Family nutrition in action

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Family nutrition in action
Physical Description:
Serial
Creation Date:
May 2001

Subjects

Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Author retains all rights.
System ID:
AA00000382:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




Family Nutrition Program



Cal
o University of Florida ,
o 1-888-FNP-8397 o


Family Nutrition In Action
Family Nutrition Program Vol. 6 No. 3
May/June 2001


1 FLORIDADEPARTMENTOF
CHILDREN
This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding & FAMILIES
from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and
Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies.


09 May is National
Osteoporosis
Prevention Month

Osteoporosis, or brittle
bone disease, affects millions of Americans
every year. Osteoporosis makes bones
weak and susceptible to fractures. The first
step in prevention is to identify if you are
at risk for developing osteoporosis. Think
about the following questions that relate to
risk factors for osteoporosis.

How old are you? As one grows
older, the bones become weaker
and less dense.
Are you a female? Women have a
higher risk for developing
osteoporosis because they have
less bone mass.
Do you have a family member that
has osteoporosis or weak bones?
Osteoporosis is not hereditary, but
the susceptibility to fractures can
be.
What is your race? Caucasian and
Asian women are more likely to
develop osteoporosis.


What type of body structure do
you have? Small-boned and thin
women (under 127 pounds) are at
greater risk for osteoporosis.
Have you been through
menopause? Normal or early
menopause increases the risk of
developing osteoporosis.

There are also lifestyle practices that can
affect bone density increasing the chance
of bone weakening. Cigarette smoking,
drinking too much alcohol, consuming an
inadequate amount of calcium, or physical
inactivity increases the chances of
developing osteoporosis.

Tips for building strong bones.

Cut back on salt. Salt causes more
calcium to be lost in the urine.
Cut back on coffee and soft drinks.
The caffeine in these products can
promote calcium loss. Limit coffee
to not more than 2 cups per day.
Get the majority of your protein
from vegetable sources. Excess
animal protein (meats) causes an
increase in calcium loss.
Get plenty of calcium and
vitamin D.









Calcium-rich Vitamin D-rich
foods foods

Dairy products: Fish: herring,
milk, cheese and salmon, sardines,
yogurt shrimp

Fortified soy foods, Fortified cow's
orange juice, and milk
cereals

Collards and turnip Fortified breakfast
greens cereals

And don't forget that regular exercise
plays an important part in building strong
bones. Two types of exercises are
important for bone health: weight-bearing
and resistance exercises. Jogging, walking,
stair climbing, dancing and soccer are
examples of weight-bearing exercises.
Weight lifting is considered a resistance
exercise. Every day physical activity
combines both types of exercise and helps
build strong bones.

For more information visit the National
Osteoporosis Foundation website
http://www.nof org

National Physical Fitness
and Sports Month
Being physically active every day not only
gives you more energy
and helps you manage
your weight. It can help
decrease the chance of
developing heart disease,
high blood pressure
(hypertension), and type 2
diabetes. Other benefits of
physical activity include:


Decrease blood pressure in people
with hypertension.
Improve bone health and flexibility.


Reach the goal of at least 30 minutes of
physical activity every day!!


* Lower anxiety and stress.


Advice for Adults and Older Adults:
Being physically active can be part of the
daily routine or it can be more structured.
Physical activity can improve strength and
flexibility. This is especially of benefit for
older adults because it can help them
reduce the chance of falling and breaking
bones. People that have been sedentary,
are frail or have health
problems need to visit their
health care provider before
starting any exercise
program or vigorous
activity.
* Go out for a walk during your
lunch break.
* Take up gardening, bowling, or
join a neighborhood walking club.
* Clean your house to the rhythm of
lively music.
* Carry your groceries.
* Go up the steps instead of using
the elevator.
Advice for Youth: Limit passive
activities such as watching TV and playing
video and computer games. Be active for
at least 1 hour every day.
Play actively during school recess.
Play tag with your friends.
* Walk, skip, or run.









Food Allergy Awareness takes
place in May.


What is a food allergy?
Food allergy is a reaction of the body's
defense system to something in a food or
an ingredient in a food. Even though we
think food allergies are common, only 1 to
2 % of adults and 5 to 8% of children
have a true food allergy. This condition
should be diagnosed by a board-certified
allergist.


Which foods cause reactions in
people with food allergies?
More than 90% of all food allergic
reactions are caused by these foods:


* milk


* eggs


* peanuts


* tree nuts soy wheat
* fish shellfish



Treatment includes eliminating the
offensive food from the diet. Eliminating
the offensive food without taking special
care to consume other foods that provide
similar nutrients can cause an imbalanced
diet. A registered dietitian (RD) can assist
in planning meals that meet the nutritional
needs and personal preferences of the
individual.


