Family nutrition in action

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SFamily Nutrition Program



o. I
o University of Florida -'
0 1-888-FNP-8397


Family Nutrition In Action
Family Nutrition Program Vol. 6 No 4
July/August 2001


SFLORIDADEPARTMENTOF
CHILDREN
This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding T & FAMILIES
from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and
Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies.


July is
National Ice
Cream Month


Ice cream is everyone's favorite summer
treat for snacks or desserts, but you need
to read labels and choose carefully to
avoid going over your fat and calorie
budget.

Here are three tips to help you enjoy your
favorite treat without the guilt:

1. Choose fat-free ice cream or frozen
yogurt over regular ice cream and save
100 calories per V2 cup.

2. Light ice creams have about half the
fat as their regular counterparts.

3. Go easy on toppings or see our
suggestions for fresh fruit combinations
below. Toppings can add a significant
amount of calories to ice cream. Two
tablespoons of most toppings contain
around 100 calories.


Healthy Topping Ideas

Fresh fruit is always
your best bet for a / ^,
delicious, healthy /,.
ice cream topping.
Pick from the following:


* Fresh strawberries
* Peaches mixed with fresh raspberries
* Kiwi and mango slices
* Fresh cherries
* Blueberries and blackberries
* Sliced apricots

Ice Cream Label Terms:

* Low-fat: 3 grams or less fat per serving
* Light: 50% less fat than the brand's regular
ice cream
S Ice Milk: Can mean low-fat or light
S Nonfat: Less than 0.5 grams of fat per
serving
S No sugar added: Neither ice cream nor add-
ins can be sweetened with sugar; can use
artificial sweeteners. This does not mean
sugar free or calorie free.


These tips are from the July/August 2000 issue of
C. ii,,,,m, .... r,, Food for Health Newsletter.










__' Preserving your

Summer Harvest
4-^
Don't let your surplus of
summer produce go to waste.
By freezing fresh fruits and vegetables in
their peak, you can enjoy the taste of
summer all year long.

Blanching Vegetables and Fruits

Blanching produce before freezing helps
keep the texture and color of fresh fruits
and vegetables by stopping the active
enzymes that promote ripening.

How to blanch ...
* Boil water and immerse
fruit or vegetable in the
water for roughly one to
three minutes..
* Remove from boiling
water and immediately
plunge into ice water to
stop the cooking process.
* Dry the blanched produce completely
before freezing.

Vegetables that can be frozen: asparagus,
corn, green beans, lima beans, peas and
summer squash.
* Add still-frozen vegetables to soups
and stews in the last few minutes of
cooking.






~CIfL3


Fruits that can be frozen: blueberries,
cherries, melons, peaches and raspberries.
Bananas and pears do not freeze too well
because they'll lose texture.
* Thawed, frozen fruits are softer than
fresh, so they work well in sauces,
chutneys, pies, crisps and quick breads


Tips for Flawless Freezing

1. Wash produce thoroughly. Be gentle with
fragile fruits like berries.

2. Dry completely on several layers of paper
towels.

3. Slice whole fruits and vegetables into
wedges. Toss sliced or chopped peaches,
apples and pears with ascorbic acid
powder (available at most grocery stores)
before freezing to keep them from
discoloring. Sprinkle blackberries,
cherries and peaches with a little
granulated sugar before freezing to help
maintain their texture.

4. Spread produce out on baking sheets and
freeze until firm.

5. Once frozen, transfer fruits and
vegetables to zip-top bags or sealed
containers.

6. Store frozen produce up to nine months.

7. Thaw in the refrigerator for six hours, or at
room temperature for three hours.


From: American Institute for Cancer Research
NEWSLETTER, Summer 2001, Issue 72.






Kids a Comer


NATIONAL LEAD POISONING
PREVENTION WEEK

Lead poisoning is a health problem that
can be completely prevented. However,
nearly one million children living in the
United States have lead levels in their
blood that are high enough to cause
irreversible damage to their health.

FACT: Lead exposure can harm young
children and babies, even before they are
born.
FACT: Even children that seem healthy can
have high levels of lead in their bodies.
FACT: People can get lead in their bodies
by breathing or swallowing lead dust, or by
eating soil or paint chips with lead in them.

Babies and young children
are at a greater risk for lead
poisoning because they often
put their hands and other C '
objects in their mouths and
these objects can have lead
dust on them. Also, their growing bodies
absorb more lead.

Children's developing brains and nervous
systems are very sensitive to the damaging
effects of lead. Some of the effects of lead
poisoning include:


slow growth and short stature
learning disabilities
behavioral problems
mental retardation


Very high blood lead levels can lead to
seizures, coma and even death.

What every parent could do to
protect their children from lead
poisoning:

* Visit the health department or
pediatrician to have your children
tested for lead.


