Family nutrition in action

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SFamily Nutrition
Program

n j
Q. University of Floriida
1-888-FNP-8397


Family Nutrition In Action
Family Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No 4
September/October 2002


LORIDA DEPARTMENT O
CHILDREN
This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding & FAMILIES
from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA
Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local
agencies.


A Healthy Start to a New
School Year

A new school year
brings new teachers,
new books, and a
new chance for
good grades! Help
your child have a
successful school year with good
nutrition and physical activity.

Good nutrition starts with a healthy
breakfast. Children who eat this
important meal are more alert and
perform better in school. They also
have less behavior problems than kids
who skip breakfast. Breakfast is
important for adults, too, so be a
positive role model and eat breakfast
with your child.

Increased physical activity also helps
kids perform better in school with
higher test scores and improved
behavior. Encourage your child to take
part in school physical activity
programs. After school, set a positive
example and play actively with your
child. Your health will benefit, too!


Source: Nutrition, Physical Activity and
Achievement Fact Sheet.
www. actionforhealthykids. org.

What's for Breakfast?

Offer a variety of healthy foods for
breakfast and let your child choose
what to eat. If you're short on time,
have some quick-to-make foods on
hand. Try ready-to-eat cereals, milk,
yogurt, fruit, string cheese, English
muffins, or bagels.

Don't worry if your child doesn't like
traditional breakfast foods. Breakfast
can be anything your child likes, even
a burrito or a grilled cheese sandwich!

If your child isn't hungry first thing in
the morning, offer something light such
as fruit, fruit juice, or milk. Then pack a
healthy mid-morning snack such as a
bagel and cheese.


The School Breakfast Program offers
free or reduced-price meals at many
schools. Check with your child's
school for more information.







Fall Harvest


Fall is a wonderful time to try some
colorful Florida squash. From acorn to
zucchini, Florida grows a variety of
squash from September through June.

Squash is fat-free and full of nutrients.
Hard-shell winter squash, like acorn
and butternut, are good sources of
vitamins A and C. Soft-skinned
summer squash, like zucchini and
yellow, are good sources of vitamin C.

Selecting, Storing, and Preparing

Choose winter squash that has a hard,
tough skin and feels heavy for its size.
Store in a cool, dark place up to 3
months. Only the flesh is edible and
must be cooked. Try baking,
microwaving, or boiling and mashing
like potatoes. Or add squash cubes to
soups or stews.

Choose firm summer squash with shiny
and tender skin. The entire summer
squash is edible. Enjoy it raw or
cooked. Cover with plastic, refrigerate
in the produce drawer, and use within
5 days.



Visit a farmers market to buy fresh,
low-priced produce from the people
who grew it. You can even talk with
the growers to learn how to prepare
your new purchases! Check with your
county Cooperative Extension agent
or local newspaper to find a farmers


Baked Acorn or Butternut Squash
Serves 4

2 acorn or butternut squash
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons margarine, melted

Rinse squash and cut in
half. Place cut side down
in taking dish with 1/4
inch of water. To
microwave, cover with
plastic wrap and cook on high until
squash is tender (about 10-15
minutes). To bake, cook at 3500 F until
tender (about 45-60 minutes). When
fully cooked, remove seeds with spoon,
then add margarine and brown sugar
in the seed cavity. Bake for another 5
minutes or microwave another 2
minutes and serve. Caution: squash
will be very hot!

Source: Produce for Better Health,
www.aboutproduce.com.

Potato and Squash Soup (Serves 6)

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup onion, finely chopped
3 cups potatoes, cleaned and diced
3 cups butternut squash (or zucchini), diced
5 cups chicken stock
14 cup green onion, sliced
salt and pepper to taste

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat.
Add onions and cook until softened. Stir in
potatoes and squash. Add chicken stock and
bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until
vegetables are tender (about 20-30 minutes).
Stir in green onions and season to taste.

Source: Produce for Better Health/Prince Edward
Island Potato Board, www.aboutproduce.com.





Molds on Food: Are They
Dangerous?

Some molds cause allergic reactions
and lung problems. And a few molds
produce poisonous substances that can
make people sick. Is it safe to cut off
the moldy part of food and eat the
rest? Read on to find out!

What are Molds?

Molds are tiny organisms with roots
and branches like very thin threads. By
the time you see mold on food-like the
gray fur on forgotten bologna-tiny
roots are deep within the food. Some-
times poisonous substances called
toxins spread throughout the food.

How Can You Control Mold Growth?

SClean the inside of
the refrigerator every
few months. Use 1
tablespoon baking
soda mixed in a quart
of water. Rinse with
clear water and dry.
* Scrub visible mold (usually black)
on refrigerator rubber casings. Use
3 tablespoons bleach mixed in a
quart of water.
* Keep dishcloths, towels, sponges,
and mops clean. Throw away items
you can't clean.


How Can You Protect Food From Mold?

* Keep foods covered.
* Empty opened cans of perishable
foods into clean storage containers
and refrigerate right away.
* Don't leave perishable food out of
the refrigerator more than 2 hours.
* Don't give mold a chance to grow
-use leftovers within 3-4 days.

How Should You Handle Moldy Food?

* Don't sniff the moldy food.
* If the food is covered with mold,
put it in a small paper bag or wrap
it with plastic and throw it away.
* Clean the spot where the food was
stored. Check nearby foods since
mold can spread quickly.

Mold usually cannot reach deep into
hard or dense foods like hard cheese
and firm vegetables like cabbage,
carrots, and bell peppers. It's OK to cut
small mold spots off these foods and
use the rest. Cut off at least 1 inch
around and below the mold spot. Keep
the knife out of the mold itself so it will
not cross-contaminate other parts of
the food.

