Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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Family Nutrition In Action
May 2004, Vol 8, No 3


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education 1O,1A.'O*,, E. o
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and L & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).



CARBOHYDRATES

Carbs, (short for carbohydrates) is now a very popular word. You hear about low-carb
diets on TV and radio. Low-carb products are in the grocery store. Low-carb meals are
sold in fast food restaurants. Yet, many of the foods we need such as grains, fruits, and
vegetables are rich in carbohydrate. It's no surprise that most of us are confused about
choosing and eating carbohydrate-type foods.


We Need Carbohydrates


Carbohydrates are very important
because they give us energy for all our
activities. Carbohydrates give us
energy for walking, running, singing,
dancing, thinking, sleeping...

There are two types of carbohydrates:
simple carbohydrates and complex
carbohydrates.

*Simple carbohydrates give us quick
energy. They are usually sweet
tasting items such as candy, soda,
and fruit. They are sweet because
sugar is a simple carbohydrate and
these foods have a lot of sugar in
them. When we eat fruit, we are
getting vitamins, minerals, and fiber
in addition to the sugar. When we eat
candy or drink soda, we are just
getting the sugar.


*Complex carbohydrates give us
energy slowly and over a longer
period of time. Examples of complex
carbohydrates are vegetables and
"starchy" foods like bread, rice,
noodles, and potatoes. Complex
carbohydrates are also a good source
of vitamins, minerals, and fiber.

Carbs and Weight Loss

People gain weight when they eat more
food energy than they need. Carbohy-
drates are a major source of food energy.
So, if too much energy makes us fat, will
cutting out carbs make us thin?

It might! But it's not the best way.

Most people loose weight on a low-carb
diet -- at least in the beginning. But most
people loose weight on any diet -- at
least in the beginning. When you are on
a diet, you eat less food than you usually
do. If you eat less, you will loose weight.


F amily NL4ri _,
PFrog.a- .








It's a good idea to eat less by eating
smaller portions and by cutting down on
some of the simple carbohydrates. It's
good to drink less soda, eat less candy,
and add less sugar to your cereal, or to
the foods you prepare.

But other carbohydrate-type foods such
as orange juice, milk, cheese, whole
grain breads, carrots, or rice and beans,
are all part of a healthy diet. By cutting
back on these carbohydrate-type foods,
you will be loosing-out on the important
vitamins, minerals, and fiber these foods
give you. For this reason, a low-carb diet
is not recommended for growing
children or pregnant women. And adults
following a low-carb diet should take a
vitamin/mineral supplement.

It is not easy to loose weight. It can be
slow and frustrating. Low-carb diets may
work faster at first. But in the long run,
you may be better off eating smaller
portions of meals that include a variety
of fresh vegetables, fruits, and grains,
and by including some form of daily
exercise in your life.


Below is an example of a simple meal
that balances carbohydrates with
nutrients and energy. Served with a glass


of water and followed by a walk, this
could be part of any healthy weight-loss
diet.

A Balanced Meal

2-3 ounces chicken
S/2 3/4 cup brown rice
2 cup steamed greens
1 small apple with 1 cheese slice


For additional information, contact your local County Extension
Office:


L ,J, I I'1.lr, Tl The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity _Affirmative
Q4 F LOR IDA Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
IFAS EXTENSION and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.


"Low-Carb" Foods

Soon you will be seeing a lot of low-carb
foods in the grocery store. But just because
an item says that it is low-carb doesn't
really mean that it is. There is not yet a true
meaning for "low-carb". For example,
"low-carb" bread may have half the
carbohydrates of regular bread or it may
have just a little bit less carbohydrate than
regular bread. But in any case, if an item
says "low-carb", it will probably cost
more.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action May 2004, Vol 8, No 3 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Carbs (short for carbohydrates) is now a very popular word. You hear about low-carb diets on TV and radio. Low-carb products are in the grocery store. Low-carb meals are sold in fast food restaurants. Yet, many of th e foods we need such as grains, fruits, and vegetables are rich in carbohydrate. It’s no su rprise that most of us are confused about choosing and eating car bohydrate-type foods. We Need Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are very important because they give us energy for all our activities. Carbohydrates give us energy for walking, running, singing, dancing, thinking, sleeping... There are two types of carbohydrates: simple carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates give us quick energy. They are usually sweet tasting items such as candy, soda, and fruit. They are sweet because sugar is a simple carbohydrate and these foods have a lot of sugar in them. When we eat fruit, we are getting vitamins, minerals, and fiber in addition to the sugar. When we eat candy or drink soda, we are just getting the sugar. Complex carbohydrates give us energy slowly and over a longer period of time. Examples of complex carbohydrates are vegetables and “starchy” foods like bread, rice, noodles, and potatoes. Complex carbohydrates are also a good source of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Carbs and Weight Loss People gain weight when they eat more food energy than they need. Carbohydrates are a major source of food energy. So, if too much energy makes us fat, will cutting out carbs make us thin? It might! But it’s not the best way. Most people loose weight on a low-carb diet -at least in the beginning. But most people loose weight on any diet -at least in the beginning. When you are on a diet, you eat less food than you usually do. If you eat less, you will loose weight.

PAGE 2

“Low-Carb” Foods Soon you will be seeing a lot of low-carb foods in the grocery store. But just because an item says that it is low-carb doesn’t really mean that it is. There is not yet a true meaning for “low-carb”. For example, “low-carb” bread may have half the carbohydrates of regular bread or it may have just a little bit less carbohydrate than regular bread. But in any case, if an item says “low-carb”, it will probably cost more. It’s a good idea to eat less by eating smaller portions and by cutting down on some of the simple carbohydrates. It’s good to drink less soda, eat less candy, and add less sugar to your cereal, or to the foods you prepare. But other carbohydrate-type foods such as orange juice, milk, cheese, whole grain breads, carrots, or rice and beans, are all part of a healthy diet. By cutting back on these carbohydrate-type foods, you will be loosing-out on the important vitamins, minerals, and fiber these foods give you. For this reason, a low-carb diet is not recommended for growing children or pregnant women. And adults following a low-carb diet should take a vitamin/mineral supplement. It is not easy to l oose weight. It can be slow and frustrati ng. Low-carb diets may work faster at first. But in the long run, you may be better off eating smaller portions of meals that include a variety of fresh vegetables, fruits, and grains, and by including some form of daily exercise in your life. Below is an example of a simple meal that balances carbohydrates with nutrients and energy. Se rved with a glass of water and followed by a walk, this could be part of any healthy weight-loss diet. A Balanced Meal 2-3 ounces chicken cup brown rice cup steamed greens 1 small apple with 1 cheese slice For additional information, cont act your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Em ployment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function withou t regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.