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CIBER Synergies

An Update on Programs of the

Center for International Business Education and Research

Warrington College of Business Administration
University of Florida


August, 2000

Website: http://bear.cba.ufl.edu/centers/ciber/

Telephone: (352) 392-3433

Fax: (352) 392-7860










From the directors
During 1999-2000, MBA students spent six weeks in Rio de Janeiro gaining
fluency in Portuguese and studying business in Brazil. Undergraduates filled to
capacity new courses on Global Telecommunications Strategy and Economic
Development of Latin America. Small businesses in Florida benefited from export
strategy plans developed abroad by graduate students in business from four
universities across the state. Academics, government policy makers and industry
representatives participated in conferences on the world sweetener markets in the
21st century, on infrastructure and e-business opportunities in Latin America, and on
university-industry collaboration to improve global competitiveness of technology
businesses. University of Florida (UF) faculty began new research on emerging
markets of Eastern Europe, foreign franchising, exchange rate volatility and
international measurement of telecommunications infrastructure.

These are a few of the exciting new CIBER-supported programs that served
students, faculty and businesses last year. Emphases of 1999-2000 were enhancing
multidisciplinary research and increasing opportunities for on-site international
business experiences abroad. Faculty from six colleges and eighteen departments
participated in a monthly workshop series on international business (IB) research
and a competitive research grants program encouraged multidisciplinary studies.
Study tours and study abroad programs were funded for undergraduates, MBAs and
faculty and graduate student travel funds supported foreign fieldwork for IB
dissertations and theses.

First-year initiatives of 1998-99 were revised, improved and expanded.
CIBER-supported courses and degree programs during 1998-1999 and 1999-2000
impacted nearly 10,000 undergraduates and over 1,000 graduate students at UF.
Curricula programs ranged from a broad introduction to the global economy for
thousands of students in Principles of Macroeconomics to specialized tutorials on
Asian business for Japanese language students to an entire new IB master 's degree.

To continue on this successful journey, new initiatives are being planned and
implemented. These focus on the goals of increasing student and faculty
opportunities for specialized, intensive IB experiences; greater incorporation of area
and language studies into the business curricula; extension of IB learning
opportunities to other institutions; expansion of interdisciplinary IB research; and
development of new outreach programs that partner CIBER i/ ith businesses and
institutions of higher learning.

Welcome to the growing UF CIBER! We 're proud to share i/ ith you how
CIBER is serving students, faculty and businesses.


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









Carol West Mark Jamison Terry McCoy
Director Associate Director for Associate Director for
Business and Economic Languages, Area and Other
Studies Professional Studies


Serving students

Undergraduate programs provide a broad introduction to international
business for thousands of students and specialized, intensive opportunities for
students seeking more in-depth training. Graduate students receive advanced IB
training through formal coursework as well as through research experiences abroad.


Undergraduate students

Study abroad and tuition scholarships were awarded to four outstanding
undergraduate students this past year. With supplemental funding provided by the
United States Department of Education, the Center was able to offer two, $3,500
awards to study abroad. Applications were reviewed by a special committee and the
recipients were selected on the basis of financial need, grade point average, and
demonstrated commitment to a career in global business. Heather Fava, junior in
Marketing and Jason Mills, sophomore in Marketing and Finance, received the
awards. Both students participated in the Summer Tour for Undergraduates to Paris,
Brussels, and London. On an ongoing basis, UF CIBER will annually award two
undergraduates with a $1,000 general tuition scholarship. In 2000, a committee
selected two students to receive this support based on grade-point average, financial
need, and interest in global business. Rashelle Sannon, junior in Finance with a minor
in Economics, and Patricia Gomez-Gracia, sophomore in Marketing with a minor in
Economics, were the recipients.

Principles of Macroeconomics continues to provide an exceptional forum to
introduce a large number of UF students to international business. Approximately
3,000 students per year take the course via TV replay from campus teaching legend
Distinguished Service Professor David Denslow. Funded by CIBER during the 1998-
1999 academic year, Dr. Denslow developed a set of seven live extra-credit
lecture/short quiz sessions on international business topics to augment the regular
course material. These lectures were enhanced and increased to a total often in the
most recent academic year and have become known as "The CIBER Classes." Over
67% of the nearly 3,000 students enrolled attend these optional lectures. (For a list of
series topics, see Appendix 1). In addition to the three new extra-credit lectures, Dr.
Denslow internationalized the mainstream portion of the course this past year by
relating the effects of globalization to basic macroeconomic models and principles.

International Business Economics was introduced as a track in the
economics major in the 1998-99 academic year and was enhanced in 1999-2000.


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









Besides the standard business core, students in the track take a trio of courses to
complete their BSBA degree: International Macroeconomics, International Trade
and The Firm in the Global Economy. (Course descriptions were provided in
Appendix 2 of the 1998-1999 CIBER Annual Report). During the 1999-2000
academic year enrollment in the three courses grew from 292 students to 328
students. The courses are enormously popular, receiving average student ratings of
4.27, 4.37, and 4.42 respectively on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (outstanding).

Teaching capacity in the track was expanded as macroeconomist Dr. William
Bomberger developed the requisite IB teaching skills to deliver International
Macroeconomics as well as traditional Intermediate Macroeconomics. Dr.
Bomberger's new IB efforts were clearly well-received by students who rated his
Spring 2000 international course a 4.50 on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (outstanding).

International Economic Relations upgraded content and technology this
past academic year with CIBER course development support. One hundred students
enrolled in the course which focused on the development of international economic
policies; geographic, economic, social and political factors underlying contemporary
international problems; and economic and political methods employed by the leading
commercial nations. The new content and Microsoft PowerPoint delivery proved
exceptionally effective. The course received an almost perfect student rating-- 4.89
on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (outstanding).

Area studies and language students were, for the second academic year,
provided specialized international business study opportunities through UF's Foreign
Language Across the Curriculum (FLAC) program. Traditionally, FLAC augments a
non-language course with a one-credit extra section of related material taught in a
foreign language. In Fall 1999, CIBER funded a Spanish FLAC for the Latin
American Business Environment course taught in the Center for Latin American
Studies (CLAS). Ten students participated in that course. Continuing from the
practices of the previous year, the Warrington College of Business Administration
(WCBA) funded a one-credit extra section on Japanese business for Japanese
language students in the Spring of 2000. Six students took advantage of this
opportunity. To address problems with differing levels of language competency noted
in the first year, separate sections were offered for second and third year students this
past year.

CIBER supported a summer term non-credit class, Intensive Beginning
Spanish for Business. While the class was targeted for graduate students, faculty and
members of the business community as well as undergraduates were eligible to enroll.
In response to the interest and needs of students, this course will be revised for
Summer A 2001 and be offered for credit as Intermediate Commercial Spanish for
undergraduate students.

Both business and non-business students benefited from CIBER-assisted
development of two new IB undergraduate courses in the Economics Department.
The courses were Economic Development of Latin America and Global


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









Telecommunications Strategy. Business students learned how differing global
cultures, politics and regulatory policies impact international strategy and non-
business students learned how economic fundamentals of the world marketplace need
to be considered in business development plans. Each class was very popular with the
broad range of students it attracted. Both courses reached capacity enrollment with
many more students requesting the opportunity to register. Course evaluations
indicated broad-based student enthusiasm for more global multidisciplinary offerings.

Economic Development of Latin America was one of the new courses
introduced under CIBER support in Spring 2000. The course is a critical assessment
of Latin American political economy and economic development issues key to
understanding the evolution of the area into the major global market it is today, a 33-
country region with nearly 500 million inhabitants. Topics covered include
commodity price cycles and balance of payment fluctuations; import substitution
industrialization; international indebtedness; trade liberalization and the development
of free trade areas; inflation stabilization policies; poverty eradication difficulties;
privatization. The class filled to capacity at 42 students and will be offered again in
the Spring of 2001. (The Spring 2000 syllabus for this course is provided in
Appendix 2.)

Global Telecommunications Strategy was the second new course introduced
by CIBER support in Spring 2000. It provides an overview of the global information
industries and players, government regulation and trade issues, technology and
business practices. Particular emphasis is given to the rapid evolution of these
industries; convergence of media, telecommunications and computer sectors; media
conglomerates; mergers and alliances; pricing; property rights; local and global
strategies; new business creation; customer acquisition and retention. Case studies
cover traditional businesses, new conglomerates and new entrants and are drawn from
both developed and developing countries. The capacity enrollment of 45 students
evaluated the class a 4.50 on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (outstanding). The course will be
enhanced and offered again in Spring 2001. (The class syllabus from Spring 2000 is
provided in Appendix 3).

International business components were developed from CIBER-supported
research in 1998-99 for courses in international relations and in advertising in the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Journalism. These were
integrated into the curricula during 1999-2000 with further enhancements planned for
2000-2001.

International relations courses were enhanced this past year after Associate
Professor of Political Science, Leann Brown, returned from a CIBER supported
faculty development program. Dr. Brown revised lectures for the 2000 level
International Relations course to account for recent world developments such as the
WTO controversy and the launch of the Euro currency. Enrollment in this course
totaled 715 students. Dr. Brown also revised the course Politics in the World
Economy and implemented a new unit entitled "Is Global Capitalism Working?"
Forty-three students took the course. Additionally, Dr. Brown augmented the course


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









Rich and Poor Countries in the World System with a new unit on the "Global AIDS
Crises." Class enrollment totaled 41 students.

