business environment-communication and meeting
styles, greetings, influence of religion, etc. The class currently combines English and
Arabic, reflective of the relatively few students fluent in Arabic. But Arabic language
enrollments have risen sharply at UF, with currently 100 students in the first-year course.
If significant numbers of students follow with more advanced training, the class will be
divided into two sections, a pure FLAC in Arabic and an introduction to Mid-East/North
African business culture in English.

Fund faculty and doctoral dissertation research on African IB: Research
grants are particularly effective in developing faculty interest/expertise given the
emphasis on research and graduate student development in AAU (American Association
of Universities) institutions such as UF. A competitive process will be established for
awarding African IB research grants.


II. Special topics programs

Not all IB development needs of students, faculty and business can be effectively
addressed within the context of integrated programs. UF CIBER has balanced
development of integrated programs with implementation of niche programs that fill gaps
in UF's IB infrastructure and target underserved constituencies.

A. Key Accomplishments 2002-2006: Special topics programs addressed IB training
needs of students, UF faculty, non-UF faculty and business.

1. Programs for students: In addition to courses, study abroad and career
counseling offered in the integrated programs, both UF and non-UF students benefited









from new courses and degrees and experiential learning programs made available outside
the ICIBE context.

Seventy six students received CIBER support for travel abroad during 2002-
2006. While the majority of these fell under the Latin American ICIBE program, a
significant minority did not. CIBER funding allowed the latter to present their own
research at professional conferences, conduct research abroad and learn about
international dimensions of their disciplines at workshops and seminars. In addition to
experiential learning through foreign travel, 52 students from both business and non-
business disciplines gained hands-on experience with IB activities through their
employment on a variety of CIBER curriculum, research and outreach projects. (For a
complete list of Student Training in IB from CIBER support through scholarships, travel
funds and project assignments, see Appendix 1).

Beyond direct award of scholarships for student foreign travel, CIBER
indirectly supported undergraduate overseas studies with funding to the WCB
Undergraduate Program Office (UPO) for development of a more efficient study abroad
model. Rather than arranging study abroad on an individual basis through exchanges and
transfer credit programs, the new model utilizes direct partnerships with institutions in
Europe that allow a group of WCB undergraduates to simultaneously study abroad at a
foreign institution. While overseas, the students continue to fulfill basic WCB
requirements by enrolling in two of the College's Electronic Platform courses that can be
delivered globally. In addition, they take region-specific courses on the European
business environment, international relations and/or language/culture delivered by partner
institutions. Piloted in Paris in Fall 2004 in conjunction with UF's Paris Research
Center, the program currently operates in Rouen, London and Madrid.

The new options are allowing significant increases in WCB undergraduate study
abroad. At CIBER's inception in 1998, only 7.5 percent of Warrington undergraduates
studied abroad. With a 23 percent increase in 2005-2006 over 2004-2005, the proportion
rose to 20 percent last year, nearing the goal of 25 percent. Compared with other colleges
at UF, WCB currently accounts for 11 percent of the student body, but a larger 20 percent
of students studying abroad.

WCB's first undergraduate IB degree was passed in 2004. The Bachelor of
Arts in Business Administration (BABA) i ith International Studies Area of Specialization
includes 28 credit hours of the undergraduate business core, a foreign language minor, a
required course in either Introduction to International Relations or Comparative Politics,
12 additional credit hours in area studies or world studies and a semester study abroad.
With judicious planning, students can complement the degree with a minor in European
Union Studies, Latin American Studies or Asian Studies. Existing IB graduate degrees-
Master of Science in International Finance, International MBA and the Master of Arts in
International Business-were augmented by the multidisciplinary MSM/MAIC (Master
of Science in Management/Master ofArts in International Communications) taught
jointly by WCB and the College of Journalism and Communications.









An IB class was added to the on-line BSBA and for on-campus students,
CIBER course development grants made new IB classes available in International
Business Ethics (graduate and undergraduate, WCB), International Negotiations
(graduate, WCB), International Sport Business (graduate, College of Health and Human
Performance), Entering Foreign Markets (graduate, College of Journalism and
Communication), International Business Law (undergraduate,WCB), The Legal
Environment of European Business (undergraduate, WCB), International Trade in
Unsafe and Unfair Products (graduate, College of Law), Asian Political Economy
(undergraduate, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences).

In foreign languages, Business Chinese was enhanced with case studies, a course
on Business Japanese was designed and delivered and two non-Latin American IB
FLACs were added, Spain and the European Union and Business and Culture in the
Francophone World. A UF CIBER grant to Florida A&M University added a capstone
simulation course on global project management to FAMU's MBA program and
facilitated the offering of the first two business language courses at that institution. (For a
complete list of CIBER supported new courses and new degree programs, see Appendix
2)

2. Programs for UFfaculty: Research and curriculum development support were
cornerstones of CIBER programs for UF faculty. Many, however, also benefited from
FDIB opportunities offered through the Center.

Curriculum development grants to faculty supported the course innovations
noted in the section above. Similarly, research grants encouraged UF faculty to pursue IB
dimensions of their scholarly investigations. Outside the Latin American research
program, CIBER funded UF faculty with expertise in economics, finance, management,
utility regulation, media markets, law and agriculture to investigate global
competitiveness implications of their research interests. Like its Latin American ICIBE
counterpart, CIBER special topics research influences national and international scholarly
and policy-making agendas.

CIBER-funded research on global media markets has been published in
Telecommunications Policy, The International Journal of Communications Studies,
Journal of Media Economics, Journal of Broadcasting and Communication and has
provided content for the book published by Lawrence Earlham and Associates, Media
Strategy, Branding, and Conglomeration: Strategic Competition, Brand Management,
and Global Diversification in the Age of Digital Media. Other recent CIBER-supported
research studies appear as chapters in scholarly books and in peer-reviewed journals such
as Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Corporate Finance,
Journal of Product Innovation Management, International Journal of Research in
Marketing and Management Science, Journal of Economic GI ,i i ih, Economics Letters
and Regional Science and Urban Economics. Consistent with long publication lags in
many top journals, a number of manuscripts from the 2002-2006 CIBER research
program are currently "under review."









Indicative of its impact and quality, CIBER-funded research on regulation and
communication policy was invited for presentation to senior FCC staff and Department of
Justice economists for two consecutive years at the 2004 and the 2005 conference
Formulating a Research Agenda for Communication Policy. Research facilitated by a
CIBER grant to WCB economist Dr. Elias Dinopoulos, was the basis for his keynote
address to the International Economics and Finance Society in London, November 2003,
and in the same month, UF CIBER researcher, Dr. Clifford Jones, was invited to be a
founding member of the Munich-based Academic Society for Competition Law
(ASCOLA).

UF CIBER maintains an active working paper series (see Appendix 3). Not all
listings are CIBER-funded, but in part reflect choice of the authors) to make a paper
available through the CIBER network. Only research outputs directly related to CIBER
funding are included in publication and presentation impact analyses such as the brief
summary provided above.

UF faculty FDIB programs over the period 2002-2006 primarily (a) sponsored
faculty to attend two-week study tours abroad that acquaint them, through lectures, firm
visits and cultural activities, with a region of the world and current business issues in the
area and; (b) sponsorship or co-sponsorship of on-campus IB workshops, public lectures,
and distinguished speaker series.

Under the Latin American ICIBE program, three UF faculty were sponsored by
CIBER to attend one of the annual two-week study tours to Brazil, Argentina and Chile
led by the Florida International University CIBER. Thirteen others were funded to attend
similar programs in other regions: Pearl River Delta (China and Hong Kong, led by the
University of Colorado at Denver CIBER)-2; European Union (Antwerp, led by the
University of Memphis CIBER)-4; Asia (Vietnam, Japan and China, led by the
University of Hawaii CIBER)-1; Eastern Europe (3 countries out of Russia, Bulgaria,
Czech Republic, Ukraine and Croatia, led by the University of Pittsburgh CIBER)-6.
Participant details are provided in Appendix 4.

As illustrated in Appendix 5, an eclectic set of UF faculty attend the CIBER
Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series. Students, faculty and staff are drawn
from 15 departments, six colleges, four centers and three program units across the UF
campus. The forum promotes a systematic exchange of IB ideas and research findings
among a broad range of disciplines. The series features presentations on IB research and
IB pedagogy by faculty and graduate students as well as IB presentations by invited
outside speakers. Over the past four years, topics presented by UF speakers included
cross-disciplinary teaching of culture and business, web-based language instruction and
Cuban agricultural markets. Outside speakers have included a business management
consultant presenting on international business ethics, an academic Africanist on
Moroccan entrepreneurship, a Brazilian businessman on entering the North American
cement markets and the Pulitzer Prize winning editor of the Miami Herald on the
newspaper business in the internet age.









