Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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1.j Family Nutrition In Action VtiP
BUY
S... .... August 2003, Vol 8, No 8 EAT


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education B oM, ,_ 0,
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and I & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


Be Ready With Enough Water
and Food In Case There Is A
Hurricane

Before a Hurricane

Keep enough food and extra drinking
water to last for at least three days.
Store enough water for all the
members of your household. Store at
least one gallon per person for each
day.

Consider having enough supplies for
up to two weeks.

Use a marker and write the date on
each food.

Replace items in your emergency food
supply every six months. Throw out
any canned goods that become
swollen, dented, rusted or corroded.


During a Hurricane Threat

Be sure you have enough drinking
water and food to last at least three
days for everyone in your household.

If you are evacuating, be prepared to
take your emergency food and water
with you.


June July
July


August


Sept Oct November






After a Hurricane

Do not drink tap water and do not
prepare food with the tap water until
the officials let you know that the
water is safe.

If you are asked to be a volunteer in
the disaster area, be sure to take your
own food and drinking water. It is
important to be able to survive on









your own after a disaster. Basic
services, such as electricity, gas, water,
sewage treatment, and telephones
may be off for days. These
services may be off for even a week or
longer. Transportation may not be
available even if you have your own
car. Roads may be closed.

What foods should be included in
your disaster supply kit?

Try to include the nutritious choices
that you and your family enjoy eating.
Also, try to include foods that do not
require special preparation.

Canned foods make good choices
because they do not need cooking,
water, or special preparation. You do
need a hand operated can opener.
Remember, the electricity may be off,
so don't count on an electric can
opener.

Cereals and dry mixes can be kept in
tightly closed plastic or metal
containers.

Here is a list of good choices to help
you plan for an emergency:

* Canned ready-to-eat meats, such
as tuna, salmon, sardines, and
chicken
* Canned fruits, such as peaches,
pears, oranges, plums and
applesauce
* Canned vegetables, such as
carrots, garbanzo beans, baked
beans, corn, and tomatoes
* Canned or boxed juices, milk or
soup


* High-energy foods like peanut
butter, jelly, low-sodium crackers,
granola bars, trail mix and
unsalted nuts
* Vitamins
* Foods for infants
* Foods for persons on special
diets
* Cookies and hard candy
* Instant coffee and tea
* Cereals
* Powdered milk


How Much Water Should Be
Stored?

Store at least one gallon of water per
person for each day. A normally
active person needs at least two quarts
of water for drinking. In some
situations, more water is needed:

* Children and nursing mothers
need more.
* People who are ill need more.
* Very hot temperatures can double
the amount of water needed by
everyone.

In addition to drinking, water will be
needed for sanitary purposes, and
possibly for cooking.

Store water in clean, safe containers.









Use thoroughly
washed plastic,
fiberglass or enamel-
lined metal containers.
Don't use containers
that can break, such as
glass bottles.
* Never use a container that has
held a toxic substance.

Change stored water every six months.
Be sure to write the date on the
container when you store the water.

What Kitchen Items Should Be In
The Emergency Kit?

* Manual can opener
* Paper cups and plates
* Plastic spoons, forks, and knives
* All-purpose knife
* Sugar, salt and pepper
* Aluminum foil and plastic wrap
* Re-sealing plastic bags
* Household liquid bleach to treat
drinking water
* If food must be cooked, small
cooking stove and a can of cooking
fuel


Water is essential for survival. Plan to
have about one gallon of water per
person for each day for drinking,
cooking, and personal hygiene. More


water may be needed if there are
medical emergencies.

On the average, a person should drink
between two and two-and-one-half
quarts of water each day.

In any case, a person absolutely
should drink at the least one quart of
water each day.

Water cannot be safely rationed.
However, food can be rationed except
for children and pregnant women or
others in special situations. For
example, healthy people can decrease
their activities and survive for an
extended period of time on half the
amount of food that they usually eat.


Remember, it is important to be able
to make it on your own after a
disaster. You should be prepared with
enough food and water for at least
three days. If you or someone in
your household will need special help,
find out now where that help is
available in your community.

Source of information: Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA): ARE YOU READY? A
Guide to Citizen Preparedness. H-
34/September 2002. FEMA.
Washington, D.C. 20472

For more information, request the
following publications from FEMA
online at http://www.fema.qov/library
or by calling FEMA's Distribution
Center at 1-800-480-2520.









* Your Family Disaster Supplies Kit
(L-189). Provides a checklist of
emergency supplies that should be
kept in the home and contained in
a Disaster Supplies Kit. Also
available in Spanish.


