Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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SFamily Nutrition In Action
-.,, July 2003, Vol 8, No 7


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This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education B1Oo E.AD,.o
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and i &C FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


Drink Water Often Water Is An Essential Nutrient


Our daily water intake comes from
many sources. Just plain water is the
best source.

Water is calorie-free, sugar-free, fat-
free, caffeine-free, sodium-free, and it
can be almost cost-free. Of course, if
you prefer bottled water, the cost for
each eight-ounce serving goes up.

A good case can be made for drinking
plain water just by looking at the
amount of calories in many types of
popular sweetened beverages. For
example, a 12-ounce can of soda
contains 140-190 calories.

Many people make it a habit to drink
several servings a day of sweetened
beverages. If high calorie beverages
are chosen, they should be chosen as
an occasional treat and not as a daily
habit. Follow this advice from the
Dietary Guidelines for Americans:

"Take care not to let soft
drinks or other sweets crowd
out other foods you need to
maintain health, such as low-
fat milk or other good sources
of calcium."


Everyone needs water everyday,
because everyone needs plenty of
fluids everyday. Water is found inside
and outside of every cell. How many
times have you heard this? You can
live for weeks without food. You can
only survive a few days without water.

Some of the important roles of water
include the following:

Water helps your body use
nutrients.
Water helps your body get rid
of wastes.
Water helps you keep a normal
body temperature.
Water helps your body build
new cells.

Does this mean that you should not
drink other beverages? No! It means
that you should make wise choices.
For example, milk (preferably low-fat
or fat-free) and juices are important
sources of water and other key
nutrients. Soup, though it is not a
beverage, is also mostly water.










Is Water Found In Other Foods?

Water is also found in
solid foods. Fresh
fruits and vegetables
contain high amounts
of water. You should
choose five to nine servings of fruits
and vegetables everyday for the many
nutrients they provide.

What About Juices?

Since juices are important sources of
key nutrients, why can't I just drink
enough juice to meet my fluid needs?
You need to choose a variety of foods
from the fruits and vegetable group,
not just juices. Juices should be

Broccoli Soup (4 servings)

What you need:
Broccoli, chopped 1 /2 cups
(frozen broccoli 10 ounce package)
Celery, diced 1/4 cup
Onion, chopped 1/4 cup
Low sodium chicken broth 1 cup
Nonfat milk 2 cups
Cornstarch 2 Tbsp
Salt 1/4 tsp
Pepper to taste
Ground thyme Dash
Swiss cheese, grated 1/4 cup


consumed as a part of your
recommended servings from the fruit
group and the vegetable group. You
don't want to use up all of your
calories on just juices, because you
need to spend some of those calories
on foods in the other food groups as
well. Remember, a healthy diet
contains the recommended number of
servings from all the major food
groups in the Food Guide pyramid.

A healthy diet also contains plenty of
fluids. Pay special attention to the
fluid needs of small children, senior
adults, and people who are very
active.


How to make:


Place vegetables and broth in saucepan.
Bring to boil, reduce heat, cover, and cook until vegetables are tender, about 8
minutes.
Mix milk, cornstarch, salt, pepper, and thyme; add to cooked vegetables.
Cook, stirring constantly, until soup is lightly thickened and mixture just begins to
boil.










5. Remove from heat.
6. Add cheese and stir until melted.

Nutrient analysis per serving:

Calories 115 Cholesterol 10mg
Sodium 225mg Fat 3g
Calories from fat 24%


For additional information, contact your local County
Extension Office:


IVERSITY OF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Airmative Action
'* FLORIDA Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and
EXTENSION institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action July 2003, Vol 8, No 7 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDAs Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Drink Water Often Water Is An Essential Nutrient Everyone needs water everyday, because everyone needs plenty of fluids everyday. Water is found inside and outside of every cell. How many times have you heard this? You can live for weeks without food. You can only survive a few days without water. Our daily water intake comes from many sources. Just plain water is the best source. Water is calorie-free, sugar-free, fat-free, caffeine-free, sodium-free, and it can be almost cost-free. Of course, if you prefer bottled water, the cost for each eight-ounce serving goes up. Some of the important roles of water include the following: A good case can be made for drinking plain water just by looking at the amount of calories in many types of popular sweetened beverages. For example, a 12-ounce can of soda contains 140-190 calories. Water helps your body use nutrients. Water helps your body get rid of wastes. Water helps you keep a normal body temperature. Many people make it a habit to drink several servings a day of sweetened beverages. If high calorie beverages are chosen, they should be chosen as an occasional treat and not as a daily habit. Follow this advice from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans: Water helps your body build new cells. Does this mean that you should not drink other beverages? No! It means that you should make wise choices. For example, milk (preferably low-fat or fat-free) and juices are important sources of water and other key nutrients. Soup, though it is not a beverage, is also mostly water. Take care not to let soft drinks or other sweets crowd out other foods you need to maintain health, such as low-fat milk or other good sources of calcium.

PAGE 2

Is Water Found In Other Foods? Water is also found in solid foods. Fresh fruits and vegetables contain high amounts of water. You should choose five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables everyday for the many nutrients they provide. What About Juices? Since juices are important sources of key nutrients, why cant I just drink enough juice to meet my fluid needs? You need to choose a variety of foods from the fruits and vegetable group, not just juices. Juices should be consumed as a part of your recommended servings from the fruit group and the vegetable group. You dont want to use up all of your calories on just juices, because you need to spend some of those calories on foods in the other food groups as well. Remember, a healthy diet contains the recommended number of servings from all the major food groups in the Food Guide pyramid. A healthy diet also contains plenty of fluids. Pay special attention to the fluid needs of small children, senior adults, and people who are very active. Broccoli Soup (4 servings) What you need: Broccoli, chopped 1 cups (frozen broccoli 10 ounce package) Celery, diced cup Onion, chopped cup Low sodium chicken broth 1 cup Nonfat milk 2 cups Cornstarch 2 Tbsp Salt tsp Pepper to taste Ground thyme Dash Swiss cheese, grated cup How to make: 1. Place vegetables and broth in saucepan. 2. Bring to boil, reduce heat, cover, and cook until vegetables are tender, about 8 minutes. 3. Mix milk, cornstarch, salt, pepper, and thyme; add to cooked vegetables. 4. Cook, stirring constantly, until soup is lightly thickened and mixture just begins to boil.

PAGE 3

5. Remove from heat. 6. Add cheese and stir until melted. Nutrient analysis per serving: Calories 115 Cholesterol 10mg Sodium 225mg Fat 3g Calories from fat 24% For additional information, contact your local County Extension Office: The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative AEmployer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. ction U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.