Zionist record

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Material Information

Title:
Zionist record the organ of South African Jewry
Distinctive title:
50th anniversary of the South African Zionist Federation, December 11, 1898-1948, and the fortieth anniversary of the Zionist Record, November 15, 1908-1948
Zionist Record Golden Jubilee, 1908-1958 : November 21, 1958 supplement
Physical Description:
v. : illus., ports. ; 38-44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Johannesburg
Frequency:
weekly[apr. 22, 1949-]
weekly[ former ]
semiweekly[ former -apr. 13, 1949]
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jews in Africa, South -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
South Africa

Record Information

Source Institution:
Judaica Collections at UF
Holding Location:
Judaica Newspapers
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33316494
lccn - sn 94094834
Classification:
lcc - Microfilm 01616
System ID:
AA00000372:00002

Full Text


























'4


Supplement to the Zionist Record of
aoid o0emr6e, 21, 19S8


I i

ov


Vol. XIA, (50) No. 1790.


po, 6
0 04 0





STIHE ZIONIST I RECOMI, FRIDAY, NOVE.NMBEI, 21, 1058.





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Zionist


313 Zionist Centre,
84 De Villiers Street,
Johannesburg


GOLDEN JUBILEE 1908-1958
SUPPLEMENT TO ZIONIST RECORD. NOVEMBER 21. 1958


Telegrams: "Kadimah'"
Telephone 22-2903
P.O. Box 150


Table of Contents


The Zionist Record and its Mission
by C. Gershater .. .. .. .. .
South Africa 50 Years Ago by Karl
Lemeer . .. .. .. .. . .
From Our Album .... ... 6,
Message from Mr. Ben Gurion .
Zionist Federation Today by A.
Mureinik . . . . . ....
Milestones of the Record . . .
Sarah Gertrude Millin . . . .
Then and Now by G. Saron ....
Cartoons . . . . . . . .
The Jewish Brigade by Ted R. Lurie
David Dainow by Edgar Bernstein
Chaim Joffe and L. Policansky .
First Editor of Zionist Record by A.
Abrahams . . . . . . ...
The Beilis Case by M. Harris . .
Zionist Office by Birdie Cohen ..
When We Were Young by D.
Goitein . . . . . . .
A Share of the Credit by Jack
Alexander . . . . . .
I Covered the Dachau Story by S. J.
Goldsmith . . . . . .


Page 1
Quite a Family Affair by Naomi
3 Sherr .. .. .. . . . . .
Jewish Population Has Trebled by


5
93
1
1
2
2
3
7
8
9
11


Chief Rabbi Professor L. I.
Rabinowitz . .. . . . .
Two Pioneer Journalists by S. A.
Rochlin .. .. .. . . . .
Benzion S. Hersch . . . . .
My Career by Percy Baneshik ....
Women's Zionist Work by Sarah
Leftwich . . . . . . .
New Type of Leader by Max
Melamet . . . . . . .
London Associations by Jacob
Hodess . . . . . . . .


Proofs and Scoops by Isaac Kriel ..
12 When Smuts Had His Doubts ....
13 Woolf Senior .. ........ . ..
14 Industrial Revolution by Marcus
Arkin . . . . . . . .
15 I Was the Office Boy by S. Hirsch-
mann . . . . . . .
17 Die Joodse Bydrae deur Abraham
Rosen . .. . . . ..
19 Tribute from a Famous Editor ....


Page


Cover design by Ernest Ullman.
'lil -i'lfll i[,l l -ll~ ll l 1lllilllllllll hllllllll l ,illlllll lllllll lllil l,'llllliIM!!! 1111',ll! llil!!!!:! L!! i!! i11!1!! II! III! l! il!!^! 11!!! 1iilll!! l!! tl! ill!!!


Page


The Oudtshoorn Story by, Monty
21 Mann .... .. ...... .... .. 48
They Shone Like Diamonds by C. B.
Harris .. .. .. .. .. .. 51, 101
25 Looking Back by Frieda Winokur 57
The J.N.F. Club .. .. .. .. .. 67
27 Jews and Music by Jerry Idelson .. 68
29 Jews and Theatre by Annie Shulman 69
30 Youth Movements by Chaim Rosen-
berg . . . . . . . .. 75
31 Anglo-Saxon Pioneers by Fay Doron 77
Aunt Rachel . ........ ...... 79
33 The Growth of Johannesburg ... 80
35 Architecture of Johannesburg by
35 H. Le Roith .. .. .. ...... 84
38 Thirty-five Synagogues by Rabbi J.
39 Newman ... .. .. .. .. 85
40 An Editor of the Pre-Aspirin Age
by W. Stone ........ .... 87
41 The Yiddish Supplement by S. J.
Judelowitz .. ...... .... 89
42 First Steps in Education by R.
Misheiker .. ...... ..... 91
45 Jewish Periodicals in South Africa
47 by J. A. Poliva ...... .. 97


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIiIIIIiIIIIIIIIIiIIII I


MESSAGES AND GREETINGS O


INTERVIEWS WITH ZIONIST


AND COMMUNAL PIONEERS.


ji


CONGRA TULA TE
the

JEWISH COMMUNITY
on


FIFTY


years of


progress


EVERYTHING FOR THE HOME
we extend our warmest greetings

to the Zionist Record

on its

50th Anniversary
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Record


[lllll ll lll ll llllll lll lll llll l llllHl lll llllll lll lllll lllllll llllllllll lllll ll; lllll r




Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


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PAGE I






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


The arrival in South Africa, In February 1932, of Dr.
Chaim Weizmann was the crowning culmination of a
series of visits of Zionist dignitaries during the inter-
war period and indicated the high position occupied


by South African Jewry in the Zionist movement.
Picture shows left to right: Sitting: A. I. Miller, Lazar
Braudo, Dr. Chaim Weizmann, Chief Rabbi Dr. J. L.
Landau, Dr. Vera' Weizmann, Alexander Goldsteiff
(who accompanied Dr. and Mrs. Weizmann) Mrs.


Katie Gluckmann. Back row: Mr. David Dalnow, Rabbi
I. M. Gervis, Mr. J. Bahr, Dr. David Ordman, N.
Kirschner, B. Gering, Dr. W. Sachs, J. Daleski, J.
Janower, S. M. Gordon, B. S. IIcrsch. Front: Mrs. F.
Winokur, J. Alexander, Mrs. Ethel Hayman.


W HEN the Zionist Record was
launched in 1908 the Jewish
community of South Africa was
small; struggling and isolated
from the rest of the Jewish world.
The majority were still bewildered
immigrants who had just begun
to build their own homes. The
community was a tiny sapling
transplanted from a foreign and
distant climate to the soil of
Africa. Nobody as yet knew how
it would strike root and how it
would grow. It was nursed by
the zeal of a handful and its
strength lay in the great tradi-
tions of the past.
In distant Europe, where the
Jewish people was, at that time,
mainly- concentrated, little was
known of the transplantation and
there was no presentiment of
future growth.
To the Jews of Europe and
to the leaders of the world Zion-
-1st movement, the South Afri-
can community was a tiny out-
post community.
-Symbolic


It is true that Herzl had writ-
ten to a few individuals in this
country calling for South African
representation at the Zionist Con-
gress. But this was merely of
symbolic significance; it was to
demonstrate that Jews in all parts
of the globe were behind the Zion-
ist ideal.
Two years before the Zionist
Record was established, the then
president of the World Zionist
Organisation and successor of
Herzl, David Wolffsohn, visited
the local Jewish community. The
visit was, however, accidental; he
was on a health cruise off the
coast of South-rn Africa.
The jubilant welcome extended


Zionist


to him by the Jews of Johannes-
burg and Cape Town offered the
first hints of Zionism's potential
strength in Southern Africa. In
retrospect It also offered a hint
of the future role of the South
African community in world
Jewry.

Not converted
By and large, however, another
16 years had to pass before a
Jewish personality of the calibre
of Wolffsohn deemed the com-
munity worthy of a special visit.
There were bigger things to be
done elsewhere: European Jewry
was not yet converted to the
Zionist cause; the assimilationists,
on the one hand, and ultra-ortho-


Record


dox on the other, were violently
opposed to the alms of Zionism.
In between were the indiffer-
ent, the sceptical and the
apathetic masses. In the U.S.A.,
too, Zionism was fighting a hard
battle.

