Family nutrition in action

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Family nutrition in action
Physical Description:
Serial
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Author retains all rights.
System ID:
AA00000382:00003


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




SFamily Nutrition Program

I P

o University of Florida -
O 1-888-FNP-8397


Family Nutrition In Action
Family Nutrition Program Vol. 6 No 5
September/October 2001


CHILDREN
This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding & FAMILIES
from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and
Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies.


September is National Cholesterol Education Month
Are You Cholesterol Smart?

Test how much you know about high blood cholesterol with the following
questions. Circle each true or false.


T F 1. High blood cholesterol is one of the risk factors for heart disease that
you can do something about.
T F 2. To lower your blood cholesterol level you must stop eating meat
altogether.
T F 3. Fish oil supplements are recommended to lower blood cholesterol.
T F 4. Saturated fats raise your blood cholesterol level more than anything
else in your diet.
T F 5. All vegetable oils help lower blood cholesterol levels.
T F 6. Reading food labels can help you eat the heart healthy way.


Answers to the True/False questions:

1. True. High blood cholesterol is
considered a controllable risk factor
for heart disease. High blood pressure,
cigarette smoking, diabetes, overweight,
and physical inactivity are the others.
2. False. Although some red meat is high
in saturated fat and cholesterol, you do
not need to stop eating it or any other
single food. To cut back on the amount
of saturated fat and cholesterol that you
eat choose lean cuts of meat with the fat


trimmed and watch portion sizes of
meat products.
3. False. The use of fish oil supplements
has not proven to reduce blood
cholesterol levels. However, fish is a
good food choice because it is low in
saturated fat.
4. True. Saturated fats raise your blood
cholesterol level more than anything
else. So, the best way to reduce your
cholesterol level is to cut back on the
amount of saturated fats that you eat.
These fats are found in largest
amounts in animal products such as


i,






butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream,
cream, and fatty meats. They are also
found in some vegetable oils--coconut,
palm, and palm kernel oils.
5. False. Most vegetable oils--canola,
corn, olive, safflower, soybean, and
sunflower oils--contain mostly mono-
and poly-unsaturated fats, which help
lower blood cholesterol. However, a few
vegetable oils-- coconut, palm, and palm
kernel oils--contain more saturated fat
than unsaturated fat.
6. True. Look on the nutrition label for the
amount of saturated fat, total fat,
cholesterol, and total calories in a
serving of the product. Use this
information to compare similar products.
Also, look for the list of ingredients. To
choose foods low in saturated fat or total
fat, go easy on products that list fats or
oil first, or that list many fat and oil
ingredients.

Adapted from CHECK YOUR CHOLESTEROL AND
HEART DISEASE I.Q. Prepared by the National Heart,
Lung, and Blood Institute. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service
National Institutes of Health

Simple steps to help reduce the
risk for coronary heart disease:

Know your numbers! You can find
out your total cholesterol, LDL
cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and
triglyceride numbers by having a
"lipoprotein profile" blood test. Discuss
the results with your doctor and take
steps to reduce your risk factors.


Goal for people without
coronary heart disease:
Total blood Less than 200 mg/dL*
cholesterol
LDL "bad" cholesterol Less than 130 mg/dL*
HDL "good" Greater than 35 mg/dL*
cholesterol
*Cholesterol levels are measured in milligrams (mg) of
cholesterol per deciliter (dL) of blood.


* Learn how to read a food label -
Choose foods that are low in saturated
fat and cholesterol. Low in saturated
fat means no more than 1 gram of
saturated fat per serving and low in
cholesterol means no more than 20
mg of cholesterol per serving.

* See how your weight measures
up. Obesity is a risk factor for heart
disease. Making changes toward
healthy lifestyle practices can help you
maintain or lose weight (if needed.)
Make it a goal to eat healthy and to be
physically active.

* Participate in physical activity
every day for at least 30 minutes
every day. Try low-to-moderate level
activities, such as walking, taking the
stairs instead of the elevator,
gardening, and housework. You can
also include regular aerobic activity,
such as brisk walking, swimming,
bicycling, or playing tennis. (Consult
your doctor before starting any
exercise program or increasing your
physical activity.)

