Family nutrition in action

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Family nutrition in action
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SFamily Nutrition
S Program


JUniversity of Florida &
S1-888-FNP-8397


Family Nutrition In Action
Family Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No 3
July/August 2002


ILORIDA DEPARTMENT f
CHILDREN
This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding Li & FAMILIES
from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and
Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies.


Food: a source of water?


S,
Ile

J. mmer




Stay Cool in the Summer

Summer's intense heat will have an effect
on you, whether you are mowing the lawn,
playing with the kids, or just sitting under
the shade of a tree. When the body is
exposed to intense heat, it needs even more
water to keep a normal temperature. Losing
too much body water can lead to:

O headache
nausea and vomiting
fatigue
weakness

Even though dehydration, or excessive
water loss, doesn't occur over the course of
a single day, it is important to pay attention
to signs of water loss. Decrease your risk
for dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids
throughout the day, before you get thirsty.


While water and non-alcoholic, non
caffeinated beverages are great sources of
fluids, solid foods also provide a surprising
amount of water. Consider using these foods
more often, especially during the summer
heat waves.

% Water
Food Serving by
Size Weight

Lettuce /2 cup 95

Watermelon /2 cup 92

Grapefruit /2 cup 91

Carrot /2 cup 87

Yogurt 1 cup 75

Cool ideas for quenching your thirst this
summer:

Mix 100% juice with sparkling
water.
Mix unsweetened, decaffeinated iced
tea with orange juice or lemonade.

O Mix 100% juice and water and
freeze into fruit juice popsicles.











Keep water readily accessible.
Consider refrigerating tap water or
getting personal water bottle for
everyone at home!

Patriotic Fruit Plate
(6-8 servings)
Ingredients
2 cups frozen whipped topping, thawed
2 cups low-fat vanilla yogurt
/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
12 teaspoon vanilla extract
2-3 pints strawberries, sliced
3-4 cups blueberries

Directions
1. Combine whipped
topping, yogurt, cin
namon, and vanilla. Chill until serving
time.
2. Place the bowl of topping in the middle
of a large plate. Arrange the blueberries
and strawberries around the bowl.
3. To serve, dip fruit into topping and
enjoy.


Safe Summer Grilling

Scientists recommend eating grilled foods,
especially meats, in moderate amounts.
Grilling food over an open flame or letting
the meat cook to the point of burning
increases the chances of the food developing
cancer-causing substances, or carcinogens.
When grilling, you can take some
precautions to reduce the formation of
carcinogens.

$ Marinade foods before grilling.
$ Grill foods that present less risk, like
vegetables, veggie burgers, or tofu.


/ Speed the time meats spend on the
grill.
Pre-cook in an oven or
microwave oven, then briefly
grill for flavor.
S Chop food into small pieces
for quick grilling.
/ Cook the food at lower temperatures
by raising the grill rack.
/ Trim the fat from meats so it won't
drip into the flames and cause flare-
ups. Flare-ups burn the meat.

Don't be discouraged! Grilled foods can be
part of your summer celebrations. Follow
these tips to keep your grilling safe.

Source of information: American Institute for Cancer
Research Newsletter, Summer 2002.

Family Activities=Stronger
Families
Automation and technology have
contributed to the sedentary lifestyle of
many American families. Less physical
activity and our "super size" eating habits
are factors possibly leading to over weight
problems.









Let's start promoting more physical activity
within our family routine. Select a few
activities that may become part of your
family rituals. And remember that time
spent together strengthen family ties! Here
are some ideas to help you get started:

" Plan walking/hiking outings in the many
local and state parks.
/ Explore the outdoors for animal tracks
and identify them.
" Go on a backyard or neighborhood
scavenger hunt.
" Play games, like hide 'n seek, three-
legged race, or tag, in the backyard.
" Walk along the beach, river or creek and
collect shells or stones.