New course offerings in international relations were available this past year.
Iro Chen taught Culture and International Relations to 42 students. This class
considered some of the principal issues associated with cultural forces such as
nationalism, ethnic, linguistic, and religious identity and their impacts on eco-political
relations. Sixteen students participated in a new International Environmental
Relations course taught by Samuel Barkin. The course addresses environmental
issues in the context of international business development, the special problems
posed by environmental issues for international policymakers; some of the primary
organizations addressing environmental problems; and selected specific international
environmental topics such as global warming, ozone depletion, and rain forest
destruction.

International advertising courses were also enhanced or expanded this past
year after Dr. Marilyn Roberts, Associate Dean and Associate Professor of
Journalism and Communications, returned from a CIBER supported internship with
Johnson and Johnson Corporation in the summer of 1999. Dr. Roberts revised her
undergraduate course for the 1999-2000 academic year to include new segments on
global and cultural issues pertaining to advertising. Course enrollment was 74
students. Dr. Roberts also developed and introduced a new graduate level section
Special Topics in International Advertising where students do special project work in
conjunction with their learning about cultural issues in advertising. Eight students
participated in this graduate offering.

Upcoming for undergraduate programs are new rounds of IB scholarships
and study abroad financial support. In Spring 2000, WCBA set a goal that within five
years, 50 percent of its undergraduate students experience a foreign study abroad or
study tour as part of their educational program. Currently, approximately 25 percent
of undergraduates have overseas experiences, up significantly from less than 5
percent five years ago. While the Undergraduate Office has worked to develop
affordable opportunities, marginal costs still exceed the budgets of a number of
students and CIBER will continue to expand travel scholarships. In addition to
increasing seats in the three courses of the International Business Economics track,
CIBER has secured financial support for repeat offerings in 2000-01 of the popular
international electives provided during 1999-00, International Economic Relations,
Economic Development of Latin America and Global Telecommunications Strategy.
During the first half of 2001, two new CIBER-sponsored business language classes
will be offered -- Commercial Chinese in the Spring semester and Intermediate
Commercial Spanish in the first summer term. Business majors can look forward to a
tour of Latin America financial markets that is currently being organized by Andy
Naranjo, Associate Professor of Finance.


Graduate students


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









The University of Florida Summer Program in Rio de Janeiro was
launched this year as a collaborative program between UF and the Catholic
University of Rio (Pontificia Universidade Catolica or PUC-Rio). The program
provides a unique study opportunity that combines business coursework with training
in Brazilian Portuguese. Building upon UF's longstanding experience in providing
Portuguese language training in Brazil and its solid relationship with PUC-Rio, this
six-week, six-credit program integrates the language component with professional
level business coursework and visits to local companies in financial, industrial, and
service sectors. (The syllabus for Study Business in Brazil is provided in Appendix 4).

The program is designed for MBA students and others with career interests in
Latin American IB and is open to faculty members and to students from other
universities. CIBER provided scholarships to seven graduate students to attend this
program. Five were from the University of Florida, one was from Northwestern
University, and another was from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In
the future, the Center will seek funding from businesses and other schools to provide
additional scholarship support to student and faculty participants in this program.

The IB 2000 Program is a unique, innovative approach to development of
critical IB skills. It integrates classroom teaching with experience abroad as students
assist companies in achieving their overseas business objectives. A total of 28
students from the University of Florida, University of Central Florida, University of
Tampa and Florida Atlantic University participated in the IB 2000 Program. UF
CIBER funds provided travel support to four students -- one representative of each of
the four participating universities.

Students began the program in Spring 2000 by taking a four-credit course that
teaches a broad spectrum of export operations through role-playing, simulations and
case studies. Course participants then identified companies, small Florida businesses,
to recruit into the program and worked with those companies to develop an export
strategy. By the end of the semester, the students established a "memorandum of
understanding" or contract with these companies on what the student would do on
behalf of the company to put the strategic plan into operation. During the summer
session, the students went abroad in teams of two to carry out the contract. Target
countries in Summer 2000 were Israel, China and the United Kingdom. Upon
satisfactory completion of this work, the students received certification by the Small
Business Administration as an Overseas Company Representative. (For a more
detailed description of IB 2000 see Appendix 5).

The IB 2000 Program is being enhanced for the upcoming year and the
consortium of four Florida universities continues to work with private companies as
well as public sources to fund this excellent opportunity for practical IB training.
Faculty from the consortium of schools have proposed an International Market
Research Service (IMRS) designed to train students from universities around the
world to conduct product/service and company-specific market research using a
standardized format. Companies or organizations can obtain the service for a nominal


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









fee. In return, the firms receive a report outlining the information needed for their
specific international trade or investment decisions.

MBA offerings were enhanced this past year. Two new courses were
developed and the MBA Latin American Business Concentration was approved by
the college and university. The courses, the Latin American Business Environment
and Latin American Business Topics, will be delivered in Fall 2000 and Spring 2001
respectively. Additionally, another course for the concentration, Latin American
Business Economics, is in process of being developed with CIBER funding and will
be offered in the Spring 2001 semester.

Three non-traditional MBA programs are receiving IB upgrades. Taping of an
IB module for the WCBA Internet MBA was completed in Spring 2000 and will be
delivered by Dr. Roy Crum in the fall. International Business Economics was made
available to accelerated (one-year) MBA students in the second half of Summer 1999
and is again being offered in Summer 2000. Dr. Waldo's Open Economy
Macroeconomics has long been popular with participants in UF's Executive MBA
program, earning Dr. Waldo the honor of Executive MBA Teacher of the Year in
1999-2000. The class will be added to the Weekend MBA roster in 2000-01.

A Master of Arts in International Business (MAIB) was awarded to an
inaugural class of 45 students in May 2000. Sixty students have been accepted into
the new MAIB class for the upcoming academic year. The 30-credit hour curriculum,
completed over a 10-month period, is designed to provide students with an
interdisciplinary approach to the study of the functional areas of international
business and to increase students' awareness of cross-cultural, societal and business
differences. It includes a Study Tour to major business centers that gives a brief, but
intensive, international immersion experience. A final project produces an extensive
case study of a global industry or company. (Details of the MAIB program of study
are available in Appendix 3 of the 1998-1999 CIBER Annual Report.) The Center
supports updating and enriching courses and expanding study abroad options for
students in the MAIB program. In Spring 2000, two MAIB students, Brian O'Keefe
and David Cortes, each received $1,000 CIBER scholarships.

Doctoral student travel funds allowed Ph.D. students from WCBA,
Romance Languages and Literatures, and the Institute for Food and Agricultural
Science (IFAS) to attend special conferences organized by other institutions.
Students have the opportunity to present their own research, conduct research, and to
learn about international dimensions of their disciplines. Economics Ph.D. student
Eric Chiang presented his paper "Technology Diffusion and Costly Knowledge
Spillovers: A Cross-Country Analysis" at the Young Economists' Conference 2000 at
Oxford University in March. CIBER co-sponsored the attendance of Kasturi Rangan
(Ph.D. student in Finance) at the Doctoral Consortium on Finance organized by the
UCLA, University of Washington, University of Michigan, University of Texas-
Austin, Purdue University, and Duke University CIBERs.


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Economics graduate student Janice Hauge attended the Miami Conference on
the Caribbean and Latin America in December 1999. This large, annual
interdisciplinary meeting attracted 525 participants attending sessions on the
environment, E-commerce, telecommunications, agribusiness, finance, energy,
tourism, and transportation. Economics students Luis Gutierrez and Maria Louisa
Corton received travel support from the Center to attend the Latin American Forum
on Communications, a CIBER-sponsored event. CIBER provided support to Ph.D.
candidate, Marcela Hurtado, to present her work on teaching business Spanish at the
Thunderbird EMU 2000 Language Conference sponsored the Thunderbird CIBER.

CIBER particularly encourages graduate student research abroad. Supported
jointly by CIBER and IFAS, two doctoral students in Food and Resource Economics
traveled to Latin America to conduct research in international transportation and trade
issues. Kevin Athearn worked in Ecuador to study costs of product delivery to Latin
American Markets, while Waldir Fernandes conducted research on international
citrus production and economic competition in Brazil. Using CIBER and private
funding, Economics graduate student Janice Hauge traveled to Europe to gather data
for a cross-country comparison of U.S. and European competitiveness in
telecommunications. She met with executives of the European Union, Analysys,
Oftel, and British Telecom. CIBER research and travel funds partially supported
MBA student Alexander Kaltsas in his work with a venture capital company on
privatization and management in Russia.

Graduate and undergraduate student training in international business is
available through opportunities for students both in business and non-business
programs to work on CIBER projects. Twenty-two students participated in the
Center's second year of operation: Brandon Knox (Master of Arts in Latin American
Studies or MALAS); Richard Kjellander (MBA); Eric Chiang, Luis Gutierrez,
Jacqueline Hamilton, Janice Hauge, lordanis Petsas, Kudayja Parker, Salvador
Martinez and Maria Louisa Corton (Ph.D. -- Economics); Jungsuk Park (Ph.D. --
Journalism and Communication); Tauheed Khan (MA Decision Information
Sciences); Jason Mills (BSBA); Eileen Pun (Liberal Arts and Sciences); Joshua
Silverboard (BS Decision Information Sciences); George Glenn (BSBA); Kevin
Stofan (Liberal Arts and Sciences); Kevin Athearn and Waldir Fernandes (Ph.D. --
Food and Resource Economics); Tricia Bailey (MS Food and Resource Economics);
Marcela Hurtado (Ph.D. -- Spanish); and Carmen Canete Quesada (MA/Ph.D. -- Latin
American Literature). Students researched the Latin American business environment
and global telecommunications, prepared and taught international economics courses
and international business foreign language sections, and supported CIBER outreach
programs through preparation of conference materials, working paper series and web
sites.