They begged
Leadership of world Jewry in
1908 was not yet crystallised in
the form in which we know it
today. There was no semblance
of any kind of direct, or modified,
democratic communal system. In
Russia, Jewish organisation was
forbidden by decree; in America
Jewish democratic representation
was non-existent, by self-choice.
The spokesmen of Jewry in
1908 were self-appointed and well-
meaning shtadlanim and benefac-
tors who seldom raised their
voices before the high and mighty
rulers. They petitioned and
begged for favours; they seldom
demanded their rights.
Herzl was to revolutionise and


and


galvanise Jewish organisation. But
he died prematurely and by 1908
the Zionist movement had not yet
recovered from the blow. The
organisation had also to recover
from the controversy between
those who insisted on Palestine
as the future state and those who
advocated as a solution to the
Jewish problem in East Africa.
The very emergence of a
"territorialist" movement, which
incidentally also had its small
counterpart In this country, was
an indication of doubt about the
prospects of the Zionist Ideal.

The change

No one could have anticipated
in those days the tremendous
changes which were to be wrought
by the First World War, the Rus-
sian Revolution, the attainment of
independence by small nations in
Europe, and ultimately the Bal-
four Declaration, which gave a
tremendous impetus to Zionism.


its


The dislocations amongst Jewry
-political, social and economic-
in the new states of Eastern and
Central Europe, coupled with the
new possibilities for colonisation
In the Jewish National Home
under the Balfour Declaration,
turned the Zionist organisation
Into a mass movement, and made
possible the rise of Hechalutz and
the allyah of thousands of pioneers
who built the new kibbutzim and
settlements, and became the
pioneers of the state-on-the-way.

South Africa
In the meantime, the growth
of immigration into South Africa
lent stability to the Jewish com-
munity and to the young Zionist
organisation. S o u t h African
Jewry swam into the focus of the
larger world communities.
The visit of Dr. Shmarya
Levin in 1922 and the object of
his mission-to launch the first
Keren Hayesod campaign -
0 Continued overleaf


O.K. & C.T.C. BAZAARS

offer their heartiest congratulations




THE ZIONIST RECORD

on 50 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC
.. and take this opportunity to wish them
continued success and prosperity in the future years
ahead






Sll __i I _ _m


The


mission

By C. Gershater


PAGE IIM








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PRIVILEGE OF SERVING DURING GREAT


marked the great turning point
In the story of the Zionist move-
ment of Southern Africa.
A man of world stature had
come to conduct a fund-raising
effort which, by the standards of
that time, had an ambitious tar-
get. His visit placed South Afri-
can Zionism on the map. It was
the harbinger of contact on the
highest level between headquar-
ters of Zionism and Eretz Israel
on the one hand, and *the Jewish
community of South Africa on the
other; it marked the transition of
South African Zionism from a
homely association of somewhat
naive "lovers of Zion" into a poli-
tical movement, embracing the
majority of Jewry and calling for
personal, immediate and practical
association with a working or-
ganisation rather than attachment
to a remote vision.
THE ZIONIST RECORD WAS
PRIVILEGED TO HAVE BEEN
A VITAL INSTRUMENT IN
THIS GREAT TRANSFORM.
TION.

To organise
In its earliest period the journal
faithfully helped to organise the
small and scattered communities
which (as shown in articles pub-
lished elsewhere in this issue)
were much more scattered than
today and making them ripe for
the big tasks that lay ahead.
From the very beginning the


(Continued from previous page)

Zionist Record emphasised the Im-
portance of the small coin. These
were the days of dunam-by-dunanm
Zionism, the penny-by-penny col-
lections for the J.N.F., of the
Colonial Trust shares, and the
occasional little meetings of the
branches, small and big. The
journal grew with the movement
and inspired it towards greater
efforts; it gave courage to those
who lost heart; it preached to the
unconverted.

Opposed
There were many in South
Africa who opposed Zionism and
many more who were Indifferent.
Those who were Zionists included
large numbers who placed Jewish
statehood In'a remote future. Few,
if any, expected a Jewish state
to come into being in the con-
crete form of today. At "best,
they hoped for a little crumb, for
some concession, from the Turkish
Sultan; some vague kind of auto-
nomy within the Turkish Empire.
EVen after the Balfour Deerara-
;tIon they were in need of incen-
tive, encouragement and faith.
They were subjected to terrible
shocks, disappointments and dis-
illusionments which tended to
weaken heart and faith.
In all these periods of trial and
test the Zionist Record stood
steadfast, affirming the certainty
of fulfilment; sometimes even


tending to be over-optimistic; and
urging the community to have
faith and to be loyal to the great
ideal; maintaining that "sof ha-
kavod lavo," that in the end the
glory of Jewry will be realized.
When in the First World War
the Turks deported large numbers


Dr. Schmarya Levin
By Glicenstein

of Jews from Eretz Israel and
almost ruined the young Yishuv;
when, in the inter-war period, the
Arabs rioted again and again, in
vain attempts to paralyse and
destroy the Yishuv; when succes-
sive British Governments reduced
the Balfour Declaration with their
White Papers and restrictions on
immigration on all these occa-
sions the Zionist Record called on
the community to stand firm and


TRANSITION PERIOD


,to continue their- assistance in
faith.
We do not make these claims
in a spirit of boastfulness. The
Zionist Record was a paper with
a mission. Its primary task and
purpose was the furtherance 9f
a cause. It simply did its duty.
The Zionist Record owes its
growth to the painstaking efforts
of many individuals and groups
who gave much to it, in an honor-
ary or in. a professional capacity.
But, above all, it owes its growth
to the rise of Jewry as a
people. The 50 years of 1908-1958
have seen many pogroms, much
persecution and the final tragic
destruction of a third of Jewry
at the hands of the Nazis...
But these 50 years have also
seen the transformation of
Jewry as a whole from a reli-
gious community into a solid
nation.

Public life
Within this sub-continent the 50
years have also marked the- con-
solidation of South African Jewry
as a section of the population
which, though not very great in
numbers, has made its mark in
public life, both here and over-
seas.
We take pride in the fact
'that the Zionist Record has to
some extent had a share in the
moulding and education of a
large 'number of personalities
who have contributed to the pub-
lic life of South Africa, whether
as judges, writers, parliamen-
tarians, civic leaders, or social
welfare workers.


U m


Here again we are aware that
in guiding our readers towards
public service we were perform-
ing the elementary duty that de-
volves on every responsible news.
paper or journal.
. In conformity with these prin-
ciples, the Zionist Record has
always been at the disposal of
the community in every field of
endeavour-in religious activity;
in the promotion of learning, cul-
ture and education; in charitable
effort; in the encouragement of
sports and social welfare.
The task which the Zionist
Record had set itself is not yet
complete. We are happy in the
thought that within our lifetime
the State of Israel was estab-
lished, and that our journal has
been privileged to report the great-
est events in modern Jewish his-
tory and to render some assistance
in the' emergence and consolida-
tion of the young State. Buit
Israel is still faced with many
dangers and difficulties.
There is still much to be done
by Jewry in all parts of the
world, by the community in
South Africa, and by the Zion-*
ist Record as one of its insti-
tutions.
Our own community has grown
and developed beyond recognition.
The need for a communal mouth-
piece which should be ever-con-
scious of its responsibilities to-
wards the community is even
more vital today than in former
years.
There is a new generation that
has to be enlightened, guided and
directed In the Jewish field.
May we prove worthy in the
years to come -of the traditions of
the past and of the tasks that
lie ahead of-us.


The




SCHLESINGER ORGANISATION




congratulates the




ZIONIST RECORD




on attaining its Golden Jubilee


PAGE If







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE V


South


of


f if


LET us pluck from the period
in which the Zionist Record
was born the threads of South
African history which were to
affect the shape of things to
come.
The Transvaal Republic and the
Republic of the Orange Free
State had been defeated in war.
A young Boer general, by name
Jan Christiaan Smuts, having
swallowed the bitter dregs of his
people's cup, said at last to his
fellow burghers: "We did not fight
merely to be shot. We commenced
the struggle and continued it
because we wished to maintain
our independence and were pre-
pared to sacrifice everything for
it.
"But we may not"sacrifice the
Afrikaner people for that indepen-
dence..."
The Boers, listening to Smuts,
bowed to the inevitable. Imperial
Britain, already mistress of the
Cape Colony and the -Colony of
Natal, now became mistress, too,
of the former Boer republic of the
Transvaal and, the -former Boer
republic of the Orange Free State.
Four British colonies, each inde-
pendent of the other.
In 1905 a Liberal British
Government granted responsible
government to the Transvaal.
Louis Botha, leader of Het Volk,
became Prime Minister and Jan
Christiaan Smuts, his lieutenant,
became Colonial Secretary.
THE FREE STATE
In the Free State, President
Steyn remained the influential
figure he had always been. But
his health was poor. When Britain
granted responsible government
to the Orange Free State in 1907,
It was Abraham Fischer who
became Prime Minister. A member
of his Cabinet was James Barry
Munnik Hertzog, later to become
founder and leader of the
National Party.
The Cape, in 1908, was under
the able Prime Ministership of
.John X. Merriman, of whom Afri-
kaners continue to speak with af-
fection and respect.
Natal in sentiment, culture and
language, was an outpost of Great
Britain.
Three European languages were
in use in the country:-
1. The all-powerful and all-
pervasive English language.
2. Nederlands, or High Dutch.
This was the written language
of the Boer people; it was also
the language of the churches of
the Boer people. But it was dead
as a spoken language.
3. Afrikaans, the language
la which the Boers expressed
themselves naturally and spon-
taneously, but a language with-
out a literature and despised as
a "patois."
That, starkly, was the setting
in which the Zionist Record was
born in Johannesburg at the end
Of 1908.
jWhat were the ideas, political
and cultural, then floating about
and working in the minds of the
thinking men?
There were three of considerable
Significance-:
1. The first was- that the four
colonies should unite into one
country. It was explicit and had
many good minds working on it.


