Family nutrition in action

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Family nutrition in action
Physical Description:
Serial
Creator:
unknown
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Author retains all rights.
System ID:
AA00000382:00005


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





5 Family Nutrition
S Program
S 3


LJUn iv rmiy nf Floridra .
Sl-BBsB-FNP-Ma '


Family Nutrition In Action
Family Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No 1
March/April 2002


cH IL DREN
This program is brought to you thanks to the support in &. FAMAILIE
funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families
and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county,
and local agencies.


Colorful fruits and vegetables play an
important role in disease prevention. They
are rich in vitamins and minerals, in
addition to other plant substances
(phytochemicals) that promote health.
Take a look at the rainbow of foods.

REDS
Foods like tomatoes, red and pink
grapefruit, watermelon and guava are rich
in lycopene, a phytochemical that seems
to reduce the risk for certain types of
cancer. These foods are also rich in
vitamin C.

GREENS
Green vegetables look great and taste
wonderful, and are packed with important
nutrients. Spinach, collards, kale, and
broccoli are rich in vitamin A, vitamin C,
and folate, in addition to carotenoids that
also protect body tissues. Foods in the
cabbage (or cruciferous) family are known
to be nutrient-packed. Eat up your
cabbage, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale
and turnips!


ORANGES
Orange fruits and vegetables, like sweet
potatoes, pumpkin, cantaloupe, mangoes,
carrots and apricots, have beta carotene.
Beta carotene turns into vitamin A in our
body, and is known to be an antioxidant
that may reduce the risk for some types of
cancer and heart disease. Foods in this
color group are also rich in vitamin C,
vitamin E, and in some cases, folate.

BLUES
Anthocyanins, a phytochemical, are
responsible for the blue color in fruits and
vegetables, and they may help defend
against harmful carcinogens. Blueberries,
in particular, are good sources of vitamin
C, folic acid, fiber, and potassium.

Make it a goal to add one new colorful
fruit or vegetable to your diet every week.
You'll discover wonderful flavors and
textures while giving your body these
nutritious foods.










Celebrate St Patrick's Day with Pot 'Gold Soup


Perfect Wrap!
Who says sandwiches have to be boring.
Not only do we have all kinds of breads,
from whole wheat to sunflower seeds, but
now we also have flat breads and flour
tortillas. Sandwiches made with flat bread,
pita, and flour tortilla have gained
popularity in the fast food world. Try
making your own "wrap" sandwich at
home.

The Basics
Wrapper: Use flour tortilla or pita bread
(look for the whole wheat kind) for the
wrap sandwich. To warm the wrapper,
microwave on medium heat for 30
seconds or wrap in foil and place in a
375'F oven for about 5 minutes.

Filling: Add a selection of vegetables,
like sliced tomatoes, bell peppers,
cucumbers, green onions, spinach
leaves, shredded carrots, lettuce or


cabbage. Add an ounce or two of lean
meat, poultry, tuna, tofu, beans, or
reduced-fat cheese.

Sauce: Roll up the sandwich and serve
with a light sauce, like salsa or plain
yogurt.

Wraps for kids
Kids can also enjoy wrap sandwiches. Try
these kid-friendly ideas:
Spread some peanut butter over pita
bread or flour tortilla. Add thin
slices of banana, thin slices of
apple, or dried fruits.

Sprinkle some reduced-fat cheese
on a flour tortilla and melt, then
add shredded carrots, diced
tomatoes, cooked beans, or diced
hamr


Pot 'O Gold Soup

2 tablespoons margarine
1 small onion, chopped
3 medium potatoes, cubed A4
1 large carrot, sliced
3 chicken bouillon cubes
1 /2 cups low fat milk
3 cups chopped cabbage
1 12 cups leftover corned beef, cut into bite-size pieces

In a Dutch oven, melt the margarine and cook the onion until soft. Add the
potatoes, carrot slices, bouillon cubes, and just enough water to cover, and
simmer until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. With a hand-held blender,
puree the potatoes until smooth (or mash with a fork). Add the milk, cabbage
and leftover corned beef and simmer another 15 minutes. Season with salt and
pepper to taste, and serve.
I









When choosing wrap sandwiches in
restaurants and fast foods, you want to be
cautious because these sandwiches can
exceed the limits of fat and calories.
Follow these recommendations to keep fat
and calories under control:


* SUPER SIZE: Many wrap sandwiches
are big. Consider sharing with a friend
or eat half at the restaurant and take
the other half home.

* DRENCHED IN SAUCE: Instead of
having them add the dressing or sauce
when preparing the sandwich, ask for
the it on the side. Use just a small
amount of the sauce.

Adapted from the American Institute for Cancer
Research Newsletter, Spring 1998.

Nutrition and Physical Activity:
Partners Against Cancer

The American Cancer Society has stated
that approximately one-third of the
500,000 annual cancer deaths in the US
are due to poor diet and lack of exercise,
while another third is from cigarette
smoking. This means that by making
changes in lifestyle, people can reduce
their risks for cancer.