Faculty support for internationalizing doctoral education in business on a
national scale was also provided his past year. CIBER Associate Director, Dr. Terry
McCoy, served on one of the faculty panels for the program "Internationalizing
Doctoral Education in Business: a Ph.D. Seminar" sponsored by the Midwest CIBER
Consortium and convened at the Fisher School of Business at Ohio State University.


CIBER Synergies, Volume II










Upcoming for graduate students are two new degree programs--a Master of
Science in International Finance and an International MBA (IMBA). The former,
scheduled to begin in 2001-2002, is taught in three segments, one in Gainesville and
the other two at partner institutions in Europe, University of Groningen (Netherlands)
and Uppsala University (Sweden). The IMBA is scheduled to start in January 2002.
Students in the program will first take major components of the business core at a
partner institution abroad and then return to Gainesville for electives and
concentrations. As of mid-summer 2000, IMBA business school partnerships had
been arranged in seven countries: Chile, China, England, France, Germany, Japan and
Turkey. CIBER funding will support a new round of IB enhancements to existing
graduate programs through financial support for doctoral research abroad and IB 2000
international market analyses.



Serving faculty

Through a variety of research grants, including a new competitive grant
program, CIBER supports specific faculty research projects on international business.
CIBER-sponsored faculty development programs encourage UF faculty to enhance
international business aspects of their courses and their research agendas. A lecture
series brings distinguished speakers to campus to stimulate interest in international
business topics, a working paper series makes UF studies available to researchers
elsewhere and a multidisciplinary workshop brings together faculty from diverse
colleges to learn from the perspectives of other disciplines.


Research support

Competitive research grants were offered by the Center for the first time
this academic year. This program is open to all university faculty and graduate
students and provides funding for research in international business. The competition
emphasizes interdepartmental and interdisciplinary research, especially research
combining language / area studies faculty with that of business faculty, and the
linking of agriculture faculty with business, language, and area studies faculty. The
goals and objectives of this grant program are to 1) promote the competitiveness of
US businesses in international markets; 2) enhance the IB capacity of university
faculty and students; and 3) encourage a broad interdisciplinary approach to IB
issues.

Ten proposals were submitted for funding this year and were evaluated by a
Research Advisory Committee. Seven of the ten proposals were awarded grants
ranging from $3,000 to $7,000 each and totaling over $36,000. A complete
description of the research activities and accomplishments of this program is provided
in Appendix 6.


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Travel grants issued to faculty in the first year of CIBER's operation were
the basis for new research and several working papers this past year. Topics included
the impact of government regulatory and competition policies on the development of
global telecommunications; spatial equilibrium policy modeling of world markets in
orange juice and selected fresh fruits and vegetables; cultural aspects of international
business; developing business data on emerging markets and developing collaborative
projects with researchers in Brazil on regional econometric input-output modeling
and privatization. Outside of the competitive research grant program, the Center
provided travel support to research transportation bottlenecks impeding agricultural
trade in Eastern Europe. This project, headed by Dr. Richard Bielock of IFAS,
included joint research with Air Vortex, the Bulgarian representative of Emory
Worldwide.

Specialized databases and software expand university international business
research beyond the constraints of publicly available databases and UF-licensed
software. Specialized purchases were made to support several of the research projects
awarded CIBER funding in the competitive research grant program. In IFAS, CIBER
funding for upgraded software enhanced sophisticated mathematical modeling of
world markets in orange juice, fresh fruits and vegetables, and dairy products. The
models simulate impacts of changes in trade restrictions, ecological policies, currency
devaluations and market promotion activities. This is the second year that CIBER has
supported software upgrades to enhance capabilities for analyzing international
markets for agricultural products.

Summer salary funding was awarded outside the Competitive Research
Grants Program to special projects in the WCBA, languages, and area studies. This
funding allowed UF faculty in the WCBA to develop a new course for the MBA
program, Latin American Business Economics. Faculty from the Romance Languages
and Literatures Department received CIBER support to teach Intensive Beginning
Spanish for Business in Summer A and to prepare a new Intermediate Commercial
Spanish course offering for Summer 2001. Asian language faculty were funded to
develop a Chinese Language for Business course to be delivered Spring 2001. CIBER
additionally supported CLAS faculty research on evolution of Latin American
business markets and free trade in the Americas. WCBA and Public Utility Research
Center (PURC) matching funds supported four faculty conducting IB research in
Summer 2000.

Graduate student funding supports faculty international business research
as well as training students in the research process and introducing them to current
global business issues. Five CIBER-supported graduate students worked with faculty
on state IB economic development activities and on research projects analyzing
global infrastructure markets, current business conditions in Latin America, and
international agricultural markets. The students were Eric Chiang, Richard
Kjellander, Tauheed Khan, Brandon Knox, and Tricia Bailey.


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The CIBER Working Paper Series disseminates UF research to faculty and
graduate students at other universities. It began in 1998-99 with a base of forty-three
recent international business research manuscripts. (The 1998-99 Working Papers are
available in Appendix 3 of the 1998-1999 CIBER Annual Report.) Another forty-five
manuscripts were added in 1999-2000. Studies cover a broad range of topics
including theoretical models of how world markets develop; empirical policy models
that simulate the impact of global trade restrictions (and removing those restrictions);
cross-cultural studies of business practices; in-depth case studies of particular
international markets and; analysis of the financial, legal, regulatory, socio-economic
and political environments that frame the context of international business. (For a full
listing of CIBER Working Papers from the 1999-2000 academic year, see Appendix
7).


Faculty development

Study programs for faculty combine formal lectures and opportunities to
visit global firms. The UF CIBER co-sponsored two programs in Summer 2000 --
the South American Faculty Development Program organized by the Florida
International University CIBER and the European Union program organized by the
University of Memphis CIBER. UF faculty from Economics and Decision
Information Sciences attended the former two-week business tour of Argentina,
Brazil and Chile. It emphasized the impact of the global economic crises on South
American markets, national economic reform and regional integration. Faculty from
Marketing and Business Law participated in the European program that focused on
economic, financial and management issues in the European Union. The University
of Antwerp delivered the two-week program. CIBER additionally funded business
faculty from Hillsborough County Community College (HCCC), the University of
Tampa and Florida A& M University (FAMU) to attend these programs. The Honors
Institute Director from HCCC and an Associate Professor of Accounting from the
University of Tampa participated in the South American tour. A FAMU Associate
Professor of Accounting attended the European tour. Students from all three schools
will receive enhanced IB training as a result of the study tour participation of these
faculty members.

The CIBER Interdisciplinary Research Workshop Series officially kicked
off in September 1999. The forum promotes a systematic exchange of ideas and
research among a broad campus working group. During 1999-2000, faculty from six
colleges and 18 departments participated in the monthly series featuring presentations
on IB research by faculty and graduate students as well as IB presentations by invited
speakers. Topics presented by UF faculty included cross-cultural analyses of conflict
management and resolution; globalization of telecommunications and media;
implications of economic, social, and political developments for the Latin American
business environment; and potential impacts of the FTAA on the world orange juice
market. The faculty presenters represented the WCBA, Journalism and
Communications, IFAS and CLAS. Faculty presentations for the upcoming year will


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









feature research by those awarded CIBER competitive research grants in 1999-2000.
As in the previous year, lectures by invited speakers will also be featured.

Lecture series bring distinguished scholars and business leaders to campus,
enhancing the research environment and providing faculty links to the business
community. CIBER-supported presentations featured a range of speakers representing
international businesses, government agencies and academia. Richard Terlink,
former Chairman of the Board for Harley Davidson discussed how the motorcycle
company learned to adjust product to different preferences across cultures and
countries. Carlos Ginardini, President of Motorola, Latin America and Senior Vice
President, Motorola, Inc., provided insights into Motorola's Latin American business
strategy. Consul-General Ken Shimanouchi from the Japanese Embassy in Miami
addressed a large interdisciplinary group of faculty and students on the status and
future of US/Japanese trade and investment. CIBER, CLAS and the Economics
Department augmented funding from the Bradbury Lecture Series to sponsor a public
lecture by Dr. Robert Staiger, Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin.
Dr. Staiger spoke on "GATT-Think: Making Economic Sense Out of a Mercantilist
Institution."

Presentations of basic research on international business topics were
coordinated through specialized seminar series and included "Policy Implications of
the Trade and Wages Debate" (Alan Deardorff, University of Michigan); "How
(Diverse) Exports Drive US Growth and Comparative Advantage" (David
Richardson, Syracuse University); "Intel Economics" (Paul Segerstrom, Michigan
State University); "Multilateral Trade Negotiations, Bilateral Opportunism and the
Rules of GATT" (Robert Staiger, University of Wisconsin); "A Unification of Second
Best Results in International Trade" (Avind Panagariya, University of Maryland);
"The Effect of Monetary Policy in Exchange Rate Stabilization in Post-Crisis Korea"
(Ken Shepsle, Harvard University).

International business conferences and seminars for scholars provide
unique opportunities for faculty initiating new curriculum and research projects. To
strengthen campus links between foreign language and business, CIBER sponsored
UF attendance at the Thunderbird EMU 2000 Conference on Language &
Communication for World Business and the Professions and the Annual Asian
Business Language Workshop at Brigham Young University. Techniques learned at
the language conferences are being integrated into the Intermediate Commercial
Spanish and Commercial Chinese courses scheduled for offering in 2001. Dr. Greg
Moreland, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, also shared his
experiences on teaching intensive business language courses at the Annual Meeting
of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese held in San Juan,
Puerto Rico.