Africa:



ty year

The most dynamic was that o
Smuts.
2. The second was wrapped up
in the womb of a tendency. It was
hoped by leading British elements
that the British would anglicise
and absorb the Afrikaners.
3. Individual Afrikaners arose
to take the Afrikaans language
into their passionate care. The re
suits, political and cultural, were
to be far-reaching.
Let us now elaborate on these
tendencies. It needs an act of
imagination today when we accept
the fruit of Union as natural to
understand a situation in which
four colonies, guided by self-
interest, pursued different railway
and customs policies in which there
was no common defence system,
and in which a common approach
to the Native and Indian "ques-
tions" was impossible.






.



',,. ,' ^
0 .-









Gustav Preller. zealous fighter
for Afrikaans "In the days of!
Strugglee" and first editor of -
," Die Vaderland. j


In this sense, the question of
"Union" was a real issue. It ob-
truded because it had to obtrude.
In 1903, on the initiative of Lord
Milner, British High Commissioner,
a general customs union had come
into force between all the Colonies.
The agreement was good on paper
only. Rivalry between the rail-
ways of each colony persisted. The
ports of Natal and Cape competed
to snatch from each other every
ton of goods possible.
Transvaal, Cape, Orange Free
State and Natal all had their
grievances and anxieties.
In 1908 Transvaal gave notice
of its intention to withdraw from
the customs union.
Intensified chaos and rivalry
threatened. The threat confirmed
the thinking spirits of the country
in the view-now rapidly gaining
ground and supported, among
others, by Lord Selborne, the new
High Commissioner that the
only way out was a complete eco-
nomic and political union of the
South African colonies.
To achieve this union was not
plain sailing. Smuts, leading sup-
porters of the idea (a holistic
concept after all) had to pull out


The



ago


ig lim iml IIIIIIIIBy l, l lllt llRl l


Karl Lemeer


of himself all the eloquence and
persuasiveness that he could mus-
ter. But the logic of necessity was
on his side.
e Yet the forces that had to be
f overcome were formidable. The
Afrikaners of the O.F.S. feared
for the future of Afrikanerdom in
a union politically dominated by
"Englishmen."
English-speaking Natal argued
from presentiments that foresaw
the numerical domination of the
Afrikaner in the White population.
Many Transvalers grudged
sharing the wealth of their prov-
ince with others.
The liberals of the Cape were
worried about the fate of the
colony's liberal franchise under
union.
But the forces for union were
stronger. They were strong enough
to lead to a national convention
which met in Durban in October
1908. It was a momentous gather-
ing. Afrikaans- and English-speak-
ing came together to decide the
fate of the country as a whole.
Out of that convention came
a constitution and a draft of
union. On Sept. 20, 1909, the Bill
of Union received the Royal assent
and on December 2, a Royal
proclamation appeared appointing
May 31, 1910, as the day on which
it would be put into effect.
The four colonies fused into the
South Africa we know today. The
Zionist Record, a modest little
sheet but recently launched, began
its years of growth under the new
dispensation.

CULTURAL FRONT
And on the cultural front?
Article 6 of the Peace Treaty
of Vereeniging said: "The Dutch
language will be taught in public
schools in the Transvaal and
Orange River Colony where
parents of the children desire it,
and will be allowed in courts of
law when necessary for the
better and more effective adminis-
tration of justice."
But real intent emerged from
other documents. In 1903, Mr. Sar-
gent, Director of Education in the
Transvaal, wrote to Lord Milner:
"Our military operations have had
the effect that the great majority
of Boer boys are to be found in
the camps; and I am convinced
that we have no better opportunity
than now to make them English.
"What are needed are women,
highly qualified teachers . pre-
pared to come to this country
(from Britain) and dedicated
enough to work in the camps to
instruct the children of the bur-
ghers in our language and our
ideals . ."
This policy of attempting to
anglicise the Afrikaner became
stronger with time.
Indeed, seen from the high
vantage point of a day more
than 50 years later, the triumph
of Afrikaans in such an unequal
cofitest must be seen as nothing
less than a miracle.
Consider the essence of the
struggle as outlined some years
ago by Dr. G. Dekker in his book
"Afrikdanse Literatuurgeskicde-
nis'-."
"The situation was that the
Afrikaner had to fight English, a
world language, with a written
language (Dutch) that he could
not properly use and which was
not the language near his heart,
and with a spoken language that-
had still to know itself . ."
The men who saved the Afri-
kaner people for themselves were
their poets and writers. They
stimulated the Second Language
Movement (the first was killed by
the Boer War) and kindled the


ferment


flames of rebirth in the Boer na- | .
tion. I
Eugene Marais' "Winternag"
came as a herald of what the
Afrikaans language could achieve.
In De Volkstem of May 12, 1906,
Jan Celliers' "Die Vlakte" made its
first appearance. Its craggy rug-
ged strength penetrated to the
heart of the South African land-
scape and people.
Langenhoven began to sing. 3.
H. H. de Waal, Ds. W. Postma,
Gustav Preller, Dr. N. Hoogenhout, | Louis Botha ... Boer War hero
and others, wrapped tender, yet | and leader; the Union's first
assertive, Intellects around the Prime Minister.
language.r n............................................................J.I
language.
It is not necessary, I think, to
underline to a people like Jews, Hebrew a battlefield in Palestine,
the significance of poets and while in Eastern Europe the Yid-
writers to a nation. In the days dish language whose emergence
when Celliers was writing the first from a "jargon" and "kitchen
Afrikaans lyric poetry and haunt- tongue" was so similar in its
ing the minds of his people with career to Afrikaans, was passing
fresh strains, Bialik was sounding through its golden period. In like
new notes in Hebrew poetry. spirit Afrikaner committee were
The Hebrew 'fanatic' Eliezer (Continued on pge 98)
Ben Yehuda had already made (Continued on page 08)


Take great pleasure


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the Zionist Record


on the occasion of


their Golden Jubilee


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*


Supplement to THE ZIONIST -RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER,21, 1968

FROM OUR ALBUM


rTT, -n At i r:i-'t TA v0


FULL SYMPATHY Serious and amusing items
rTHE warmest sympathy with from early issues of the
I the Zionist cause was ex- Zionist Record.
pressed by the Prime Minister, Zi s -ec.
General Louis Botha, when he L'---- "---
opened the Zionist Bazaar in Jo-


hahnesburg, in aid of the Jewish
National Fund.
"It is indeed depressing to
think," he declared, "that in the
20th century there are still states
which are described 'as civilised
and in which a class of citizens-


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the Jewish population are ex-
posed not merely to the most dis-
graceful humiliations, but also to
the cruellest persecutions. The sad
position of the Jewish population
in various parts of the world aas
thus led to the establishment of
the Jewish National Fund and I
therefore again express iny most
cordial sympathy for this -fund.
"I am also aware of the fact
that your National Fund has the
object of creating a great centre
in Palestine which -will represent
the home of your people. I sliould
like you to know that this object
also has my fullest sympathy."'
-From the Zionist Record of
October 31, 1910.

NEVER HEARD OF IT? -
AT a meeting held recently in
London,, at which Rev. Mor-
ris Joseph read a paper on the
prevalence of anti-Semitism, one
of the subsequent speakers gave
vent to the opinion that there was
no such thing as anti-Semitism,
t-hat he had never come across an
anti-Semite, nor met anyone who
had.
-From the Zionist Record of
August 15, 1913.


BUFFELJAGSFONTEIN
SIR,_-I have much pleasure in
enclosing money order for 1
5s. 6d., which sum was collected
for your fund during the Simchas
Torah night at the house of Mr.
an I Mrs. A. M. Kaplan, of Buffel-
jagsfontein, District Oudtshdorn.
I hope to be able to forward you
shortly another collection.
Yours, etc.,
ISAAC SACKS,
Jan Foureskraal,
District Oudtshoorn.
-From the Zionist Record of
November 15, 1908.
* FOOTNOTE: There is no Jewish
community in Buffeljagsfontein,
today.