Adaptedfrom: "Eat Smart. Play Hard.TM: A Monthly
Menu ofFamily Activities, "Publication 348-968,
Virginia Cooperative Extension, 2001.


Prepare for
Hurricane
Season


season is from June 1
until November 30. This is a good time to
take a close look at your emergency food
supply. The most important step in dealing
with an emergency or with disaster is to be
PREPARED.

Emergency food supply
The emergency supply includes water and
foods that your family enjoys and that store
well without refrigeration. Keep the
emergency food supply separate from the
other foods so you can access it when
needed. You should keep at least a 3-day
supply of both food and water.

Include a selection of the following foods
that need little preparation:


* Ready-to-eat canned fruits and
vegetables, and puddings
* Canned juices
* Canned soup (if concentrated, store extra
water for preparation)
* Canned meats (tuna, deviled ham, chili,
beef stew, pork and beans)
* High energy foods such as peanut butter,
jelly, crackers, dried fruits, granola bars,
and trail mix
* "Comfort" foods such as sweetened
cereal, cookies, and hard candy
* Food for infants, elderly persons, or
those on special diets

Some foods need to be refrigerated once
they are opened. If you think that once
opened you will not be able to use it all at
once, then consider having foods packaged
in one-meal sizes or individually.

Storing the emergency food supply
Store foods in a cool place. Date foods as
you buy them. Make sure that you replace
them with new groceries as you approach
the "use date" of the food (you'll find the
date on the package.)

Use within three months:
crackers and cereals

Use within six months:
dried fruits, peanut butter, dry milk,
instant coffee, cocoa mix

Use within a year:
canned foods










Don't forget water!!
Water is a very important item to have on
hand in case of an emergency. You will
need it for preparing foods, washing dishes,
and keeping clean. Store water in plastic
containers such as soft drink bottles or milk
jugs. To keep the stored water fresh, change
it every six months.

A normally active person needs to drink at
least 2 quarts of water a day. Children and
nursing mothers will need more. If the
weather is hot, you'll need more water.


For more information on preparing for a
disaster, contact your local Extension office
(under "government" section of the phone
book.)

Source of information: The Disaster Handbook,
IFAS/UF, 1998 and "Be Prepared with a 3-day
Emergency Food Supply, Iowa State University
Extension, November 1997.


Local Family Nutrition Program:


SThe Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
S i authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
E X T E N S IO, N without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In ActionFamily Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No 3 July/August 2002 This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. Stay Cool in the SummerSummer’s intense heat will have an effect on you, whether you are mowing the lawn, playing with the kids, or just sitting under the shade of a tree. When the body is exposed to intense heat, it needs even more water to keep a normal temperature. Losing too much body water can lead to:headachenausea and vomitingfatigueweakness Even though dehydration, or excessive water loss, doesn’t occur over the course of a single day, it is important to pay attention to signs of water loss. Decrease your risk for dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids throughout the day, before you get thirsty. Food: a source of water? While water and non-alcoholic, non caffeinated beverages are great sources of fluids, solid foods also provide a surprising amount of water. Consider using these foods more often, especially during the summer heat waves. FoodServing Size % Water by Weight Lettuce cup95 Watermelon cup92 Grapefruit cup91 Carrot cup87 Yogurt1 cup75 Cool ideas for quenching your thirst this summer:Mix 100% juice with sparkling water.Mix unsweetened, decaffeinated iced tea with orange juice or lemonade.Mix 100% juice and water and freeze into fruit juice popsicles.

