Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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Family Nutrition In Action
... .... June 2004, Vol. 8, No. 4


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education :,, sE1,MRT,
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and I & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


Caffeine Anyone?

Pure caffeine is odorless and bitter
tasting. Most people don't want
pure caffeine. But to most people,
a cup of coffee, tea, or a glass of
cola sounds pretty good -- and we
get a lot of caffeine from coffee, tea,
and cola. We can also get a lot of
caffeine from some pain relievers
and weight loss pills including
herbal or natural formulas. We can
even get caffeine from chocolate.

Caffeine and Health

Caffeine is a stimulant. It is
the most commonly used drug in
the United States and in the
world. Caffeine is not really
addictive, but it can be habit
forming.

For most people, caffeine, in
moderation seems to have no
effect on health. On the other
hand, if you have
hypertension, caffeine may
make it worse at least
temporarily. Caffeine is


helpful because it can keep us
awake and alert. But it can also
make us nervous,
impatient, and dizzy,
and it can cause
headaches.

Caffeine can interfere with
sleep. Once you've consumed a
product with caffeine in it, it
takes about 6 hours for just half
of that caffeine to wear off. If
it's still in your body at night,
the caffeine keeps you from
getting the deep sleep that is so
important to your health. Instead,
you are more likely to toss and
turn and get up
several times during
the night, which
leaves you tired the
next day.









How Much is OK?


Caffeine seems to have the same
effect on children as it does on
adults. But the effect of caffeine on
a person depends a lot on the size
of the person and how caffeine-
sensitive the person is. Like many
chemicals, caffeine is measured in
milligrams. (It takes 28,000
milligrams to equal 1 ounce). A
general recommendation is that
adults should not have more than
300 milligrams of caffeine a day
and that children should not have
more than 100 milligrams of
caffeine a day.


Food and drink manufacturers are
not required to list caffeine on the
product label unless caffeine has
been added to the item. Even then,
the label does not have to specify
how much caffeine the item
contains. People expect caffeine in
certain products like coffee or tea.
But, you wouldn't expect it in
orange soda. Sunkist orange soda
has caffeine but other brands do
not. Chocolate has only a little
caffeine, but chocolate has another
chemical in it that work likes
caffeine so your body feels like it's
getting more than it really is. The
amount of caffeine in several
drinks, desserts, and drugs is listed
below.


Average amount of
Product/Item Serving Size caffeine (in
milligrams)
Drinks:
Coffee 8 ounces 110
Tea 8 ounces 60
Ice tea 8 ounces 25
Dark colored colas
(Coke, Pespsi, Tab, Dr. 12 ounces 50
Pepper)
Light colored colas 1
(Sprite, 7-up)
Chocolate milk 8 ounces 6
High energy drinks 8 o s
T8 ounces 70-80
(XTC, Red Bull)



































Want to Cut Back?


If you are having trouble sleeping at
night or if you are too easily
stressed during the day, you might
want to try cutting back on caffeine.
Decaffeinated products are a good
choice, but they still have a little bit
of caffeine. If you really want to cut
out caffeine:

* Drink herbal teas, lemonade,
fruit juices, milk, water, seltzer.


* Avoid coffee, green tea, black
tea, oolong tea, and colas.

* Avoid chocolate and foods that
have chocolate in them.

* Ask a pharmacist about the
caffeine level in prescription and
over the counter drugs so you'll
know what you're getting.

* For a quick burst of energy
during the day, try deep
breathing, taking a fast walk or
stretching.


Average amount of
Product/Item Serving Size caffeine (in
milligrams)
Desserts:
Milk chocolate 1 ounce 6
Dark chocolate 1 ounce 20
Chocolate ice cream /2 cup 3
Coffee yogurt 1 cup 45
Drugs:
Anacin 1 tablet 32
Dristan 1 tablet 30
Excedrin 1 tablet 65
Midol 1 tablet 32
NoDoz 1 tablet 100








Caffeine-Free Lemon Mint Ice Tea


4 mint, herbal tea bags
14 cup sugar
1 can (6 ounces) lemonade concentrate, thawed
Water



* In a large, heat resistant pitcher, steep tea bags in 1 quart (4
cups) boiling water for 10 minutes.

* Remove tea bags and add sugar, stir until dissolved.

* Add the lemonade concentrate and 1 quart (4 cups) cold water.

