Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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FNmily NLutrtri
Sra Family Nutrition In Action
....... April 2005, Vol. 9, No. 4


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education CHI'LDR
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


Vegetarianism can
Work

It is becoming more and more
common for young children and
teenagers to announce that they want
to be a vegetarian. Younger children
may do this because they have made
a connection between cute animals
and the meat on their plate. Teenagers
may have environmental or health
concerns. Regardless of the reason, a
vegetarian diet can be a healthy
choice especially if you give
attention to a few key nutrients.

Vegetarian Diet and Health

A well-balanced vegetarian diet tends
to be low in saturated fats and
cholesterol and rich in important
nutrients such as folate, vitamins C, E,
and other anti-oxidants. Vegetarians
are at lower risk for obesity, heart
disease, high blood pressure, diabetes,
osteoporosis, and some forms of
cancer.

A well-balanced vegetarian diet is
based on whole grains, vegetables,
fruits, and low fat dairy products.
Avoiding meat will not be a positive
move if it is replaced with high fat


cheeses, oils, or junk foods (chips,
cakes, cookies, sodas...). Of course,
children will probably need to include
some higher fat foods. The vegetarian
diet is bulkier than the meat based
diet. So, growing children generally
need meals and snacks to meet their
energy needs.

Vegetarian Diet and Nutrients

A meatless diet may be low in 4 key
nutrients: protein, vitamin B12, iron,
and zinc. A vegetarian diet that
excludes dairy products may also be
low in calcium and vitamin D. Below
is a list of food sources for each of
these nutrients. A healthy vegetarian
diet should include a variety of foods
from the following groupings.


Protein: soy products/tofu, dried
beans/lentils, nuts/seeds, dairy
products/eggs.

Vitamin B12: dairy
products/eggs, enriched
cereals/breads, and fortified soy
products.

Iron: enriched cereals, whole
grains, dark leafy green vegetables,
dried beans/legumes, dried fruits.









(You get more iron from these
foods if you eat them with a source
of vitamin C such as orange juice,
strawberries, or tomatoes).

Zinc: whole grains, wheat germ,
nuts, and soy products.

Calcium: low-fat dairy products,
dark green leafy vegetables, and
calcium-fortified products such as
orange juice, soy, rice drinks, and
cereals.


Vitamin D: low-fat dairy
products, fortified juices and
cereal/grain products.

Children go through a variety of eating
stages. Vegetarianism may be a new
way of life or it may be a passing
phase. Either way, try to respect it and
help your family get the nutrients they
need. If you are concerned, provide a
standard vitamin/mineral supplement
for your children.


Puffy Chile Relleno Casserole
From Quick & Healthy by Brenda J. Ponichtera

3 cans (7 oz. each) whole green chiles
8 flour tortillas (6-inch size), cut into 1 inch strips
1 lb. Grated low-fat cheese (mozzarella or cheddar)
3 cups egg substitute or 12 eggs
3 cup skim milk
1/ tsp. each: pepper, cumin, garlic powder
1/4 tsp. salt (optional)
salsa (optional)

Preheat oven to 350F. Drain chiles and remove seeds. Spray a 9 x 13 inch pan with non-stick
coating. Lay half the chiles in the pan. Top with half the tortilla strips and then half the cheese.
Repeat another layer using remaining chilies, tortillas, and cheese. Beat the eggs together with the
pepper, cumin, garlic powder, and salt. Pour this mixture over casserole. Sprinkle with paprika. Bake
uncovered for 40 minutes or until puffy and set in the center. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.
Serve with salsa. Yield: 8 servings.


For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office:


,. L'Isl l-I. 1 The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity _Affirmative
SF LOR IDA Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
IFAS EXTENSION and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400
Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action April 2005, Vol. 9, No. 4 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Vegetarianism can Work It is becoming more and more common for young children and teenagers to announce that they want to be a vegetarian. Younger children may do this because they have made a connection between cute animals and the meat on their plate. Teenagers may have environmental or health concerns. Regardless of the reason, a vegetarian diet can be a healthy choice – especially if you give attention to a few key nutrients. Vegetarian Diet and Health A well-balanced vegetarian diet tends to be low in saturated fats and cholesterol and rich in important nutrients such as fola te, vitamins C, E, and other anti-oxidants. Vegetarians are at lower risk for obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, osteoporosis, and some forms of cancer. A well-balanced vegetarian diet is based on whole gra ins, vegetables, fruits, and low fat dairy products. Avoiding meat will not be a positive move if it is replaced with high fat cheeses, oils, or junk foods (chips, cakes, cookies, sodas…). Of course, children will probably need to include some higher fat foods. The vegetarian diet is bulkier than the meat based diet. So, growing children generally need meals and snacks to meet their energy needs. Vegetarian Diet and Nutrients A meatless diet may be low in 4 key nutrients: protein, vitamin B12, iron, and zinc. A vegetarian diet that excludes dairy products may also be low in calcium and vitamin D. Below is a list of food sources for each of these nutrients. A healthy vegetarian diet should include a variety of foods from the following groupings. Protein: soy products/tofu, dried beans/lentils, nuts/seeds, dairy products/eggs. Vitamin B12: dairy products/eggs, enriched cereals/breads, and fortified soy products. Iron: enriched cereals, whole grains, dark leafy green vegetables, dried beans/legumes, dried fruits.

PAGE 2

(You get more iron from these foods if you eat them with a source of vitamin C such as orange juice, strawberries, or tomatoes). Zinc: whole grains, wheat germ, nuts, and soy products. Calcium: low-fat dairy products, dark green leafy vegetables, and calcium-fortified products such as orange juice, soy, rice drinks, and cereals. Vitamin D: low-fat dairy products, fortified juices and cereal/grain products. Children go through a variety of eating stages. Vegetarianism may be a new way of life or it may be a passing phase. Either way, try to respect it and help your family get the nutrients they need. If you are concerned, provide a standard vitamin/mineral supplement for your children. Puffy Chile Relleno Casserole From Quick & Healthy by Brenda J. Ponichtera 3 cans (7 oz. each) whole green chiles 8 flour tortillas (6–inch size), cut into 1 inch strips 1 lb. Grated low-fat cheese (mozzarella or cheddar) 3 cups egg substitute or 12 eggs cup skim milk tsp. each: pepper, cumin, garlic powder tsp. salt (optional) salsa (optional) Preheat oven to 350F. Drain chiles and remove seeds. Spray a 9 x 13 inch pan with non-stick coating. Lay half the chiles in the pan. Top with half the tortilla strips and then half the cheese. Repeat another layer using remainin g chilies, tortillas, and cheese. Beat the eggs together with the pepper, cumin, garlic powder, and salt. Pour this mi xture over casserole. Sprinkle with paprika. Bake uncovered for 40 minutes or until puffy and set in the center. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving. Serve with salsa. Yield: 8 servings. For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Em ployment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function withou t regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Direct or, Office of Civil Rights, ro om 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.