To strengthen links between IFAS research and global agribusiness, CIBER
sponsored UF attendance at the conference "Global Agricultural Trade in the New
Millennium" in New Orleans and at two association meetings the Western
Economic Association International and the Western Agricultural Economics


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Association. At the Conference in New Orleans, Dr. Suzanne Thornsbury presented
the paper "Sanitary and Phytosanitary Issues: Where Does the WTO Go From Here?"
Dr. Thornsbury serves as a field researcher for IFAS at the Fort Pierce extension
station. At both association meetings, Dr. Gary Fairchild of the Food and Resource
Economics Department chaired sessions and presented two IB papers: 1) "Impacts of
Economic Adulteration on the U.S. Honey Industry;" and 2) "Using Business
Simulations and Issue Debates to Facilitate Synthesis in Agribusiness Capstone
Courses." Materials from the international agribusiness conference and association
meetings are the basis for further WTO related research, an IFAS briefing book for
regulators involved in global agricultural trade, future IFAS Extension Fact Sheets for
Florida and US farmers, and new curriculum development.

MBA Placement Director, Melanie Parker, and Assistant MBA Placement
Director, Suzanne Scott, attended the Chazen/CIBE Seventh Annual MBA
International Placement Conference at Columbia University. The conference brings
together career services professionals from business schools across the country to
discuss complex issues surrounding the global marketplace for MBAs. Outside of
WCBA and IFAS, Milagros Rivera Sanchez, Department of Journalism, was
sponsored by CIBER to participate in the conference "Business and Investment
Strategies in Latin American Infrastructure Markets" in Tampa.

*International business education for Florida high school teachers was
enhanced by two Center-supported teacher training seminars. A total of 55 teachers
attended the seminars held in St. Augustine and Gainesville on incorporating the
study of Latin American business into the curriculum. The Center assisted by
subsidizing the printing expenses of an "Outreach Resource Library Catalog" which
includes specific lesson plans for a high school Latin American business curriculum.
These lesson plans are also available on CD-ROM.

Upcoming opportunities for faculty include additional faculty participation
in the South American and European Union CIBER programs and a new round of
competitive research grants. Scholarships will be available to send Florida
community college representatives to the Michigan State University International
Business Institute for Community College Faculty. Research results stemming from
the 1999-2000 CIBER Competitive Research Grants Program have yielded a full and
diversified agenda for the 2000-2001 Interdisciplinary IB Workshop series.



Serving business

An annual publication on The Latin American Business Environment is a
signature UF CIBER program for state, regional and national businesses. Other
business programs vary year to year in response to current issues and needs and
include conferences, forums, workshops, publications and presentations.


CIBER Synergies, Volume II










Conferences, forums and seminars


Sweetener Markets in the 21st Century was a CIBER co-sponsored
agribusiness conference held November 14-16, 1999, in Miami, Florida. Organized
by the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida, the
conference brought together 108 persons from throughout the world to discuss
challenges and issues facing the global sweetener industry in the 21st century.
Speakers and participants at the event represented the foremost authorities from
industry, government and academia. (The conference agenda was provided in
Appendix 9 of the 1998-1999 CIBER Annual Report).

CIBER supported Dr. Luis Ramiro Garcia Chavas of Chapingo Autonomous
University in Mexico, a widely renowned sugar industry expert, not only to
participate in the conference, but additionally to collaborate with UF faculty in the
development of an econometric model of the sweetener markets of the United States
and Mexico.

The Latin American Forum on Communications was sponsored in January
2000 by CIBER, PURC, Communications Competitive Research Initiative (CCRI at
the University of Florida), Nortel Networks, and itFlorida.com (Governor's
Information Services Technology Development Task Force). The forum brought
together leading Latin American communications policy makers and United States e-
business providers to discuss business development issues. Activities included
presentations by international experts, e-business demonstrations, participant panels
covering issues and best practices, and roundtable discussions to explore problems,
policy options, and implementation hurdles. The forum was held in Miami, a hub for
Latin American trade and e-business. Over 50 persons participated in this event. As
part of further business outreach, UF and the World Bank sponsored a follow-on
forum via the web. (For details on the background, agenda and speakers at the forum,
see Appendix 8.)

The itFlorida.com Workshop on University-Business Collaboration was
held on the UF campus on February 25, 2000, and led by CIBER Associate Director,
Mark Jamison, also special academic advisor to the chair of the Governor's
Information Services Technology Task Force. Workshop participants explored types
of university and business collaborations that foster global competitiveness of
technology businesses. (For details on the workshop agenda and speakers, see
Appendix 9.)

The First Annual International Conference on Utilities Infrastructure was
held March 20 21, 2000, at the Plant Hall Conference Facilities on the campus of the
University of Tampa in Tampa, Florida. The event, Business andInvestment
Strategies in Latin American Infrastructure Markets, provided senior international
managers, investors, consultants, and policy makers with key information on how
businesses can successfully participate in international utility infrastructure markets,
with special emphasis on Latin America. Sessions at the conference focused on


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









strategies for continued market growth, commercial and regulatory developments,
political and economic environments, key lessons from experienced operators, e-
business opportunities, and investor and executive perspectives. Seventy persons
attended the event. (The conference agenda was provided in Appendix 6 of the 1998-
1999 CIBER Annual Report).

As part of CIBER's continuing collaboration on international infrastructure
initiatives, the event was also sponsored by PURC. The TECO Energy Center for
Leadership in a Global Economy and the Office of International Programs at the
University of Tampa provided conference services on site. Nortel Networks, Sprint,
AT&T, Lucent Technologies, White & Case LLP, TECO, NERA, Inter-American
Development Bank, itFlorida.com and Wireless Week formally co-sponsored the
conference. Additional support was provided by Latin American Newsletters, CEER-
UADE, LatinFinance, CITEL/OAS, U.S. Department of Commerce, Enterprise
Florida, World Trade Center Tampa Bay, Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce,
Central Florida Development Council, Tampa Bay International Business Council
and Tampa Bay Women in International Trade.

Conference development assistance for an event sponsored by the
University of Florida College of Law was provided through consultations with
CIBER staff. The conference Legal and Policy Issues in the Americas included a
session on "Regional Trade Agreements and the WTO in the Americas."

Upcoming conferences, forums and seminars include three events in fall
2000. The first is the conference Communications by Design: Exploring the Digital
Future to be held in Tampa, Florida. The Center is co-sponsoring the conference and
CIBER affiliated researchers from PURC will serve as speakers. (For background
information and a conference agenda, see Appendix 10) The second is the Seventh
International Economic Outlook Conference for Citrus and Non-Citrus Juices in
Orlando, Florida. (For a list of distinguished presenters and a conference agenda, see
Appendix 11.) The third is a business seminar in conjunction with the University of
North Florida and the Florida West Africa Institute. This seminar will be co-
sponsored by UF's Center for African Studies.


Publications and presentations

The Latin American Business Environment: An Assessment annually
provides a comprehensive examination of business conditions in Latin America, a 33-
country region comprising a global market of nearly 500 million inhabitants. The
report for the year 2000 is a mid-year assessment that analyzes key developments
over the past 18 months and gives individual area reports for the 20 largest markets in
the region. CIBER Associate Director, Dr. Terry McCoy, prepared the document that
combines text and tables to track socio-economic trends and analyzes recent
developments that currently shape the outlook for Latin American markets. Within
the context of the report, the business environment consists of government regulatory
policies, global and regional external impacts on Latin America and internal Latin


CIBER Synergies, Volume II









American economic, social and political conditions. (See Appendix 12 for the
report's Executive Summary and a list of its tables.)

IFAS Extension Fact Sheets are distributed directly to extension offices in
the 67 counties of Florida and are available publicly on-line. CIBER has supported
further development of web-based information on international agribusiness and
research on hemispheric agribusiness issues to be disseminated through this
established outreach medium.

Trade publications reach a large audience around the globe. During 1999-
2000, CIBER researchers from IFAS collaborated on two articles for Citrus Industry,
"Trends in the NFC Orange Juice Segment" and "Focus on Brazil." CIBER Associate
Director, Mark Jamison, contributed to outreach publications on international utilities
infrastructure. "Lessons from the World's Utility Regulators" was distributed to
1,400 utility executives and government officials in the National Association of
Regulating Utility Commissioners Bulletin, April 2000. "The Role of Costing as a
Ratemaking Tool in an Environment of Dynamic Change" examines how
globalization and competition affects the way regulators oversee telecommunications
and pricing. It was published in the Michigan State University Press volume The
Institutionalist Approach to Public Utilities Regulation, edited by Edythe Miller and
Warren J. Samuels.

The Free Trade Area of the Americas: Opportunities and Challenges for
Florida was widely distributed to public officials, businesses and the media in
Florida.

CIBER research presentations transfer technical university expertise to
business and policy practice. CIBER-affiliated faculty presented research findings to
local Florida business groups, to international trade groups and to industry groups
nationally and worldwide. Dr. Agnes Leslie of the Center for African Studies and Dr.
Barbara McDade of the Department of Geography led sessions in workshops at
Valencia Community College on business and economic development in Africa.
These workshops served interested parties in both business and academia. Dr. Leslie
based her presentation on materials she gathered the previous year when attending a
CIBER supported U.S. / African trade symposium. Other audiences of CIBER
faculty presentations include the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference,
the Florida Communications Policy Symposium, the University of Tampa Brazil
Symposium, the World Forum on Energy and the Gainesville Council for Economic
Outreach. CIBER presentations emphasized research on international
telecommunications competition, trade and investment opportunities in Latin
America, lessons for energy regulation based on experiences with telecommunication
deregulation and global lessons learned in energy restructuring. (For a complete list
of CIBER research presentations for 1999-2000, see Appendix 13).