* Stir well.

* Serve over ice.


For additional information, contact your local County Extension
Office:


., .' r-r.i ]-1r The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative
F LOR IDA Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
IFAS EXTENSION and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400
Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action June 2004, Vol. 8, No. 4 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Caffeine Anyone? Pure caffeine is odorless and bitter tasting. Most people don’t want pure caffeine. But to most people, a cup of coffee, tea, or a glass of cola sounds pretty good -and we get a lot of caffeine from coffee, tea, and cola. We can also get a lot of caffeine from some pain relievers and weight loss pills – including herbal or natural formulas. We can even get caffeine from chocolate. Caffeine and Health Caffeine is a stimulant. It is the most commonly used drug in the United States and in the world. Caffeine is not really addictive, but it can be habit forming. For most people, caffeine, in moderation seems to have no effect on health. On the other hand, if you have hypertension, caffeine may make it worse – at least temporarily. Caffeine is helpful because it can keep us awake and alert. But it can also make us nervous, impatient, and dizzy, and it can cause headaches. Caffeine can interfere with sleep. Once you’ve consumed a product with caffeine in it, it takes about 6 hours for just half of that caffeine to wear off. If it’s still in your body at night, the caffeine keeps you from getting the deep sleep that is so important to your health. Instead, you are more likely to toss and turn and get up several times during the night, which leaves you tired the next day.

PAGE 2

How Much is OK? Caffeine seems to have the same effect on children as it does on adults. But the effect of caffeine on a person depends a lot on the size of the person and how caffeinesensitive the person is. Like many chemicals, caffeine is measured in milligrams. (It takes 28,000 milligrams to equal 1 ounce). A general recommendation is that adults should not have more than 300 milligrams of caffeine a day and that children should not have more than 100 milligrams of caffeine a day. Food and drink manufacturers are not required to list caffeine on the product label unless caffeine has been added to the item. Even then, the label does not have to specify how much caffeine the item contains. People expect caffeine in certain products like coffee or tea. But, you wouldn’t expect it in orange soda. Sunkist orange soda has caffeine but other brands do not. Chocolate has only a little caffeine, but chocolate has another chemical in it that work likes caffeine so your body feels like it’s getting more than it really is. The amount of caffeine in several drinks, desserts, and drugs is listed below. Product/Item Serving Size Average amount of caffeine (in milligrams) Drinks: Coffee 8 ounces 110 Tea 8 ounces 60 Ice tea 8 ounces 25 Dark colored colas (Coke, Pespsi, Tab, Dr. Pepper) 12 ounces 50 Light colored colas (Sprite, 7-up) 12 ounces 0 Chocolate milk 8 ounces 6 High energy drinks (XTC, Red Bull) 8 ounces 70-80

PAGE 3

Product/Item Serving Size Average amount of caffeine (in milligrams) Desserts: Milk chocolate 1 ounce 6 Dark chocolate 1 ounce 20 Chocolate ice cream cup 3 Coffee yogurt 1 cup 45 Drugs: Anacin 1 tablet 32 Dristan 1 tablet 30 Excedrin 1 tablet 65 Midol 1 tablet 32 NoDoz 1 tablet 100 Want to Cut Back? If you are having trouble sleeping at night or if you are too easily stressed during the day, you might want to try cutting back on caffeine. Decaffeinated products are a good choice, but they still have a little bit of caffeine. If you really want to cut out caffeine: Drink herbal teas, lemonade, fruit juices, milk, water, seltzer. Avoid coffee, green tea, black tea, oolong tea, and colas. Avoid chocolate and foods that have chocolate in them. Ask a pharmacist about the caffeine level in prescription and over the counter drugs so you’ll know what you’re getting. For a quick burst of energy during the day, try deep breathing, taking a fast walk or stretching.

PAGE 4

Caffeine-Free Lemon Mint Ice Tea 4 mint, herbal tea bags cup sugar 1 can (6 ounces) lemonade concentrate, thawed Water In a large, heat resistant pitcher, steep tea bags in 1 quart (4 cups) boiling water for 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and add sugar, stir until dissolved. Add the lemonade concentrate and 1 quart (4 cups) cold water. Stir well. Serve over ice. For additional information, cont act your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Em ployment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function withou t regard to race, color, sex, ag e, handicap or national origin. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Direct or, Office of Civil Rights, Ro om 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.