Reading ingredient lists on food labels is
very important because some of these
foods are added to processed foods.
Peanut butter is used as a "glue" to hold
together egg rolls; some
low-fat peanut butter and
some hot dogs have soy;
most egg substitutes are
made of egg whites.


What are the symptoms of food
allergies?
Food allergy symptoms vary from
individual to individual. Common
symptoms include swelling, hives, skin
rash, stomach cramps, nausea and
vomiting, sneezing, runny nose, and
trouble breathing. Some food allergic
reactions can be life threatening, causing
an anaphylactic situation that needs
medical attention, immediately!


For additional information contact:
The Food Allergy Network
http://www.foodallergy. org
International Food Information Council
http://ificinfo.health. org


Fresh Fruit and Vegetable
Month in June


If you are wondering
why health officials
continue to 44
encourage people to
eat a lot of fruits and
vegetables, take a look at some good
reasons for eating at least 5 servings of
fruits and vegetables:
1. Prevent Cancer. Fruits and
vegetables are rich in antioxidants
and phytochemicals. These are
groups of natural substances that
protect the body cells from harmful
cancer-causing substances.
2. Prevent Heart Disease. Fruits
and vegetables are rich in soluble
fiber which helps lower blood
cholesterol. The antioxidants and
phytochemicals in these foods can
help prevent fat build-up that clogs
blood vessels. For a healthy heart









choose a diet rich in fruits and
vegetables while limiting high-fat
meats and dairy products.
3. Bring Blood Pressure Down.
People that have high blood
pressure benefit from low-salt diets
and weight management. It seems
that the potassium and magnesium
found in fruits and vegetables also
play a role in controlling blood
pressure.
4. Love Your Eyes. Eating fruits and
vegetables rich in vitamin C and
carotenoids can lower the risk of
developing cataracts or macular
degeneration. These two are the
major causes of blindness in
Americans.
5. Help for Diabetes. The fiber in
fruits and vegetables can slow the
absorption of sugar into the blood.
The body can handle better the
slow rise of blood sugar. Even
though fruits and vegetables have
carbohydrates, they seem to raise
blood sugar very little.
Source of information: American Institute for
Cancer Research Newsletter, Issue 65, Fall 1999.


* Select fresh fruits and vegetables at
different ripeness levels ... some ready
to eat immediately and some ready in
3-4 days.
* Add one new fruit or
vegetable to your shopping -j
cart each week.





Extra nutritious fruits and
vegetables:
Fruits and vegetables give us a variety of
nutrients needed for good health. There


are some, though, that are extra nutritious
because they give us several of those
nutrients in one crunchy, juicy bite!


Rich in all three: vitamin A, vitamin
C, and fiber:


Bok choy cabbage
Broccoli
Cantaloupe


Greens
Spinach
Tomato


Pick brightly colored fruits
and vegetables in dark
greens, oranges, yellows,
reds, and purples. These
,I- have more good-for-you
nutrients than their less
colorful counterparts.


Rainbow Pasta Salad (Serves 6) '
Cooked macaroni ............. 3 cups
Red onion, chopped ........... V2 cup
Tomato, chopped ............. 2 cups
Red or green bell pepper, chopped 1 cup
Cooked black beans ........... 1 cup


Cooked corn .................


1 cup


Vinegar .................... 1 Tbsp
Black pepper ................ to taste
Italian seasoning ............... 2 tsp
Combine all ingredients in large mixing
bowl. Refrigerate until ready to serve, up
to 24 hours. Optional garnish: sprinkle
with Parmesan.


Each 1 V4 cup serving: 182 calories, 1.5 g
fat, 5 g fiber.
(Source: Communicating Food for Health, July/
August 2000)










Kids Comer

With kids spending more time playing outside this summer, make sure they
drink often to keep their bodies hydrated. Offer milk, fruit juices, and water
as sources of liquids. Water is the best thirst-quencher, while milk and fruit
juices are packed with nutrients that growing children need.


Fruit juices are nutritious and taste good, which makes it easier to over-
consume. Too much juice, like too much of any food, can throw children's diets off balance
and lead to some problems like:


Poor appetite because of filling up with juice while crowding out
other foods.
SUnnecessary weight gain due to excessive calories from large
amounts of juice.
S Intestinal problems (cramps, diarrhea) because of the sorbitol in
some types of juices. Sorbitol is a type of sugar that cannot be
absorbed by the gut. Prune juice and pear juice have sorbitol.