SOUTH AFRICA FIRST'
SOUTH AFRICA stands fore-
fmost in its contribution to
the various funds as compared
with Its Jewish population, but
much still remains to be done.
- From the Zionist Record: of
November 14, 1908.


THE DIlFFERENCE
ADVOCATE MORRIS ALEX-
ANDER, addressing the
fourth S.A.. Zionist conference,
said that the only check to the
dereliction of duties on the part
of members of the federation was
to hold annual conferences. The


With compliments
on achieving
your
50th anniversary-
from

ROSLIN PARK
HOMES FOR
THE AGED


Telephone 835-7341/2
Telegrams "FULINSUR"


P.O. Box 2858


'PAGE VI


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JOHANNESBURG


!


conference, he said, was in the
position of Parliament towards
its Ministers, with, however, this
important difference, that our
Cabinet was not paid.
From the Zionist Record of July
31, 1911.

OPPENHEIMER IS PROUD
OF HIS RACE
H E was proud of his race and
its glorious- traditions and
always endeavoured to be loyal to
the great heritage that was theirs,
declared Mr. Oppenheimer, speak-
ing at a function held in Kimber-
ley to bid farewell to the Rev.
Harris Isaacs.
The Jewish community in .Kim-
berley turned up in full force and
a presentation was made to the
Rev. Isaacs.
From the Zionist Record of May
15, 1911.

ERR4TUM
N the text of the address pre-
sentd by the S.A. Zionist
Federation to General Botha,
which was published in "our last
issue, the words "Right Honour-
able SiN" should have been printed
wherever the words "Honourable
Sir" appear. -
-From the Zionist Record of
September 6, 1915.

NOT LIKE FISH OUT OF
WATER
THE city of Hamburg has a
JH Jewish population of more
than 20,000 souls,- and so the dele-
gates to the ninth Zionist congress
do not feel altogeker like fish
out of water.
-From the Zionist Record of
January 28, 1910.


MOVED TO TEARS
A T the trial of Jewish dentists
in Moscow,_ counsel for the
defence delivered a great speech
picturing scenes of Jewish misery
and poverty-in Russia.
The people in the public gallery,
which was crowded at the time
and the 300 defendants 'were so
deeply moved that they all cried
bitterly. It became necessary for
the President to declare an inter-
val.
-From the Zionist Record of
January 23, 1913. "


latolps







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958

Various articles in this Golden Jubilee issue of" u
the Zionist Record endeavour to portray the
South African Zionist movement in earlier days.
This article gives a bird's-eye view of the activi-
ties of the Federation at the present time.



THE ZIONIST


FEDERATION |
Just over 100. This was the
O AD ) Y forerunner of the numerous ap-
peals and campaigns conducted
i in Southern Africa for more than
a century.
SOME 50,000 adults, out of a The J.N.F., Keren Hayesod,
total Jewish population of Youth Allyah, the Hebrew Univer- 0
110,000 are shekel holders in sity and various other causes, re-
Southern Africa. At the last Zion- ceived generous support.
ist, elections, 30,000 shekel holders Large as those contributions
went to ithe poll. Two thousand were, it was only with the estab-
South Africans have settled in lishment of the State that fund- M
Israel. raising in Southern Africa reached
These figures, more than any the peak.
others, symbolise the devotion of When the United Nations
adopted the resolution of Novem-
ber 29, 1947, the S.A. Zionist
B Federation immediately launched
By a Palestine Special Emergency
A. *ureinik Fund. With the proclamation of
the State and with the Special
Palestine Emergency Fund hardly
the Jews of Southern Africa completed, the Israeli United Ap- iIIIIIIIIIII
the Jews of Southern Africa to peal came into being, and it
the Zionist cause, reached even greater heights than Israel,
As long ago as 1854, Sir Moses the Special Palestine Emergency I.U.A. c
Montefiore appealed for financial Fund. special
assistance for the poverty-stricken Notwithstanding the Israeli From
Jews in Palestine at that time. United Appeal and the huge sums African
The. tiny and scattered Jewish of money it raises, the Federation held a s
community of South Africa re- at the end of 1955, when dark hearts
sponded immediately, and sent clouds swept over the skies of although


PAGE ONE


Cable from

MR. DAVID

BEN GURION
Prime Minister of

the State of Israel
I SEND greetings and best wishes to
the Zionist Record on the occasion
of its 50th anniversary. As organ of
the South African Zionist Federation,
the Zionist Record has been, for the
past 50 years, a major instrument in
the transmission of the Zionist mes-
sage to the Jewish community of
South Africa.
Some of the tangible results of this
guidance are enjoyed in Israel today.
South African Jews have settled
in Israel and have made their mark
on the life of the country in all fields,
including commerce, industry, learned
professions and as pioneer farmers
have established kibbutzim.
The Jewish community of South
Africa has achieved a deservedly
noble name for its dedicated and
devoted service to the cause of Israel
and for its deep Jewish consciousness.
These qualities are tangibly reflected
in the character of its sons and daugh-
ters who have settled in Israel and are
playing so Important a part in build-
nlug the country. Please accept my
sincere congratulations and my best
wishes to you In the future.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIll Il ulIIIl I l ll l l I ulll l l lIuu l l l l l l l l l l I ll l l l lllI I l l I l l l l l II l ll l l l l l t l I I I I I I ll l I I l l II I l l l IIIIIIIIIII I


launched (between one no longer held specially for the other artists to this country, with
campaign and the next) a J.N.F., there are still special people in their thousands flocking
Israeli Emergency Appeal. efforts such as tree drives, fune- to the performances.
the early days of South tons, inscriptions for the Keren The J.N.F. Charitable Trust Is
Zionism the J.N.F. has Kayemet. Of late, the national doing excellent work. Bequests
pecially warm place in the committee of the Jewish National made by South Afribans to the
of the community, and Fund for Southern Africa have J.N.F. and to various other good
h specific campaigns are brought out leading Israel and Continued on page 95)


Guidance, a pathway-this is
what man seeks over the years
from the trusted friend.
For fifty years the Zionist Record has
proved itself the trusted friend of its readers.
In this Golden Jubilee year
CNA extends the hand of congratulation.


j CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY LIMITED







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


MILESTONES OF THE


RECORD
* 1908: First issue of the Zionist
Record appeared on November 15
as a monthly bulletin.
* 1911: Format changed to look
like periodical, with articles by
Sarah Gertrude Millin (then Miss
Liebson), S. Lennox Loewe, Rabbi
Dr. Hertz, Dr. J. L. Magnus and
others.
* 1914-15: Record publishes lists
of Jews on active service.
* 1917-18: Distressing reports of
Ukraine pogroms.
0 1924: Formation of Kadimah
Press publishing company, with
the object of expanding the
journal. Zionist Record becomes
a fortnightly in August.
* 1926: Largely due to the efforts
of the acting president of the S.A.
Zionist Federation, the late Mr.
Hyman Morris (father of advocate
H. H. Morris), the Record becomes
a weekly. Editorial control is
placed in the hands of Dr. Manfred
Nathan, and his committee con-
sisting of Messrs. A. M. Abrahams,
R. Rosenthal, I. Kaplan and
Lennox Loewe.
* 1930: Record continues to make
progress. Contributors include
some of the most prominent
Jewish writers in the world. News
features and articles reflect the
rising storm in Europe and critical
crises in Palestine. At the same
time the journal mirrors the pro-
gress of the Yishuv, the growth of
the local community and the Zion-
ist movement in this country.
* 1939: Editorials give full sup-
port to the war against Hitler.


The Editors
The following were editors of
the Zionist Record since Its In-
ception. Mr. I. Abrahams
(1908-11), Mr. I. H. Harris
(1912), Mr. Isaac Goodman
(September, 1912 to February
1913), Mr. I. H. Harris (re-
sumed his editorship in 1913
until 1918), Mr. Jack Alexan-
der (1919-24), Mr. David
Dainow (1924-43), Mr. C. Ger-
shater (1943).

ences of Jews on active service.
1943-44: Among numerous new
features is the publication in serial
form of Maurice Samuel's now
famous work, "The World of
Sholem Aleichem."
1945: Special issue devoted to
extermination of European Jewry.
A special VE-Day edition gives a
graphic description of the Jewish
war effort.
1948: With the beginning of
Israel's War of Liberation the
Zionist Record launches a special
mid-week edition which gives the
latest news from Palestine at a
time when reports were either
inadequate or distorted. On the
Sunday following the proclama-
tion of the State the Zionist
Record publishes a four-page
"special" edition under the banner
heading "The Birth of Israel."
1956: Special edition on Israel's
victory in the Sinai campaign.
1958: Special issue on the occa-
sion of the tenth anniversary of


* 1940-42: The Record devotes the State of Israel. Zionist Record
considerable space to the experi- celebrates golden jubilee.


