Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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iFamily Nutrition In Action
_i.. ,. September 2003, Vol 7, No 9


BUY
BETTER
EAT
6 BET En


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education '1OAqM E.,.o
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


September is National Food Safety
Education Month

These questions and answers are about
some of the things you can do to keep food
safe to eat in your home.

1) Why is it important to keep the
refrigerator temperature at 40 degrees
Fahrenheit or less?
Bacteria in food will increase quickly if the
temperature is higher than 40 degrees
Fahrenheit. A temperature of 40 F or less
will cause the growth of most bacteria to be
slower. You are less likely to get sick with
fewer bacteria in the food.












board after using it to cut raw meat,
poultry, or fish?
Always wash and sanitize cutting boards
after using them for raw foods. Wash the
board in hot soapy water. Rinse. Sanitize
using bleach solution. (1 teaspoon bleach
per quart of water) Allow to air dry.

3) What is the best way to wash hands?
Wash hands with warm water and soap for
at least 20 seconds before and after
handling food. Be sure to wash hands after
going to the bathroom, blowing your nose,


changing diapers, or handling pets.
Thoroughly scrub hands, wrists, fingernails,
and in between fingers. Wear rubber or
plastic gloves if you have an infection or a
cut on your hands. Wash hands before
putting on the gloves. Also, wash gloved
hands just as often as bare hands.

4) What is wrong with thawing meat,
poultry or fish on the counter?
Bacteria can increase very quickly at room
temperature. Do not thaw meat, poultry or
fish on the counter or in the sink without cold
water. Choose one of these methods:

* Thaw foods in the refrigerator overnight.
* Thaw foods in a plastic bag that is
watertight. Put the package in the sink
or a container that is deep enough to
cover the package with cold water.
Change the water every 30 minutes.
* Thaw foods in the microwave. Follow
directions on the package. There
should be at least two inches of space
around the food for the heat to circulate.
After thawing in the microwave, the food
should be cooked immediately.

5) How can I explain to my family the
importance of using a thermometer when
cooking ground beef?

/0 Cook ground beef to an
L inside temperature of at
least 160 degrees
Fahrenheit. Using a food
thermometer is crucial. The
color of the cooked meat is
not the best way to tell if it is
cooked enough. Some ground meat may
turn brown before reaching a safe internal










temperature. Research also shows that
some ground meat patties may stay pink
inside even when cooked to 160 degrees F.
When eating out, order your ground beef to
be cooked well done.

6) What is the 2-Hour Rule?
Throw away any perishable foods left at
room temperature longer than 2 hours.
When temperatures are above 90 degrees
F, throw away food after 1 hour.


7) Is it safe to eat raw eggs?
No. Cook eggs until the yolk and white are
firm. Do not prepare or eat recipes where
the eggs are served raw or only partially
cooked. Cook fried eggs for 2 or 3 minutes
on both sides. Cook scrambled eggs until
they're firm all the way through. Boil eggs
for seven minutes.

When preparing cakes, pies, or homemade
cookies, don't taste the batter, filling or raw
cookie dough if it contains, raw,
unpasteurized eggs.

8) What are some safety tips for fresh
produce?
Some dense raw vegetables like potatoes
and onions can be stored at cool room
temperatures. Other raw vegetables
should be put in the refrigerator.

Wash fresh vegetables and fruit under cool,
running water before preparing or eating.
Do not use soap, detergents, or bleach
solutions. For thick or rough-skinned


--


vegetables and fruits, use a small vegetable
brush to remove surface dirt. Try to cut
away any damaged or bruised areas on
produce. Bacteria grow well in such places.

Refrigerate or freeze cooked vegetables and
fruit within two hours.

For additional information:

Call the following toll-free hotlines:
1-888-Safefood The Food and Drug
Administration Hotline
* Safe handling of seafood, fruits, and
vegetables
* Rules that govern food safety in
restaurants and grocery stores
1-800-535-4555 The USDA Meat and
Poultry Hotline
* Safe handling of meat and poultry
and many other consumer food
issues
Go on the World Wide Web:
Senior Food Safety
http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/-dms/seniors.ht
ml
US FDA Center for Food Safety
http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov
Food Safety and Inspection
Service
www.fsis.usda.gov
Federal Food Safety Information
www.FoodSafety.gov
Partnership for Food Safety
Education
www.fightbac.org










