Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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Famly Nutritorn
| Family Nutrition In Action
*" February 2003, Vol. 8 No. 2


This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education
Program, USDA's Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and T- CHILDREN
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and t & FAMILIES
local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).


Keep Your Heart Healthy

February is American Heart
Month. What can you do to help
keep your heart healthy?

Eat more fruits and veggies!
Aim to eat at least 5 servings
of fruits and vegetables every
day. Enjoy your favorites or
try something new!

* Eat more whole grain foods. Try
brown rice, oatmeal, or whole grain
breads and cereals. It's easy to find
out if a food is a whole grain by
reading the ingredient list. If a whole
grain is one of the first ingredients
listed, go for it!

* Make the switch to lowfat or fat-free
milk. It has all the vitamins and
minerals as whole milk, but less fat
and cholesterol. Children age 1-2
should drink whole milk.

* Get moving! Be physically active as
often as you can. You don't have to
join a gym or buy fancy equipment.
Just move! Walk around the mall or


your neighborhood. Get off the bus
one or two stops early and walk the
rest of the way. You can do it!

Potatoes Anyone?

February is Potato Lovers
Month and Sweet Potato
Month. Both sweet
potatoes and white
potatoes are good sources
of vitamin C, potassium,
and fiber (especially if you eat the skin).
Sweet potatoes are also high in vitamin
A. Here are some tips on using both
types of potatoes.

Buying
Choose potatoes that are firm with
smooth, clean skins.

Storing
Store potatoes in a cool, dark, dry place
(not the refrigerator). They'll keep for 2-
3 weeks.

Preparing
Scrub potatoes under cool running water.
Do not peel (most of the nutrients are in
the skin).









Baking
Poke holes in potatoes with a fork. Bake
white potatoes at 4250 F for about 50-60
minutes. Bake sweet potatoes at 4000 F
for about 40-50 minutes. It's done when
you can poke it easily with a fork.

Microwaving
Poke holes in potato with a fork and
wrap it in a paper towel. Cook it on high
for 3-4 minutes; turn potato over once
during cooking. The potato will still cook
once you take it out of the microwave, so
let it stand about 5 minutes before eating.
Cooking time may vary depending on
your microwave, so read your
microwave's instruction book.


Boiling
Leave the skin on-it will help the potato
keep it's nutrients and flavor. You can
either boil the potato whole or cut it into
thick slices.

Put potatoes in a large pot and cover with
water. Cook on high and bring to a boil.
Then reduce the heat and cook until
potatoes prick easily with a fork. Allow
30-40 minutes for whole potatoes, about
20 minutes for cut potatoes.

If desired, mash with a fork, electric
mixer, or potato masher.


Oven Wedge Fries (Serves 4)


2 large Idaho or Russet potatoes, or sweet potatoes
1 teaspoon olive oil
Desired seasonings (such as Italian seasonings, pepper, chili powder)


1. Place bottom oven rack about 7 inches from bottom of oven. Preheat oven to 4000F.
2. Clean potatoes and cut into quarters. Cut each quarter into wedges.
3. Coat a cookie sheet with 1 teaspoon olive oil.
4. Lay the wedges on the cookie sheet, one side down.
5. Place cookie sheet on bottom oven rack. Bake about 7 minutes, or until bottom and
edges of potatoes start to turn brown.
6. Turn wedges over and season, if desired. Bake another 7 minutes, or until wedges
pierce easily with a fork. Enjoy!
Source: Produce for Better Health Foundation



Local Extension Nutrition Program:


UN[VERSrTYOF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
FLORIDA authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
IFAS EXTENSION without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In ActionFebruary 2003, Vol. 8 No. 2This newsletter is supported with funding fro m the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florida De partment of Children and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Serv ice, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nut rition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better di et. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Keep Your Heart HealthyFebruary is American Heart Month. What can you do to help keep your heart healthy?Eat more fruits and veggies! Aim to eat at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Enjoy your favorites or try something new!Eat more whole grain foods. Try brown rice, oatmeal, or whole grain breads and cereals. It’s easy to find out if a food is a whole grain by reading the ingredient list. If a whole grain is one of the first ingredients listed, go for it!Make the switch to lowfat or fat-free milk. It has all the vitamins and minerals as whole milk, but less fat and cholesterol. Children age 1-2 should drink whole milk. Get moving! Be physically active as often as you can. You don’t have to join a gym or buy fancy equipment. Just move! Walk around the mall or your neighborhood. Get off the bus one or two stops early and walk the rest of the way. You can do it!Potatoes Anyone?February is Potato Lovers Month and Sweet Potato Month. Both sweet potatoes and white potatoes are good sources of vitamin C, potassium, and fiber (especially if you eat the skin). Sweet potatoes are also high in vitamin A. Here are some tips on using both types of potatoes. Buying Choose potatoes that are firm with smooth, clean skins. Storing Store potatoes in a cool, dark, dry place (not the refrigerator). They’ll keep for 23 weeks. Preparing Scrub potatoes under cool running water. Do not peel (most of the nutrients are in the skin).

PAGE 2

The Institute of Food and Agri cultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employme nt Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educationa l information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SE RVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND B OARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Oven Wedge Fries (Serves 4 ) 2 large Idaho or Russet pot atoes, or sweet potatoes 1 teaspoon olive oil Desired seasonings (such as Italian seasonings, pepper, chili powder) 1.Place bottom oven rack about 7 inches from bottom of oven. Preheat oven to 400F. 2.Clean potatoes and cut into quarters. Cut each quarter into wedges. 3.Coat a cookie sheet with 1 teaspoon olive oil. 4.Lay the wedges on the cookie sheet, one side down. 5.Place cookie sheet on bottom oven rack. Bake about 7 minutes, or until bottom and edges of potatoes start to turn brown. 6.Turn wedges over and season, if desir ed. Bake another 7 minutes, or until wedges pierce easily with a fork. Enjoy!Source: Produce for Better Health FoundationLocal Extension Nutrition Program: Baking Poke holes in potatoes with a fork. Bake white potatoes at 425 F for about 50-60 minutes. Bake sweet potatoes at 400 F for about 40-50 minutes. It’s done when you can poke it easily with a fork. Microwaving Poke holes in potato with a fork and wrap it in a paper towel. Cook it on high for 3-4 minutes; turn potato over once during cooking. The potato will still cook once you take it out of the microwave, so let it stand about 5 minutes before eating. Cooking time may vary depending on your microwave, so read your microwave’s instruction book. Boiling Leave the skin on–it will help the potato keep it’s nutrients and flavor. You can either boil the potato whole or cut it into thick slices. Put potatoes in a large pot and cover with water. Cook on high and bring to a boil. Then reduce the heat and cook until potatoes prick easily with a fork. Allow 30-40 minutes for whole potatoes, about 20 minutes for cut potatoes. If desired, mash with a fork, electric mixer, or potato masher.