Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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FNmily NLutrtri
Sra Family Nutrition In Action
....... July 2004, Vol. 8, No. 5


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education CHIDR
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


Ready-to-Eat Breakfast Cereals


All our lives we've been told that
it's important to eat breakfast.
And this has been good advice!
Breakfast eaters can work faster
and concentrate better than non-
breakfast eaters. Eating breakfast
tends to improve creativity,
endurance, and weight
management. It even appears to
help reduce tooth decay at
least in young children.

In the United States, ready-to-eat
cereal is among the most popular
breakfast choices. It's quick and
it's easy perfect first thing in the
morning when very few people
have the time or the inspiration
to prepare meals. Fortunately,
eating a ready-to-eat breakfast
cereal can be a very nutritious
way to begin the day.


Today's Cereals


Breakfast cereals, as we know
them, are made from grains. The
most popular breakfast cereals
are made from corn, wheat, oats,
or rice. Cereal can be found as
flakes, puffs, shreds, rings, balls,
or as popular cartoon characters.
Cereal can be bright cheerful
colors or dull browns and tans.
Regardless of the form it takes,
breakfast cereal can be a good
source of nutrients and fiber.
Most of the breakfast cereals
available in the stores today are
fortified with vitamins and






minerals, ranging from 10-100%
of the Daily Value (DV).

Daily Value is the amount of a
nutrient such as calcium or
vitamin B6, that an average,
healthy person should consume
each day. Cereals that provide
10-25% of the daily value of
most nutrients may be good
choices. Cereals that provide
100% of the Daily Value for
most nutrients may be too much.
Some of the newer cereals claim
to be promoting health by
adding soy protein, flax, and
dried fruit to their products.
These additions will not hurt, but
the amount in a serving of cereal
is probably too small to really
improve your health.


Choosing a Breakfast Cereal

When selecting a cereal, it's
important to read the product
label. Cereal grains are basically
low in protein, low in fat, and
high in complex carbohydrate.
These grains are processed into
the breakfast cereals we know by
adding or removing sugars,
proteins, fats, fiber, vitamins,
minerals, flavorings, and colors.
Some of these changes are
healthful, but some are not. A
nutritious breakfast cereal is
made from a whole grain.
Ideally, 1-serving of this whole


grain breakfast cereal should
provide:

100-200 calories
At least 2 grams protein
At least 3 grams fiber
No more than 8 grams
sugar
No more than 3 grams fat
Approximately 25% of the
Daily Value for key
nutrients (iron, folate, B6
and B12).

Most cereals are not a good
source of vitamin C, calcium,
vitamin D, or phosphorous. This
is one of the reasons that
breakfast cereals are advertised
as "...part of a nutritious
breakfast." But for most of us,
cereal is the breakfast. So, even
if you add milk or yogurt to your
cereal, and even if you drink a
vitamin C rich juice in the
morning, it's still beneficial to
select a more healthful cereal.


4.
j:







Below is a chart that will help you compare the basic nutritional
components found in 1-serving of 10 popular breakfast cereals:


-lulneernosu 11U ZZ 1 Z 6 Yes
*Rice
e 120 29 3 2 0 0 No
Krispies@
Corn flakes 100 24 2 2 0 1 Yes
**Spoon Size@
Shredded
shredded 170 41 0 5 1 6 No
Wheat
Raisin Bran 200 46 20 5 2 8 Yes
Granola 200 41 17 4 3 3 No
***Lucky
***LuC y 115 25 13 2 1 1 Yes
Charms@
*Frosted
115 28 12 1 0 1 Yes
Flakes@
*Corn Pops@ 120 28 14 1 0 0 No
***Cocoa
ocoa 120 26 14 1 1 1 Yes
Puffs@

*Rice Krispies, Frosted Flakes, and Corn Pops are registered trademarks of the Kellogs@ Company.
**Spoon Size Shredded Wheat is a Post@ Cereal Brand, which is a registered trademake of Kraft
Food Inc.
*** Cheerios, Lucky Charms, and Cocoa Puffs are registered trademarks of General Mills, Inc.


If the cereals you like the best are
not the most nutritious choices,
try mixing cereals. For example,
if you really enjoy the flavor of
Frosted Flakes, then pour
yourself a serving of Frosted
Flakes@. But add a handful of
Shredded Wheat or a plain bran
cereal to get more fiber and
protein without additional
sugars. If you prefer the
unsweetened flavor of Rice


Krispies@, then pour yourself a
serving of Rice Krispies@. But
mix in some Cheerios to provide
more fiber and key nutrients
without adding fat or sugar.
There are many combinations
that will give you the flavor you
like and nutrients you need.







A Few Additional Cereal
Considerations


Cereals with nuts will have
more fat.
Cereals with fruit will have
more sugar.
Nutritious cereals straight
out of the box make great
snacks.


* 1-2 cups of cereal can be
added to cookie recipes for
additional texture, fiber,
and nutrients.
* If you eat cereal as cereal
bars, follow these same
selection guidelines


For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office:


FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity _Affirmative
Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.


