Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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SFamily NL'urir ^utriiit
Family Nutrition In Action
...... February 2005, Vol. 9, No. 2


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education CHIDR
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).



r --OF=


Fast Food Possibilities

Fast food is quick, convenient,
satisfying, and inexpensive. It's no
wonder that we eat so many fast food
meals. Unfortunately, typical fast food
meals are high in calories, sodium, fat
and cholesterol. They are also lacking
in fresh fruits and vegetables. Over
time, this can lead to weight gain and
increased risk to diabetes and heart
disease.

The goods news is that many of the
fast food chains provide healthier
options. Some of these are listed on
the menu; some, you just have to ask
for. It's not hard to make healthy
choices it's just a matter of trying
something new.


When eating fast food:


* Select regular or junior size meals.
These are appropriate for most
people. A typical regular size meal
(hamburger, French fries and soda)
is -680 calories. A large order of
this same meal is 1,330 calories.
Eating the large meal once a week
for a year, could mean a weight gain
of -9-10 pounds.

* Select grilled or broiled meats and
baked potatoes. On average, a


grilled chicken sandwich has 10
grams of fat less than a breaded/fried
sandwich. And even with a serving
of sour cream, a baked potato has 5
grams of fat less than a small serving
of French fries. Over the year, this
could mean another 2 pounds of
body weight.

* Pass up the fatty condiments. An
easy way to make your fast food
meal healthier is to order sandwiches
without mayonnaise, cheese, bacon,
or sauces. Ketchup, mustard, pickles,
or additional fresh vegetables can be
used to add flavor without adding
fat. Order salads with low-fat salad
dressing. The calories and fat you
pass up could be more than is found
in a frozen yogurt or soft ice cream
dessert.


* Select orange juice, low fat
milk/chocolate milk, or water. A
regular size fast food soda provides a
similar number of calories but no
nutrients other than sugar! Even a
kid size milk shake though a little
higher in calories is a more
nutritious choice.

* Be untraditional. You don't have to
order traditional fast food menu
items or go to traditional fast food









restaurants to get the convenience of
a fast food meal. Many restaurants
now offer subs, wraps, burritos,
kebabs, chili or hearty salads. These
can be made with lean meats, fresh
vegetables, and low fat spreads.
Several restaurants now offer fruit
cups or side salad meal options. And
some grocery stores and smaller
shops offer complete prepared and
made-to-order meals.

* Don't feel that you have to give up
your favorite foods. If you really like
French fries, eat them but eat less.
Order fries for yourself and a salad


(with low-fat dressing) for a friend or
family member. Then, share with
each other. If you prefer whole
wheat bread or extra vegetables in a
sandwich, ask if it can be made up -
even if you don't see it on the menu.

No one wants to give up the ease of a
fast food meal. So next time you eat
fast food, think about making healthier
choices. If you eat at fast food
restaurants frequently, than consuming
smaller portions of carefully selected
menu items can make a big difference
in your long-term health.


For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office:


t'Ji r i-.Ii OF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity _Affirmative
[ F LOR IDA Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
IFAS EXTENSION and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400
Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action February 2005, Vol. 9, No. 2 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Fast Food Possibilities Fast food is quick, convenient, satisfying, and inexpensive. It’s no wonder that we eat so many fast food meals. Unfortunately, typical fast food meals are high in ca lories, sodium, fat and cholesterol. They are also lacking in fresh fruits and vegetables. Over time, this can lead to weight gain and increased risk to diabetes and heart disease. The goods news is th at many of the fast food chains provide healthier options. Some of these are listed on the menu; some, you just have to ask for. It’s not hard to make healthy choices – it’s just a matter of trying something new. When eating fast food: Select regular or junior size meals These are appropriate for most people. A typical regular size meal (hamburger, French fries and soda) is ~680 calories. A large order of this same meal is ~ 1,330 calories. Eating the large meal once a week for a year, could mean a weight gain of ~9-10 pounds. Select grilled or broiled meats and baked potatoes. On average, a grilled chicken sandwich has ~ 10 grams of fat less th an a breaded/fried sandwich. And even with a serving of sour cream, a baked potato has 5 grams of fat less than a small serving of French fries. Over the year, this could mean another 2 pounds of body weight. Pass up the fatty condiments An easy way to make your fast food meal healthier is to order sandwiches without mayonnaise, cheese, bacon, or sauces. Ketchup, mustard, pickles, or additional fresh vegetables can be used to add flavor without adding fat. Order salads with low-fat salad dressing. The calories and fat you pass up could be more than is found in a frozen yogurt or soft ice cream dessert. Select orange juice, low fat milk/chocolate milk, or water A regular size fast food soda provides a similar number of calories – but no nutrients other than sugar! Even a kid size milk shake – though a little higher in calories – is a more nutritious choice. Be untraditional You don’t have to order traditional fast food menu items or go to traditional fast food

PAGE 2

restaurants to get the convenience of a fast food meal. Many restaurants now offer subs, wraps, burritos, kebabs, chili or hearty salads. These can be made with lean meats, fresh vegetables, and low fat spreads. Several restaurants now offer fruit cups or side salad meal options. And some grocery stores and smaller shops offer comple te prepared and made-to-order meals. Don’t feel that you have to give up your favorite foods If you really like French fries, eat them – but eat less. Order fries for yourself and a salad (with low-fat dressing) for a friend or family member. Then, share with each other. If you prefer whole wheat bread or extra vegetables in a sandwich, ask if it can be made up – even if you don’t see it on the menu. No one wants to give up the ease of a fast food meal. So next time you eat fast food, think about making healthier choices. If you eat at fast food restaurants frequently, than consuming smaller portions of carefully selected menu items can make a big difference in your long-term health. For additional information, contac t your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Em ployment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function withou t regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Direct or, Office of Civil Rights, ro om 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.