IB 2000 Export Strategy Reports provide small businesses in Florida with
strategic plans for expanding international markets. During Summer 2000, students


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from the four Florida universities participating in the program represented firms from
a diverse range of industries. Examples include manufacturers of customized roofing
materials for large commercial buildings, designers and fabricators of exhibition and
theme park backgrounds, producers and distributors of construction and food safety
testing equipment, and developers of software for stock trading systems.

Upcoming outreach publications and presentations include an IFAS
briefing book on global agricultural trade, a 2001 edition of The Latin American
Business Environment: An Assessment, two new IFAS Extension Fact Sheets on
international agricultural markets and IB presentations and publications on current
global infrastructure issues. The International Market Research Program within IB
2000 will also provide reports to participating companies.


CIBER Synergies, Volume II




Full Text

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CIBER Synergies An Update on Programs of the Center for International Business Education and Research Warrington College of Business Administration University of Florida August, 2000 Website: http://bear.cba.ufl.edu/centers/ciber/ Telephon e: (352) 392 3433 Fax: (352) 392 7860

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 1 From the directors During 1999 2000, MBA students spent six weeks in Rio de Janeiro gaining fluency in Portuguese and studying business in Brazil. Undergraduates filled to capacity new courses on Global Telecommu nications Strategy and Economic Development of Latin America. Small businesses in Florida benefited from export strategy plans developed abroad by graduate students in business from four universities across the state. Academics, government policy makers and industry representatives participated in conferences on the world sweetener markets in the 21st century, on infrastructure and e business opportunities in Latin America, and on university industry collaboration to improve global competitiveness of tech nology businesses. University of Florida (UF) faculty began new research on emerging markets of Eastern Europe, foreign franchising, exchange rate volatility and international measurement of telecommunications infrastructure. These are a few of the exci ting new CIBER supported programs that served students, faculty and businesses last year. Emphases of 1999 2000 were enhancing multidisciplinary research and increasing opportunities for on site international business experiences abroad. Faculty from six colleges and eighteen departments participated in a monthly workshop series on international business (IB) research and a competitive research grants program encouraged multidisciplinary studies. Study tours and study abroad programs were funded for unde rgraduates, MBAs and faculty and graduate student travel funds supported foreign fieldwork for IB dissertations and theses. First year initiatives of 1998 99 were revised, improved and expanded. CIBER supported courses and degree programs during 1998 19 99 and 1999 2000 impacted nearly 10,000 undergraduates and over 1,000 graduate students at UF. Curricula programs ranged from a broad introduction to the global economy for thousands of students in Principles of Macroeconomics to specialized tutorials on Asian business for Japanese language students to an entire new IB master's degree. To continue on this successful journey, new initiatives are being planned and implemented. These focus on the goals of increasing student and faculty opportunities for sp ecialized, intensive IB experiences; greater incorporation of area and language studies into the business curricula; extension of IB learning opportunities to other institutions; expansion of interdisciplinary IB research; and development of new outreach p rograms that partner CIBER with businesses and institutions of higher learning. Welcome to the growing UF CIBER! We're proud to share with you how CIBER is serving students, faculty and businesses.

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 2 Carol West Mark Jamison Terry McCoy Director Associat e Director for Associate Director for Business and Economic Languages, Area and Other Studies Professional Studies Serving students Undergraduate programs provide a broad introduction to international business for thousands of students and specia lized, intensive opportunities for students seeking more in depth training. Graduate students receive advanced IB training through formal coursework as well as through research experiences abroad. Undergraduate students Study abroad and tuition scholarships were awarded to four outstanding undergraduate students this past year. With supplemental funding provided by the United States Department of Education, the Center was able to offer two, $3,500 awards to study abroa d. Applications were reviewed by a special committee and the recipients were selected on the basis of financial need, grade point average, and demonstrated commitment to a career in global business. Heather Fava, junior in Marketing and Jason Mills, soph omore in Marketing and Finance, received the awards. Both students participated in the Summer Tour for Undergraduates to Paris, Brussels, and London. On an ongoing basis, UF CIBER will annually award two undergraduates with a $1,000 general tuition schola rship. In 2000, a committee selected two students to receive this support based on grade point average, financial need, and interest in global business. Rashelle Sannon, junior in Finance with a minor in Economics, and Patricia Gomez Gracia, sophomore in Marketing with a minor in Economics, were the recipients. Principles of Macroeconomics continues to provide an exceptional forum to introduce a large number of UF students to international business. Approximately 3,000 s tudents per year take the course via TV replay from campus teaching legend Distinguished Service Professor David Denslow. Funded by CIBER during the 1998 1999 academic year, Dr. Denslow developed a set of seven live extra credit lecture/short quiz session s on international business topics to augment the regular course material. These lectures were enhanced and increased to a total of ten in the most recent academic year and have become known as "The CIBER Classes." Over 67% of the nearly 3,000 students en rolled attend these optional lectures. (For a list of series topics, see Appendix 1). In addition to the three new extra credit lectures, Dr. Denslow internationalized the mainstream portion of the course this past year by relating the effects of globaliza tion to basic macroeconomic models and principles. International Business Economics was introduced as a track in the economics major in the 1998 99 academic year and was enhanced in 1999 2000.

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 3 Besides the standard busine ss core, students in the track take a trio of courses to complete their BSBA degree: International Macroeconomics International Trade and The Firm in the Global Economy (Course descriptions were provided in Appendix 2 of the 1998 1999 CIBER Annual Report ). During the 1999 2000 academic year enrollment in the three courses grew from 292 students to 328 students. The courses are enormously popular, receiving average student ratings of 4.27, 4.37, and 4.42 respectively on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (outstandin g). Teaching capacity in the track was expanded as macroeconomist Dr. William Bomberger developed the requisite IB teaching skills to deliver International Macroeconomics as well as traditional Intermediate Macroeconomics Dr. Bomberger's new IB effort s were clearly well received by students who rated his Spring 2000 international course a 4.50 on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (outstanding). International Economic Relations upgraded content and technology this past academic year with CIBER course development support. One hundred students enrolled in the course which focused on the development of international economic policies; geographic, economic, social and political factors underlying contemporary international problems ; and economic and political methods employed by the leading commercial nations. The new content and Microsoft PowerPoint delivery proved exceptionally effective. The course received an almost perfect student rating -4.89 on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (ou tstanding). Area studies and language students were, for the second academic year, provided specialized international business study opportunities through UF's Foreign Language Across the Curriculum (FLAC) program. Trad itionally, FLAC augments a non language course with a one credit extra section of related material taught in a foreign language. In Fall 1999, CIBER funded a Spanish FLAC for the Latin American Business Environment course taught in the Center for Latin Am erican Studies (CLAS). Ten students participated in that course. Continuing from the practices of the previous year, the Warrington College of Business Administration (WCBA) funded a one credit extra section on Japanese business for Japanese language stud ents in the Spring of 2000. Six students took advantage of this opportunity. To address problems with differing levels of language competency noted in the first year, separate sections were offered for second and third year students this past year. CIBER supported a summer term non credit class, Intensive Beginning Spanish for Business While the class was targeted for graduate students, faculty and members of the business community as well as undergraduates were eligible to enroll. In response to the i nterest and needs of students, this course will be revised for Summer A 2001 and be offered for credit as Intermediate Commercial Spanish for undergraduate students. Both business and non business students benefited from CIBER assisted development of t wo new IB undergraduate courses in the Economics Department. The courses were Economic Development of Latin America and Global

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 4 Telecommunications Strategy Business students learned how differing global cultures, politics and regulatory policies impact int ernational strategy and non business students learned how economic fundamentals of the world marketplace need to be considered in business development plans. Each class was very popular with the broad range of students it attracted. Both courses reached c apacity enrollment with many more students requesting the opportunity to register. Course evaluations indicated broad based student enthusiasm for more global multidisciplinary offerings. Economic Development of Latin America was one of the new courses i ntroduced under CIBER support in Spring 2000. The course is a critical assessment of Latin American political economy and economic development issues key to understanding the evolution of the area into the major global market it is today, a 33 country reg ion with nearly 500 million inhabitants. Topics covered include commodity price cycles and balance of payment fluctuations; import substitution industrialization; international indebtedness; trade liberalization and the development of free trade areas; in flation stabilization policies; poverty eradication difficulties; privatization. The class filled to capacity at 42 students and will be offered again in the Spring of 2001. (The Spring 2000 syllabus for this course is provided in Appendix 2.) Glo bal Telecommunications Strategy was the second new course introduced by CIBER support in Spring 2000. It provides an overview of the global information industries and players, government regulation and trade issues, technology and business practices. Part icular emphasis is given to the rapid evolution of these industries; convergence of media, telecommunications and computer sectors; media conglomerates; mergers and alliances; pricing; property rights; local and global strategies; new business creation; cu stomer acquisition and retention. Case studies cover traditional businesses, new conglomerates and new entrants and are drawn from both developed and developing countries. The capacity enrollment of 45 students evaluated the class a 4.50 on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (outstanding). The course will be enhanced and offered again in Spring 2001. (The class syllabus from Spring 2000 is provided in Appendix 3). International business components were developed from CIBER suppor ted research in 1998 99 for courses in international relations and in advertising in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Journalism. These were integrated into the curricula during 1999 2000 with further enhancements planned for 20 00 2001. International relations courses were enhanced this past year after Associate Professor of Political Science, Leann Brown, returned from a CIBER supported faculty development program. Dr. Brown revised lectures for the 2000 level International Relations course to account for recent world developments such as the WTO controversy and the launch of the Euro currency. Enrollment in this course totaled 715 students. Dr. Brown also revised the course Politics in the World Economy and implemented a n ew unit entitled "Is Global Capitalism Working?" Forty three students took the course. Additionally, Dr. Brown augmented the course