CIBER annually co-sponsors the Bradbury Distinguished Public Lecture on
International Trade and Development. Featured speakers during the 2002-2006 period
were Nobel Laureate, Dr. Joseph Stiglitz; Dr. Arvind Panagariya, Jagdish Bhaghati
Professor of Indian Political Economy at Columbia University; and Dr. Kaushik Basu,
the C. Marks Professor of International Studies at Cornell University.

Finally, faculty FDIB is supported by CIBER funding to attend specialized
conferences as documented in Appendix 6. In a number of cases, the attendance also
constitutes academic or business outreach-i.e., the UF attendee is presenting as well as
listening and learning.

3. Programs for non-UF faculty: CIBER programs address a wide range of non-
UF actual and potential IB educational personnel-secondary school teachers through
university professors.

Since its inception in 1998, CIBER has supported secondary school faculty IB
development by funding training programs and materials delivered through the
established outreach workshops of UF's area studies centers. During 2002-2006,
secondary school outreach was significantly expanded from this traditional role through
partnerships with faculty from the UF College of Journalism and Communication and the
Buchholz High School (Gainesville, Florida) Academy of Finance Program.

The College of Journalism and Communication's Summer Journalism Institute
(SJI) is a six-day workshop for approximately 100 high school students from around the
United States who are aspiring journalists or interested in pursuing a career in the media.
In summer 2005, CIBER funded the addition of an IB module that introduced students to
global business trends, trade institutions, and timely issues (e.g., offshoring of jobs,
software, movie and music piracy). Students received resource materials and were
challenged on how to "localize" these global events so the reported information had an
impact on readership. Given very positive student evaluations of the IB module, it was
repeated in the Summer 2006 program.

Robert Anderson at the Gainesville, Florida Buchholz High School Academy of
Finance, developed an International Finance curriculum with lesson plans and projects
covering gains from trade, exchange rates, and governing systems and trade. It was
introduced over a 3-week period to 20 students in the second-year class of the four year
Academy of Finance program. Post-pilot evaluations were very useful in identifying the
need for greater use of group projects in developing the material, a result that will help
frame UF CIBER's States in the Global Economy initiative in the 2006-2010 grant
period.

CIBER sponsored four faculty from Florida community colleges to attend
Michigan State University's 6th Biennial International Business Institute for Community
College Faculty, May 14-19, 2005. The program is unique in its focus specifically on
community college and technical college faculty. Positive evaluations indicate the
program is very effective in achieving its goal of "providing participants with the









knowledge, experience and resources they need to internationalize general business
courses and/or develop specialized international business courses at the two-year college
level." In addition, two community college faculty received funding to participate in
CIBER 2-week study tours abroad (Pearl River Delta, 2003, and Mercosur, 2005-see
Appendix 4).

Globalizing Business Schools (GBS) is a joint project of 10 CIBERs and the
Institute for International Public Policy (the US Department of Education Title VI
program to prepare underrepresented minorities for careers in international affairs). GBS
addresses the observation that Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)
typically lag other institutions of higher education in internationalization of business
programs. Initiative emphasis is on faculty development since that is fundamental to
successful internationalization of any business program. The GBS program has three
phases:

(a) In Phase I, both CIBERs and HBCUs attend CIBER-organized workshops that
inform on sources of federal and private funds for internationalizing business programs
and provide grant-writing tips, budgeting techniques, etc. Each of the ten HBCUs in a
"class" is paired one-on-one with a participating CIBER. The latter then works with the
HBCU to develop an internationalization plan for its business program and also provides
further guidance in writing grant proposals for funding the plans.

(b) In Phase II (partially concurrent with Phase I), a total of eight business faculty
and four language faculty from each HBCU attend intensive workshops on
internationalization of business courses and integration of language, culture and business
in the curriculum. If a grant proposal from Phase I was funded, CIBER assists its HBCU
partner in implementation of the award. If the grant proposal was denied, a second round
of guidance on grant writing occurs in preparation for re-application.

(c) In Phase III, there are two weeks of experiential learning abroad for two
faculty representatives from each of the participating HBCUs in the class.

The pairing of UF CIBER with HBCU Florida A&M University (FAMU) proved
to be exceptionally productive. FAMU was successful in its first application for grant
funding, has successfully initiated its internationalization plans, and faculty at FAMU and
UF are working on projects of joint interest.

The University of Memphis CIBER annually hosts concurrent Globalization
Seminars, day-long workshops in which business faculty from around the US are
provided with instruction and materials on how to develop international versions of basic
business classes or how to infuse international content into current courses on
management, marketing, finance, etc. UF CIBER has supported the program by funding
UF Business Law Professor Robert Thomas to co-teach the seminar on e-commerce.

Working papers, professional conference presentations and publications are on-
going venues through which faculty at other institutions learn about UF IB research and









IB pedagogical innovations. In addition, UF has annually co-sponsored academic
conferences on IB issues. Major co-sponsorships for 2002-2006 included:

(a) The Annual CIBER Language Conference. Supported by all CIBERs,
this annual conference is the premier meeting for the field broadly known as "Teaching
Languages for the Professions." Attracting approximately 150-160 attendees, its
combination of keynote presentations and breakout workshops for 10 languages
communicates best practices and networks newcomers to the field with pioneers. It is an
energizing meeting, sustaining enthusiasm and innovation among dedicated faculty who
often face significant institutional skepticism in their home literature-oriented
departments. Since 2003-2004, UF CIBER has been on the conference Steering
Committee.

(b) International Agricultural Trade and Policy Conference, 2003, 2004
and 2005. Organized by the IFAS International Trade and Policy Center, and co-
sponsored by CIBER, this conference for academics, policy makers and industry
practitioners annually has addressed a range of trade policy issues facing US
agribusiness. CIBER has supported the conference both directly with general co-
sponsorship funds and indirectly through funding of research for presentation at the
conference.

(c) 2004 JIBS AIB CIBER Invitational Conference on Emerging Research
Frontiers in International Business. Jointly organized and sponsored by 29 CIBERs
(including UF CIBER), the Academy of International Business (AIB) and the Journal of
International Business Studies jibsS), the conference brought together leading IB
scholars to discuss and define the direction of IB research with respect to theoretical
frameworks, constructs and methodologies. Participating IB scholars gathered at the
James B. Henry Center for Executive Development, Michigan State University,
September 16-19, 2004 to network on key issues affecting IB research agendas and to
address development of academic IB research expertise.

(d) Telecommunications Policy Conferences, 2004 and 2005. Jointly
sponsored by UF's CIBER, Public Policy Research Center, Public Utility Research
Center, and the London Business School, these conference for academics, policy makers
and industry practitioners focused on key questions facing the industry with regard to
wireless and wireline networking and broadband.

(e) Conceptualizing Security Issues for International Business Research:
Opportunities and Challenges, Oakbrook, Illinois, 2004. Following the business
program, Corporate Security and International Operations, this academic workshop
consisted of presentations and discussions among participating CIBERs to define an
agenda for scholarly CIBER research on conflicts and compatibility of national security
and global competitiveness goals.

(f) Globalization: Prospects and Problems: Conference in Honor of
Jagdish Bhagwati's 70th Bit ih, ,y, Gainesville, Florida, January 28-30, 2005. CIBER co-









sponsored and provided logistical support to this academic conference that brought
together scholars from over two dozen prominent institutions worldwide including Johns
Hopkins, Yale, Michigan, Michigan State, Berkeley, Columbia, Brown, Syracuse, Texas
and the Stockholm School of Economics. New research focused on six major topics: (1)
Globalization and Poverty; (2) Globalization and Wages; (3) Globalization and Hi-Tech
Industries; (4) Globalization and Institutions; (5) Multinationals: Predatory or
Beneficial? (6) Multilateralism and Regionalism: Friends or Foes?

(g) Global Security Risks and International Competitiveness, March,
2005, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. UF CIBER both co-sponsored the conference and
funded research for presentation at this conference that was dedicated to examining the
relationship between domestic security measures and the competitiveness of US firms in
global markets.

Programs for business: Gainesville, FL is essentially a college town-220,000
residents, many of whom are students. The nearest major metropolitan business area is
90 miles to the northeast. Without a large local business community to serve, the UF
CIBER has had to be creative in designing outreach programs for business. This has
involved: (1) linking with other institutions to deliver programs in more populous regions
of the state; (2) using electronic media and publications to disseminate IB information;
(3) linking with business groups to add IB components to industry conferences and; (4)
taking advantage of existing university outreach infrastructure. As a result, the apparent
disadvantage of geographical location and size has actually been an advantage since it
has encouraged program delivery around the state and not just in the CIBER city of
location, has favored dissemination in cost-effective electronic and published formats,
and has led to efficient use of CIBER outreach funds by leveraging existing outreach
infrastructure and by using conference money to add substantive IB content as opposed to
covering overhead administrative expenses.