ONE of the most interesting
names to appear in early
issues of the Zionist Record is
that of Sarah Gertrude Liebson,
later to became Sarah Gertrude
Million, South Africa's most
famous author.
Introducing her to his
readers, in the Zionist Record
of September 15, 1911 (nine
years before the appearance of
her first novel, "The Dark

WAS ACTING I1
EDITOR I


- The late Mr. Morris de Saxe,
' who was acting editor of the
Zionist Record during several
periods In the 'twenties. A
grandson of Emanuel Mendels- 1
sohn, he came to South Africa
in 1908 from Australia at the
age of ten. Following a brilliant
educational career at the Uni-
versities of Cape Town and the i
Witwatersrand, he joined the
bar in Johannesburg and took
a leading part in Zionist and
communal activities.


.. ,...............,fh.,,h,. ,


article

appeared

in 1911
River"), the editor, Mr. I.
Abrahams, wrote:
"South Africa, so far, has
numbered but few journalists,
and of these hardly any have
been identified with Judaism.
"It is, therefore, with the
greatest pleasure that we have
to record the rise of a Jewish
young lady journalist, Miss S.
G. Liebson, of Kimberley, whose
work is of a high order of merit.
"She has contributed to The
State: and a small sketch. 'The


I



e.


= This photograph of Sarah Ger-.!
I trude Millin was taken about ;
1912 at the time when, as Mis M
SLiebson, she wrote for the ,
- Zionist Record. -
$ i fin mlellg H


Eggman,' which appeared m to time. On December 5, 1914,
Johannesburg Sunday Times of we published her lively article,
September 3, attracted consider- "The Jewishness of Johannes-
able attention. It was written burg."
in the best Zangwillian style,
pathos and humour being in- When told about her earliest
-extricably blended. If you have contribution to the Zionist
the paper, read it again. Record, Mrs. Million, who is now
"We publish in this number writing a lengthy book on "The
an article from her able pen." Jews," was quite surprised. "I
had forgotten all about it," she
The article to which the;edi- said and asked for a copy.
tor referred was the first of a "The articles on 'The Jew in
series of articles on "The Jew English Literature,' must have
in English Literature," which belonged to the very first days
When I appeared in print. I
appeared in the Record between had won a lumber of literary
September, 1911, and April, competitions and that is how
1912. Mr. Abrahams must have got
In subsequent years, and to know me and ask me to write
for the Zionist Record. The
after she had achieved world paper used to come to our house
fame, Mrs. Million contributed from the first day. My mother
to the Zionist Record from time was a subscriber," she said.


Congratulations to the Zionist Record on their 50 years of achievement


FOR 63 YEARS


THE NAME OF







Has Been Symbolic of Quality & Value
THREE GENERATIONS HAVE LEARNED TO
TRUST KATZ & LOURIE AND KNOW IT IS
WISE TO BUY DIAMONDS FROM A JEWELLER
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Sarah Gertrude Millin's first


/


N


PAGE TWO










Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


A contrast of-communal life

in South Africa

between 1908 and 1958


AND


By GUS SARON
"' I Il l ll l ildii ttiiiiii1iiii llllllllll!Hlu l 1iII ii lluii lllllii i i ill


- IN 1908, six years after the signing of the Peace of Vereeniging,
the impact of the South African War was still strongly felt.
The country had not yet emerged from the trough of a pro-
longed economic depression.
Nevertheless, in both the Transvaal and O.F.S., where
Jewish organisational life had almost come to an end during the
war years, notable strides had been made towards communal
reconstruction.
In the Cape, the situation was
in some respects easter, because
the war had created less disloca-
tion; and the influx of the large
numbers of "refugees" from the
north had actually given a fillip ,
to Jewish activities. The economic .
and social problems, consequent
upon the war, were aggravated
by the great flow of immigration
mainly from Eastern Europe,
which took place.
The. volume of Jewish immi-
gration immediately after the
war was indeed the largest
ever experienced in South ,
Africa..
There were 20-25,000 Jews living
in the country at the outbreak of
the war. Between 1900 and 1908,
mqre than 17.176 Jewish immi-
grants came into the country, some



From the Cape to the Transvaal


former residents who had gone. together with the passage of
abroad during the war, others- the years, has brought about a
the majority entire newcomers, radical transformation in the com-
The greater proportion of these position of the South African
newcomers found their wa y, Jewish community.
increased by former Transvaalers Fifty years ago, the great
where their numbers were also e Imigrans
increased by former Transvalers preponderance were immigrants
-some recent, others dating
returning from the Cape. their arrival as far back as a
The pattern is vividly reflected quarter of a century or more.
in the census statistics of 1904 TODAY PERHAPS AS MANY
and 1911 respectively. Between -AS 80 PER CENT. OF OUR
those years, the total Jewish COMMUNITY ARE SOUTH
population* grew' from 38,101 to AFRICAN BORN.
46,926. In 1904 there were 19,537 The proportion of males to
Jews in the Cape Province; seven The proportion of males to
years, later, the numbers had females at the earlier period was
diminished to 16,744. In the Trans- also a significant reflection of its
vaal, on the other -hand, the immigrant character. the men
figures grew from 15,478 in 1904, were the first to come as pioneers
to 25,892 in 1911; and the same to the new country. Later, when
trend was to be observed in the they had begun to establish them-
O.F.S. where the corresponding selves, they brought over their
numbers were 1,616 and .2,808 re- women-folk, wives or sweethearts
tivelas the case may have been and
specttvely. their children. In 1904 there were
The situation of South Afri- thermhildrento one female;04 thby were1911
can Jewry today offers a very the percentage of males had
marked contrast.
Except for the first few years dropped to 59 per cent. This dis-
immexiately after the end of proportion of the sexes had aifad-
World War II, there has been verse effect on many aspects of
little Jewish immigration since community life. Thereafter a
1940. During the last eight years steady adjustment between the
the average annual influx was numbers of the sexes took place, so
just under 200. This contrast that by the time the 1951 census
was taken out of 108,496 persons,
there were 55,165 males and 53,331
................................- ." females. (The fact that there is
I This' picture of the Harrismith still a discrepancy, even though a
SCongregation bears the date of small one, should still be a com-
C 1884 on the back. It was taken! fort to lonely females)!!
I 74 years ago. The names of the
I people could not be identified. I have already referred to the


trend from the south to the north
in the early days. It continued to
be a feature of the distribution ol
Jewish population.
Throughout the half century
the growth of the Jewish com-
munity at the Cape was rela-
tively much slower than it was
in the Transvaal.
Indeed, keeping pace with the
more rapid expansion in the Trans-
vaal generally, the Jewish popula-
tion in this province grew by
1951 to 68,962, more than double
the number at the Cape which
stood then at 30,728 (with a fur-
ther 121 in the Transkel). Th(
rapidity with which the northern
province outstripped the southern
which had prided itself on being
the "mother community" of South
African Jewry, may have had some
bearing on the coolness which was
sometimes shown by the Cape-
tonians to the "upstart" Trans-
valers!
In another aspect, too, the
Jewish population movement fol
lowed the general South African
trend. This was the migration
from the country to town. Even It
the early days there was a con
centration of Jews in the urban
centres. Later the disproportion
between town and'country became
even larger. Nevertheless, in the
twenties, quite a substantial num
ber of Jews lived in the plattelan<
areas and Jewish rural congrega
(Continued on page 99)


Above Is a picture of the Bethlehem
m Hebrew Congregation photographed in
C IOllRAt 1007, and in the centre of the page are
a group of young people of today photo-
graphed at the laying of the foundation stone of the Sydenham
Hebrew Congregation in 1054. We Bethlehem picture has the fol-
lowing members: Standing (from left to right): Mr. Addleson, Mr.
Lasarus, Mr. Hirshon, Mr. Goldberg, Mr .Hurwitz, hon. secretary,
Mr. Hurwitz, Mr. Foorman, Mr. Yankelowitz and Mr. Sellikon.
Sitting: Mr. Sher, Mr. Herr, Mr. Lasarus, Mr. L. Elstensteln, presi-
dent, Rev. Moskowitz, Mr. Israel and Mr. Sellkson. This article
describes the position of our community.at a time when the Zionist
Record was established as compared with the pattern of the com-
munity today.






















| artt] A trau ?auk of|



I / +(t94t? t*I


THEN



NOW


(Registered Commercial Bank).



Head Office:
Johannesburg















EXTEND BEST WISHES TO THE


RECORD ON THE


ZIONIST


ATTAINMENT OF ITS GOLDEN
JUBILEE


f




y




e
h




e
n
-
e
-





r

e
h
e


PAGE THREE







PAGE FOUR


GREETINGS FROM


S.A.


