Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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Famly Nutritorn
Family Nutrition In Action
t " March 2003, Vol. 8 No. 3


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education
Program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and T- CHILDREN
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and i & FAMILIES
local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


March 3-7 is School Breakfast Size Matters!
Week


Do your children take part in the
School Breakfast Program? Did you
know that children who eat breakfast:

* *are more alert and creative,
* *have better concentration skills,
* *miss school less often,
* *have less behavior problems, and
* *are more likely to get all the
nutrients they need everyday?

It's true....children who eat breakfast
do better in school! The School
Breakfast Program offers free and
reduced price lunches to those who
qualify. Ask your child's school for
more information.


Have you ever noticed that the portion
sizes in restaurants, especially fast food
restaurants, are getting larger? Is this
good or bad?

While larger portions give us more
value for our money, we tend to eat
more if we are given a larger portion.
And eating more calories than we need
can cause weight gain.

What to do? Avoid the urge to "super
size!" Instead, order the regular or kid
size portion. Or share your order with a
friend.

Fast foods are usually high in fat,
sodium, and calories, so eat these
foods less often. When you cook at
home, you can control how your food
is made and how much you are
served!





March is Frozen Food Month

Why buy frozen foods? Frozen fruits
and vegetables:

* *Are available all year long-they're
never out of season!
* *Are just as nutritious as fresh. At
their peak of freshness, they are
blanched (dipped for a short time in
boiling water and then cold water)
and then frozen. This helps "lock
in" the flavor and nutrients.
* *Are convenient-they're quick and
easy to prepare. No need to wash,
peel, or chop!
* *Are affordable-frozen produce is
usually cheaper than fresh.


Thaw frozen produce in your
refrigerator or under cool running
water. Thaw just the amount you need
and put the rest back in the freezer to
use later. Don't refreeze food once it's
been thawed.

If you're cooking vegetables, there's no
need to thaw first. You can steam,
microwave, saute, or put them in the
slow cooker. Remember frozen
vegetables have already been partly
cooked, so be careful not to overcook
them!

You can store frozen fruit up to 12
months and frozen vegetables up to 8
months.


Mixed Berry Crisp (serves 6)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/ cup sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
6 cups mixed frozen berries, thawed (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries
in any combination)
Vanilla ice milk (optional)

1. Combine flour, sugar, and cinnamon in a bowl.
2. Blend in butter or margarine until mixture is crumbly.
3. Place berries in non-stick baking dish and sprinkle crumb mixture 0
over them.
4. Bake at 3750 for 20-30 minutes.
5. Serve warm with vanilla ice milk, if desired.

Source: Produce for Better Health Foundation/5 A Day

Local Extension Nutrition Program:


L,'NVrl\R s oF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
FLORIDA authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
]FAS EXTENSION without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.


i




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In ActionMarch 2003, Vol. 8 No. 3This newsletter is supported with funding fro m the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florida De partment of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Serv ice, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nut rition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better di et. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). March 3-7 is School Breakfast WeekDo your children take part in the School Breakfast Program? Did you know that children who eat breakfast:are more alert and creative,have better concentration skills,miss school less often,have less behavior problems, andare more likely to get all the nutrients they need everyday? It’s true....children who eat breakfast do better in school! The School Breakfast Program offers free and reduced price lunches to those who qualify. Ask your child’s school for more information.Size Matters!Have you ever noticed that the portion sizes in restaurants, especially fast food restaurants, are getting larger? Is this good or bad? While larger portions give us more value for our money, we tend to eat more if we are given a larger portion. And eating more calories than we need can cause weight gain. What to do? Avoid the urge to “super size!” Instead, order the regular or kid size portion. Or share your order with a friend. Fast foods are usually high in fat, sodium, and calories, so eat these foods less often. When you cook at home, you can control how your food is made and how much you are served!

PAGE 2

The Institute of Food and Agri cultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employme nt Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educationa l information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SE RVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND B OARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Extension Nutrition Program: March is Frozen Food MonthWhy buy frozen foods? Frozen fruits and vegetables:Are available all year long–they’re never out of season!Are just as nutritious as fresh. At their peak of freshness, they are blanched (dipped for a short time in boiling water and then cold water) and then frozen. This helps “lock in” the flavor and nutrients.Are convenient –they’re quick and easy to prepare. No need to wash, peel, or chop!Are affordable –frozen produce is usually cheaper than fresh. Thaw frozen produce in your refrigerator or under cool running water. Thaw just the amount you need and put the rest back in the freezer to use later. Don’t refreeze food once it’s been thawed. If you’re cooking vegetables, there’s no need to thaw first. You can steam, microwave, saute, or put them in the slow cooker. Remember frozen vegetables have already been partly cooked, so be careful not to overcook them! You can store frozen fruit up to 12 months and frozen vegetables up to 8 months. Mixed Berry Crisp (serves 6)1 cup all-purpose flour cup sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon 4 tablespoons butter or margarine 6 cups mixed frozen berries, thawed (blueberr ies, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries in any combination) Vanilla ice milk (optional) 1.Combine flour, sugar, and cinnamon in a bowl. 2.Blend in butter or margarine until mixture is crumbly. 3.Place berries in non-stick baking dish and sprinkle crumb mixture over them. 4.Bake at 375 for 20-30 minutes. 5.Serve warm with vanilla ice milk, if desired.Source: Produce for Better Health Foundation/5 A Day