Read the following recommendations.
Place a check mark (* ) next to the
recommendations you are willing to put
into practice. Your next step will be to take
ACTION!
Nutrition
G Choose a diet with plenty of plant
sources.


_Include vegetables and fruits at
every meal and snack.
_Choose whole grains instead of
processed (refined) grains.

G Limit consumption
Whole Grains:
of red meats,
Oat bran
especially those Whole wheat
high in fat and products
processed. Brown rice
_Choose fish, Corn tortillas
poultry, and beans
as an alternative to
meat.
Choose lean cuts of meat and
remove any visible fat.
_Prepare meat by baking or broiling
instead of frying.

Physical activity
G Engage in physical activity every day.
Adults need at least 30 minutes of
physical activity on 5 or more days a
week.
Children and adolescents need at
least 60 minutes (1 hour) of physical
activity for at least 5 days a week.

Choose activities you enjoy.*
Daily chores (vacuuming,
organizing closets, general lawn
and garden maintenance)
Structured exercise (aerobic classes,
strength training)
Sports (tennis, volleyball,
basketball, golf)
Leisure activities (walking,
bicycling, roller-skating, dancing)

* Consult with your physician before making any
changes to your physical activity level.

Take it easy.
Stretch and warm up before you
start any exercise or physical






activity to keep your muscles from
getting sore or injuring.

Steady progress.
Start slow at first, especially if
you've not been physically active
at all before. It's best to do less and
feel good, than to push the limits
and be in pain. Always consult
your doctor before increasing the
intensity of any activity.

Be safe.
Use the buddy-system and exercise
with a friend. Exercise in safe
places and wear bright colors if you
are out at dusk or if you are around
traffic.

TV Turn Off Week is April 22-28,
2002*

Did you know that ...
# On average, children in the US will
spend more time in front of the
television (1,023 hours) than in
school this year (900 hours)?

# Approximately 40% of Americans
frequently watch television during
dinner?

Television keeps us connected to world
events and some programs are actually
educational in nature. But too much TV
watching is not good. Time spent watching
TV cuts into family time, affects


children's ability to read and use their
imaginations, and contributes to
unhealthy, sedentary lifestyles.

Turn Off The TV!
Turning off the television gives us a
chance to reconnect with our family and to
participate actively in our communities.
Get the family together and write an
activity plan. Fill it up with TV-free
activities. Here are some ideas:

Start journal
Make a scrapbook or photo album
Cook a meal with family or friends
Play board games
Go to the library or a local
bookstore
Start a garden
Attend local cultural and sporting
events
Listen to music
Sign up for a class (languages,
crafts)
Visit the zoo or local museum

* TV Turnoff Week is supported by over 70
national organizations, including the American
Medical Association, American Academy of
Pediatrics, National Education Association, and
President's Council on Physical Fitness.


Local Family Nutrition Program:


. 1 r. V '. I : The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action
* .L ~ '. IIl[[- Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and
"./ *T.1'..I -':.l institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A.
& M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action Family Nutrition Program Vol. 7 No 1 March/April 2002 This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. Colorful fruits and vegetables play an important role in disease prevention. They are rich in vitamins and minerals, in addition to other plant substances (phytochemicals) that promote health. Take a look at the rainbow of foods. REDS Foods like tomatoes, red and pink grapefruit, watermelon and guava are rich in lycopene, a phytochemical that seems to reduce the risk for certain types of cancer. These foods are also rich in vitamin C. GREENS Green vegetables look great and taste wonderful, and are packed with important nutrients. Spinach, collards, kale, and broccoli are rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, and folate, in addition to carotenoids that also protect body tissues. Foods in the cabbage (or cruciferous) family are known to be nutrient-packed. Eat up your cabbage, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale and turnips! ORANGES Orange fruits and vegetables, like sweet potatoes, pumpkin, cantaloupe, mangoes, carrots and apricots, have beta carotene. Beta carotene turns into vitamin A in our body, and is known to be an antioxidant that may reduce the risk for some types of cancer and heart disease. Foods in this color group are also rich in vitamin C, vitamin E, and in some cases, folate. BLUES Anthocyanins, a phytochemical, are responsible for the blue color in fruits and vegetables, and they may help defend against harmful carcinogens. Blueberries, in particular, are good sources of vitamin C, folic acid, fiber, and potassium. Make it a goal to add one new colorful fruit or vegetable to your diet every week. Youll discover wonderful flavors and textures while giving your body these nutritious foods.