Although a number of the CIBER programs for business are products of the
Latin American program, each year the Center has sponsored outreach activities that
target industry sector groups and/or update regional business groups on a broader range
of IB issues. Many of the former overlap programs for faculty through co-sponsorship of
conferences with participants drawn from academia, business and policy-
making/regulatory groups-e.g., the International Agricultural Trade and Policy
Conferences and Telecommunications Policy Conferences noted above.

Regionally, a consortium of state and university groups, including UF CIBER, has
organized an annual IB conference to address globalization issues pertinent to the state's
business community. The first event, Florida International Summit on Globalization and
Technology: Expanding Opportunities in a .\h inking World, attracted approximately 500
attendees. Nationally, UF is part of the CIBER consortium sponsoring the annual
National Forum on Trade Policy (NFTP). Recognizing that US trade policy creates both
opportunities and threats in most regions of the nation, the National Forum on Trade
Policy was organized to encourage development of effective local globalization
strategies. The conference blends presentations by trade specialists with breakout









sessions that come up with concrete regional policy action items. It annually attracts
150-180 attendees from 35-40 states.

Some conference funding is reserved for one-time special conferences. CIBER
co-sponsored and served on the Steering Committee of the 2004 Florida's Global
Frontiers: Impacts of Trade Liberalization, the first comprehensive forum for
understanding Florida as part of the global economy. Four sessions covered the impact
of globalization on Florida industries, workforce development and composition in
Florida, the state's environment and state and local public policy. Other one-time
business conference events co-sponsored by UF CIBER in 2002-2006 included Doing
Business in the "New Europe and Corporate Security and International Operations, the
former targeting a central Florida business audience and the latter a national one. For a
complete listing of CIBER conference co-sponsorships, see Appendix 7. The Executive
Summary, Table of Contents and List of Tables for the 2006 edition of UF CIBER's
premier business outreach publication, Latin American Business Environment Report, can
be found in Appendix 8.

B. Programs for 2006-2010 : Although participants and topics will change, successful
program formats continued from the previous grant cycle include: (1) graduate student IB
training on CIBER research and outreach projects; (2) UF faculty two-week foreign study
tour FDIB programs; (3) the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series; (4)
participation in the Globalizing Business Schools CIBER-HBCU program; (5) co-
sponsorship of IB business outreach and academic conferences. Changes to be noted fall
into three categories: CIBER conference leadership; emphases of research and
curriculum support; new outreach initiatives.

1. CIBER Conference Leadership: Maturing of the UF CIBER program through
two previous grant cycles has brought it to a position of leadership among its colleague
centers across the country. See Appendix 9 for a list of schools receiving CIBER grants
for 2006-2010.

With eight years of CIBER support, UF's business language program
has grown exceptionally. In 1998, UF did not even offer Business Spanish; only
commercial French and German were available. Today, a dynamic group of business
language faculty offer business Spanish, French, German, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese
and Arabic. These are complemented by innovative programs that link business content
courses with foreign language training and programs that enhance commercial language
instruction by developing new case studies and new web-based pedagogical techniques.
This growth has transformed UF from a "follower" to a "leader" in business language
development and is reflected in the selection of UF as the host institution for the 2008
CIBER Language Conference.

Similar growth in business conference outreach initiatives has prepared
UF CIBER to take a leadership role in this area also. The Center will co-host the 2010
National Forum on Trade Policy in Orlando. Partner hosts are the Florida International
University CIBER and the University of Central Florida's Global Perspectives Office.










2. Research and curriculum development emphases: Special topics research
grants will target university junior faculty and doctoral students while curriculum grants
will expand offerings that integrate business content with training in foreign cultures and
languages.

Compared with earlier funding cycles, a greater proportion of CIBER
supported research is dedicated to continuing and developing the integrated programs in
Latin American and African lB. The emphasis of special topics research is on engaging
junior faculty and doctoral students in IB research. Since the former are the university
leaders of tomorrow, sustained internationalization requires they develop global
perspectives today. This is not always consistent with their career advancement that
rewards significant research in the home discipline. The CIBER challenge is to identify
and fund research initiatives that simultaneously have large IB impacts and large payoffs
in the home discipline of the researcher. Similarly, "training the future trainers" calls for
emphasis on research initiatives that substantively engage doctoral students and lead to
publications in their field.

In addition to course development in African IB, funding for curriculum
innovations reinforces UF's emerging strength in business language and culture training.
The successful FLAC (Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum) program provides a
model. With funding from a Title VI-A grant, UF's Department of Romance Languages
and Literatures pioneered development of a FLAC prototype applicable for use at a large
university. A "FLAC" section is a one-credit discussion section conducted in a foreign
language in conjunction with a content course. The FLAC section is taught by a foreign
language graduate student who receives pedagogical training from his/her home
department and who works out reading/discussion materials in conjunction with the
content professor. Key to the program's success, and ability to expand it, is the fact the
content professor does not have to know the foreign language of the FLAC.

When applied to courses in the business college, graduate foreign language students are
introduced to business applications of their language study and enrollees in the FLAC
section benefit from practicing their foreign language skills in a business discussion
context. UF CIBER's Profession-Specific Language, Culture and lB Training program
experimentally expands this model in three dimensions:

(a) Interacting IB Ti dining n ith Foreign Language Training in Non-Business
Professional Schools: New FLAC sections will be developed for large enrollment
undergraduate courses in non-business professional schools. They will simultaneously
introduce IB content to the classes and provide foreign language training. Target colleges
and languages) of the new sections are: Design, Construction and Urban Planning
(French and Portuguese); Public Health and Health Professions (Spanish); Food and
Agricultural Sciences (French); Health and Human Performance (Chinese).

(b) Culture Across the Curriculum: Business language classes have been the
primary venue for training in foreign business cultures. One credit classes, modeled after









the FLAC program, but conducted in English, will provide similar learning opportunities
for students not proficient in the language of a country. Pilots will focus on the Asian
cultures.

(c) Student Culture Consulting Corp: While business-related FLACs train
graduate foreign language students in IB aspects of their expertise, similar opportunities
are not available for undergraduate foreign language majors/minors. Simultaneously, in
undergraduate business classes, student teams often lack the language and cultural
expertise to produce top quality foreign market entry plans. The experimental Student
Culture Consulting Corp addresses both shortcomings. Students in upper division
foreign language/foreign culture programs are invited to sign up as potential language
and culture consultants to business projects. Depending on country distribution of IB
classroom projects, individual students will be selected for basic training on the nature of
global market entry business plans and be paid a stipend to act as consultants to an IB
project.

3. New faculty development programs: Consistent with the mandate that CIBERs
serve faculty outside their home institutions, the UF Center is introducing new regional
and secondary school faculty development programs in 2006-2010.

EFIBI--Enhancing Florida's International Business Infrastructure:
Opportunities to fund IB innovations in curriculum, research and outreach vary
considerably across Florida's complex higher education system with its 11 state
universities, 28 community colleges and 61 private colleges and universities. For faculty
in units with endowment funds and/or external profit-making programs, income from
these sources may provide needed funding for individual faculty initiatives. For others,
there is a critical mass of talent at the home institution that can be assembled to attract
national funding, allowing financing of a specific effort as part of a broader program. For
many educators in Florida, however, neither of these opportunities exists and valuable
program enhancements go unimplemented. EFIBI is a flexible IB grant development
program targeting Florida higher-education faculty in social sciences, business, other
professional programs, language and culture, and area studies with (a) innovative ideas
for strengthening IB related training and (b) limited funding opportunities. Its activities
are overseen by an advisory group of IB-interested faculty from smaller educational
institutions in the state.

States in the Global Economy: Interpreting globalization in regional terms is
critical for engaging student interest at the high school level, and also in the community
college classroom. What does it mean for my state? Generally applicable templates for
depicting a state in the global economy, and specific instructions for interpreting them,
requires not just IB expertise, but considerable understanding of fundamental ways in
which state economies differ and familiarity with state data sources. The latter is the
realm of regional science. Drawing upon an unusual UF confluence of IB and regional
science expertise, and with input from the US Department of Commerce BEA User
Group and advice of high school instructors, UF CIBER will develop a broadly
applicable set of state IB materials. These include a "global state-scan," teacher









instructions for reading the scan and identifying direct and indirect globalization issues of
particular significance to the state, lesson plans for general modules that a state scan
might map into and resources for high school and community college teachers to obtain
state-specific examples of globalization's impacts.