The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that fruit juice should provide no
more than half of a child's daily fruit needs. Children under 4 years need 2 servings of fruit
every day. Older children need up to 4 servings.

One fruit serving = 6 ounces of fruit juice
/2 cup of chunks of whole or canned fruit


Offer your child 4 to 8 ounces of fruits juice a day, in addition to a variety of fresh
and canned fruits.
Offer juice only in a cup and as part of meals or snacks.
If children are thirsty in between meals, offer only water.
Source of information: USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine.
Website accessed on 5/22/01.


Local Family Nutrition Program:



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
[ L R A .authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function
,E X TE NSIi N without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Family Nutrition In Action Family Nutrition Program Vol. 6 No. 3 May/June 2001 This program is brought to you thanks to the support in funding from the Florida Department of Children and Families and USDA Food and Nutrition Services, in collaboration with state, county, and local agencies. May is National Osteoporosis Prevention Month Osteoporosis, or brittle bone disease, affects millions of Americans every year. Osteoporosis makes bones weak and susceptible to fractures. The first step in prevention is to identify if you are at risk for developing osteoporosis. Think about the following questions that relate to risk factors for osteoporosis. How old are you? As one grows older, the bones become weaker and less dense. Are you a female? Women have a higher risk for developing osteoporosis because they have less bone mass. Do you have a family member that has osteoporosis or weak bones? Osteoporosis is not hereditary, but the susceptibility to fractures can be. What is your race? Caucasian and Asian women are more likely to develop osteoporosis. What type of body structure do you have? Small-boned and thin women (under 127 pounds) are at greater risk for osteoporosis. Have you been through menopause? Normal or early menopause increases the risk of developing osteoporosis. There are also lifestyle practices that can affect bone density increasing the chance of bone weakening. Cigarette smoking, drinking too much alcohol, consuming an inadequate amount of calcium, or physical inactivity increases the chances of developing osteoporosis. Tips for building strong bones. Cut back on salt. Salt causes more calcium to be lost in the urine. Cut back on coffee and soft drinks. The caffeine in these products can promote calcium loss. Limit coffee to not more than 2 cups per day. Get the majority of your protein from vegetable sources. Excess animal protein (meats) causes an increase in calcium loss. Get plenty of calcium and vitamin D.

PAGE 2

Calcium-rich foods Vitamin D-rich foods Dairy products: milk, cheese and yogurt Fish: herring, salmon, sardines, shrimp Fortified soy foods, orange juice, and cereals Fortified cows milk Collards and turnip greens Fortified breakfast cereals And dont forget that regular exercise plays an important part in building strong bones. Two types of exercises are important for bone health: weight-bearing and resistance exercises. Jogging, walking, stair climbing, dancing and soccer are examples of weight-bearing exercises. Weight lifting is considered a resistance exercise. Every day physical activity combines both types of exercise and helps build strong bones. For more information visit the National Osteoporosis Foundation website http://www.nof.org National Physical Fitness and Sports Month Being physically active every day not only gives you more energy and helps you manage your weight. It can help decrease the chance of developing heart disease, high blood pressure (hypertension), and type 2 diabetes. Other benefits of physical activity include: Decrease blood pressure in people with hypertension. Improve bone health and flexibility. Lower anxiety and stress. Advice for Adults and Older Adults: Being physically active can be part of the daily routine or it can be more structured. Physical activity can improve strength and flexibility. This is especially of benefit for older adults because it can help them reduce the chance of falling and breaking bones. People that have been sedentary, are frail or have health problems need to visit their health care provider before starting any exercise program or vigorous activity. T Go out for a walk during your lunch break. T Take up gardening, bowling, or join a neighborhood walking club. T Clean your house to the rhythm of lively music. T Carry your groceries. T Go up the steps instead of using the elevator. Advice for Youth: Limit passive activities such as watching TV and playing video and computer games. Be active for at least 1 hour every day. T Play actively during school recess. T Play tag with your friends. T Walk, skip, or run. Reach the goal of at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day!!

