Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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Family Nutrition In Action
April 2004, Vol 8, No 2


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education 'm L.D,.E
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and L & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


I want A Snack

That's OK snacking can be good. It
gives us the energy we need between
meals. It can be an important way to
get all the nutrients we need daily. The
trick is to snack on nourishing foods.

Most children cannot eat enough at
meals to get all the energy they need
to grow, learn, and play. Young
children may need to snack 2-3 times
a day. Adults could use snacks also,
but not as often.


Creating Balanced Snacks

Snacks should be balanced. This
means that they should have items
from at least two food groups. A
balanced snack will be satisfying. It
could put off hunger until the next
meal.

Preparing a balanced snack can be
simple. Use the Food Guide Pyramid
to help you make your selections.


Food Guide

Pyramid
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2-3 servings I 2-3 servings


3-5 servings 2-4 servirv


6-11 servings


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Some examples of balanced snacks are:


Food Items
Cereal and milk
Cookies and milk
Yogurt with fruit
Cheese and juice
Celery with peanut butter
Pretzels and chocolate milk


Food Group
Grain
Fats/Sweets
Milk
Milk
Vegetable
Grain


Food Group
Milk
Milk
Fruit
Fruit
Meat
Milk


Snacks Can Complete Your Meals

Use snack time as a way of getting any
foods you might be missing. Again,
you can use the Food Guide Pyramid
to help you select the foods you need.
For example, if you ate only cereal
and milk for breakfast, (foods from the
grain and milk groups), then have
something with fruit for snack. If you
had a meat sandwich and juice for
lunch, (items from the meat, grain and
fruit groups), then include milk or
yogurt with your snack.

Portion Sizes

When preparing snacks, think about
portion sizes. Young children eat
smaller portions. But in most cases,
the serving sizes on food container
labels are a good guide.

Using serving sizes from food labels:
Sthe cookies and milk snack
becomes 2-3 cookies and 1 cup
milk. Low fat or skim milk is best
for most people over 2 years old.


* The yogurt snack would be one 6-
8 ounce container of a yogurt.
* The cheese and juice snack could
be one cheese stick and 1 cup of
juice.

Other good snack choices might
include: 1/sandwich, 1/cup ice cream
or frozen yogurt, 1 juice bar, 3-cups
popcorn, 1 hard-boiled egg, a small
slice of cake, 12 cup baby carrots, a
piece of fruit, a small muffin, 12 cup
pudding, 1 slice toast, 1 cup soup, 2
graham crackers, 1 cup hot cocoa, 1/4
cup nuts, 1 tortilla, or a small serving
of yesterday's left-overs.

Pre-portion your snacks to avoid over-
eating. When eating or drinking
directly from the food container (the
pretzel bag, the cookie box, the juice
bottle...), most people loose track of
how much they've had. Eating too
much for snacks can promote weight
gain. Plate, bag or pour a set amount
of food before you eat.


We all get hungry and we all need food.
Eating limited portions of balanced snacks is a great way to
satisfy hunger and get the nutrients we need.






Sweet Cornbread
The Cornbread Book by Jeremy Jackson

Served hot or cooled, a 3-inch square piece of corn bread served with milk or juice
makes a balanced and tasty afternoon snack.

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1-cup cornmeal
5 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2-teaspoon salt
1-cup milk
1/3-cup canola oil
1 large egg, slightly beaten

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly
grease an 8 or 9-inch square pan.

Sift dry ingredients into mixing bowl. Form a well in the mixture and add the milk,
oil, and egg. Stir just until everything is combined there should still be scattered
clumps of flour, about the size of baby peas.

Pour the batter into the pan and bake for 24 to 30 minutes, until the cornbread is
starting to brown slightly (especially at the edges) and a knife inserted in the middle
comes out clean.


For additional information, contact your local County Extension
Office:


FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity _Affirmative
Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action April 2004, Vol 8, No 2 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). I want A Snack That’s OK snacking can be good. It gives us the energy we need between meals. It can be an important way to get all the nutrients we need daily. The trick is to snack on nourishing foods. Most children cannot eat enough at meals to get all the energy they need to grow, learn, and play. Young children may need to snack 2-3 times a day. Adults could use snacks also, but not as often. Creating Balanced Snacks Snacks should be balanced. This means that they should have items from at least two food groups. A balanced snack will be satisfying. It could put off hunger until the next meal. Preparing a balanced snack can be simple. Use the Food Guide Pyramid to help you make your selections.

PAGE 2

Some examples of balanced snacks are: Food Items Food Group Food Group Cereal and milk Grain Milk Cookies and milk Fats/Sweets Milk Yogurt with fruit Milk Fruit Cheese and juice Milk Fruit Celery with peanut butter Vegetable Meat Pretzels and chocolate milk Grain Milk __________________________________________________________ Snacks Can Complete Your Meals Use snack time as a way of getting any foods you might be missing. Again, you can use the Food Guide Pyramid to help you select the foods you need. For example, if you ate only cereal and milk for breakfast, (foods from the grain and milk groups), then have something with fruit for snack. If you had a meat sandwich and juice for lunch, (items from the meat, grain and fruit groups), then include milk or yogurt with your snack. Portion Sizes When preparing sna cks, think about portion sizes. Young children eat smaller portions. But in most cases, the serving sizes on food container labels are a good guide. Using serving sizes from food labels: the cookies and milk snack becomes 2-3 cookies and 1 cup milk. Low fat or skim milk is best for most people over 2 years old. The yogurt snack would be one 68 ounce container of a yogurt. The cheese and j uice snack could be one cheese stick and 1 cup of juice. Other good snack choices might include: sandwich, cup ice cream or frozen yogurt, 1 juice bar, 3-cups popcorn, 1 hard-boiled egg, a small slice of cake, cup baby carrots, a piece of fruit, a small muffin, cup pudding, 1 slice toast, 1 cup soup, 2 graham crackers, 1 cup hot cocoa, cup nuts, 1 tortilla, or a small serving of yesterday’s left-overs. Pre-portion your snacks to avoid overeating. When eating or drinking directly from the food container (the pretzel bag, the cookie box, the juice bottle…), most people loose track of how much they’ve had. Eating too much for snacks can promote weight gain. Plate, bag or pour a set amount of food before you eat. We all get hungry and we all need food. Eating limited portions of balan ced snacks is a great way to satisfy hunger and get the nutrients we need.

PAGE 3

Sweet Cornbread The Cornbread Book by Jeremy Jackson Served hot or cooled, a 3-inch square piece of corn bread served with milk or juice makes a balanced and tasty afternoon snack. 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 1-cup cornmeal 5 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2-teaspoon salt 1-cup milk 1/3-cup canola oil 1 large egg, slightly beaten Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease an 8 or 9-inch square pan. Sift dry ingredients into mixing bowl. Form a well in the mixtur e and add the milk, oil, and egg. Stir just until everything is combined – there should still be scattered clumps of flour, about the size of baby peas. Pour the batter into the pan and bake for 24 to 30 minutes, until the cornbread is starting to brown slightly (especially at the edges) and a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. For additional information, cont act your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Em ployment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function withou t regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.