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 5 Rich and Poor Countries in the World System with a new unit on the "Global AIDS Crises." Class enrollment totaled 41 stud ents. New course offerings in international relations were available this past year. Iro Chen taught Culture and International Relations to 42 students. This class considered some of the principal issues associated with cultural forces such as national ism, ethnic, linguistic, and religious identity and their impacts on eco political relations. Sixteen students participated in a new International Environmental Relations course taught by Samuel Barkin. The course addresses environmental issues in the co ntext of international business development, the special problems posed by environmental issues for international policymakers; some of the primary organizations addressing environmental problems; and selected specific international environmental topics su ch as global warming, ozone depletion, and rain forest destruction. International advertising courses were also enhanced or expanded this past year after Dr. Marilyn Roberts, Associate Dean and Associate Professor of Journalism and Communications, retu rned from a CIBER supported internship with Johnson and Johnson Corporation in the summer of 1999. Dr. Roberts revised her undergraduate course for the 1999 2000 academic year to include new segments on global and cultural issues pertaining to advertising. Course enrollment was 74 students. Dr. Roberts also developed and introduced a new graduate level section Special Topics in International Advertising where students do special project work in conjunction with their learning about cultural issues in adve rtising. Eight students participated in this graduate offering. Upcoming for undergraduate programs are new rounds of IB scholarships and study abroad financial support. In Spring 2000, WCBA set a goal that within five years, 50 percent of its underg raduate students experience a foreign study abroad or study tour as part of their educational program. Currently, approximately 25 percent of undergraduates have overseas experiences, up significantly from less than 5 percent five years ago. While the Un dergraduate Office has worked to develop affordable opportunities, marginal costs still exceed the budgets of a number of students and CIBER will continue to expand travel scholarships. In addition to increasing seats in the three courses of the Internati onal Business Economics track, CIBER has secured financial support for repeat offerings in 2000 01 of the popular international electives provided during 1999 00, International Economic Relations Economic Development of Latin America and Global Telecommun ications Strategy During the first half of 2001, two new CIBER sponsored business language classes will be offered -Commercial Chinese in the Spring semester and Intermediate Commercial Spanish in the first summer term. Business majors can look forward to a tour of Latin America financial markets that is currently being organized by Andy Naranjo, Associate Professor of Finance. Graduate students

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 6 The University of Florida Summer Program in Rio de Janeiro was lau nched this year as a collaborative program between UF and the Catholic University of Rio (Pontificia Universidade Catolica or PUC Rio). The program provides a unique study opportunity that combines business coursework with training in Brazilian Portuguese Building upon UF's longstanding experience in providing Portuguese language training in Brazil and its solid relationship with PUC Rio, this six week, six credit program integrates the language component with professional level business coursework and v isits to local companies in financial, industrial, and service sectors. (The syllabus for Study Business in Brazil is provided in Appendix 4). The program is designed for MBA students and others with career interests in Latin American IB and is open to f aculty members and to students from other universities. CIBER provided scholarships to seven graduate students to attend this program. Five were from the University of Florida, one was from Northwestern University, and another was from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. In the future, the Center will seek funding from businesses and other schools to provide additional scholarship support to student and faculty participants in this program. The IB 2000 Prog ram is a unique, innovative approach to development of critical IB skills. It integrates classroom teaching with experience abroad as students assist companies in achieving their overseas business objectives. A total of 28 students from the University of Florida, University of Central Florida, University of Tampa and Florida Atlantic University participated in the IB 2000 Program UF CIBER funds provided travel support to four students -one representative of each of the four participating universities. Students began the program in Spring 2000 by taking a four credit course that teaches a broad spectrum of export operations through role playing, simulations and case studies. Course participants then identified companies, small Florida businesses, to r ecruit into the program and worked with those companies to develop an export strategy. By the end of the semester, the students established a "memorandum of understanding" or contract with these companies on what the student would do on behalf of the comp any to put the strategic plan into operation. During the summer session, the students went abroad in teams of two to carry out the contract. Target countries in Summer 2000 were Israel, China and the United Kingdom. Upon satisfactory completion of this w ork, the students received certification by the Small Business Administration as an Overseas Company Representative. (For a more detailed description of IB 2000 see Appendix 5). The IB 2000 Program is being enhanced for the upcoming year and the consort ium of four Florida universities continues to work with private companies as well as public sources to fund this excellent opportunity for practical IB training. Faculty from the consortium of schools have proposed an International Market Research Service (IMRS) designed to train students from universities around the world to conduct product/service and company specific market research using a standardized format. Companies or organizations can obtain the service for a nominal

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 7 fee. In return, the firms rec eive a report outlining the information needed for their specific international trade or investment decisions. MBA offerings were enhanced this past year. Two new courses were developed and the MBA Latin American Busin ess Concentration was approved by the college and university. The courses, the Latin American Business Environment and Latin American Business Topics will be delivered in Fall 2000 and Spring 2001 respectively. Additionally, another course for the conce ntration, Latin American Business Economics is in process of being developed with CIBER funding and will be offered in the Spring 2001 semester. Three non traditional MBA programs are receiving IB upgrades. Taping of an IB module for the WCBA Internet MBA was completed in Spring 2000 and will be delivered by Dr. Roy Crum in the fall. International Business Economics was made available to accelerated (one year) MBA students in the second half of Summer 1999 and is again being offered in Summer 2000. Dr. Waldo's Open Economy Macroeconomics has long been popular with participants in UF's Executive MBA program, earning Dr. Waldo the honor of Executive MBA Teacher of the Year in 1999 2000. The class will be added to the Weekend MBA roster in 2000 01. A Master of Arts in International Business (MAIB) was awarded to an inaugural class of 45 students in May 2000. Sixty students have been accepted into the new MAIB class for the upcoming academic year. The 30 credit hour curr iculum, completed over a 10 month period, is designed to provide students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the functional areas of international business and to increase students' awareness of cross cultural, societal and business differe nces. It includes a Study Tour to major business centers that gives a brief, but intensive, international immersion experience. A final project produces an extensive case study of a global industry or company. (Details of the MAIB program of study are av ailable in Appendix 3 of the 1998 1999 CIBER Annual Report.) The Center supports updating and enriching courses and expanding study abroad options for students in the MAIB program. In Spring 2000, two MAIB students, Brian O'Keefe and David Cortes, each re ceived $1,000 CIBER scholarships. Doctoral student travel funds allowed Ph.D. students from WCBA, Romance Languages and Literatures, and the Institute for Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) to attend special conference s organized by other institutions. Students have the opportunity to present their own research, conduct research, and to learn about international dimensions of their disciplines. Economics Ph.D. student Eric Chiang presented his paper "Technology Diffusi on and Costly Knowledge Spillovers: A Cross Country Analysis" at the Young Economists' Conference 2000 at Oxford University in March. CIBER co sponsored the attendance of Kasturi Rangan (Ph.D. student in Finance) at the Doctoral Consortium on Finance org anized by the UCLA, University of Washington, University of Michigan, University of Texas Austin, Purdue University, and Duke University CIBERs.

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 8 Economics graduate student Janice Hauge attended the Miami Conference on the Caribbean and Latin America in December 1999. This large, annual interdisciplinary meeting attracted 525 participants attending sessions on the environment, E commerce, telecommunications, agribusiness, finance, energy, tourism, and transportation. Economics students Luis Gutierrez and Maria Louisa Corton received travel support from the Center to attend the Latin American Forum on Communications, a CIBER sponsored event. CIBER provided support to Ph.D. candidate, Marcela Hurtado, to present her work on teaching business Spanish at the Thunderbird EMU 2000 Language Conference sponsored the Thunderbird CIBER. CIBER particularly encourages graduate student research abroad. Supported jointly by CIBER and IFAS, two doctoral students in Food and Resource Economics traveled to Latin Ameri ca to conduct research in international transportation and trade issues. Kevin Athearn worked in Ecuador to study costs of product delivery to Latin American Markets, while Waldir Fernandes conducted research on international citrus production and economi c competition in Brazil. Using CIBER and private funding, Economics graduate student Janice Hauge traveled to Europe to gather data for a cross country comparison of U.S. and European competitiveness in telecommunications. She met with executives of the E uropean Union, Analysys, Oftel, and British Telecom. CIBER research and travel funds partially supported MBA student Alexander Kaltsas in his work with a venture capital company on privatization and management in Russia. Graduate and undergraduate student training in international business is available through opportunities for students both in business and non business programs to work on CIBER projects. Twenty two students participated in the Center's second year of ope ration: Brandon Knox (Master of Arts in Latin American Studies or MALAS); Richard Kjellander (MBA); Eric Chiang, Luis Gutierrez, Jacqueline Hamilton, Janice Hauge, Iordanis Petsas, Kudayja Parker, Salvador Martinez and Maria Louisa Corton (Ph.D. -Economi cs); Jungsuk Park (Ph.D. -Journalism and Communication); Tauheed Khan (MA Decision Information Sciences); Jason Mills (BSBA); Eileen Pun (Liberal Arts and Sciences); Joshua Silverboard (BS Decision Information Sciences); George Glenn (BSBA); Kevin Stofan (Liberal Arts and Sciences); Kevin Athearn and Waldir Fernandes (Ph.D. -Food and Resource Economics); Tricia Bailey (MS Food and Resource Economics); Marcela Hurtado (Ph.D. -Spanish); and Carmen Canete Quesada (MA/Ph.D. -Latin American Literature) Students researched the Latin American business environment and global telecommunications, prepared and taught international economics courses and international business foreign language sections, and supported CIBER outreach programs through preparatio n of conference materials, working paper series and web sites. Faculty support for internationalizing doctoral education in business on a national scale was also provided his past year. CIBER Associate Director, Dr. Ter ry McCoy, served on one of the faculty panels for the program "Internationalizing Doctoral Education in Business: a Ph.D. Seminar" sponsored by the Midwest CIBER Consortium and convened at the Fisher School of Business at Ohio State University.