The exceptional accomplishments of the UF CIBER during the 2002-2006 grant
cycle by no means exhausted IB development potential at the University of Florida. To
the contrary, programs initiated during the last four years spawned a large number of
creative ideas for further enhancement and innovation in multidisciplinary IB research,
education and outreach. The most promising ideas were developed into an exciting
agenda of activities for 2006-2010 that will further solidify UF as a national resource for
IB programs and that will promote the competitiveness of US firms in global markets.




Full Text

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1 CIBER Synergies: A Comprehensive Review of Programs Center for International Business Education and Research Grant 2: 2002 2006 CIBER Website: http://bear.cba.ufl.edu/centers/ ciber/ CIBER PO Box 117140 Warrington College of Business University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 32611 (352) 392 3433

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2 From the directors In May 2006, the US Department of Education awarded another four years of funding to the University of Flo rida (UF) CIBER. We fared well in the competitive process, an outcome reflective both of the productivity of the UF CIBER under the previous grant and the exciting, innovative and timely programs proposed for the 2006 2010 period. This volume of CIBER Syne rgies presents a comprehensive four year perspective on UF CIBER achievements in the grant cycle that ended September 30, 2006 and plans for the new cycle that began on October 1, 2006. UF CIBER offers both integrated programs and special topics programs. Both are comprehensive with activities spanning teaching, research, business outreach, and faculty development in international business (FDIB). Integrated programs have a common focus while special topics programs vary in subject, filling gap s in UF's international business (IB) infrastructure and targeting underserved constituencies. During the 2002 2006 grant cycle, the integrated Latin American IB program was substantially enhanced by new research on trade policy in the hemisphere and t he impact of post 911 national security policies on US Latin American economic relations. Students benefited from a new financial market short term study abroad and new courses, degree programs and foreign language initiatives in Spanish and Portuguese tha t integrate Latin American area studies and business training. Industry was updated on the Latin American business climate through a variety of outreach programs and a new biennial conference facilitated recruitment of Florida students by Latin American a ffiliates of US firms. Special topics programs introduced a variety of new IB courses including Business Japanese, International Sport Business and The Legal Environment of European Business. CIBER funded research on global media markets, regulation and in ternational finance impacted both academic and policy making audiences. CIBER outreach programs provided IB development opportunities for faculty in secondary schools, community colleges and Historically Black Colleges and Universities. More exciting than the accomplishments of 2002 2006 are the new programs upcoming for 2006 2010. These include an integrated program in African IB and UF CIBER's hosting of major national and international IB conferences IAABD (International Academy of African Business Development), the CIBER Language Conference, the National Forum on Trade Policy. Also look for a Student Culture Consulting Corp, a States in the Global Economy program for secondary school teachers, FDIB for Portuguese business language faculty, a course on the Anthropology of Global Trade and Investment and research on competition in international wireless markets and security in global supply chain management. We're proud to share with you how CIBER has served and will continue to serve students, facu lty and businesses.

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3 Carol West Terry McCoy and Andy Naranjo, Isabelle Winzeler, Director Associate Directors Assistant Director I. In tegrated P rograms Integrated programs identify international business (IB) "cor e competency" of a university and develop multidisciplinary expertise and comprehensive programs of interrelated curriculum, research and outreach that address a specific area of IB e.g., an industry, a global region, world trade institutions, etc. They a re key to meeting the CIBER mandate of being a "national resource," a place academics, policy makers and industry practitioners look to for insight on emerging global issues in the program's topic area. S eed funding by the University of Florida (UF) Ce nter for International Business Educ ation and Research (CIBER) ha s led to develop ment of UF as a national resource on Latin American business. For 2006 2010, the Center now looks to begin building a similar national resource on emerging African business. A. Key Accomplishments 2002 2006 : Development of a Latin American Integrated Center of International Business Excellence ( ICIBE ) was essentiall y completed in the last funding cycle Cri tical foundation programs from the 1998 2002 cycle were continued and enhanced and new, innovative programs were added. 1. Continu ed and enhance d Latin American programs: Reflective of the breadth of the Latin American ICIBE, continued and enhanced initiatives spanned outreach, overseas learning, on campus curricula and fa culty development in international business (FDIB). Four annual updates of The Latin American Business Environment Report (LABER): Now a UF CIBER signature outreach publication, LABER is an approximately 50 page annual report, disseminated to over 2000 educators and businesses, that provides a comprehen sive examination of Latin American business conditions, tracking social, political and economic trends in the region. It analyzes recent developments shaping market outlooks generally and those of the 20 largest countries specifically. Annual offering s of Business in Brazil : UF CIBER's six week, six credit summer program in Rio de Janeiro combines language training in Portuguese, lectures and field trips on Brazilian business practices, and cultural immersion. It is a unique national program, drawing graduate business student participants from around the country. Integrative course s and curricul a : Classes piloted in 1998 2002 were institutionalized in 2002 2006 including Business Spanish, The Latin American Business Environment, a Spanish FLAC ( Foreign Language Across the Curriculum) attached to

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4 the latter, Lat in American Business Economics and a Latin American concentration in the MBA program. Faculty development in Latin American IB : Following sponsorship of nine faculty in 1998 2002, UF CIBER sponsored four more in 2002 2006 to participate in a two week F DIB study program in Brazil, Argentina and Chile. Program format included lectures on the Mercosur business climate, visits to firms in the region and participation in cultural events. 2. Innovation s in Latin American programs: New initiatives expanded the Latin American IB capacity of business and non business faculty, increased the range of overseas and on campus learning options for students, updated business practitioners on developments in the hemisphere, and facilitated interaction of Latin Americ an corporate recruiters with graduating students trained and knowledgeable on the region Research programs focused on current critical issues such as hemispheric economic integration, the impact of Homeland Security on US Latin American trade, US Lati n American immigration policy and the supply of agricultural labor the potential for US Cuban trade in agricultural goods, evolving Latin American economic policy, the global sweeteners market, CARICOM trade patterns, comp etition policy dimensions of the EU and NAFTA and dispute resolution mechanisms in the Americas. Faculty contributing to the Latin American research program came from business, political science, law, agriculture and journalism and they distributed findings through publications, working papers, academic conferences and invited presentations to business practitioners and policy makers including invited testimony to the US Senate Finance Committee A short term study abroad (STSA) was developed to provide an international experience fo r students without time to devote to a summer or semester long program. The International Financial Markets Study Tour combines classroom instruction with a week long visit to Latin American institutions. Relative to similar STSA s at peer business schools, the distinctive design feature of UF's Financial Markets Study Tour is accommodat ion of both business and non business graduate students in the program, including participants from other professional s chools and from area studies Such participant heterog eneity permitt ed a rich sharing of different perspectives both in the classroom and on the tour. New undergraduate short term overseas programs t arget ed the exceptionally bright and motivated business undergraduates who participate in UF's Students in Fr ee Enterprise (SIFE) program CIBER funding supported two trips to Nicaragua for SIFE students to work with UF affiliates there provid ing training in basic business programs and learn ing about potential business market linkages and private sector partnersh ips in th e country New language offerings included Commercial Portuguese case stud ies develop ed for the course and additional Spanish IB FLAC (Foreign Language Across the

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5 Curriculum) sections in the Warrington College of Business (WCB) and the Coll ege of Journalism and Communication (UF's IB FLAC program is explained in more detail in Section II.B.2 below). In addition, class es in Spanish on Marketing and Advertising in the Spanish Speaking World and The Business and Culture of Sports in the Spani sh Speaking World were introduced SPN 166, Teaching Spanish for the Professions was developed and will be piloted in 2006 2010. The course completes a three phase program of CIBER supported development of business Spanish at UF. When CIBER was founded i n 1998, there were no opportunities to study business Spanish at UF. Phase 1 of the CIBER Spanish language program funded development of traditional business Spanish courses that are now offered on an on going basis. Phase 2 provided more substantive lin ks between foreign language and IB content through FLAC sections attached to international courses in WCB and through scholarships for language students to attend immersion programs abroad that emphasize commercial applications. Phase 3 recognize s that to have a long term impact on US IB capacity, it i s critical to "train the future trainers." SPN 166 is designed to excite graduate Spanish students about teaching business Spanish and to train them how to do it effectively. D rawing on expertise at WCB's Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEI), faculty at the Center for Latin American Studies developed and offered LAS 6291: Conservation and Entrepreneurship: Business and Management Practices in International Environmental Conservation. Integratio n of business and area studies was further enhanced by development of a Business Environment Concentration in the MALAS degree (Master of Arts in Latin American Studies). In addition to the annual updates of LABER, agribusiness practitioners benefited from over two dozen Latin American country specific specialized export primers for ag ri culture published on the Institute for Food and Agriculture Science (IFAS) electronic EDIS network. Annual CIBER co sponsorship of the Conference on Legal and Policy Issues in the Americas added topics on trade policy for legal scholars and Latin American IB legal practitioners. CIBER researchers gave presentations focused on Latin America n IB to 20 diverse community, business and policy groups that ranged from regional programs organized by local community colleges in the state's smaller metropolitan areas to larger business forums in Orlando, Tampa and Miami to international audiences at the Americas Business Forum in Quito, Ecuador and the Special Summit of the Americas in Monterrey, Mexico. Faculty development in Latin American IB was enhanced by (1) sponsorship of four faculty to participate in the Mercosur two week study abroad FDI B; (2) funding for Spanish and Portuguese business language faculty to attend eight professional conferences; (3) six Latin American presentations at the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series, an academic year luncheon program attended by stu dents, faculty and staff from 15 departments, six colleges, four centers and three program units ac ross the UF campus and; (4) annual Latin American IB outreach programs to secondary