To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400
Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action July 2004, Vol. 8, No. 5 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Ready-to-Eat Breakfast Cereals All our lives we’ve been told that it’s important to eat breakfast. And this has been good advice! Breakfast eaters can work faster and concentrate better than nonbreakfast eaters. Eating breakfast tends to improve creativity, endurance, and weight management. It even appears to help reduce tooth decay – at least in young children. In the United States, ready-to-eat cereal is among the most popular breakfast choices. It’s quick and it’s easy perfect first thing in the morning when very few people have the time or the inspiration to prepare meals. Fortunately, eating a ready-to-eat breakfast cereal can be a very nutritious way to begin the day. Today’s Cereals Breakfast cereals, as we know them, are made from grains. The most popular breakfast cereals are made from corn, wheat, oats, or rice. Cereal can be found as flakes, puffs, shreds, rings, balls, or as popular cartoon characters. Cereal can be bright cheerful colors or dull browns and tans. Regardless of the form it takes, breakfast cereal can be a good source of nutrients and fiber. Most of the breakfast cereals available in the stores today are fortified with vitamins and

PAGE 2

minerals, ranging from 10-100% of the Daily Value (DV). Daily Value is the amount of a nutrient such as calcium or vitamin B6, that an average, healthy person should consume each day. Cereals that provide 10-25% of the daily value of most nutrients may be good choices. Cereals that provide 100% of the Daily Value for most nutrients may be too much. Some of the newer cereals claim to be promoting health by adding soy protein, flax, and dried fruit to their products. These additions will not hurt, but the amount in a serving of cereal is probably too small to really improve your health. Choosing a Breakfast Cereal When selecting a cereal, it’s important to read the product label. Cereal grains are basically low in protein, low in fat, and high in complex carbohydrate. These grains are processed into the breakfast cereals we know by adding or removing sugars, proteins, fats, fiber, vitamins, minerals, flavorings, and colors. Some of these changes are healthful, but some are not. A nutritious breakfast cereal is made from a whole grain. Ideally, 1-serving of this whole grain breakfast cereal should provide: 100-200 calories At least 2 grams protein At least 3 grams fiber No more than 8 grams sugar No more than 3 grams fat Approximately 25% of the Daily Value for key nutrients (iron, folate, B6 and B12). Most cereals are not a good source of vitamin C, calcium, vitamin D, or phosphorous. This is one of the reasons that breakfast cereals are advertised as “…part of a nutritious breakfast.” But for most of us, cereal is the breakfast. So, even if you add milk or yogurt to your cereal, and even if you drink a vitamin C rich juice in the morning, it’s still beneficial to select a more healthful cereal.

PAGE 3

Below is a chart that will help you compare the basic nutritional components found in 1-serving of 10 popular breakfast cereals: Popular Cereal Energy calories Complex Carbs grams Sugar grams Protein grams Fat grams Fiber grams At least 25% DV of Key Nutrients ***Cheerios 110 22 1 3 2 3 Yes *Rice Krispies 120 29 3 2 0 0 No Corn flakes 100 24 2 2 0 1 Yes **Spoon Size Shredded Wheat 170 41 0 5 1 6 No Raisin Bran 200 46 20 5 2 8 Yes Granola 200 41 17 4 3 3 No ***Lucky Charms 115 25 13 2 1 1 Yes *Frosted Flakes 115 28 12 1 0 1 Yes *Corn Pops 120 28 14 1 0 0 No ***Cocoa Puffs 120 26 14 1 1 1 Yes *Rice Krispies, Frosted Flakes, and Corn Pops are registered trademarks of the Kellogs Company. **Spoon Size Shredded Wheat is a Post Cereal Br and, which is a registered trademake of Kraft Food Inc. *** Cheerios, Lucky Charms, and Cocoa Puffs are re gistered trademarks of General Mills, Inc. If the cereals you like the best are not the most nutritious choices, try mixing cereals. For example, if you really enjoy the flavor of Frosted Flakes, then pour yourself a serving of Frosted Flakes. But add a handful of Shredded Wheat or a plain bran cereal to get more fiber and protein without additional sugars. If you prefer the unsweetened flavor of Rice Krispies, then pour yourself a serving of Rice Krispies. But mix in some Cheerios to provide more fiber and key nutrients without adding fat or sugar. There are many combinations that will give you the flavor you like and nutrients you need.

PAGE 4

A Few Additional Cereal Considerations Cereals with nuts will have more fat. Cereals with fruit will have more sugar. Nutritious cereals straight out of the box make great snacks. 1-2 cups of cereal can be added to cookie recipes for additional texture, fiber, and nutrients. If you eat cereal as cereal bars, follow these same selection guidelines For additional information, contac t your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Em ployment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function withou t regard to race, color, sex, ag e, handicap or national origin. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Direct or, Office of Civil Rights, Ro om 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.