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 9 Upcomin g for graduate students are two new degree programs -a Master of Science in International Finance and an International MBA (IMBA). The former, scheduled to begin in 2001 2002, is taught in three segments, one in Gainesville and the other two at partner ins titutions in Europe, University of Groningen (Netherlands) and Uppsala University (Sweden). The IMBA is scheduled to start in January 2002. Students in the program will first take major components of the business core at a partner institution abroad and then return to Gainesville for electives and concentrations. As of mid summer 2000, IMBA business school partnerships had been arranged in seven countries: Chile, China, England, France, Germany, Japan and Turkey. CIBER funding will support a new round o f IB enhancements to existing graduate programs through financial support for doctoral research abroad and IB 2000 international market analyses. Serving faculty Through a variety of research grants, including a new competitive grant program, CIBER supports specific faculty research projects on international business. CIBER sponsored faculty development programs encourage UF faculty to enhance international business aspects of their courses and their research agendas. A lecture series brings disti nguished speakers to campus to stimulate interest in international business topics, a working paper series makes UF studies available to researchers elsewhere and a multidisciplinary workshop brings together faculty from diverse colleges to learn from the perspectives of other disciplines. Research support Competitive research grants were offered by the Center for the first time this academic year. This program is open to all university faculty and graduate students and provides funding for research in international business. The competition emphasizes interdepartmental and interdisciplinary research, especially research combining language / area studies faculty with that of business faculty, and the linking of agricul ture faculty with business, language, and area studies faculty. The goals and objectives of this grant program are to 1) promote the competitiveness of US businesses in international markets; 2) enhance the IB capacity of university faculty and students; and 3) encourage a broad interdisciplinary approach to IB issues. Ten proposals were submitted for funding this year and were evaluated by a Research Advisory Committee. Seven of the ten proposals were awarded grants ranging from $3,000 to $7,000 ea ch and totaling over $36,000. A complete description of the research activities and accomplishments of this program is provided in Appendix 6.

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 10 Travel grants issued to faculty in the first year of CIBER's operation were t he basis for new research and several working papers this past year. Topics included the impact of government regulatory and competition policies on the development of global telecommunications; spatial equilibrium policy modeling of world markets in orang e juice and selected fresh fruits and vegetables; cultural aspects of international business; developing business data on emerging markets and developing collaborative projects with researchers in Brazil on regional econometric input output modeling and pr ivatization. Outside of the competitive research grant program, the Center provided travel support to research transportation bottlenecks impeding agricultural trade in Eastern Europe. This project, headed by Dr. Richard Bielock of IFAS, included joint re search with Air Vortex, the Bulgarian representative of Emory Worldwide. Specialized databases and software expand university international business research beyond the constraints of publicly available databases and UF l icensed software. Specialized purchases were made to support several of the research projects awarded CIBER funding in the competitive research grant program. In IFAS, CIBER funding for upgraded software enhanced sophisticated mathematical modeling of worl d markets in orange juice, fresh fruits and vegetables, and dairy products. The models simulate impacts of changes in trade restrictions, ecological policies, currency devaluations and market promotion activities. This is the second year that CIBER has s upported software upgrades to enhance capabilities for analyzing international markets for agricultural products. Summer salary funding was awarded outside the Competitive Research Grants Program to special projects in th e WCBA, languages, and area studies. This funding allowed UF faculty in the WCBA to develop a new course for the MBA program, Latin American Business Economics Faculty from the Romance Languages and Literatures Department received CIBER support to teach Intensive Beginning Spanish for Business in Summer A and to prepare a new Intermediate Commercial Spanish course offering for Summer 2001. Asian language faculty were funded to develop a Chinese Language for Business course to be delivered Spring 2001. CIB ER additionally supported CLAS faculty research on evolution of Latin American business markets and free trade in the Americas. WCBA and Public Utility Research Center (PURC) matching funds supported four faculty conducting IB research in Summer 2000. Graduate student funding supports faculty international business research as well as training students in the research process and introducing them to current global business issues. Five CIBER supported graduate students wo rked with faculty on state IB economic development activities and on research projects analyzing global infrastructure markets, current business conditions in Latin America, and international agricultural markets. The students were Eric Chiang, Richard Kj ellander, Tauheed Khan, Brandon Knox, and Tricia Bailey.

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 11 The CIBER Working Paper Series disseminates UF research to faculty and graduate students at other universities. It began in 1998 99 with a base of forty three re cent international business research manuscripts. (The 1998 99 Working Papers are available in Appendix 3 of the 1998 1999 CIBER Annual Report.) Another forty five manuscripts were added in 1999 2000. Studies cover a broad range of topics including theor etical models of how world markets develop; empirical policy models that simulate the impact of global trade restrictions (and removing those restrictions); cross cultural studies of business practices; in depth case studies of particular international mar kets and; analysis of the financial, legal, regulatory, socio economic and political environments that frame the context of international business. (For a full listing of CIBER Working Papers from the 1999 2000 academic year, see Appendix 7). Faculty dev elopment Study programs for faculty combine formal lectures and opportunities to visit global firms. The UF CIBER co sponsored two programs in Summer 2000 -the South American Faculty Development Program organized by the Florida International University CIBER and the European Union program organized by the University of Memphis CIBER. UF faculty from Economics and Decision Information Sciences attended the former two week business tour of Argentina, Brazil and Chil e. It emphasized the impact of the global economic crises on South American markets, national economic reform and regional integration. Faculty from Marketing and Business Law participated in the European program that focused on economic, financial and m anagement issues in the European Union. The University of Antwerp delivered the two week program. CIBER additionally funded business faculty from Hillsborough County Community College (HCCC), the University of Tampa and Florida A& M University (FAMU) to a ttend these programs. The Honors Institute Director from HCCC and an Associate Professor of Accounting from the University of Tampa participated in the South American tour. A FAMU Associate Professor of Accounting attended the European tour. Students from all three schools will receive enhanced IB training as a result of the study tour participation of these faculty members. The CIBER Interdisciplinary Research Workshop Series officially kicked off in September 1999. The f orum promotes a systematic exchange of ideas and research among a broad campus working group. During 1999 2000, faculty from six colleges and 18 departments participated in the monthly series featuring presentations on IB research by faculty and graduate s tudents as well as IB presentations by invited speakers. Topics presented by UF faculty included cross cultural analyses of conflict management and resolution; globalization of telecommunications and media; implications of economic, social, and political d evelopments for the Latin American business environment; and potential impacts of the FTAA on the world orange juice market. The faculty presenters represented the WCBA, Journalism and Communications, IFAS and CLAS. Faculty presentations for the upcoming year will

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 12 feature research by those awarded CIBER competitive research grants in 1999 2000. As in the previous year, lectures by invited speakers will also be featured. Lecture series bring distinguished scholars and bu siness leaders to campus, enhancing the research environment and providing faculty links to the business community. CIBER supported presentations featured a range of speakers representing international businesses, government agencies and academia. Richard Terlink, former Chairman of the Board for Harley Davidson discussed how the motorcycle company learned to adjust product to different preferences across cultures and countries. Carlos Ginardini, President of Motorola, Latin America and Senior Vice Presid ent, Motorola, Inc., provided insights into Motorola's Latin American business strategy. Consul General Ken Shimanouchi from the Japanese Embassy in Miami addressed a large interdisciplinary group of faculty and students on the status and future of US/Jap anese trade and investment. CIBER, CLAS and the Economics Department augmented funding from the Bradbury Lecture Series to sponsor a public lecture by Dr. Robert Staiger, Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Staiger spoke on "GATT T hink: Making Economic Sense Out of a Mercantilist Institution." Presentations of basic research on international business topics were coordinated through specialized seminar series and included "Policy Implications of the Trade and Wages Debate" (Alan D eardorff, University of Michigan); "How (Diverse) Exports Drive US Growth and Comparative Advantage" (David Richardson, Syracuse University); "Intel Economics" (Paul Segerstrom, Michigan State University); "Multilateral Trade Negotiations, Bilateral Opport unism and the Rules of GATT" (Robert Staiger, University of Wisconsin); "A Unification of Second Best Results in International Trade" (Avind Panagariya, University of Maryland); "The Effect of Monetary Policy in Exchange Rate Stabilization in Post Crisis Korea" (Ken Shepsle, Harvard University). International business conferences and seminars for scholars provide unique opportunities for faculty initiating new curriculum and research projects. To strengthen campus l inks between foreign language and business, CIBER sponsored UF attendance at the Thunderbird EMU 2000 Conference on Language & Communication for World Business and the Professions and the Annual Asian Business Language Workshop at Brigham Young Universit y. Techniques learned at the language conferences are being integrated into the Intermediate Commercial Spanish and Commercial Chinese courses scheduled for offering in 2001. Dr. Greg Moreland, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, also shared h is experiences on teaching intensive business language courses at the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese held in San Juan, Puerto Rico. To strengthen links between IFAS research and global agribusiness, CIBER sponsored UF attendance at the conference "Global Agricultural Trade in the New Millennium" in New Orleans and at two association meetings the Western Economic Association International and the Western Agricultural Economics