For more information visit the National Heart, Lung,
and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health at
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/index.htm

October 7-13 is National Fire
Prevention Week

Practice cooking safety all year long!
Cooking is the number one cause of
residential fires. Data collected on fires has
helped identify behaviors that lead to
cooking fires.


,* *
**. .o-


rlne






These are major behaviors leading to
cooking fires:

* Unattended cooking
* Ignition of grease
* Food left on the range
* Combustible materials left on the range-
top

Simple steps to prevent cooking
fires:
* Turn it. Move pot handles away from
the edge to prevent spills.
* Keep it clear. Remove grease build-
up and flammable materials (dish cloths,
pot holders, flammable cleaners) from
the heat.
* Watch it. Keep an eye on your
cooking and stay in the kitchen.

Information from: The Association of Home Appliances
Manufacturers. Visit the National Fire Protection
Association web site at http://www.nfpa.org

Healthy Halloween in
RMW October

Halloween is known for the abundance of
tricks, treats and parties. To make sure that
you and your kids enjoy the moment, try
the following suggestions:

* Make sure the kids have a good
nutritious meal BEFORE they go out
trick or treating. With a balance of whole
grain, fruits and vegetables, meat and
dairy foods from supper in their
tummies, there won't be so much room
for empty-calorie foods like candy.


* Instead of eating all their goodies at
once, encourage children to eat a small
piece or two as desert or as a snack.
* When handing out treats, choose
healthy treats- small bags of pretzels or
popcorn, juice boxes, fresh fruit, fruit
rolls or individual sized dried fruit, like
raisins. Include non-food treats like
stickers, erasers, little glow-in-the-dark
figures or other small toys.

Parties are becoming popular. Parties are
a terrific way for children and adults in the
neighborhood to get to know each other.
They also provide a safe alternative for
fun. Consider these tips to make a party
more healthful.

* Instead of sugar drinks, try 100 percent
fruit juices in your punch.
* Serve "finger foods" that could include
baby carrots, low-fat cream cheese,
sliced almonds and salsa. Place cream
cheese on carrot tips and press in
almonds to get a literal "finger food."
* Use cookie cutters to shape
sandwiches into pumpkins, leaves,
witches and ghosts.

Information from: "Halloween Celebration Tips for
Your Children" Colorado State University
Cooperative Extension.
http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/PUBS/COL
UMNCC/cc971023.htm Web site accessed 8/30/01.


Local Family Nutrition Program:


.. ,' The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
F IOR -I'\ authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
E. XTEN N without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action Family Nutrition Program Vol. 6 No 5 September/October 2001 This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. September is National Cholesterol Education Month Are You Cholesterol Smart? Test how much you know about high blood cholesterol with the following questions. Circle each true or false. T F T F T F T F T F T F 1. High blood cholesterol is one of the risk factors for heart disease that you can do something about. 2. To lower your blood cholesterol level you must stop eating meat altogether. 3. Fish oil supplements are recommended to lower blood cholesterol. 4. Saturated fats raise your blood cholesterol level more than anything else in your diet. 5. All vegetable oils help lower blood cholesterol levels. 6. Reading food labels can help you eat the heart healthy way. Answers to the True/False questions: 1. True. High blood cholesterol is considered a controllable risk factor for heart disease. High blood pressure, cigarette smoking, diabetes, overweight, and physical inactivity are the others. 2. False. Although some red meat is high in saturated fat and cholesterol, you do not need to stop eating it or any other single food. To cut back on the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol that you eat choose lean cuts of meat with the fat trimmed and watch portion sizes of meat products. 3. False. The use of fish oil supplements has not proven to reduce blood cholesterol levels. However, fish is a good food choice because it is low in saturated fat. 4. True. Saturated fats raise your blood cholesterol level more than anything else. So, the best way to reduce your cholesterol level is to cut back on the amount of saturated fats that you eat. These fats are found in largest amounts in animal products such as