* Wash children's hands,
bottles, pacifiers, and
toys often.
* Get your home
checked for lead
hazards (paint,
plumbing).
* Regularly clean floors, window sills,
and other surfaces.

Encourage healthy eating habits.
Eating nutrient-rich
foods at meal time
and snack time could
make it harder for
lead to hurt your
child. Lead is easily
absorbed in an empty MllK "
stomach, and regular
meals are important
to prevent the child from having an empty
stomach. In addition to healthy grains,
fruits, and vegetables, meals should
include calcium-rich foods (milk, cheese,
yogurt, corn tortillas, or tofu) and iron-rich
foods (meat, chicken, iron-fortified cereals,
legumes, and raisins).

Back to School in

August

Vacation time is almost
over. It's time to get the
kids ready for school. Ask
the principal or the teacher
to see if your children
could qualify for free or reduced price
school lunches at school. The USDA
National School Lunch Program provides
nutritious lunches. Participating schools
offer: meat or meat alternate, bread or
bread alternate, milk and two fruits and/or
vegetables.







Did you know that children who
buy a hot lunch at school generally
have a more nutritious lunch than
those who take their lunch?



If you choose to pack a school lunch
box, here are some suggestions:

* Your child can help
you buy the food and
prepare his/her lunch.
* Keep sandwiches
simple- sliced turkey rather than
turkey salad-if your child doesn't like
mixtures.
* Select and prepare foods that are
appropriate for your child's age (slices
of fresh fruits for younger children,
whole fruits for older children).
* To add variety, offer foods in different
shapes and textures of food.
* It will not hurt to include one of your
child's favorite foods even if it has
more sugars, salt or fat.


Brown Bag Lunches

Grownups going to work
also need to plan their
lunches. Here are some
ideas of breads and fillings
that will add variety to
your sandwiches:


EN


Breads: whole-wheat bread, multi-grain,
potato, cinnamon, onion, oatmeal, raisin,
herb-bread

Fillings (mayonnaise-type fillings must be
kept refrigerated):

Water-packed tuna or leftover cooked fish,
flaked mixed with:
a thickened herb-seasoned tomato
sauce
chopped raw vegetables and plain
low-fat yogurt or lite mayonnaise

Chopped cooked lean meat or poultry
mixed with:
shredded cabbage, minced onion,
and plain low-fat yogurt, seasoned
with cayenne pepper
cottage cheese and chopped raw
vegetables seasoned with chili
powder and dry mustard

Mashed cooked dry beans flavored with:
chopped garlic and onions, parsley,
rosemary, thyme and pepper
chopped cooked lean pork, celery,
onions, and plain low-fat yogurt

Sandwich Safety

* Use an insulated lunch box or bag to
keep chilled foods cold.
* Use chilled ingredients for making
sandwiches.
* Put your sandwich in the refrigerator
until lunchtime.


Local Family Nutrition Program:


S.' ''1. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
S I authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
E X T ENSIO, O ,,N without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action Family Nutrition Program Vol. 6 No 4 July/August 2001 This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. July is National Ice Cream Month Ice cream is everyones favorite summer treat for snacks or desserts, but you need to read labels and choose carefully to avoid going over your fat and calorie budget. Here are three tips to help you enjoy your favorite treat without the guilt: 1. Choose fat-free ice cream or frozen yogurt over regular ice cream and save 100 calories per cup. 2. Light ice creams have about half the fat as their regular counterparts. 3. Go easy on toppings or see our suggestions for fresh fruit combinations below. Toppings can add a significant amount of calories to ice cream. Two tablespoons of most toppings contain around 100 calories. Healthy Topping Ideas Fresh fruit is always your best bet for a delicious, healthy ice cream topping. Pick from the following: Fresh strawberries Peaches mixed with fresh raspberries Kiwi and mango slices Fresh cherries Blueberries and blackberries Sliced apricots Ice Cream Label Terms: Low-fat: 3 grams or less fat per serving Light: 50% less fat than the brands regular ice cream Ice Milk: Can mean low-fat or light Nonfat: Less than 0.5 grams of fat per serving No sugar added: Neither ice cream nor addins can be sweetened with sugar; can use artificial sweeteners. This does not mean sugar free or calorie free. These tips are from the July/August 2000 issue of Communicating Food for Health Newsletter