Source: USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline fact
sheet, Molds on Food: Are They Dangerous? April
2002. http://www.fsis. usda.gov/oa/pubs/molds. htm.


Local Family Nutrition Program:


SIVERSITY OF The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
LORIDA authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
E,.XT E N S I N without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In ActionFamily Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No 4 September/October 2002 This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. A Healthy Start to a New School YearA new school year brings new teachers, new books, and a new chance for good grades! Help your child have a successful school year with good nutrition and physical activity. Good nutrition starts with a healthy breakfast. Children who eat this important meal are more alert and perform better in school. They also have less behavior problems than kids who skip breakfast. Breakfast is important for adults, too, so be a positive role model and eat breakfast with your child. Increased physical activity also helps kids perform better in school with higher test scores and improved behavior. Encourage your child to take part in school physical activity programs. After school, set a positive example and play actively with your child. Your health will benefit, too! Source: Nutrition, Physical Activity and Achievement Fact Sheet. www.actionforhealthykids.org.What’s for Breakfast?Offer a variety of healthy foods for breakfast and let your child choose what to eat. If you’re short on time, have some quick-to-make foods on hand. Try ready-to-eat cereals, milk, yogurt, fruit, string cheese, English muffins, or bagels. Don’t worry if your child doesn’t like traditional breakfast foods. Breakfast can be anything your child likes, even a burrito or a grilled cheese sandwich! If your child isn’t hungry first thing in the morning, offer something light such as fruit, fruit juice, or milk. Then pack a healthy mid-morning snack such as a bagel and cheese. The School Breakfast Program offers free or reduced-price meals at many schools. Check with your child’s school for more information.

PAGE 2

Fall HarvestFall is a wonderful time to try some colorful Florida squash. From acorn to zucchini, Florida grows a variety of squash from September through June. Squash is fat-free and full of nutrients. Hard-shell winter squash, like acorn and butternut, are good sources of vitamins A and C. Soft-skinned summer squash, like zucchini and yellow, are good sources of vitamin C.Selecting, Storing, and PreparingChoose winter squash that has a hard, tough skin and feels heavy for its size. Store in a cool, dark place up to 3 months. Only the flesh is edible and must be cooked. Try baking, microwaving, or boiling and mashing like potatoes. Or add squash cubes to soups or stews. Choose firm summer squash with shiny and tender skin. The entire summer squash is edible. Enjoy it raw or cooked. Cover with plastic, refrigerate in the produce drawer, and use within 5 days. Visit a farmers market to buy fresh, low-priced produce from the people who grew it. You can even talk with the growers to learn how to prepare your new purchases! Check with your county Cooperative Extension agent or local newspaper to find a farmers Baked Acorn or Butternut SquashServes 4 2 acorn or butternut squash 2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons margarine, melted Rinse squash and cut in half. Place cut side down in taking dish with 1/4 inch of water. To microwave, cover with plastic wrap and cook on high until squash is tender (about 10-15 minutes). To bake, cook at 350 F until tender (about 45-60 minutes). When fully cooked, remove seeds with spoon, then add margarine and brown sugar in the seed cavity. Bake for another 5 minutes or microwave another 2 minutes and serve. Caution: squash will be very hot!Source: Produce for Better Health, www.aboutproduce.com.Potato and Squash Soup (Serves 6) 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup onion, finely chopped 3 cups potatoes, cleaned and diced 3 cups butternut squash (or zucchini), diced 5 cups chicken stock cup green onion, sliced salt and pepper to taste Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions and cook until softened. Stir in potatoes and squash. Add chicken stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until vegetables are tender (about 20-30 minutes). Stir in green onions and season to taste.Source: Produce for Better Health/Prince Edward Island Potato Board, www.aboutproduce.com.

PAGE 3

The Institute of Food and Agri cultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employme nt Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educationa l information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SE RVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND B OARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Family Nutrition Program: Molds on Food: Are They Dangerous?Some molds cause allergic reactions and lung problems. And a few molds produce poisonous substances that can make people sick. Is it safe to cut off the moldy part of food and eat the rest? Read on to find out!What are Molds?Molds are tiny organisms with roots and branches like very thin threads. By the time you see mold on food–like the gray fur on forgotten bologna–tiny roots are deep within the food. Sometimes poisonous substances called toxins spread throughout the food. How Can You Control Mold Growth?•Clean the inside of the refrigerator every few months. Use 1 tablespoon baking soda mixed in a quart of water. Rinse with clear water and dry. •Scrub visible mold (usually black) on refrigerator rubber casings. Use 3 tablespoons bleach mixed in a quart of water. •Keep dishcloths, towels, sponges, and mops clean. Throw away items you can’t clean.How Can You Protect Food From Mold?•Keep foods covered. •Empty opened cans of perishable foods into clean storage containers and refrigerate right away. •Don’t leave perishable food out of the refrigerator more than 2 hours. •Don’t give mold a chance to grow —use leftovers within 3-4 days.How Should You Handle Moldy Food?•Don’t sniff the moldy food. •If the food is covered with mold, put it in a small paper bag or wrap it with plastic and throw it away. •Clean the spot where the food was stored. Check nearby foods since mold can spread quickly. Mold usually cannot reach deep into hard or dense foods like hard cheese and firm vegetables like cabbage, carrots, and bell peppers. It’s OK to cut small mold spots off these foods and use the rest. Cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot. Keep the knife out of the mold itself so it will not cross-contaminate other parts of the food.Source: USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline fact sheet, Molds on Food: Are They Dangerous? April 2002. http://www.fsis.usda.go v/oa/pubs/molds.htm.