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 13 Association. At the Conferen ce in New Orleans, Dr. Suzanne Thornsbury presented the paper "Sanitary and Phytosanitary Issues: Where Does the WTO Go From Here?" Dr. Thornsbury serves as a field researcher for IFAS at the Fort Pierce extension station. At both association meetings, Dr Gary Fairchild of the Food and Resource Economics Department chaired sessions and presented two IB papers: 1) "Impacts of Economic Adulteration on the U.S. Honey Industry;" and 2) "Using Business Simulations and Issue Debates to Facilitate Synthesis in A gribusiness Capstone Courses." Materials from the international agribusiness conference and association meetings are the basis for further WTO related research, an IFAS briefing book for regulators involved in global agricultural trade, future IFAS Extensi on Fact Sheets for Florida and US farmers, and new curriculum development. MBA Placement Director, Melanie Parker, and Assistant MBA Placement Director, Suzanne Scott, attended the Chazen/CIBE Seventh Annual MBA International Placement Conference at Co lumbia University. The conference brings together career services professionals from business schools across the country to discuss complex issues surrounding the global marketplace for MBAs. Outside of WCBA and IFAS, Milagros Rivera Sanchez, Department of Journalism, was sponsored by CIBER to participate in the conference "Business and Investment Strategies in Latin American Infrastructure Markets" in Tampa. International business education for Florida high school teachers was enhanced by two Center supported teacher training seminars. A total of 55 teachers attended the seminars held in St. Augustine and Gainesville on incorporating the study of Latin American business into the curriculum. The Center assisted by subsidizing the printing expenses of an "Outreach Resource Library Catalog" which includes specific lesson plans for a high school Latin American business curriculum. These lesson plans are also available on CD ROM. Upcoming opportunities for faculty include additional faculty participati on in the South American and European Union CIBER programs and a new round of competitive research grants. Scholarships will be available to send Florida community college representatives to the Michigan State University International Business Institute fo r Community College Faculty. Research results stemming from the 1999 2000 CIBER Competitive Research Grants Program have yielded a full and diversified agenda for the 2000 2001 Interdisciplinary IB Workshop series. Serving business An annual publicat ion on The Latin American Business Environment is a signature UF CIBER program for state, regional and national businesses. Other business programs vary year to year in response to current issues and needs and include conferences, forums, workshops, public ations and presentations.

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 14 Conferences, forums and seminars Sweetener Markets in the 21st Century was a CIBER co sponsored agribusiness conference held November 14 16, 1999, in Miami, Florida. Organized by the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida, the conference brought together 108 persons from throughout the world to discuss challenges and issues facing the global sweetener industry in the 21st century. Speakers and participants at the ev ent represented the foremost authorities from industry, government and academia. (The conference agenda was provided in Appendix 9 of the 1998 1999 CIBER Annual Report). CIBER supported Dr. Luis Ramiro Garcia Chavas of Chapingo Autonomous University in M exico, a widely renowned sugar industry expert, not only to participate in the conference, but additionally to collaborate with UF faculty in the development of an econometric model of the sweetener markets of the United States and Mexico. The Latin American Forum on Communications was sponsored in January 2000 by CIBER, PURC, Communications Competitive Research Initiative (CCRI at the University of Florida), Nortel Networks, and itFlorida.com (Governor's Information Servi ces Technology Development Task Force). The forum brought together leading Latin American communications policy makers and United States e business providers to discuss business development issues. Activities included presentations by international exper ts, e business demonstrations, participant panels covering issues and best practices, and roundtable discussions to explore problems, policy options, and implementation hurdles. The forum was held in Miami, a hub for Latin American trade and e business. O ver 50 persons participated in this event. As part of further business outreach, UF and the World Bank sponsored a follow on forum via the web. (For details on the background, agenda and speakers at the forum, see Appendix 8.) The itFlorida.com Workshop on University Business Collaboration was held on the UF campus on February 25, 2000, and led by CIBER Associate Director, Mark Jamison, also special academic advisor to the chair of the Governor's Information Services Tech nology Task Force. Workshop participants explored types of university and business collaborations that foster global competitiveness of technology businesses. (For details on the workshop agenda and speakers, see Appendix 9.) The First Annual International Conference on Utilities Infrastructure was held March 20 21, 2000, at the Plant Hall Conference Facilities on the campus of the University of Tampa in Tampa, Florida. The event, Business and Investment Strategies in L atin American Infrastructure Markets provided senior international managers, investors, consultants, and policy makers with key information on how businesses can successfully participate in international utility infrastructure markets, with special emphas is on Latin America. Sessions at the conference focused on

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 15 strategies for continued market growth, commercial and regulatory developments, political and economic environments, key lessons from experienced operators, e business opportunities, and investor a nd executive perspectives. Seventy persons attended the event. (The conference agenda was provided in Appendix 6 of the 1998 1999 CIBER Annual Report). As part of CIBER's continuing collaboration on international infrastructure initiatives, the event was also sponsored by PURC. The TECO Energy Center for Leadership in a Global Economy and the Office of International Programs at the University of Tampa provided conference services on site. Nortel Networks, Sprint, AT&T, Lucent Technologies, White & Case LL P, TECO, NERA, Inter American Development Bank, itFlorida.com and Wireless Week formally co sponsored the conference. Additional support was provided by Latin American Newsletters CEER UADE, LatinFinance CITEL/OAS, U.S. Department of Commerce, Enterprise Florida, World Trade Center Tampa Bay, Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce, Central Florida Development Council, Tampa Bay International Business Council and Tampa Bay Women in International Trade. Conference development assistance for an event sponsored by the University of Florida College of Law was provided through consultations with CIBER staff. The conference Legal and Policy Issues in the Americas included a session on "Regional Trade Agreements and the WTO in the Am ericas." Upcoming conferences, forums and seminars include three events in fall 2000. The first is the conference Communications by Design: Exploring the Digital Future to be held in Tampa, Florida. The Center is co sponsoring the conference and CIBER affiliated researchers from PURC will serve as speakers. (For background information and a conference agenda, see Appendix 10) The second is the Seventh International Economic Outlook Conference for Citrus and Non Citrus Juices in Orlando, Florida. (For a list of distinguished presenters and a conference agenda, see Appendix 11.) The third is a business seminar in conjunction with the University of North Florida and the Florida West Africa Institute. This seminar will be co sponsored by UF's Center for African Studies. Publications and presentations The Latin American Business Environment: An Assessment annually provides a comprehensive examination of business conditions in Latin America, a 33 country region comprisin g a global market of nearly 500 million inhabitants. The report for the year 2000 is a mid year assessment that analyzes key developments over the past 18 months and gives individual area reports for the 20 largest markets in the region. CIBER Associate Director, Dr. Terry McCoy, prepared the document that combines text and tables to track socio economic trends and analyzes recent developments that currently shape the outlook for Latin American markets. Within the context of the report, the business envi ronment consists of government regulatory policies, global and regional external impacts on Latin America and internal Latin

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 16 American economic, social and political conditions. (See Appendix 12 for the report's Executive Summary and a list of its tables.) IFAS Extension Fact Sheets are distributed directly to extension offices in the 67 counties of Florida and are available publicly on line. CIBER has supported further development of web based information on internationa l agribusiness and research on hemispheric agribusiness issues to be disseminated through this established outreach medium. Trade publications reach a large audience around the globe. During 1999 2000, CIBER researchers f rom IFAS collaborated on two articles for Citrus Industry, "Trends in the NFC Orange Juice Segment" and "Focus on Brazil." CIBER Associate Director, Mark Jamison, contributed to outreach publications on international utilities infrastructure. "Lessons f rom the World's Utility Regulators" was distributed to 1,400 utility executives and government officials in the National Association of Regulating Utility Commissioners Bulletin April 2000. "The Role of Costing as a Ratemaking Tool in an Environment of D ynamic Change" examines how globalization and competition affects the way regulators oversee telecommunications and pricing. It was published in the Michigan State University Press volume The Institutionalist Approach to Public Utilities Regulation edite d by Edythe Miller and Warren J. Samuels. The Free Trade Area of the Americas: Opportunities and Challenges for Florida was widely distributed to public officials, businesses and the media in Florida. CIBER research presentations transfer technical university expertise to business and policy practice. CIBER affiliated faculty presented research findings to local Florida business groups, to international trade groups and to industry group s nationally and worldwide. Dr. Agnes Leslie of the Center for African Studies and Dr. Barbara McDade of the Department of Geography led sessions in workshops at Valencia Community College on business and economic development in Africa. These workshops se rved interested parties in both business and academia. Dr. Leslie based her presentation on materials she gathered the previous year when attending a CIBER supported U.S. / African trade symposium. Other audiences of CIBER faculty presentations include th e Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, the Florida Communications Policy Symposium, the University of Tampa Brazil Symposium, the World Forum on Energy and the Gainesville Council for Economic Outreach. CIBER presentations emphasized research on international telecommunications competition, trade and investment opportunities in Latin America, lessons for energy regulation based on experiences with telecommunication deregulation and global lessons learned in energy restructuring. (For a complete li st of CIBER research presentations for 1999 2000, see Appendix 13). IB 2000 Export Strategy Reports provide small businesses in Florida with strategic plans for expanding international markets. During Summer 2000, students

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CIBER Synergies Volume II 17 from the four Florida univer sities participating in the program represented firms from a diverse range of industries. Examples include manufacturers of customized roofing materials for large commercial buildings, designers and fabricators of exhibition and theme park backgrounds, pr oducers and distributors of construction and food safety testing equipment, and developers of software for stock trading systems. Upcoming outreach publications and presentations include an IFAS briefing book on global agricultural trade, a 2001 edition of The Latin American Business Environment: An Assessment, two new IFAS Extension Fact Sheets on international agricultural markets and IB presentations and publications on current global infrastructure issues. The International Market Research Program wi thin IB 2000 will also provide reports to participating companies.