JEWISH


BOARD of DEPUTIES IT is with the greatest
pleasure that I convey to


* 50 years ago the name

SNN


PIONEER CATERERS AND' BAKERS

appeared proudly among the first
M advertisers in the Zionist Record

i


TODAY
i

Q OuINN 2

I OFFICIAL CATERERS TO ZION HALL

V are proud to salute the Zionist
* Record's Golden Jubilee
Ili lillh i i i iin llllih il i ii ii, iiii. iillitg lihi,, Bll i ligii iii l ll l ,ll i Einliga n giilihl iiiilllll il iiil illlirg lilil

Congratulations

from

HAMILTON'S

to the

SOUTH AFRICAN

ZIONIST RECORD

on the Grand
Occasion of its

GOLDEN JUBILEE



On behalf of its many Jewish friends and cus-
tomers, as well as the Company's Directors
and Staff, Hamilton's send heartiest congratu-
lations to the South African Zionist Record on
the celebration of its Golden Jubilee. Such a
record of service to the people of this country
is indeed remarkable, and richly deserves the
honour and success which the future un-
doubtedly holds.


RAD 2288


you the congratulations and
the good wishes of- the South
African Jewish Board of Depu-
ties on the celebration of the
Golden Jubilee of the Zionist
Record.
The 50 years that have passed
since -the Zionist Record was
founded have been a momentous
period in the history of the world
and of the Jewish people. Your
journal has played a valuable role
in interpreting the significance of
those events for the South African
Jewish community.
For our community, the period
has been one of swift development.
When the Zionist Record first saw
the light of day, the community
was largely one of newly-arrived
immigrants from overseas. For


: Mr. N. Philips, chairman of the
S.A. Jewish Board of Deputies. .
! ... .


.--..--.... .........n.i.Mu.u .........al.............l u
many of them your journal was
their English primer. The journal
grew together with the community
and in addition to its primary
function of furthering Zionism, it
has helped to enrich and streng-
then Jewish life in South Africa.
May the Zionist Record long con-
tinue to flourish.
N. PHILIPS,
Chairman,
Executive Council.


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


Bernard Gering's

association with

Zionist Record

BERNARD GERING'S association with the Zionist Record
goes back 40 years. As chairman of the Young Israel
Society in 1918 he reported youth activities in the journal.
The association became closer from year to year, and par-
ticularly after 1924 when he was first elected to the executive
of the Federation.
During the 15 years of his vice-chairmanship of the Federa-
tion and during his chairmanship he was in almost daily touch
with the office and kept a watchful eye on editorial policy and
financial affairs.
In 1943 Mr. Gering initiated a
radical reorganization of the
Record.. He devoted days and
Aiights to discussions of detail,
arrangements of staff, and general
questions of expansion.
For years thereafter he made
a point-of meeting the editor once
a week in order to survey past
editorials and articles and discuss
policies. He was sometimes a hard
taskmaster and a severe critic, but
always a devoted friend of the
Journal,
In January, 1950, a decision was
taken to change the format of the
Zionist Record into a tabloid size.
This was a highly-complicated re-
form intended to give the Zionist
Record an attractive appearance
and facilities for the display of
news and advertising. Mr. Gering
was the major architect of this
reform. He recalls the day when he and
."Those were critical days," he Mrs. Katie Gluckmann were first
said in an interview. "Apart from elected to the Federation in 1924.
financial aid for Eretz Israel, the The late Mr. Jacob Gitlin ex-,
Federation was engaged in mo- claimed: "What's happening to the
mentous work in the field of public Federation? It is being filled with
relations and in attaining the youngsters and women." He and
goodwill of prominent personali- Gitlin soon became close friends
ties in this country towards the and phoned each other regularly
Zionist cause. The Record was our on Zioni- t business.
chief mouthpiece and through its Mr Gering has many interest-
columns we tried to convey the r. ring has many interest-
message of Zion to the community ing memories of earlier days.
as well to the South African public Shmaryahu Levin's oratory in
as a whole." 1922 was an unforgettable ex-
as a whole. perience and the sensational Grey-
BORN IN ZIONISM shirt case at Grahamstown, he
Son of a family of Maskilim, he says, still deserves to be fully
came to South Africa at the age described. The late Mr. Nahum
of 13. He started as a messenger Sokolow was go prolific and had
boy and educated himself in his such an inexhaustible fund of
leisure hours. Despite his busy knowledge that legal counsel had
youth, he found time for Zionist difficulty -in obtaining from him a
activity, devoted himself heart and concise briefing on the Protocols
soul to the cause until he rose in of the Elders of Zion. Gering was
1947 to the chairmanship of the delegated to talk to Sokolow and
Federation. draw up a memorandum.


; I


pop-



, . w T 9 f I 10 c A R p E T I N 0
IG %VG& r F, i







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


- PAGE FIVU


HfEARTIEST congratulations to
the Zionist Record on its
Golden Jubilee and best wishes
for its future. The 50 years of the
existence of your paper spans a
very fateful period in Jewish life.
I have known the Zionist Record
for all the years of its existence.
I well remember Benzion Hersch,
one of the founders of the Record.
,He served his people in all
spheres, with ability and sincerity
and shared to the full in the de-
velopment of the Jewish com-
munity in all its aspects. Under
his influence, your paper became
the recorder and mouthpiece of
South African Jewry's aspirations.
Those who followed him, were
they editors or policy makers, gave
voice in your paper with courage
and dignity to all that Jews strove
and fought for-their needs com-


Maintaining

a great

tradition
THE Golden Jubilee of the
Zionist Record is a notable
event in South African Zionism,
Symbolising' and reflecting the
great progress made since those
early years in 1891 when the first
Chovevei Zion Society was esta-
blished. In its own way the Zionist
Record has made a significant
contribution towards the evolu-
tion of the Zionist idea in South
Africa as well as the growth and
development of the. Zionist move-
ment, which has influenced South
African Jewry so profoundly. c
The Zionist Record not only t
mirrored the activities of the 0
movement but gave them con- I
-stant encouragement. As the offi-a
cial organ of the S.A. Zionist 1
Federation it 'ias helped to mould
and educate public opinion and to t
mobilise it in times of indifference t
and in days -of crisis behind the (
great effort to achieve the Zionist i
ideal.
Simultaneously,. the. Zionist Re- j


7131n ,11-.71fll 1"1-9,U IT


i
t


i
i
t


t
C
(
Cl

c


"MAKE THE

CALL TO

ALL OF US"

munally, their hopes nationally -
and so the Record gained the ear
and won the regard of the Jews
of South Africa, and the respect
of the wider public.
Out of the 50 years of your
paper's existence you, Mr. Editor
Gershater, have for the last 16
years guided the Record hard
years they were, black with the
great tragedy that befell our
people-and all through those
years you faithfully mirrored the
feelings of the Jewish people, and
showed a deep understanding of
the problems facing us. You fought
with increasing determination for
the right of the Jews to the Land
of the Jews, in weather, foul or
fair, and you have seen the State
of Israel emerging from the holo-
caust.
Much has yet to be done by
South African Jewry to help Israel
towards strength and security.
Much has yet to be told to the
Jews of South Africa of the needs
of Israel and our duty towards
the young State. Your paper is
there to make the call to all of
us, and to send your voice on
towards the next 50 years with the
hope that the half-century to come
will be filledwith fruitfulness and
peace.
",sy ? ywmi plo
With personal good wishes,
Yours sincerely,
NICOLAI KIRSCHNER.


cord has rendered faithful service
:o the community in other spheres
of endeavour, holding fast to the
principle that nothing Jewish is
alien to Zionism. Thus it has given
freely of its space to the en-
couragement of communal life, to
the furtherance of Hebrew educa-
tion and to the advancement of
charitable, social and sporting
institutions of all sections.
On the occasion of the Golden
Fubilee I wish to pay"tribute to the
)ioneers and founders of the Zion-
st Record, and to the men and
women who guided its destinies
throughout the years, whether in
in honorary or in a professional
capacity. I extend hearty congratu-
latlons to all who are engaged
n the production of the journal
today-to the editor and staff, the
contributors, the management
committee and the printers. I hope
that in the coming years they will
continue to maintain the great
raditions of the past in the service
of the community and of Israel.
ISRAEL DUNSKY
Chairman, S.A. Zionist Federation.


NEDERLANDSCHE ZIONISTENBOND
Ik geloof, dat het. moeilijk is een schoner ge- '
tuigenis san een Zionistisch orgaan te geven dan
de lezers er aan verschaffen door het felt, dat zlj
gebleken zijn een der voor Israel waardevolste
Joodse gemeenschappen in de Diaspora to zijn.
Moge dit resultaat ertoe aansporen de kracht
to vinden in de volgende decennia deze gemeenschap
in brede lagen er toe to brengen de weg van de o
Diaspora naar ons aller tehuis to vinden.
Amsterdam. J. ELZAS, President.