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6 school educators delivered through established infrastructure in the Cent er for Latin American Studies. The new biennial Latin American Corporate and Careers Conference introduce d students to job opportunities in the region. The conference features sector specific presentations by industry representatives, round table discu ssions on career paths and recruiting strategies in Latin American affiliates of US firms, and insights from recent UF graduates working in the region. B. Programs for 2006 2010 : Building on a strong foundation laid in the first four years of CIBER (19 98 2002), initiatives in the last funding cycle (2002 2006) successfully established the UF Latin American ICIBE. Funding for 2006 2010 continues to support and enhance key Latin American programs and lays the foundation for an African ICIBE. 1. Continued and expanded Latin American programs : Funding is earmarked for updating seven initiatives: the Latin American Business Environment Repor t ; Business in Brazil ; the International Financial Markets Tour ; faculty development in Latin American IB ; new researc h on Latin American issues; transfer of university research to business practice through regional, national and international presentations ; the Latin American Corporate and Careers Conference. In addition, Latin American Spanish and Portuguese IB FLACs will be offered for the first time in the c ollege s of Public Health and Health Professions and Design, Construction and Urban Planning. 2. Innovations in Latin American programs : Although the pace of innovation in the Latin American IB program will slow r elative to earlier funding cycles, three new initiatives will extend its coverage and impact. Faculty Development in Business and Culture (FDBC ): The CIBER network offers a selection of excellent two week FDIB programs in various parts of the world. While open to all faculty with IB interests, content is clearly oriented to business and economics professors. As such, these programs do not necessarily serve well the professional development needs of current and potential business language faculty. The UF CIBER and University of Kansas (KU) CIBER will jointly develop an FDBC that specifically target s this group Li ke the traditional FDIB, the new program will combine lectures and visits to firms in a 12 day to 2 week study abroad tour. Lecture content of the FDBC will focus on basic issues of business culture e.g., communication styles, cultural si milarities/differences among linguistically similar countries, cultural aspects of business strategy, cultural risk shift management. Current economic events impacting the area will be introduced in basic terms and discussion stimulated by thinking about h ow they shape, and are shaped by, cultural factors. Local instructors of "commercial English" will explain the US regional differences they stress. Firm visits to multinationals will feature presentations by human resources (HR) and marketing executives on the role of cultural adaptation in global competition and at visits to local firms managers will speak on the language and culture of global business from a

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7 non US perspective. The program pilot is a Brazil tour for Portuguese language instructors. C uban Agricultural Trade Newsletter: Historically, UF CIBER supported incorporation of agribusiness IB topics into traditional Agricultural Extension Fact Sheets and later into the EDIS electronic publication series. At present, the latter fully facilitate s transfer of UF IB agricultural research to agribusiness practitioners. Upcoming CIBER support will focus on agribusiness IT consolidation and interpretation of data on specific topics for agribusiness. Passage of the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export En hancement Act (TSRA), allowing the sale of food, agricultural products and medical supplies to Cuba, provided new opportunities for US agricultural exporters, but many remain uncertain and uninformed about the potential. Given its expertise on Cuban agricu ltural markets, UF i s exceptionally prepared to fill this business information gap The quarterly report will present statistical updates compiled from the US Departments of Commerce and Agriculture basic information on the range of US agricultural product s being sold to Cuba, markets in which Cuba is becoming a major importer of US agricultural goods, etc. It will also summarize current eco political factors affecting trade potential, synthesizing information gleaned from both US and Cuban sources, includi ng the network of Cuban agricultural contacts developed from on going collaborative research of faculty at UF 's I FAS and faculty at the University of Havana. Funding is available fo r a potential second multidisciplinary Latin American STSA this one emphasizing agriculture or retailing / marketing or technology competitiveness 3. Initial development of an African ICIBE : While continuing and deepening the Lati n American ICIBE remain central focus es of the UF CIBER, 2006 2010 is also a time to apply the lessons learned in a new context. Foundation building for an African ICIBE is an ambitious new program. Why African IB? Internal African partnerships such as NEPAD (the New Partnership for Africa's Development) and the East African Customs Union are improving the continent's business climate by reforming regulatory practices, reducing notorious administrative red tape that inhibits establishment of business ent erprises and increasing regional integration. As Africa begins joining the global economy, there is corresponding emerging need for African IB training in the US. UF has un ique resources to respond to this need: UF's Title VI Center for African Studie s is one of the oldest in the US, and the only one in the southeast. Its 140 affiliate faculty support outstanding programs including course offerings on Economic Development of Africa and Africa in the Global Economy: Trade, Aid and Debt and organization of sessions on growth and trade at meetings of the regional organization it founded in 2000, The Southeast Africanist Network

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8 WCB African expertise has been developed at its Public Utility Research Center (PURC). Eighteen offerings of its International Training Program on Utility Regulation and Strategy have trained nearly 1500 industry and government officials from 128 countr ies, including 445 from 34 African countries. Case study reports include utility regulation in developing African economies; on site seminars have been conducted in Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. African expertise exists in critical social s cience business supporting disciplines and includes co authors of the book, African Entrepreneurship: Theory and Reality (2000, University of Florida Press), author of the forthcoming NSF funded book Working the Border: Navigating Sovereignty in West Afric a, a former President of the US African Studies Association and a former US Ambassador to Mozambique who also served as the National Security Council's Senior Director for African Affairs. Complementing these IB basics are law school expertise on Africa a nd scientific expertise in the continent's evolving resource base. UF has outstanding raw material for an African business program, but realization of the potential IB synergy of the pieces requires engaging and coordinating faculty, students and regional resources The plan for laying the foundation for an African I CIBE parallels the strategy that developed UF's successful Latin American program. Interest students by i nfus ing Africa into business course offerings and fund development of IB courses and modules by African specialists outside WCB: The thousands of business and non business students who annually take Principles of Macroeconomics wil l have a "broad brushstroke" introduction to the continent as examples from the region are explicitly integrated into lectures. Upper division undergraduate and MBA business students will work on African market entry projects and both business and non bus iness students will benefit from a new course on the Anthropology of Global Trade and Finance. Get faculty exposed and involved: Jointly with UF's Center for African Studies, UF CIBER will host the 9 th annual conference of IAABD the International Academy of African Business and Developmen t at Gainesville in Spring 2008. IAABD is one of the pre eminent global professional organizations focused on analyzing and advancing solutions to the challenges facing development of African business. It publishes the Journal of African Business and its annual meeting attracts approximately 175 scholars from around the world. UF business and African Studies faculty will be engaged as program and session organizers. A follow up business outreach conference in the Tampa area will leverage African business acumen at the academic conference and will involve Afri can specialists at other institutions of higher education in Florida in the planning network. Fund faculty FDIB: CIBER will sponsor two faculty per year, one business and one non business, to participate in a two week study abroad in Africa, similar to the Mercosur program noted above under the Latin American ICIBE program.