PAGE 2

Perfect Wrap! Who says sandwiches have to be boring. Not only do we have all kinds of breads, from whole wheat to sunflower seeds, but now we also have flat breads and flour tortillas. Sandwiches made with flat bread, pita, and flour tortilla have gained popularity in the fast food world. Try making your own wrap sandwich at home. The Basics Wrapper: Use flour tortilla or pita bread (look for the whole wheat kind) for the wrap sandwich. To warm the wrapper, microwave on medium heat for 30 seconds or wrap in foil and place in a 375 o F oven for about 5 minutes. Filling: Add a selection of vegetables, like sliced tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, green onions, spinach leaves, shredded carrots, lettuce or cabbage. Add an ounce or two of lean meat, poultry, tuna, tofu, beans, or reduced-fat cheese. Sauce: Roll up the sandwich and serve with a light sauce, like salsa or plain yogurt. Celebrate St Patricks Day with Pot Gold Soup Pot 'O Gold Soup 2 tablespoons margarine 1 small onion, chopped 3 medium potatoes, cubed 1 large carrot, sliced 3 chicken bouillon cubes 1 cups low fat milk 3 cups chopped cabbage 1 cups leftover corned beef, cut into bite-size pieces In a Dutch oven, melt the margarine and cook the onion until soft. Add the potatoes, carrot slices, bouillon cubes, and just enough water to cover, and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. With a hand-held blender, puree the potatoes until smooth (or mash with a fork). Add the milk, cabbage and leftover corned beef and simmer another 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve. Wraps for kids Kids can also enjoy wrap sandwiches. Try these kid-friendly ideas: Spread some peanut butter over pita bread or flour tortilla. Add thin slices of banana, thin slices of apple, or dried fruits. Sprinkle some reduced-fat cheese on a flour tortilla and melt, then add shredded carrots, diced tomatoes, cooked beans, or diced ham.

PAGE 3

Whole Grains: Oat bran Whole wheat products Brown rice Corn tortillas When choosing wrap sandwiches in restaurants and fast foods, you want to be cautious because these sandwiches can exceed the limits of fat and calories. Follow these recommendations to keep fat and calories under control: SUPER SIZE: Many wrap sandwiches are big. Consider sharing with a friend or eat half at the restaurant and take the other half home. DRENCHED IN SAUCE: Instead of having them add the dressing or sauce when preparing the sandwich, ask for the it on the side. Use just a small amount of the sauce. Adapted from the American Institute for Cancer Research Newsletter, Spring 1998. Nutrition and Physical Activity: Partners Against Cancer The American Cancer Society has stated that approximately one-third of the 500,000 annual cancer deaths in the US are due to poor diet and lack of exercise, while another third is from cigarette smoking. This means that by making changes in lifestyle, people can reduce their risks for cancer. Read the following recommendations. Place a check mark ( T ) next to the recommendations you are willing to put into practice. Your next step will be to take ACTION! Nutrition G Choose a diet with plenty of plant sources. __Include vegetables and fruits at every meal and snack. __Choose whole grains instead of processed (refined) grains. G Limit consumption of red meats, especially those high in fat and processed. __Choose fish, poultry, and beans as an alternative to meat. __Choose lean cuts of meat and remove any visible fat. __Prepare meat by baking or broiling instead of frying. Physical activity G Engage in physical activity every day. __Adults need at least 30 minutes of physical activity on 5 or more days a week. __Children and adolescents need at least 60 minutes (1 hour) of physical activity for at least 5 days a week. Choose activities you enjoy.* < Daily chores (vacuuming, organizing closets, general lawn and garden maintenance) < Structured exercise (aerobic classes, strength training) < Sports (tennis, volleyball, basketball, golf) < Leisure activities (walking, bicycling, roller-skating, dancing) Consult with your physician before making any changes to your physical activity level. Take it easy. < Stretch and warm up before you start any exercise or physical

PAGE 4

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Family Nutrition Program: activity to keep your muscles from getting sore or injuring. Steady progress. < Start slow at first, especially if youve not been physically active at all before. Its best to do less and feel good, than to push the limits and be in pain. Always consult your doctor before increasing the intensity of any activity. Be safe. < Use the buddy-system and exercise with a friend. Exercise in safe places and wear bright colors if you are out at dusk or if you are around traffic. TV Turn Off Week is April 22-28, 2002* Did you know that . # On average, children in the US will spend more time in front of the television (1,023 hours) than in school this year (900 hours)? # Approximately 40% of Americans frequently watch television during dinner? Television keeps us connected to world events and some programs are actually educational in nature. But too much TV watching is not good. Time spent watching TV cuts into family time, affects children's ability to read and use their imaginations, and contributes to unhealthy, sedentary lifestyles. Turn Off The TV! Turning off the television gives us a chance to reconnect with our family and to participate actively in our communities. Get the family together and write an activity plan. Fill it up with TV-free activities. Here are some ideas: ) Start a journal ) Make a scrapbook or photo album ) Cook a meal with family or friends ) Play board games ) Go to the library or a local bookstore ) Start a garden ) Attend local cultural and sporting events ) Listen to music ) Sign up for a class (languages, crafts) ) Visit the zoo or local museum TV-Turnoff Week is supported by over 70 national organizations, including the American Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, National Education Association, and President's Council on Physical Fitness.