FP'ineapple Sla

Pineapple Slaw
(8 servings)


cup green peppers, chopped
% cup apples, chopped
3 cups cabbage, shredded
11/2 cups carrots, shredded
1 cups pineapple tidbits
1/8 tsp. pepper
%1 cup pineapple juice-


1. Toss together green peppers,
apples, cabbage, carrots and
pineapple.
2. Combine pineapple juice and
pepper.
3. Pour dressing on salad and
toss lightly. Chill.
, -?^ -^

/ :


For additional information, contact your local County
Extension Office:


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity
UNIVERSITY r F Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other
SFLORI DA services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age,
IFAS EXTENSION handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action September 2003, Vol 7, No 9 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDAs Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). September is National Food Safety Education Month These questions and answers are about some of the things you can do to keep food safe to eat in your home. 1) Why is it important to keep the refrigerator temperature at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or less? Bacteria in food will increase quickly if the temperature is higher than 40 degrees Fahrenheit. A temperature of 40 F or less will cause the growth of most bacteria to be slower. You are less likely to get sick with fewer bacteria in the food. 2) What is the way to clean a cutting board after using it to cut raw meat, poultry, or fish? Always wash and sanitize cutting boards after using them for raw foods. Wash the board in hot soapy water. Rinse. Sanitize using bleach solution. (1 teaspoon bleach per quart of water) Allow to air dry. 3) What is the best way to wash hands? Wash hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling food. Be sure to wash hands after going to the bathroom, blowing your nose, changing diapers, or handling pets. Thoroughly scrub hands, wrists, fingernails, and in between fingers. Wear rubber or plastic gloves if you have an infection or a cut on your hands. Wash hands before putting on the gloves. Also, wash gloved hands just as often as bare hands. 4) What is wrong with thawing meat, poultry or fish on the counter? Bacteria can increase very quickly at room temperature. Do not thaw meat, poultry or fish on the counter or in the sink without cold water. Choose one of these methods: Thaw foods in the refrigerator overnight. Thaw foods in a plastic bag that is watertight. Put the package in the sink or a container that is deep enough to cover the package with cold water. Change the water every 30 minutes. Thaw foods in the microwave. Follow directions on the package. There should be at least two inches of space around the food for the heat to circulate. After thawing in the microwave, the food should be cooked immediately. 5) How can I explain to my family the importance of using a thermometer when cooking ground beef? Cook ground beef to an inside temperature of at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Using a food thermometer is crucial. The color of the cooked meat is not the best way to tell if it is cooked enough. Some ground meat may turn brown before reaching a safe internal

PAGE 2

temperature. Research also shows that some ground meat patties may stay pink inside even when cooked to 160 degrees F. When eating out, order your ground beef to be cooked well done. 6) What is the 2-Hour Rule? Throw away any perishable foods left at room temperature longer than 2 hours. When temperatures are above 90 degrees F, throw away food after 1 hour. 7) Is it safe to eat raw eggs? No. Cook eggs until the yolk and white are firm. Do not prepare or eat recipes where the eggs are served raw or only partially cooked. Cook fried eggs for 2 or 3 minutes on both sides. Cook scrambled eggs until theyre firm all the way through. Boil eggs for seven minutes. When preparing cakes, pies, or homemade cookies, dont taste the batter, filling or raw cookie dough if it contains, raw, unpasteurized eggs. 8) What are some safety tips for fresh produce? Some dense raw vegetables like potatoes and onions can be stored at cool room temperatures. Other raw vegetables should be put in the refrigerator. Wash fresh vegetables and fruit under cool, running water before preparing or eating. Do not use soap, detergents, or bleach solutions. For thick or rough-skinned vegetables and fruits, use a small vegetable brush to remove surface dirt. Try to cut away any damaged or bruised areas on produce. Bacteria grow well in such places. Refrigerate or freeze cooked vegetables and fruit within two hours. For additional information: Call the following toll-free hotlines: 1-888-Safefood The Food and Drug Administration Hotline Safe handling of seafood, fruits, and vegetables Rules that govern food safety in restaurants and grocery stores 1-800-535-4555 The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline Safe handling of meat and poultry and many other consumer food issues Go on the World Wide Web: Senior Food Safety http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/seniors.ht ml US FDA Center for Food Safety http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov Food Safety and Inspection Service www.fsis.usda.gov Federal Food Safety Information www.FoodSafety.gov Partnership for Food Safety Education www.fightbac.org

PAGE 3

1. For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.