PAGE 2

Tips for Flawless Freezing 1. Wash produce thoroughly. Be gentle with fragile fruits like berries. 2. Dry completely on several layers of paper towels. 3. Slice whole fruits and vegetables into wedges. Toss sliced or chopped peaches, apples and pears with ascorbic acid powder (available at most grocery stores) before freezing to keep them from discoloring. Sprinkle blackberries, cherries and peaches with a little granulated sugar before freezing to help maintain their texture. 4. Spread produce out on baking sheets and freeze until firm. 5. Once frozen, transfer fruits and vegetables to zip-top bags or sealed containers. 6. Store frozen produce up to nine months. 7. Thaw in the refrigerator for six hours, or at room temperature for three hours. Preserving your Summer Harvest Dont let your surplus of summer produce go to waste. By freezing fresh fruits and vegetables in their peak, you can enjoy the taste of summer all year long. Blanching Vegetables and Fruits Blanching produce before freezing helps keep the texture and color of fresh fruits and vegetables by stopping the active enzymes that promote ripening. How to blanch . Boil water and immerse fruit or vegetable in the water for roughly one to three minutes. Remove from boiling water and immediately plunge into ice water to stop the cooking process. Dry the blanched produce completely before freezing. Vegetables that can be frozen: asparagus, corn, green beans, lima beans, peas and summer squash. Add still-frozen vegetables to soups and stews in the last few minutes of cooking. Fruits that can be frozen: blueberries, cherries, melons, peaches and raspberries. Bananas and pears do not freeze too well because theyll lose texture. Thawed, frozen fruits are softer than fresh, so they work well in sauces, chutneys, pies, crisps and quick breads From: American Institute for Cancer Research NEWSLETTER, Summer 2001, Issue 72.

PAGE 3

NATIONAL LEAD POISONING PREVENTION WEEK Lead poisoning is a health problem that can be completely prevented. However, nearly one million children living in the United States have lead levels in their blood that are high enough to cause irreversible damage to their health. FACT : Lead exposure can harm young children and babies, even before they are born. FACT : Even children that seem healthy can have high levels of lead in their bodies. FACT : People can get lead in their bodies by breathing or swallowing lead dust, or by eating soil or paint chips with lead in them. Babies and young children are at a greater risk for lead poisoning because they often put their hands and other objects in their mouths and these objects can have lead dust on them. Also, their growing bodies absorb more lead. Childrens developing brains and nervous systems are very sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. Some of the effects of lead poisoning include: slow growth and short stature learning disabilities behavioral problems mental retardation Very high blood lead levels can lead to seizures, coma and even death. What every parent could do to protect their children from lead poisoning: Visit the health department or pediatrician to have your children tested for lead. Wash childrens hands, bottles, pacifiers, and toys often. Get your home checked for lead hazards (paint, plumbing). Regularly clean floors, window sills, and other surfaces. Encourage healthy eating habits. Eating nutrient-rich foods at meal time and snack time could make it harder for lead to hurt your child. Lead is easily absorbed in an empty stomach, and regular meals are important to prevent the child from having an empty stomach. In addition to healthy grains, fruits, and vegetables, meals should include calcium-rich foods (milk, cheese, yogurt, corn tortillas, or tofu) and iron-rich foods (meat, chicken, iron-fortified cereals, legumes, and raisins). Back to School in August Vacation time is almost over. Its time to get the kids ready for school. Ask the principal or the teacher to see if your children could qualify for free or reduced price school lunches at school. The USDA National School Lunch Program provides nutritious lunches. Participating schools offer: meat or meat alternate, bread or bread alternate, milk and two fruits and/or vegetables.

PAGE 4

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Family Nutrition Program: Did you know that children who buy a hot lunch at school generally have a more nutritious lunch than those who take their lunch? If you choose to pack a school lunch box, here are some suggestions: Your child can help you buy the food and prepare his/her lunch. Keep sandwiches simple sliced turkey rather than turkey saladif your child doesnt like mixtures. Select and prepare foods that are appropriate for your childs age (slices of fresh fruits for younger children, whole fruits for older children). To add variety, offer foods in different shapes and textures of food. It will not hurt to include one of your childs favorite foods even if it has more sugars, salt or fat. Brown Bag Lunches Grownups going to work also need to plan their lunches. Here are some ideas of breads and fillings that will add variety to your sandwiches: Breads : whole-wheat bread, multi-grain, potato, cinnamon, onion, oatmeal, raisin, herb-bread Fillings (mayonnaise-type fillings must be kept refrigerated): Water-packed tuna or leftover cooked fish, flaked mixed with: T a thickened herb-seasoned tomato sauce T chopped raw vegetables and plain low-fat yogurt or lite mayonnaise Chopped cooked lean meat or poultry mixed with: T shredded cabbage, minced onion, and plain low-fat yogurt, seasoned with cayenne pepper T cottage cheese and chopped raw vegetables seasoned with chili powder and dry mustard Mashed cooked dry beans flavored with: T chopped garlic and onions, parsley, rosemary, thyme and pepper T chopped cooked lean pork, celery, onions, and plain low-fat yogurt Sandwich Safety Use an insulated lunch box or bag to keep chilled foods cold. Use chilled ingredients for making sandwiches. Put your sandwich in the refrigerator until lunchtime.