* Emergency Food and Water
Supplies (1-210). Explains how to
choose food for an emergency kit,
emergency cooking, water
purification, where to locate
emergency food and water
supplies in the home.


For additional information, contact your local County
Extension Office:


IVERSITY OF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action
* F LORIDA Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and
EXTENSION institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action August 2003, Vol 8, No 8 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Be Ready With Enough Water and Food In Case There Is A Hurricane Before a Hurricane Keep enough food and extra drinking water to last for at least three days. Store enough water for all the members of your household. Store at least one gallon per person for each day. Consider having enough supplies for up to two weeks. Use a marker and write the date on each food. Replace items in your emergency food supply every six months. Throw out any canned goods that become swollen, dented, rusted or corroded. During a Hurricane Threat Be sure you have enough drinking water and food to last at least three days for everyone in your household. If you are evacuating, be prepared to take your emergency food and water with you. After a Hurricane Do not drink tap water and do not prepare food with the tap water until the officials let you know that the water is safe. If you are asked to be a volunteer in the disaster area, be sure to take your own food and drinking water. It is important to be able to survive on

PAGE 2

your own after a disaster. Basic services, such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment, and telephones may be off for days. These services may be off for even a week or longer. Transportation may not be available even if you have your own car. Roads may be closed. What foods should be included in your disaster supply kit? Try to include the nutritious choices that you and your family enjoy eating. Also, try to include foods that do not require special preparation. Canned foods make good choices because they do not need cooking, water, or special preparation. You do need a hand operat ed can opener. Remember, the electricity may be off, so don’t count on an electric can opener. Cereals and dry mixes can be kept in tightly closed plastic or metal containers. Here is a list of good choices to help you plan for an emergency: Canned ready-to-eat meats, such as tuna, salmon, sardines, and chicken Canned fruits, such as peaches, pears, oranges, plums and applesauce Canned vegetables, such as carrots, garbanzo beans, baked beans, corn, and tomatoes Canned or boxed juices, milk or soup High-energy foods like peanut butter, jelly, low-sodium crackers, granola bars, trail mix and unsalted nuts Vitamins Foods for infants Foods for persons on special diets Cookies and hard candy Instant coffee and tea Cereals Powdered milk How Much Water Should Be Stored? Store at least one gallon of water per person for each day. A normally active person needs at least two quarts of water for drinking. In some situations, more water is needed: Children and nursing mothers need more. People who are ill need more. Very hot temperatures can double the amount of water needed by everyone. In addition to drinking, water will be needed for sanitary purposes, and possibly for cooking. Store water in clean, safe containers.

PAGE 3

Use thoroughly washed plastic, fiberglass or enamellined metal containers. Don’t use containers that can break, such as glass bottles. Never use a container that has held a toxic substance. Change stored water every six months. Be sure to write the date on the container when you store the water. What Kitchen Items Should Be In The Emergency Kit? Manual can opener Paper cups and plates Plastic spoons, forks, and knives All-purpose knife Sugar, salt and pepper Aluminum foil and plastic wrap Re-sealing plastic bags Household liquid bleach to treat drinking water If food must be cooked, small cooking stove and a can of cooking fuel Water is essential for survival. Plan to have about one gallon of water per person for each day for drinking, cooking, and personal hygiene. More water may be needed if there are medical emergencies. On the average, a person should drink between two and two-and-one-half quarts of water each day. In any case, a person absolutely should drink at the least one quart of water each day. Water cannot be safely rationed. However, food can be rationed except for children and pregnant women or others in special situations. For example, healthy people can decrease their activities and survive for an extended period of time on half the amount of food that they usually eat. Remember, it is important to be able to make it on your own after a disaster. You should be prepared with enough food and water for at least three days. If you or someone in your household will need special help, find out now where that help is available in your community. Source of information: Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA): ARE YOU READY? A Guide to Citizen Preparedness. H34/September 2002. FEMA. Washington, D.C. 20472 For more information, request the following publications from FEMA online at http://www.fema.gov/library or by calling FEMA’s Distribution Center at 1-800-480-2520.

PAGE 4

Your Family Disa ster Supplies Kit (L-189). Provides a checklist of emergency supplies that should be kept in the home and contained in a Disaster Supplie s Kit. Also available in Spanish. Emergency Food and Water Supplies (l-210). Explains how to choose food for an emergency kit, emergency cooking, water purification, where to locate emergency food and water supplies in the home. For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employm ent Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide rese arch, educational informa tion and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race color, sex, age, handi cap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.