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9 In addition, faculty will be exposed to current topics in African IB through presentations at the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series. Engage the brightest under graduates: Targeting the brightest and most motivated undergraduates can effectively "jump start" a program since these students typically lead their colleagues. Such elite students can be reached through programs that focus on honors papers topics and/or the competitive University Scholars Program (summer faculty mentored research that pays a stipend to student researchers). A series of CIBER workshops will identify African related topics in microfinance and developing country entrepreneurship appropriate for honors papers and/or the University Scholars competition, assist students in preparing research proposals and pair students with faculty mentors to conduct the research. Initiate foreign language programs: While UF's Department of African and Asi an Languages and Literatures, in conjunction with the Center for African Studies, offers training in a large number of African languages, few are viable candidates for a business program An except ion is Arabic. Program development started this past year w ith piloting of Arabic Business Culture a one credit course for Arabic language students and heritage Arabic speakers that introduces students to the complexities involved in negotiating the Arab business environment communication and meeting styles, gr eetings, influence of religion, etc. The class currently combine s English and Arabic, reflective of the relatively few students fluent in Arabic But Arabic language enrollments have risen sharply at UF, with currently 100 students in the first year course If significant numbers of students follow with more advanced training, the c lass will be divided into two sections, a pure FLAC in Arabic and a n introduction to Mid East/North African business culture in English. Fund faculty and doctoral dissertation research on African IB: Research grants are particularly effective in developing faculty interest/expertise given the emphasis on research and graduate student development in AAU (American Association of Universiti es) institutions such as UF. A competitive process will be established for awarding African IB research grants. II. Special topics programs Not all IB development needs of students, faculty and business can be effectively addressed within the c on text o f integrated programs. UF CIBER has balanced development of integrat ed programs with implementation of niche programs that fill gaps in UF's IB infrastructure and target underserved constituencies. A. Key Accomplishments 2002 2006 : Special topics programs addressed IB training needs of students, UF faculty, non UF faculty and business. 1. Programs for students : In addition to course s study abroad and career counseling offered in the integrated programs, both UF and non UF students benefited

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10 from new courses and degrees and experiential learning programs made available outside the ICIBE context. Seventy six students received CIBER support for travel abroad during 2002 2006. While the majority of these fell under the Latin American ICIBE program, a significant minority did not. CIBER funding allowed the latter to present their own research at pr ofessional conferences, conduct research abroad and learn about international dimensions of their disciplines at workshops and seminars. In addition to experiential learning through foreign travel, 52 students from both business and non business disciplin es gained hands on experience with IB activities through their employment on a variety of CIBER curriculum, research and outreach projects. (For a complete list of Student Training in IB from CIBER support through scholarships, travel funds and project as signments, see Appendix 1). Beyond direct award of scholarships for student foreign travel, CIBER indirectly supported undergraduate overseas studies with funding to the WCB Undergraduate Program Office (UPO) for development of a more efficient study abr oad model. Rather than arranging study abroad on an individual basis through exchanges and transfer credit programs, the new model utilizes direct partnerships with institutions in Europe that allow a group of WCB undergraduates to simultaneously study ab road at a foreign institution. While overseas, the students continue to fulfill basic WCB requirements by enrolling in two of the College's Electronic Platform courses that can be delivered globally. In addition, they take region specific courses on the European business environment, international relations and/or language/culture delivered by partner institutions. Piloted in Paris in Fall 2004 in conjunction with UF 's Paris Research Center the program currently operates in Rouen, London and Madrid. Th e new options are allowing significant increases in WCB undergraduate study abroad. At CIBER's inception in 1998, only 7.5 percent of Warrington undergraduates studied abroad. With a 23 percent increase in 2005 2006 over 2004 2005, the proportion rose to 20 percent last year, nearing the goal of 25 percent. Compared with other colleges at UF, WCB currently accounts for 11 percent of the student body, but a larger 20 percent of students studying abroad. WCB's first undergraduate IB degree was passed in 2004. The Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration (BABA) with International Studies Area of Specialization includes 28 credit hours of the undergraduate business core, a foreign language minor, a re quired course in either Introduction to International Relations or Comparative Politics 12 additional credit hours in area studies or world studies and a semester study abroad. With judicious planning, students can complement the degree with a minor in E uropean Union Studies, Latin American Studies or Asian Studies. Existing IB graduate degrees Master of Science in International Finance, International MBA and the Master of Arts in International Business were augmented by the multidisciplinary MSM/ MA IC ( M aster of Science in Management/ Master of Arts in International Communications ) taught jointly by WCB and the College of Journalism and Communications.

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11 An IB class was added to the on line BSBA and for on campus students CIBER course development grant s made new IB c lasses available in International Business Ethics (graduate and un d ergraduate WCB ) International Negotiations (graduate WCB ) International Sport Business (graduate, College of Health and Human Performance) Entering Foreign Markets (grad uate, College of Journalism and Communication) International Business Law ( undergraduate ,WCB ) The Legal Environment of European Business (undergraduate WCB ) International Trade in Unsafe and Unfair Products (graduate, College of Law) Asian Political E conomy ( undergraduate, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ) In foreign languages, Business Chinese was enhanced with case studies, a course on Business Japanese was designed and delivered and two non Latin American IB FLACs were added, Spain and th e European Union and Business and Culture in the Francophone World A UF CIBER grant to Florida A&M University added a capstone simulation course on global project management to FAMU's MBA program and facilitated the offering of the first two business lang uage courses at that institution. (For a complete list of CIBER supported new courses and new degree programs, see Appendix 2) 2. Programs for UF faculty : Research and curriculum development support were cornerstones of CIBER programs for UF faculty. Ma ny, however, also benefited from FDIB opportunities offe red through the Center. Curriculum development grants to faculty support ed the course innovations noted in the section above. Similarly research grants encouraged UF faculty to pursue IB dimensions of their scholarly investigations Outside the Latin American research program CIBER funded UF faculty with expertise in economics, finance, management, utility regulation, media markets, law and agriculture to investigate global competitiveness implications of their research interests. Like its Latin American ICIBE counterpart, CI BER special topics research influences national and international scholarly and policy making agendas. CIBER funded research on global media markets has been published in Telecommunications Policy, The International Journal of Communications Studies, J ournal of Media Economics Journal of Broadcasting and Communication and has provided content for the book published by Lawrence Earlham and Associates, Media Strategy, Branding, and Conglomeration: Strategic Competition, Brand Management, and Global Diver sification in the Age of Digital Media. Other recent CIBER supported research studies appear as chapters i n scholarly books and in peer reviewed journals such as Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Corporate Finance, Journal of Prod uct Innovation Management, International Journal of Research in Marketing and Management Science, Journal of Economic Growth Economics Letters and Regional Science and Urban Economics. Consistent with long publication lags in many top journals, a number o f manuscripts from the 2002 2006 CIBER research program are currently "under review."

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12 Indicative of its impact and quality, CIBER funded research on regulation and communication policy was invited for presentation to senior FCC staff and Department of Justice economists for two consecutive years at the 2004 and the 2005 conference Formulating a Research Agenda for Communication Policy. Research facilitated by a CIBER grant to WCB economist Dr. Elias Dinopoulos, was the basis for his keynote address to t he International Economics and Finance Society in London November 2003, and in the same month, UF CIBER researcher, Dr. Clifford Jones, was invited to be a founding member of the Munich based Academic Society for Competition Law (ASCOLA). UF CIBER maint ains an active working paper series (see Appendix 3). Not all listings are CIBER funded, but in part reflect choice of the author(s) to make a paper available through the CIBER network. Only research outputs directly related to CIBER funding are included in publication and presentation impact analyses such as the brief summary pr ovid ed above. UF faculty FDIB programs over the period 2002 2006 primarily (a) sponsored faculty to attend two week study tours abroad that acquaint them through lectures, firm visits and cultural activities, with a region of the world and current business issues in the area and; (b) sponsorship or co sponsorship of on campus IB workshops, public lectures, and distinguished speaker series. Under the Lat in American ICIBE program, three UF faculty were sponsored by CIBER to attend one of the annual two week study tours to Brazil, Argentina and Chile led by the Florida International University CIBER. Thirteen others were funded to attend similar programs in other regions: Pearl River Delta (China and Hong Kong, led by the University of Colorado at Denver CIBER) 2 ; European Union (Antwerp, led by the University of Memphis CIBER) 4; Asia (Vietnam, Japan and China, led by the University of Hawaii CIBER) 1; Eastern Europe (3 countries out of Russia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Ukraine and Croatia, led by the University of Pittsburgh CIBER) 6. Participant details are provided in Appendix 4. As illustrated in Appendix 5, an eclectic set of UF faculty attend the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series S tudents, faculty and staff are drawn from 15 departments, six colleges, four centers and three program units across the UF campus. The forum promotes a systematic exchange of IB ideas and research findings among a broad range of disciplines. The series features presentations on IB research and IB pedagogy by fa culty and graduate students as well as IB presentations by invited outside speakers. Over the past four years, topics presented by UF speakers included cross disciplinary teaching of culture and business, web based language instruction and Cuban agricultu ral markets. Outside speakers have included a business management consultant presenting on international business ethics, an academic Africanist on Moroccan entrepreneurship, a Brazilian businessman on entering the North American cement market s and the Pu litzer Prize winning editor of the Miami Herald on the newspaper business in the internet age.

