Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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i. Family Nutrition In Action
__ .May 2003, Vol 8, No 5


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education B1'_ A.' ,.E
program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and L & FAMILIES
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


MAY IS NATIONAL
HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE
EDUCATION MONTH

A healthy lifestyle helps to prevent
high blood pressure. These are some
healthy lifestyle habits that can help
you prevent and control high blood
pressure:

* maintaining a healthy weight

* being physically active

* following a healthy eating plan

* choosing and preparing foods with
less salt and sodium

* If you drink alcoholic beverages,
do so in moderation and limit
alcohol intake. Some people
should not have alcohol at all,
including pregnant or lactating,
underage, or people who have
problems

Choosing And Preparing Foods
Lower In Salt And Sodium

Most of us take in more salt and
sodium than we need. The current


recommendation is that the amount
that we take in should be less than
2,400 milligrams a day. This means
that the total amount of sodium in our
daily food should be less than the
equivalent of one teaspoon of table
salt. For those who have high blood
pressure, the doctor may advise you
to eat even less salt and sodium.

So what can you do to reduce the salt
and sodium in your diet? You can
follow these tips for shopping,
preparing and serving healthy meals
and snacks:

* Learn to read the food label.
Look at the serving size. Consider
the milligrams of sodium and the
percent daily value. Think about
the amount that you will usually
use. Is it more or less than the
serving size given on the package?
Can this food fit into your healthy
eating plan?

When you shop for food, choose the
types and amounts of foods that will
help you manage the amount of
sodium in your healthy eating plan.

* Buy fresh vegetables or when you
buy frozen or canned vegetables,









choose the plain ones and choose
those that have no added salt.
* Choose fresh poultry, fish, and
lean meat, instead of canned or
processed types.
* Choose herbs, spices, and salt-free
seasoning blends in cooking and at
the table.
* Buy less instant or flavored rice,
pasta, and cereal mixes. These
usually have more sodium and salt.
When you cut back on these you
could also have another bonus.
That is you will probably save
money on your grocery bill,
because these products often cost
more than the plain versions.
* Choose less frozen dinners, pizzas,
packaged mixes, canned soups or
broths, and salad dressings. These
foods often have a lot of sodium.
* When you do choose convenience
foods, choose those that are lower
in sodium.
* When available, buy low- or
reduced-sodium, or no salt added
versions of foods.
* Choose ready-to-eat breakfast
cereals that are lower in sodium.

When you prepare and serve foods,
try these steps for meals with less salt
and sodium:

* Use less salt at the table and in
cooking.


* Cook rice, pasta, and hot cereals
without adding salt.
* Cook with low-salt ingredients; Use
more spices and herbs.
* Try salt-free blends of spices and
herbs in cooking and at the table.
* Rinse salt from canned foods. For
example, you can rinse canned
tuna to remove some sodium.
* Use fewer sauces, mixes, and
instant products.
* Limit smoked, cured, or processed
beef, pork, or poultry.

Chicken and Spanish Rice
(5 servings)
Ingredients
1 cup onions, chopped
1/4 cup green peppers
2 tsp vegetable oil
1 8-oz can tomato sauce
1 tsp parsley, chopped
/2 tsp black pepper
1-/4 tsp garlic, minced
5 cups cooked rice (in unsalted water)
3-12 cups chicken breast, cooked (skin
and bone removed), diced.

Preparation
In a large skillet, saute onions
and green peppers in oil for 5
minutes on medium heat.
Add tomato sauce and spices.
Heat through.
Add cooked rice and chicken,
and heat through.


IVERSITY OF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action
'F FLORIDA Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and
EXTENSION institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida
A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action May 2003, Vol 8, No 5 This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florid a Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Servic e, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assist ance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To fi nd out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). MAY IS NATIONAL HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE EDUCATION MONTH A healthy lifestyle helps to prevent high blood pressure. These are some healthy lifestyle habits that can help you prevent and control high blood pressure: maintaining a healthy weight being physically active following a healthy eating plan choosing and preparing foods with less salt and sodium If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation and limit alcohol intake. Some people should not have alcohol at all, including pregnant or lactating, underage, or people who have problems Choosing And Preparing Foods Lower In Salt And Sodium Most of us take in more salt and sodium than we need. The current recommendation is that the amount that we take in should be less than 2,400 milligrams a day. This means that the total amount of sodium in our daily food should be less than the equivalent of one teaspoon of table salt. For those who have high blood pressure, the doctor may advise you to eat even less salt and sodium. So what can you do to reduce the salt and sodium in your diet? You can follow these tips for shopping, preparing and serv ing healthy meals and snacks: Learn to read the food label. Look at the serving size. Consider the milligrams of sodium and the percent daily value. Think about the amount that you will usually use. Is it more or less than the serving size given on the package? Can this food fit into your healthy eating plan? When you shop for food, choose the types and amounts of foods that will help you manage the amount of sodium in your healthy eating plan. Buy fresh vegetables or when you buy frozen or canned vegetables,

PAGE 2

choose the plain ones and choose those that have no added salt. Choose fresh poultry, fish, and lean meat, instead of canned or processed types. Choose herbs, spices, and salt-free seasoning blends in cooking and at the table. Buy less instant or flavored rice, pasta, and cereal mixes. These usually have more sodium and salt. When you cut back on these you could also have another bonus. That is you will probably save money on your grocery bill, because these products often cost more than the plain versions. Choose less frozen dinners, pizzas, packaged mixes, canned soups or broths, and salad dressings. These foods often have a lot of sodium. When you do choose convenience foods, choose those that are lower in sodium. When available, buy lowor reduced-sodium, or no salt added versions of foods. Choose ready-to-eat breakfast cereals that are lower in sodium. When you prepare and serve foods, try these steps for meals with less salt and sodium: Use less salt at the table and in cooking. Cook rice, pasta, and hot cereals without adding salt. Cook with low-salt ingredients; Use more spices and herbs. Try salt-free blends of spices and herbs in cooking and at the table. Rinse salt from canned foods. For example, you can rinse canned tuna to remove some sodium. Use fewer sauces, mixes, and instant products. Limit smoked, cured, or processed beef, pork, or poultry. Chicken and Spanish Rice (5 servings) Ingredients 1 cup onions, chopped cup green peppers 2 tsp vegetable oil 1 8-oz can tomato sauce 1 tsp parsley, chopped tsp black pepper 1- tsp garlic, minced 5 cups cooked rice (in unsalted water) 3- cups chicken breast, cooked (skin and bone removed), diced. Preparation In a large skillet, saut onions and green peppers in oil for 5 minutes on medium heat. Add tomato sauce and spices. Heat through. Add cooked rice and chicken, and heat through. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employm ent Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide rese arch, educational informa tion and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race color, sex, age, handi cap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PR OGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.