Family nutrition in action

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Family nutrition in action
Physical Description:
Serial
Creator:
unknown
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Author retains all rights.
System ID:
AA00000382:00009


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





SFamily Nutrition :
c Program


SUniversity of Florida
A 1-888-FNP-8397"


Family Nutrition In Action
Family Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No. 5
November 2002


FLOaDADEPARTMENTOF
CHILDREN
This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding & FAMILIES
from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA
Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies.


Let's Talk Turkey!

It's that time of year again! '
Many of us will soon be r"
gathering with family and -l
friends to celebrate
Thanksgiving, also known '-
as Turkey Day. If you're
planning to have turkey this year, read on
to learn some turkey basics.

Fresh or Frozen?

It's up to you! But only buy a fresh turkey
if you will cook it within two days. And
don't buy a prestuffed fresh turkey.

Take the turkey straight home and
refrigerate or freeze it right away.

Thaw it Safely

Choose one of these ways to thaw a
turkey safely. Never thaw at room
temperature!

*Cold water-Leave turkey in its
airtight package and submerge in cold
water. Change the water every 30
minutes. This takes about 30 minutes


for every pound of turkey. Cook
within two days.

* Refrigerator-Make sure the juices
won't drip on other food. This takes
about 24 hours for every 5 pounds of
turkey. Cook within two days.

* Microwave-Cook turkey immediately
after defrosting in the microwave.

Keep prestuffed turkeys frozen until ready
to cook. Do not thaw.

To Stuff or Not to Stuff?

To reduce the risk of foodborne illness,
don't stuff the turkey. Instead, cook the
stuffing separately in a casserole dish. If
you decide to stuff the turkey, use a food
thermometer to make sure the middle of
the stuffing reaches 165**F and the turkey
thigh reaches 180**F.

Cooking

Use a food thermometer to make
sure your turkey is safe to eat.
Place the thermometer in the
turkey thigh and cook your turkey
at 325*F. The turkey is done








when the temperature in the thigh is 180"*
F (about 3 hours for an 8-12 pound,
unstuffed turkey).

Never partially cook a turkey and then
refrigerate to finish cooking later. Bacteria
can grow on the turkey and cause
foodborne illness.

What About Leftovers?


Refrigerate or freeze all
leftovers within two hours
of cooking. It's best to cut
the turkey off the bone and
store in shallow containers.


For more information,
call the Meat and Poultry
Hotline: 1-800-535-4555
(toll-free).


What's in a Turkey?

Turkey is a good source of
protein, B vitamins, selenium,
and zinc. It also has fat,
saturated fat, and cholesterol,
but most of the fat is in the skin.



Cook Your Sprouts!

To reduce your risk of foodborne illness,
don't eat raw sprouts. Instead, cook all
sprouts thoroughly, even homegrown
ones.

Alfalfa and other sprouts can cause
foodborne illness if they have the bacteria
Salmonella or E. coli.

The illness causes diarrhea, nausea,
cramping, and fever in healthy people.
Children, elders, and people with weak
immune systems can have more serious
illnesses. If you have any of these
symptoms after eating spouts, see a
doctor immediately.


Local Family Nutrition Program:


SIVERSITY OF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
LORIDA authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
E,,. XT.E N IIN without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.


FC




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In ActionFamily Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No. 5 November 2002 This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. Let’s Talk Turkey!It’s that time of year again! Many of us will soon be gathering with family and friends to celebrate Thanksgiving, also known as Turkey Day. If you’re planning to have turkey this year, read on to learn some turkey basics.Fresh or Frozen?It’s up to you! But only buy a fresh turkey if you will cook it within two days. And don’t buy a prestuffed fresh turkey. Take the turkey straight home and refrigerate or freeze it right away.Thaw it SafelyChoose one of these ways to thaw a turkey safely. Never thaw at room temperature! •Cold water—Leave turkey in its airtight package and submerge in cold water. Change the water every 30 minutes. This takes about 30 minutes for every pound of turkey. Cook within two days. •Refrigerator—Make sure the juices won’t drip on other food. This takes about 24 hours for every 5 pounds of turkey. Cook within two days. •Microwave—Cook turkey immediately after defrosting in the microwave. Keep prestuffed turkeys frozen until ready to cook. Do not thaw.To Stuff or Not to Stuff?To reduce the risk of foodborne illness, don’t stuff the turkey. Instead, cook the stuffing separately in a casserole dish. If you decide to stuff the turkey, use a food thermometer to make sure the middle of the stuffing reaches 165 F and the turkey thigh reaches 180 F.CookingUse a food thermometer to make sure your turkey is safe to eat. Place the thermometer in the turkey thigh and cook your turkey at 325F. The turkey is done

PAGE 2

The Institute of Food and Agri cultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employme nt Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educationa l information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SE RVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND B OARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Family Nutrition Program: What’s in a Turkey? Turkey is a good source of protein, B vitamins, selenium, and zinc. It also has fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, but most of the fat is in the skin. when the temperature in the thigh is 180F (about 3 hours for an 8-12 pound, unstuffed turkey). Never partially cook a turkey and then refrigerate to finish cooking later. Bacteria can grow on the turkey and cause foodborne illness. What About Leftovers? Refrigerate or freeze all leftovers within two hours of cooking. It’s best to cut the turkey off the bone and store in shallow containers. For more information, call the Meat and Poultry Hotline: 1-800-535-4555 (toll-free).Cook Your Sprouts!To reduce your risk of foodborne illness, don’t eat raw sprouts. Instead, cook all sprouts thoroughly, even homegrown ones. Alfalfa and other sprouts can cause foodborne illness if they have the bacteria Salmonella or E. coli The illness causes diarrhea, nausea, cramping, and fever in healthy people. Children, elders, and people with weak immune systems can have more serious illnesses. If you have any of these symptoms after eating spouts, see a doctor immediately.