Family nutrition in action

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Family nutrition in action
Physical Description:
Serial
Creator:
unknown
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Author retains all rights.
System ID:
AA00000382:00011


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


F-y Nutrion
Family Nutrition In Action
... January 2003, Vol. 8 No. 1

This newsletter is supported with funding from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, USDA's Food
Stamp Program, Florida Department of Children and Families, and University of Florida
Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The D IDRTEN
Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy i & FAMILIES
nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free).
-~AL M,...u


Are Sippy Cups Dangerous to My
Child's Teeth?

Many parents use sippy cups when
weaning babies from bottles. However,
dentists now say that using sippy cups
too much or for too long can cause
tooth decay, just like baby bottles.

These cups let liquids touch the front
teeth for a long period of time,
especially if your child uses the cup
throughout the day. If the cup has milk,
juice, or another sweet drink, the teeth
can decay.

Baby teeth are important. They help
your child speak and chew food. They
also hold the place for permanent
teeth, which may not come in for
several years. Here are some ways to
help keep your child's teeth healthy:

* *Only give a sippy cup at meals and
snacks. Don't let your child use it
throughout the day. If your child
does use it between meals and
snacks, put only water in the cup.
* *Wipe your infant's or toddler's teeth
with a clean damp cloth once a
day. By age 2, start using a soft
toothbrush and a small amount of
toothpaste.


-- w- ,-,-
*Take your child to the dentist when
the first tooth comes in, or no later
than your child's first birthday.

Start weaning your infant from the
bottle by one year of age. Weaning
should take about six months, so your
toddler should be using a regular cup
by about 18 months of age.

Can My Toddler Drink Too Much
Juice or Milk?

Your child gets important nutrients
from drinking milk and 100% fruit
juices. Milk has calcium and vitamin D,
while 100% fruit juice may have added
vitamin C and calcium.

However, children can get too much
of a good thing! Toddlers who fill up
on milk or juice are too full to eat other
nutritious foods. And drinking too
much fruit juice can lead to diarrhea.

Try to limit your toddler to 2 or 3 cups
of milk a day and 2/3 cup of 100% fruit
juice a day. Offer water to satisfy your
child's thirst during the day and save
the milk and juice for mealtimes.






What Kind of Milk is Best for My
Toddler?

It's best to give whole milk to toddlers
under the age of two. They need the
calories and nutrients in fat to grow
and develop, and lower-fat milk
doesn't have enough fat. (Infants
should only drink breast-milk or
iron-fortified formula.)

After age two, switch to 1 % or fat-free
milk. Everyone in the family over age
two can benefit from lower-fat foods!

Health food drinks like soy milk and
rice drinks may not give your toddler
the nutrients needed for growth and
development. These drinks do not
naturally have the same nutrients as
cow's milk, like calcium, vitamin D,
and protein.

If your toddler cannot drink cow's milk,
talk to your child's doctor about the
best milk choice.


Help! My Toddler
Only Eats One
Food!

When a toddler wants
the same food for
every meal, it's called a food jag. Many
parents worry about food jags. They
wonder if their toddlers are getting all
the important nutrients.

The good news is that these food jags
usually don't last long! And the
nutrients your child gets are balanced
over a period of time.

So what's a parent to do? Here are
some steps for less stressful mealtimes:

* "It's your job to make mealtimes
pleasant and offer a variety of
healthy foods-it's not your job to
make your child eat. Offer your
toddler's favorite food along with
some other healthy choices.
* "It's your child's job to decide what
foods to eat from the foods you
offer. Your child also decides how
much to eat.
* "Be patient! Remember that food
jags won't last long.


Local Extension Nutrition Program:


UNEVERSrTYOF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
FLORIDA authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
IFAS EXTENSION without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In ActionJanuary 2003, Vol. 8 No. 1This newsletter is supported with funding from the E xpanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, USDA’s Food Stamp Program, Florida Department of Childre n and Families, and University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. The Food Stamp Program gives nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, call 1-800-342-9274 (toll-free). Are Sippy Cups Dangerous to My Child’s Teeth? Many parents use sippy cups when weaning babies from bottles. However, dentists now say that using sippy cups too much or for too long can cause tooth decay, just like baby bottles. These cups let liquids touch the front teeth for a long period of time, especially if your child uses the cup throughout the day. If the cup has milk, juice, or another sw eet drink, the teeth can decay. Baby teeth are important. They help your child speak and chew food. They also hold the place for permanent teeth, which may not come in for several years. Here are some ways to help keep your child’s teeth healthy:Only give a sippy cup at meals and snacks. Don’t let your child use it throughout the day. If your child does use it between meals and snacks, put only water in the cup.Wipe your infant’s or toddler’s teeth with a clean damp cloth once a day. By age 2, start using a soft toothbrush and a small amount of toothpaste.Take your child to the dentist when the first tooth comes in, or no later than your child’s first birthday. Start weaning your infant from the bottle by one year of age. Weaning should take about six months, so your toddler should be using a regular cup by about 18 months of age. Can My Toddler Drink Too Much Juice or Milk? Your child gets important nutrients from drinking milk and 100% fruit juices. Milk has calcium and vitamin D, while 100% fruit juice may have added vitamin C and calcium. However, children can get too much of a good thing! Toddlers who fill up on milk or juice are too full to eat other nutritious foods. And drinking too much fruit juice can lead to diarrhea. Try to limit your toddler to 2 or 3 cups of milk a day and b cup of 100% fruit juice a day. Offer water to satisfy your child’s thirst during the day and save the milk and juice for mealtimes.

PAGE 2

The Institute of Food and Agri cultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employme nt Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educationa l information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SE RVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND B OARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Extension Nutrition Program: What Kind of Milk is Best for My Toddler? It’s best to give whole milk to toddlers under the age of two. They need the calories and nutrients in fat to grow and develop, and lower-fat milk doesn’t have enough fat. (Infants should only drink breast-milk or iron-fortified formula.) After age two, switch to 1% or fat-free milk. Everyone in the family over age two can benefit from lower-fat foods! Health food drinks like soy milk and rice drinks may not give your toddler the nutrients needed for growth and development. These drinks do not naturally have the same nutrients as cow’s milk, like calcium, vitamin D, and protein. If your toddler cannot drink cow’s milk, talk to your child’s doctor about the best milk choice. Help! My Toddler Only Eats One Food! When a toddler wants the same food for every meal, it’s called a food jag. Many parents worry about food jags. They wonder if their toddlers are getting all the important nutrients. The good news is that these food jags usually don’t last long! And the nutrients your child gets are balanced over a period of time. So what’s a parent to do? Here are some steps for less stressful mealtimes:It’s your job to make mealtimes pleasant and offer a variety of healthy foods– it’s not your job to make your child eat. Offer your toddler’s favorite food along with some other healthy choices. It’s your child’s job to decide what foods to eat from the foods you offer. Your child also decides how much to eat.Be patient! Remember that food jags won’t last long.