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13 CIBER annually co sponsors the Bradbury Distinguished Public Lecture on International Trade and Development Featured speakers during the 2002 2006 period wer e Nobel Laureate, Dr. Joseph Stiglitz ; Dr. Arvind Panagariya, Jagdish Bhaghati Professor of Indian Political Economy at Columbia University ; and Dr. Kaushik Basu, the C. Marks Professor of International Studies at Cornell University Finally, faculty FDI B is supported by CIBER funding to attend specialized conferences as documented in Appendix 6 In a number of cases, the attendance also constitutes academic or business outreach i.e., the UF attendee is presenting as well as listening and learning. 3. Programs for non UF faculty : CIBER programs address a wide range of non UF actual and potential IB educational personnel secondary school teacher s through university p rofessors Since its inception in 1998, CIBER has supported secondary school faculty IB development by funding training programs and materials delivered through the established outreach workshops of UF's area studies centers. During 2002 2006, secondary school outreach was significantly expanded from this traditional role through p artnerships with faculty from the UF College of Journalism and Communication and the Buch h olz High School (Gainesville, Florida) Academy of Finance Program. The College of Journalism and Communication 's Summer Journalism Institute (SJI) is a six day wor kshop for approximately 100 high school students from around the United States who are aspiring journalists or interested in pursuing a career in the media. In summer 2005, CIBER funded the addition of an IB module that introduced students to global busin ess trends, trade institutions, and timely issues (e.g., offshoring of jobs, software, movie and music piracy) Students received resource materials and were challenged on how to "localize" these global events so the reported information had an impact on r eadership. Given very positive student evaluations of the IB module, it was repeated in the Summer 2006 program. Robert Anderson at the Gainesville, Florida Buchholz High School Academy of Finance, developed an International Finance curriculum with less on plans and projects covering gains from trade, exchange rates, and governing systems and trade. It was introduced over a 3 week period to 20 students in the second year class of the four year Academy of Finance program. Post pilot evaluations were very u seful in identifying the need for greater use of group projects in dev eloping the material, a result that will help frame UF CIBER's States in the Global Economy initiative in the 2006 2010 grant period. CIBER sponsored f our faculty from Florida commun ity colleges to attend Michigan State University's 6 th Biennial International Business Institute for Community College Faculty May 14 19, 2005. The program is unique in its focus specifically on community college and technical college faculty. Positive evaluations indicate the program is very effective in achieving its goal of "providing participants with the

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14 knowledge, experience and resources they need to internationalize general business courses and/or develop specialized international business course s at the two year college level." In addition, two community college faculty received funding to participate in CIBER 2 week study tours abroad (Pearl River Delta, 2003, and Mercosur, 2005 see Appendix 4). Globalizing Business Schools ( GBS ) is a joint project of 10 CIBERs and the Institute for International Public Policy (the US Department of Education Title VI program to prepare underrepresented minorities for careers in international affairs) GBS address es the observation that Historically Black Col leges and Universities (HBCUs) typically lag other institutions of higher education in internationalization of b usiness programs. Init iative emphasis is on faculty development since that is fundamental to successful internationalization of a ny business pro gram. The GBS program has three phases: (a) In Phase I, both CIBERs and HBCUs attend CIBER organized workshops that inform on sources of federal and private funds for internationalizing business programs and provide grant writing tips, budgeting techni ques, etc. Each of the ten HBCUs in a "class" is paired one on one with a participating CIBER. The latter then works with the HBCU to develop an internationalization plan for its business program and also provides further guidance in writing grant proposa ls for funding the plans. (b) In Phase II (partially concurrent with Phase I), a total of eight business faculty and four language faculty from each HBCU attend intensive workshops on internationalization of business courses and integration of language culture and business in the curriculum If a grant proposal from Phase I was funded, CIBER assists its HBCU partner in implementation of the award If the grant proposal was denied, a second round of guidance on grant writing occurs in preparation for re application. (c) In Phase III, there are two weeks of experiential learning abroad for two faculty representatives from each of the participating HBCUs in the class. The pairing of UF CIBER with HBCU Florida A&M University (FAMU) proved to be exce ptionally productive. FAMU was successful in its first application for grant funding, has successfully initiated its internationalization plans and faculty at FAMU and UF are working on projects of joint interest. The University of Memphis CIBER annually hosts concurrent Globalization Seminars, day long workshops in which business faculty from around the US are provided with instruction and materials on how to develop international versions of basic business clas ses or how to infuse international content into current courses on management, marketing, finance, etc. UF CIBER has supported the program by funding UF Business Law Professor Robert Thomas to co teach the seminar on e commerce. Working papers, profess ional conference presentations and publications are on going venues through which faculty at other institutions learn about UF IB research and

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15 IB pedagogical innovations. In addition, UF has annually co sponsored academic conferences on IB issues. Major c o sponsorships for 2002 2006 include d : (a) The Annual CIBER Language Conference Supported by all CIBERs, this annual conference is the premier meeting for the field broadly known as "Teaching Languages for the Professions." Attracting approximately 150 160 attendees, its combination of keynote presentations and breakout workshops for 10 languages communicates best practices and networks newcomers to the field with pioneers. It is an energizing meeting, sustaining enthusiasm and innovation among dedicate d faculty who often face significant institutional skepticism in their home literature oriented departments. Since 2003 2004, UF CIBER has been on the conference Steering Committee. (b) International Agricultural Trade and Policy Conference, 2003, 2004 and 2005. Organized by the IFAS International Trade and Policy Center, and co sponsored by CIBER, this conference for academics, policy makers and industry practitioners annually has addressed a range of trade policy issues facing US agribusiness. CIBER h as supported the conference both directly with general co sponsorship funds and indirectly through funding of research for present ation at the conference. ( c ) 2004 JIBS/AIB/CIBER Invitational Conference on Emerging Research Frontiers in International Bus iness. Jointly organized and sponsored by 29 CIBERs (including UF CIBER), the Academy of International Business (AIB) and the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS), the conference brought together leading IB scholars to discuss and define the d irection of IB research with respect to theoretical frameworks, constructs and methodologies. Participating IB scholars gathered at the James B. Henry Center for Executive Development, Michigan State University, September 16 19, 2004 to network on key iss ues affecting IB research agendas and to address development of academic IB research expertise. ( d ) Telecommunications Policy Conferences, 2004 and 2005. Jointly sponsored by UF's CIBER, Public Policy Research Center, Public Utility Research Center, an d the London Business School, th e s e conference for academics, policy makers and industry practiti oners focused on key questions facing the industry with regard to wireless and wireline networking and broadband. ( e ) Conceptualizing Security Issues for Int ernational Business Research: Opportunities and Challenges, Oakbrook, Illinois, 2004. F ollow ing the business program, Corporate Security and International Operations, this academic workshop consisted of presentations and discussions among participating CI BERs to defin e an agenda for scholarly CIBER research on conflicts and compatibility of national security and global competitiveness goals ( f ) Globalization: Prospects and Problems: Conference in Honor of Jagdish Bhagwati's 70 th Birthday, Gainesville, F lorida, January 28 30, 2005. CIBER co

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16 sponsored and provided logistical support to this academic conference that brought together scholars from over two dozen prominent institutions worldwide including Johns Hopkins, Yale, Michigan, Michigan State, Berkele y, Columbia, Brown, Syracuse, Texas and the Stockholm School of Economics. New research focused on six major topics: (1) Globalization and Poverty; (2) Globalization and Wages; (3) Globalization and Hi Tech Industries; (4) Globalization and Institutions; (5) Multinationals: Predatory or Beneficial? (6) Multilateralism and Regionalism: Friends or Foes? ( g ) Global Security Risks and International Competitiveness, March, 2005, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. UF CIBER both co sponsored the conference and fun ded research for presentation at this conference that was dedicated to examining the relationship between domestic security measures and the competitiveness of US firms in global markets. Programs for business: Gainesville, FL is essentially a college town 220,000 residents, many of whom are students. The nearest major metropolitan business area is 90 miles to the northeast. Without a large local business community to serve, the UF CIBER has had to be creative in designing outreach programs for business. This has involved: (1) linking with other institutions to deliver programs in more populous regions of the state; (2) using electronic media and publications to disseminate IB information ; (3) linking with business groups to add IB components to industry conferences and; (4) taking advantage of existing university outreach infrastructure. As a result, the apparent disadvantage of geographical location and size has actually been an advantag e since it has encouraged program delivery around the state and not just in the CIBER city of location, has favored dissemination in cost effective electronic and published formats, and has led to efficient use of CIBER outreach funds by leveraging existin g outreach infrastructure and by using conference money to add substantive IB content as opposed to covering overhead administrative expenses. Although a number of the CIBER programs for business are products of the Latin American program, each year t he Center has sponsored outreach activities that target industry sector groups and/or update regional business groups on a broader range of IB issues. Many of the former overlap programs for faculty through co sponsorship of conferences with participants drawn from academia, business and policy making/regulatory groups e.g., the International Agricultural Trade and Policy Conferences and Telecommunications Policy Conferences noted above. Regionally, a consortium of state and university groups, includin g UF CIBER, has organized an annual IB conference to address globalization issues pertinent to the state's business community. The first event, Florida International Summit on Globalization and Technology: Expanding Opportunities in a Shrinking World, attr acted approximately 500 attendees. Nationally, UF is part of the CIBER consortium sponsoring the annual National Forum on Trade Policy (NFTP). Recognizing that US trade policy creates both opportunities and threats in most regions of the nation, the Natio nal Forum on Trade Policy was organized to encourage development of effective local globalization strategies. The conference blends presentations by trade specialists with breakout