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A Golden Jubilee is a momentous occasion
indeed. Our Jubilee was celebrated in 1956
and we have now for more than 50 years made
good friends among every section of Johan-
nesburg's people. The Jewish community of
this city has been among its foremost builders
and we acknowledge a debt of gratitude to
them for their support over the years of our
existence. Johannesburg has grown, John Orr's
have grown and our conception of business has
grown as our premises have increased in size
so that today we are proud to say that we can
render service comparable with that to be
found in any city of the world.


EXTEND


THEIR


CONGRATULATIONS TO


THE ZIONIST RECORD


ON THE OCCASION OF


THEIR GOLDEN JUBILEE





PAGE SIX Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958



The Women's Zionist

Council
on behalf of the seventeen thousand
members of the two hundred and
fifty organised Women's Zionist
Societies and Branches
in the Provinces of South Africa
and the Rhodesias,
offers congratulations and good
wishes to the Zionist Record
on fifty years of service to the
Cause of Zionism
and the
Jewish Community of South Africa.
The Council welcomes this
opportunity to express
appreciation to the Zionist Record
for its co-operation in
publishing the aims and
programme of work of
Women's Zionist Societies.



The Women's Zionist Organisation of

S.A. Stands for:
A strong, active MEMBERSHIP.
BIENNIAL CAMPAIGNS for KEREN HAYESOD, WIZO and YOUTH ALIYAH.
FUNDRAISING through functions for the JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, WIZO and YOUTH ALIYAH.
j.N.F. TRADITIONAL ACTIVITIES through Box Clearances, Tree Drives, Inscriptions in the Golden Book,
Sefer Bar'/Batmitzvah, Sefer Hayeled, Telegrams, Stamps.
EDUCATION AND INFORMATION through the written and spoken word, Audio-Visual Techniques, and
through Study and Discussion Groups.







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE SEVEN


SThese cartoons by Walter Herz of London appeared
in our columns during the years of 1944-46


"And now my wife has
gone and joined a quiz
team of the Women's
Zionist League ... and
the questions she asks
me!!!"


*


"And what I liked most in
the Rosh Hashanah sermon
was the way our rabbi
criticised those who sit
with their legs crossed and
talk, talk and talk about
the Jewish problem and do
nothing about it . ."


<*


"Didn't the lecturer say
that we must be proud
of our heritage."


r The Arab boycott


"'io don't buy from
trousers, or anything
\


Jews any shoes, shirts,
you don't buy anyway."
*


SThe White Paper


"They that dwell in my house .. count me as a
stranger ... I am an alien in their sight"
(Job 19-15).
This cartoon referred to the refusal to admit
refugees into Palestine by the Mandatory
Government.


SAUL PINCUS
(PTY.) LTD.
have pleasure in reciprocating the the good wishes
extended to them by the ZIONIST RECORD when
the Company celebrated its GOLDEN JUBILEE
in 1962.
















The Late Mr. Saul Pincus,
Founder of the Company.

The principals of the firm of SAUL PINCUS (Pty.) Ltd. have
always associated themselves with the Zionist cause. The late
Mr. Saul Pincus and his brother-in-law, the late Mr. Isaac
Abrahams, were actively engaged In Zionist affairs and the
present directors have maintained this Interest. Mrs. Saul
Pincus is honorary life chairman of the Yeoville branch of
the Women's Zionist League.

Saul Pincus (Pty.) Ltd., are also proud of the part they have
played In serving the wholesale and allied Jewellery trades
throughout South Africa for 56 years.


FOURTH FLOOR
89 MARKET STREET, JOHANNESBURG
Phone 22-4939 P.O. Box 5249







PAGE EIGHT


REPORTING BATTLES FOR STATEHOOD


The


"illegal"


aliyah,


resistance and the



Jewish Brigade

By TED R. LURIE, managing editor of the Jerusalem Post and former
correspondent of the Zionist Record.
To us at the Jerusalem Post who can still remember our recent silver jubilee, youi
Zionist Record seems ancient indeed on the eve of its golden jubilee. I know, however, how
youthful the paper is in its spirit and enterprise under the dynamic editorship of Mr.
Gershater.
My own experience of "cover- the Yishuv's struggle at the same tinian soldiers in the Western
Ing" Jerusalem for the Zionist time for recognition as a war ally Desert in Egypt and later in Italy,
Record in the critical between -which was finally crowned with where they were formed into the
war years-between World War success on the establishment of Jewish Brigade, were among the
II and Israel's War of Independ- the Jewish Brigade. Although too most rewarding in all my news-
ence; the years 1944, '45, '46 and late to rescue the condemned mil- paper career.
'47-during which it was my task lions, the Palestinian Jewish sol- In recalling those days now
to cable weekly articles to Johan- diers in Europe In 1945 played a it becomes even clearer in
nesburg were without doubt the vital role in saving the remnants retrospect how important it was
most decisive and the most mem- and bringing them here to their that the Jewish Palestinian
orable in our lifetime, new life, fighting force was fighting
They covered the worst period It is no exaggeration for me against the common enemy and
In history for European Jewry, the to say that the stories I wrote for under its own flag.
days of the Nazi gas chambers, and the Record of the Jewish Pales- I remember most vividly how
thrilling it was to see at General


Sincere Jubilee Greetings from




M. BLOCH

& Co. (Pty.) Ltd.
JOHANNESBURG : CAPE TOWN : DURBAN : BULAWAYO


The late Mr. MONES BLOCH


Among the oldest advertisers in the Zionist Record,
M. BLOCH & CO. (PTY.) LTD. can be regarded as
pioneers of commerce in South Africa. The company
was founded in Cape Town more than 65 years ago
by the late Mr. Menes Bloch, and the story of Its
romance and growth from a small store to the vast
organisation it is today is largely the story of the
Bloch family, of whom the third generation is now
engaged in business.
Through Its offices in London, New York and else-
where, the company imports a tremendous variety
of merchandise and thus caters for the needs of
the trade throughout the Union and the Federation.
The company Is proud of its record of service to
all sections of the community and will endeavour
to maintain this reputation in the future.


Clark's headquarters in Florence
in the spring of 1945, on the eve


- British troops searching the ,
luggage of "illegal immigrants." i

of the final thrust that pushed
the Germans out of Italy and
practically out of the war, a huge
map of the Italian front with
small flags of a dozen different
nations that made up the allied
armies there-and among those
flags pinned into a point on the
River Seno was the blue and white
Zionist pennant .that was the
banner of the Jewish Brigade and


Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, NOVEMBER 21, 1958

Readers will remember the name of Ted R. Lurle, now managing
editor of the Jerusalem Post, who was Jerusalem correspondent of 1
the Zionist Record during the critical period of 1944-47, the period
preceding the establishment of the State. Below are typical news
stories of August, 1946. They deal with deportations of refugees
from Israel curfew in Haifa, statements by the British Government
and decisions by Polish Zionists to evacuate all Jews from Poland.
It is this type of news which, in this article, Mr. Lurie recalls i
having cabled week by week to the Zionist Record. -


HAIFA UNDER CURFEW O

'LIBERTY" SHIPS LOAD,


not found its Werfel or Hersey to
record it, and the cables that we
reporters managed to write under
the noses of the British censors


First S.A. Zionist

conference

V ETERAN Zionist Abraham
Kirson, of Johannesburg, is
the only surviving delegate of the .o
first S.A. Zionist Conference ,
which was held ii Johannesburg in
July, 1905.
The conference met under the
shadow of the death of Dr. Herzl
which took place the previous
year. The horrors of the Klshinev
pogrom were still fresh in the
minds of the delegates and there
was the rift between the sup-
porters of Uganda and the sup-
porters of Palestine as the pros-
pective Jewish national home. The
chairman, Mr. Sam Goldreich, re- MR A KIRSON
ferrec. to all these events in his
presidential address.. Africa.
A notable feature of the con- Mr. Kirson, who is happily still
ference was a paper delivered by active in" the I.U.A., has vivid
the late Dr. J. H. Hertz, the then memories of those days' when
Rabbi of the Johannesburg Hebrew. already there were no less than 74
Congregation, on the history of Zionist societies from the Cape
Jewish settlement in Southern to Zambesi.


The Haganah ship, Exodus,
which was ordered back to
Europe in 1947.
ln............. ......l...a. l t
fight the war as if there were no
White P.aper and-'fight the White
Paper as if there were no war."
I regarded then, and of course
still do regard,, that a newspaper-
ihan worth his salt is also a
fighter and, in recording this
period of history, I am happy that
I was privileged to play a tiny
role.
In wishing the Zionist. Record
another half century of success I
can only pray that you won't have
any more wars to report.


DEPO RTEES "A J ews to .Curfew.Brekes
SQuitPoland"





,.,. .
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.444 IA J 44 '4 .. f,,4 4 'A tS 4 A.