PAGE 2

butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. They are also found in some vegetable oils--coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. 5. False. Most vegetable oils--canola, corn, olive, safflower, soybean, and sunflower oils--contain mostly monoand poly-unsaturated fats, which help lower blood cholesterol. However, a few vegetable oils-coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils--contain more saturated fat than unsaturated fat. 6. True. Look on the nutrition label for the amount of saturated fat, total fat, cholesterol, and total calories in a serving of the product. Use this information to compare similar products. Also, look for the list of ingredients. To choose foods low in saturated fat or total fat, go easy on products that list fats or oil first, or that list many fat and oil ingredients. Adapted from CHECK YOUR CHOLESTEROL AND HEART DISEASE I.Q. Prepared by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health Simple steps to help reduce the risk for coronary heart disease: Know your numbers! You can find out your total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride numbers by having a lipoprotein profile blood test. Discuss the results with your doctor and take steps to reduce your risk factors. Goal for people without coronary heart disease: Total blood cholesterol Less than 200 mg/dL* LDL bad cholesterol Less than 130 mg/dL* HDL good cholesterol Greater than 35 mg/dL* *Cholesterol levels are measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dL) of blood. Learn how to read a food label Choose foods that are low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Low in saturated fat means no more than 1 gram of saturated fat per serving and low in cholesterol means no more than 20 mg of cholesterol per serving. See how your weight measures up. Obesity is a risk factor for heart disease. Making changes toward healthy lifestyle practices can help you maintain or lose weight (if needed.) Make it a goal to eat healthy and to be physically active. Participate in physical activity every day for at least 30 minutes every day. Try low-to-moderate level activities, such as walking, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, gardening, and housework. You can also include regular aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, swimming, bicycling, or playing tennis. ( Consult your doctor before starting any exercise program or increasing your physical activity.) For more information visit the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/index.htm October 7-13 is National Fire Prevention Week Practice cooking safety all year long! Cooking is the number one cause of residential fires. Data collected on fires has helped identify behaviors that lead to cooking fires.

PAGE 3

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Family Nutrition Program: These are major behaviors leading to cooking fires: Unattended cooking Ignition of grease Food left on the range Combustible materials left on the rangetop Simple steps to prevent cooking fires: Turn it. Move pot handles away from the edge to prevent spills. Keep it clear. Remove grease buildup and flammable materials (dish cloths, pot holders, flammable cleaners) from the heat. Watch it. Keep an eye on your cooking and stay in the kitchen. Information from: The Association of Home Appliances Manufacturers. Visit the National Fire Protection Association web site at http://www.nfpa.org Healthy Halloween in October Halloween is known for the abundance of tricks, treats and parties. To make sure that you and your kids enjoy the moment, try the following suggestions: Make sure the kids have a good nutritious meal BEFORE they go out trick or treating. With a balance of whole grain, fruits and vegetables, meat and dairy foods from supper in their tummies, there wont be so much room for empty-calorie foods like candy. Instead of eating all their goodies at once, encourage children to eat a small piece or two as desert or as a snack. When handing out treats, choose healthy treatssmall bags of pretzels or popcorn, juice boxes, fresh fruit, fruit rolls or individual sized dried fruit, like raisins. Include non-food treats like stickers, erasers, little glow-in-the-dark figures or other small toys. Parties are becoming popular. Parties are a terrific way for children and adults in the neighborhood to get to know each other. They also provide a safe alternative for fun. Consider these tips to make a party more healthful. Instead of sugar drinks, try 100 percent fruit juices in your punch. Serve "finger foods" that could include baby carrots, low-fat cream cheese, sliced almonds and salsa. Place cream cheese on carrot tips and press in almonds to get a literal "finger food." Use cookie cutters to shape sandwiches into pumpkins, leaves, witches and ghosts. Information from: Halloween Celebration Tips for Your Children Colorado State University Cooperative Extension. http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/PUBS/COL UMNCC/cc971023.htm Web site accessed 8/30/01.