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17 sessions that come up with concrete regional policy action items. It annua lly attracts 150 180 attendees from 35 40 states. Some conference funding is reserved for one time special conferences. CIBER co sponsored and served on the Steering Committee of the 2004 Florida's Global Frontiers: Impacts of Trade Liberalization, the first comprehensive forum for understanding Florida as part of the global economy. Four sessions covered the impact of globalization on Florida industries, workforce development and composition in Florida, the state's environment and state and local p ublic policy. Other one time business conference events co sponsored by UF CIBER in 2002 2006 include d Doing Business in the "New Europe" and Corporate Security and International Operations the former targeting a central Florida business audience and the latter a nati onal one. For a complete listing of CIBER conference co sponsorships, see Appendix 7. The Executive Summary, Table of Contents and List of Tables for the 2006 edition of UF CIBER's premier business outreach publication, Latin American Busines s Environment Report, can be found in Appendix 8. B. Programs for 2006 2010 : Although participants and topics will change, successful program formats continued from the previous grant cycle include: (1) graduate student IB training on CIBER research and outreach projects; (2) UF faculty two week foreign study tour FDIB programs; (3) the CIBER Multidisciplinary IB Research Workshop series; (4) participation in the Globalizing Business Schools CIBER HBCU program; (5) co sponsorship of IB business outreach a nd academic conferences. Changes to be noted fall into three categories: CIBER conference leadership; emphases of research and curriculum support; new outreach initiatives. 1. CIBER Conference Leadership : Maturing of the UF CIBER program through t wo pr evious grant cycles has brought it to a position of leadership among its colleague centers across the country. See Appendix 9 for a list of schools receiving CIBER grants for 2006 2010. With eight years of CIBER support, UF's business language program has grown except ionally. In 1998, UF did not even offer Business Spanish ; only commercial French and German were available. Today, a dynamic group of business language faculty offer business Spanish, French, German, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and Arab ic. These are complemented by innovative programs that link business content courses with foreign language training and programs that enhance commercial language instruction by develop ing new case stud ies and new web based pedagogical techniques This gr owth has transformed UF from a "follower" to a "leader" in business language development and is reflected in the selection of UF as the host institution for the 2008 CIBER Language Conference. Similar growth in business conference outreach initiatives has prepared UF CIBER to take a leadership role in this area also. The Center will co host the 2010 National Forum on Trade Policy in Orlando. Partner hosts are the Florida International University CIBER and the University of Central Florida's Global Per spectives Office.

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18 2. Research and curriculum development emphases : Special topics research grants will target university junior faculty and doctoral students while curriculum grants will expand offerings that integrate business content with training in f oreign cultures and languages. Compared with earlier funding cycles, a greater proportion of CIBER supported research is dedicated to continuing and developing the integrated programs in Latin American and African IB. The emphasis of special topics research is on engaging junior faculty and doctoral students in IB research. Since the former are the university leaders of tomorrow sustained internationalization requires they develop global perspectives today. This is not always consistent with thei r career advancement that rewards significant research in the home discipline. The CIBER challenge is to identify and fund research initiatives that simultaneously have large IB impacts and large payoffs in the home discipline of the researcher. Similarl y, "training the future trainers" calls for emphasis on research initiatives that substantively e ngage doctoral students and lead to publications in their field. In addition to course development in African IB, funding for curriculum innovations reinforces UF's emerging strength in business language and culture training. The successful FLAC (Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum) program provides a model. With funding from a Title VI A grant, UF's Department of Romance Languages and Literature s pioneered development of a FLAC prototype applicable for use at a large university. A "FLAC" section is a one credit discussion section conducted in a foreign language in conjunction with a content course. The FLAC section is taught by a foreign languag e graduate student who receives pedagogical training from his/her home department and who works out reading/discussion materials in conjunction with the content professor. Key to the program's success, and ability to expand it, is the fact the content prof essor does not have to know the foreign language of the FLAC. When applied to courses in the business college, graduate foreign language students are introduced to business applications of their language study and enrollees in the FLAC section benefit fro m practicing their foreign language skills in a business discussion context. UF CIBER's Profession Specific Language, Culture and IB Training program experimentally expands this model in three dimensions: (a) Interacting IB Training with Foreign Languag e Training in Non Business Professional Schools : New FLAC sections will be developed for large enrollment undergraduate courses in non business professional schools. They will simultaneously introduce IB content to the classes and provide foreign language training. Target colleges and language(s) of the new sections are: Design, Construction and Urban Planning (French and Portuguese); Public Health and Health Professions (Spanish); Food and Agricultural Sciences (French); Health and Human Performance (Chine se). (b) Culture Across the Curriculum: Business language classes have been the primary venue for training in foreign business cultures. One credit classes, modeled after

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19 the FLAC program, but conducted in English, will provide similar learning opportuni ties for students not proficient in the language of a country. Pilots will focus on the Asian cultures. (c) Student Culture Consulting Corp: While business related FLACs train graduate foreign language students in IB aspects of their expertise, similar o pportunities are not available for undergraduate foreign language majors/minors. Simultaneously, in undergraduate business classes, student teams often lack the language and cultural expertise to produce top quality foreign market entry plans. The experi mental Student Culture Consulting Corp addresses both shortcomings. Students in upper division foreign language/foreign culture programs are invited to sign up as potential language and culture consultants to business projects. Depending on country distr ibution of IB classroom projects, individual students will be selected for basic training on the nature of global market entry business plans and be paid a stipend to act as consultants to an IB project. 3. New faculty development programs : Con sistent with the mandate that CIBERs serve faculty outside their home institutions, the UF Center is introducing new regional and secondary school faculty development programs in 2006 2010. EFIBI -Enhancing Florida's International Business Infrastructu re : Opportunities to fund IB innovations in curriculum, research and outreach vary considerably across Florida's complex higher education system with its 11 state universities, 28 community colleges and 61 private colleges and universities. For faculty in units with endowment funds and/or external profit making programs, income from these sources may provide needed funding for individual faculty initiatives. For others, there is a critical mass of talent at the home institution that can be assembled to att ract national funding, allowing financing of a specific effort as part of a broader program. For many educators in Florida, however, neither of these opportunities exists and valuable program enhancements go unimplemented. EFIBI is a flexible IB grant deve lopment program targeting Florida higher education faculty in social sciences, business, other professional programs, language and culture, and area studies with (a) innovative ideas for strengthening IB related training and (b) limited funding opportuniti es. Its activities are overseen by an advisory group of IB interested faculty from smaller educational institutions in the state. States in the Global Economy : Interpreting globalization in regional terms is critical for engaging student interest at th e high school level, and also in the community college classroom. What does it mean for my state? Generally applicable templates for depicting a state in the global economy, and specific instructions for interpreting them, requires not just IB expertise, b ut considerable understanding of fundamental ways in which state economies differ and familiarity with state data sources. The latter is the realm of regional science Drawing upon an unusual UF confluence of IB and regional science expertise, and with input from the US Department of Commerce BEA User Group and advice of high school instructors, UF CIBER will develop a broadly applicable set of state IB materials. Thes e include a "global state scan," teacher

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20 instructions for reading the scan and identifying direct and indirect globalization issues of particular significance to the state, lesson plans for general modules that a state scan might map into and resources for high school and community college teachers to obtain state specific examples of globalization's impacts. The exceptional accomplishments of the UF CIBER during the 2002 2006 grant cycle by no means exhausted IB development potential at the U niversity of Florida To the contrary, programs initiated during the last four years spawned a large number of creative ideas for further enhancement and innovation in multidisciplinary IB research, education and outreach. The most promising ideas were developed int o an exciting agenda of activities for 2006 2010 that will further solidify UF as a national resource for IB programs and that will promote the competitiveness of US firms in global markets.