PAGE 3

Food Allergy Awareness takes place in May. What is a food allergy? Food allergy is a reaction of the bodys defense system to something in a food or an ingredient in a food. Even though we think food allergies are common, only 1 to 2 % of adults and 5 to 8% of children have a true food allergy. This condition should be diagnosed by a board-certified allergist. Which foods cause reactions in people with food allergies? More than 90% of all food allergic reactions are caused by these foods: milk eggs peanuts tree nuts soy wheat fish shellfish Treatment includes eliminating the offensive food from the diet. Eliminating the offensive food without taking special care to consume other foods that provide similar nutrients can cause an imbalanced diet. A registered dietitian (RD) can assist in planning meals that meet the nutritional needs and personal preferences of the individual. Reading ingredient lists on food labels is very important because some of these foods are added to processed foods. Peanut butter is used as a glue to hold together egg rolls; some low-fat peanut butter and some hot dogs have soy; most egg substitutes are made of egg whites. What are the symptoms of food allergies? Food allergy symptoms vary from individual to individual. Common symptoms include swelling, hives, skin rash, stomach cramps, nausea and vomiting, sneezing, runny nose, and trouble breathing. Some food allergic reactions can be life threatening, causing an anaphylactic situation that needs medical attention, immediately! For additional information contact: The Food Allergy Network http://www.foodallergy.org International Food Information Council http://ificinfo.health.org Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month in June If you are wondering why health officials continue to encourage people to eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, take a look at some good reasons for eating at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables: 1. Prevent Cancer. Fruits and vegetables are rich in antioxidants and phytochemicals. These are groups of natural substances that protect the body cells from harmful cancer-causing substances. 2. Prevent Heart Disease. Fruits and vegetables are rich in soluble fiber which helps lower blood cholesterol. The antioxidants and phytochemicals in these foods can help prevent fat build-up that clogs blood vessels. For a healthy heart

PAGE 4

choose a diet rich in fruits and vegetables while limiting high-fat meats and dairy products. 3. Bring Blood Pressure Down. People that have high blood pressure benefit from low-salt diets and weight management. It seems that the potassium and magnesium found in fruits and vegetables also play a role in controlling blood pressure. 4. Love Your Eyes. Eating fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C and carotenoids can lower the risk of developing cataracts or macular degeneration. These two are the major causes of blindness in Americans. 5. Help for Diabetes. The fiber in fruits and vegetables can slow the absorption of sugar into the blood. The body can handle better the slow rise of blood sugar. Even though fruits and vegetables have carbohydrates, they seem to raise blood sugar very little. Source of information: American Institute for Cancer Research Newsletter, Issue 65, Fall 1999. Select fresh fruits and vegetables at different ripeness levels ... some ready to eat immediately and some ready in 3-4 days. Add one new fruit or vegetable to your shopping cart each week. Extra nutritious fruits and vegetables: Fruits and vegetables give us a variety of nutrients needed for good health. There are some, though, that are extra nutritious because they give us several of those nutrients in one crunchy, juicy bite! Rich in all three: vitamin A, vitamin C, and fiber: Bok choy cabbage Greens Broccoli Spinach Cantaloupe Tomato Pick brightly colored fruits and vegetables in dark greens, oranges, yellows, reds, and purples. These have more good-for-you nutrients than their less colorful counterparts. Rainbow Pasta Salad (Serves 6) Cooked macaroni ............. 3 cups Red onion, chopped ........... cup Tomato, chopped ............. 2 cups Red or green bell pepper, chopped 1 cup Cooked black beans ........... 1 cup Cooked corn ................. 1 cup Vinegar .................... 1 Tbsp Black pepper ................ to taste Italian seasoning ............... 2 tsp Combine all ingredients in large mixing bowl. Refrigerate until ready to serve, up to 24 hours. Optional garnish: sprinkle with Parmesan. Each 1 cup serving: 182 calories, 1.5 g fat, 5 g fiber. (Source: Communicating Food for Health, July/ August 2000)

PAGE 5

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, Florida A. & M. UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING. Local Family Nutrition Program: With kids spending more time playing outside this summer, make sure they drink often to keep their bodies hydrated. Offer milk, fruit juices, and water as sources of liquids. Water is the best thirst-quencher, while milk and fruit juices are packed with nutrients that growing children need. Fruit juices are nutritious and taste good, which makes it easier to overconsume. Too much juice, like too much of any food, can throw childrens diets off balance and lead to some problems like: Poor appetite because of filling up with juice while crowding out other foods. Unnecessary weight gain due to excessive calories from large amounts of juice. Intestinal problems (cramps, diarrhea) because of the sorbitol in some types of juices. Sorbitol is a type of sugar that cannot be absorbed by the gut. Prune juice and pear juice have sorbitol. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that fruit juice should provide no more than half of a childs daily fruit needs. Children under 4 years need 2 servings of fruit every day. Older children need up to 4 servings. Offer your child 4 to 8 ounces of fruits juice a day, in addition to a variety of fresh and canned fruits. Offer juice only in a cup and as part of meals or snacks. If children are thirsty in between meals, offer only water. Source of information: USDA/ARS Childrens Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine. Website accessed on 5/22/01. One fruit serving = 6 ounces of fruit juice cup of chunks of whole or canned fruit