Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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..... A t' 2Family Nutrition In Action
S. ... August 2004, Vol. 8, No. 6


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education CHI'LDR
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


Fats for Food Preparation
It used to be a lot simpler. We
prepared and flavored our food
with fat. Now, however, there is so
much information on the different
types of fat that it is more and more
difficult to decide what to use. On
the one hand there is butter, on the
other hand there are oils, and on
yet another hand there are
margarines and the issue of trans
fats. Each type of fat has unique
characteristics and each type of fat
has distinct health effects.

Butter is a saturated fat. Most of the
saturated fat we consume is animal
fat: beef fat, chicken fat, milk fat.
You can usually recognize a
saturated fat because it is solid at
room temperature. Tropical oils
such as coconut and palm kernel
oils are the exception to this rule;
tropical oils are also saturated.
Butter is often used as a spread and
in baking because it provides a rich
creamy flavor and permits the baker
to create a flaky/crispy product with
a golden-brown color. But butter
and other saturated fats can


increase blood cholesterol, which
increases risk for heart disease.

Oils are typically polyunsaturated or
monounsaturated fats. You can
usually recognize these types of fats
because they tend to be liquid -
although monounsaturated fats may
solidify in cold temperatures. These
fats tend to be made from plants
such as corn, soybean, safflower,
canola, olive, and peanuts.
Typically, oils are used for frying or
sauteing because they can be
heated to high temperatures without
burning.


Oils are also used for marinades
and dressings because they can be
poured. Polyunsaturated and
monounsaturated oils may help
lower blood cholesterol and help to
maintain a healthy heart.








Margarine can be thought of as a
cross between butter and oil.
Margarine is basically a vegetable
oil that has been hydrogenated a
process that converts the oil from a
liquid to a solid and changes its
function. The more an oil is
hydrogenated, the more solid the
product. Stick margarines are good
for baking. Tub or squeeze
margarines are less hydrogenated,
they spread easily to coat breads
and cooking pans.

Recently, hydrogenated fats such as
margarines (and vegetable
shortenings) have been found to
introduce a new health risk: trans
fats. Trans fats are produced during
the hydrogenation process. Trans
fats, like saturated fats, increase
blood cholesterol and risk to heart
disease.

Fats are an important part of
baking/cooking and food
preparation. The challenge is to
keep saturated and trans fats to a
minimum while selecting the most
appropriate and most healthful fats
for the task at hand.


...A Few Recommendations:

For baking, substitute
approximately half the solid
fat with vegetable oil or use
commercially available blends
of solid/liquid fats.

For spreads, select soft
margarines the term "liquid
vegetable oil" should appear
first on the product's
ingredient list.

Saute foods in unsaturated oil
canola or olive is a good
choice.

Make dressings, gravies, and
marinades with unsaturated
oils rather than meat
drippings.

In addition to canola and
olive oils, safflower,
sunflower, corn, and soybean
oils are good choices.










Butterscotch Brownies
American Heart Association Cookbook,
4th edition


/4 cup oil
1 cup light brown sugar, firmly
packed
1 egg, slightly beaten (or 2 egg
whites or egg substitute equivalent
to 1 egg)
4 cup shifted flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon vanilla extract


/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
(walnuts are high in
polyunsaturated fats)


Blend oil and sugar. Stir in beaten egg.
Sift flour and baking powder together and
combine with egg mixture. Add vanilla
and walnuts to the batter, spread in an
oiled 8 x 8 x 2 inch pan and bake at 350
F. for 25 minutes. Do not over bake. Cool
slightly, and cut into squares.

Yield: 32 squares
Approx cal/serving: 65


For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office:


,i I. r .I The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative
F LORIDA Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
IFAS EXTENSION and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400
Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action August 2004, Vol. 8, No. 6 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Fats for Food Preparation It used to be a lot simpler. We prepared and flavored our food with fat. Now, however, there is so much information on the different types of fat that it is more and more difficult to decide what to use. On the one hand there is butter, on the other hand there are oils, and on yet another hand there are margarines and the issue of trans fats. Each type of fat has unique characteristics and each type of fat has distinct health effects. Butter is a saturated fat. Most of the saturated fat we consume is animal fat: beef fat, chicken fat, milk fat. You can usually recognize a saturated fat because it is solid at room temperature. Tropical oils such as coconut and palm kernel oils are the exception to this rule; tropical oils are also saturated. Butter is often used as a spread and in baking because it provides a rich creamy flavor and permits the baker to create a flaky/crispy product with a golden-brown color. But butter and other saturated fats can increase blood cholesterol, which increases risk for heart disease. Oils are typically polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fats. You can usually recognize these types of fats because they tend to be liquid – although monounsaturated fats may solidify in cold temperatures. These fats tend to be made from plants such as corn, soybean, safflower, canola, olive, and peanuts. Typically, oils are used for frying or sauting because they can be heated to high temperatures without burning. Oils are also used for marinades and dressings because they can be poured. Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated oils may help lower blood cholesterol and help to maintain a healthy heart.

PAGE 2

Margarine can be thought of as a cross between butter and oil. Margarine is basically a vegetable oil that has been hydrogenated a process that converts the oil from a liquid to a solid and changes its function. The more an oil is hydrogenated, the more solid the product. Stick margarines are good for baking. Tub or squeeze margarines are less hydrogenated, they spread easily to coat breads and cooking pans. Recently, hydrogenated fats such as margarines (and vegetable shortenings) have been found to introduce a new health risk: trans fats Trans fats are produced during the hydrogenation process. Trans fats, like saturated fats, increase blood cholesterol and risk to heart disease. Fats are an important part of baking/cooking and food preparation. The challenge is to keep saturated and trans fats to a minimum while selecting the most appropriate and most healthful fats for the task at hand. …A Few Recommendations : For baking, substitute approximately half the solid fat with vegetable oil or use commercially available blends of solid/liquid fats. For spreads, select soft margarines – the term “liquid vegetable oil” should appear first on the product’s ingredient list. Saut foods in unsaturated oil canola or olive is a good choice. Make dressings, gravies, and marinades with unsaturated oils rather than meat drippings. In addition to canola and olive oils, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils are good choices.

PAGE 3

Butterscotch Brownies American Heart Association Cookbook, 4th edition cup oil 1 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed 1 egg, slightly beaten (or 2 egg whites or egg substitute equivalent to 1 egg) cup shifted flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract cup coarsely chopped walnuts (walnuts are high in polyunsaturated fats) Blend oil and sugar. Stir in beaten egg. Sift flour and baking powder together and combine with egg mixture. Add vanilla and walnuts to the batter, spread in an oiled 8 x 8 x 2 inch pan and bake at 350 F. for 25 minutes. Do not over bake. Cool slightly, and cut into squares. Yield: 32 squares Approx cal/serving: 65 For additional information, contac t your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Em ployment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function withou t regard to race, color, sex, ag e, handicap or national origin. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Direct or, Office of Civil Rights, Ro om 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.