PAGE 2

Patriotic Fruit Plate (6-8 servings) Ingredients 2 cups frozen whipped topping, thawed 2 cups low-fat vanilla yogurt teaspoon ground cinnamon teaspoon vanilla extract 2-3 pints strawberries, sliced 3-4 cups blueberries Directions 1.Combine whipped topping, yogurt,cin namon, and vanilla. Chill until serving time. 2.Place the bowl of topping in the middle of a large plate. Arrange the blueberries and strawberries around the bowl. 3.To serve, dip fruit into topping and enjoy.Safe Summer GrillingScientists recommend eating grilled foods, especially meats, in moderate amounts. Grilling food over an open flame or letting the meat cook to the point of burning increases the chances of the food developing cancer-causing substances, or carcinogens. When grilling, you can take some precautions to reduce the formation of carcinogens.Marinade foods before grilling.Grill foods that present less risk, like vegetables, veggie burgers, or tofu.Speed the time meats spend on the grill. •Pre-cook in an oven or microwave oven, then briefly grill for flavor. •Chop food into small pieces for quick grilling.Cook the food at lower temperatures by raising the grill rack. Trim the fat from meats so it won’t drip into the flames and cause flareups. Flare-ups burn the meat. Don’t be discouraged! Grilled foods can be part of your summer celebrations. Follow these tips to keep your grilling safe.Source of information: American Institute for Cancer Research Newsletter, Summer 2002.Family Activities=Stronger FamiliesAutomation and technology have contributed to the sedentary lifestyle of many American families. Less physical activity and our “super size” eating habits are factors possibly leading to over weight problems. Keep water readily accessible. Consider refrigerating tap water or getting personal water bottle for everyone at home!

PAGE 3

Let’s start promoting more physical activity within our family routine. Select a few activities that may become part of your family rituals. And remember that time spent together strengthen family ties! Here are some ideas to help you get started:Plan walking/hiking outings in the many local and state parks.Explore the outdoors for animal tracks and identify them.Go on a backyard or neighborhood scavenger hunt.Play games, like hide ‘n seek, threelegged race, or tag, in the backyard.Walk along the beach, river or creek and collect shells or stones.Adapted from: “Eat Smart. Play Hard.™: A Monthly Menu of Family Activities,” Publication 348-968, Virginia Cooperative Extension, 2001.Prepare for Hurricane SeasonThe Atlantic hurricane season is from June 1 until November 30. This is a good time to take a close look at your emergency food supply. The most important step in dealing with an emergency or with disaster is to be PREPARED. Emergency food supply The emergency supply includes water and foods that your family enjoys and that store well without refrigeration. Keep the emergency food supply separate from the other foods so you can access it when needed. You should keep at least a 3-day supply of both food and water. Include a selection of the following foods that need little preparation: •Ready-to-eat canned fruits and vegetables, and puddings •Canned juices •Canned soup (if concentrated, store extra water for preparation) •Canned meats (tuna, deviled ham, chili, beef stew, pork and beans) •High energy foods such as peanut butter, jelly, crackers, dried fruits, granola bars, and trail mix •“Comfort” foods such as sweetened cereal, cookies, and hard candy •Food for infants, elderly persons, or those on special diets Some foods need to be refrigerated once they are opened. If you think that once opened you will not be able to use it all at once, then consider having foods packaged in one-meal sizes or individually. Storing the emergency food supply Store foods in a cool place. Date foods as you buy them. Make sure that you replace them with new groceries as you approach the “use date” of the food (you’ll find the date on the package.) Use within three months: crackers and cereals Use within six months: dried fruits, peanut butter, dry milk, instant coffee, cocoa mix Use within a year : canned foods

PAGE 4

The Institute of Food and Agri cultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employme nt Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educationa l information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SE RVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND B OARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.Local Family Nutrition Program: Don’t forget water!! Water is a very important item to have on hand in case of an emergency. You will need it for preparing foods, washing dishes, and keeping clean. Store water in plastic containers such as soft drink bottles or milk jugs. To keep the stored water fresh, change it every six months. A normally active person needs to drink at least 2 quarts of water a day. Children and nursing mothers will need more. If the weather is hot, you’ll need more water. For more information on preparing for a disaster, contact your local Extension office (under “government” section of the phone book.)Source of information: The Disaster Handbook, IFAS/UF, 1998 and “Be Prepared with a 3-day Emergency Food Supply,” Iowa State University Extension, November 1997.