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44 *r 4 ., f,, A,' rai <',. t ''' ,.:,. .' 4 44 A "A " .' .. ..
4 s,.ti 5 A .. .. . .. 4... . ..... 1 . ' ..
... 7 .. A S: ., -,-, 4 s ... . . ... .,.. .
4 .0 $ a4 0 A 4 ,. .:t' U B i i. i. ... .4,.











were totally inadequate, but. the
experience has left an indelible
Memory nevertheless.

Censorship was a particular
obstacle in trying to tellthe-truth
.. of the arms show 'trials of that
period in which a few ,Hagana

military courts.
Some of your readers in South-
Africa, Mr. Gershater, may not

i.e. the growing terrorism of the
Irgun Zvai Leumi and the Ster-
nists with whose activities I had
little sympathy.
If I am to be charged with lack
of objectivity as a reporter I
acqept without demurrer and can
only add that I was surely not
expected to-be objective in report-
ing the 'simultaneous strugglee
against the British White Paper
and against Hitler.-
If you remember, At. the out-
.* '^ break of the. E openn .war, Ben
Gurion -outlifted our extremely
difficult and& almost impossible'
position, when he said: "We will
afterwards became the flag of the ". ..
State of Israel. ,
Then came the heartbreaking. "
coverage of the Resistance Aliya A
Bet "hell ships" that ran the
Royal Navy blockade, and thethe

struggle of the Yishuv in support
of that immigration, including the
raids on the refugee camps, the.
radar stations and so on. That
tremendous human story has still








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


DA VID DAINOW: Editor of the Zionist Record
(1923-43)


the credit for its rise to its
present estate undoubtedly
belongs to him.
SIt was during his- encumbency Edgar Bernstein
of the editorial chair that the
journal developed from a monthly
to a fortnightly, and from a fort-C
nightly into the weekly of the pre-
sent day. He attracted to the
columns of the Zionist Record con-
tributions from Jewish writers all
over the world, and gave it the
character of a Jewish newspaper "
where it had previously been limi-.
ted to. Zionist propaganda.
He made it a policy to encourage .
South African Jewish writers to
S David Dainow express themselves in its columns,
.......... ............................. ...... and many are the names, today
well known in South African
OR 20 of the Zionist Jewry, which first made their
Record's 50 years of exis- literary appearance in its pages.
tence-from 1923 to 1943-its. David Dainow brought to light
editorial and business manage- the literary talent of the late Dr.
David Mierowsky, one of South
Inent was in the hands of Mr. Africa's best known educationists.
David Dainow,- and much of Impressed by Mierowsky's cul-
tural attainments when he met him Formerly assistant editor of the
in Port Elizabeth, Dainow invited ornist Rmerly assistcordant editor of thess
*.lf him to contribute to the Record. itat editor of the Sw aewis
H" Mierowsky declined. "I am aI Timhes. is
teacher, not a writer," hp said. But I,,,,,,,,,.,,,,0,,,,,,,,,.,...,,,.,,,.,,,,,*,, .
Dainow persisted, and eventually
got him to agree to "try his lish articles, written at Mr.
hand" at writing-on condition Dalnow's invitation, appeared in
that he be allowed to put his the Zionist Record-though Chalm
thoughts into letter form, as Gershater little thought, in those
though he were writing, not for an days, that they would lead him,
audience, but to his son. That was eventually, to the "Record's"
how "Letters of a Jewish Father editorial chair.
to His Son" came to be written,,' I personally owe a special debt
and their regular appearance in of gratitude to David Dainow, for
the. Zionist Record created such it was under him that I served my
an interest that their publication apprenticeship in Jewish journa-
in book form followed: lism.
It was David Dainow who first I joined the staff of the Zionist
encouraged Mr. Chaim Gershater, Record way back in 1934, in re-
the present editor the Zionist sponse to an advertisement calling
Record, to write in English. Mr. for "an assistant to the editor."
X Mr- (now Justice) S. M. Kuper, Gershater was then Principal of I was a young man, new to the
I who was chairman of the Edi- the Bulawayo Hebrew School, and rough and tumble of Jewish com-
I trial Board in the 'twenties. contributed to the overseas'Hebrew munal affairs, and my first ex-
......... .,... ,......................I...................i and Yiddish press. His first Eng- perlences in my new position


shattered quite a few of my
illusions about comnmunal work and
communal leaders.
Had it not been for the unfailing
kindness which David Dainow
showed me during the early months
of adaptation, I doubt whether
I would have remained in Jewish
journalism. Dainow held me over
the brambles and taught me to
develop a resistance to the frus-
trations and disappointments that
are as inseparable a part of Jewish
communal work as its rewards and
satisfactions.
He became my friend as well as
my "Chief," and though I left the
paper a few years later for other
pastures, we have remained close
friends to this day
His capacity for friendship has
always been one of David Dainow's
characteristics. Though he has
never been rich in a worldly sense
(what journalist who remains a


I The late Mr. B. Reinhold, who |
I was for many years chairman !
I of Kadimah Press, publishers I
j of the Zionist Record. |
llllllllellel Ill I III IIIIIIIII ,lllll lll III IIIIII I I..11.


j Mr. J. Daleski, who was closely !
I associated with the Zionist
* Record as chairman and mem- I
ber of the editorial board.


: ,
,,


journalist ever is?), he has been
prodigal in the friendship he has
lavished on many people, who have
kept in touch with him from dif-
ferent parts of the world. His
approach to people was-still is-
to take them on trust. Doing so
has brought him his share of dis-
appointments; but also, I am sure
has enriched his life, as he has
enriched the lives of his friends.
It was David Dalnow's human-
kindliness that brought him to
South Africa. He came to the
Union in 1922, to help place some
of the orphans of World War I in
Jewish homes here. A Zionist from
his youthful days in his native
England, and a free-lance journa-
list in Canada, he began contri-
buting to the Zionist Record-
then the monthly bulletin of the
S.A. Zionist Federation, edited,
as part of his work as Secretary
of the Zionist Federation, by Jack
Alexander.
Alexander was one of the most
brilliant personalities ever to serve
(Continued on page 92)


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PAGE NINB





PAGE TEN Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD,-FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958






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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958

30 YEARS AGO THEY WERE PIONEERS IN TEL AVIV


Chaim Joffe and Louis


Policansky

From a Correspondent


SITTING on a verandah in a
quiet by-way of Tel Aviv, I
had an interesting, chat with a
little-known but nevertheless very
distinguished South A f r i c a n
pioneer in Israel.' She is silver-
haired, friendly, Mrs. Bertha
Joffe, who, with her husband.
Chaim Joffe, and their .two child-
ren, set up their home in 'Tel Aviv
in March, 1928. '
The Joffes -belonged to a select
group of Cape Zionists who had
done so much for the movement at
the beginning of the century when
men of vision, optimism and ex-
ceptional daring were,required.
Her particular group included
- Chaim and Myer Joffe, the
Salber, Gesundheit and Polican-
sky families, and the never-to-
be-forgotten Jacob Gitlin.
The late Chaim was a man of
and built up a very successful cold
storage business in South Africa.
Even in those early days he plan-
ned to introduce a similar cold
storage plant into Eretz Yisrael.
MORTGAGE BANK
When Shmaryah Levin visited
South Africa in 1922 he interested
local business men in the idea of
investment. Thus, the plan for a
mortgage bank-the South African
Binyan--first germinated. Joffe,
Policansky, and the rest took up
shares and made their first prac-
tical link with Eretz Israel. In
1924 they visited Palestine and
rejoiced to see that the Binyan
was already in operation under the
enterprising management of
Abraham Levy.
Chaim Joffe lost no time. He
acquired the site on the Petach
Tlkva road, near Tel Aviv's old
railway station, where the Pales-
tine Cold Storage has continued to
operate until this very day. He
also induced Louis Policansky, who
with his wife settled in Israel later.
in the same year (1928), to join
with him in acquiring orange
groves and purchased extensive
stretches of land at a time when
such investments were quite risky.
Early the next year Cha'm Joffe
went abroad. He attended the
Zionist Congress at Basle and went
on to England to order machinery
for his cold storage plant. He
then proceeded to South Africa to
enlist the collaboration of his col-


leagues. While all this was hap-
pening the 1929 riots broke out and
they were liable to have shaken the
faith of any potential investor.
However, Joffe did not hesitate
and went ahead with his plans. His
cold storage opened in 1930 and
was a success from the start.
It was a bitter blow in the first
place to his brave wife and family,
but no less to his wide circle of
friends, when Chaim Joffe died in
1935. In these short seven years,
however, he succeeded in building
up a flourishing business wh!ch
was able even then to declare a
dividend of 15 per cent..
EVERYTHING IMPORTANT


Bulgarian Zionists who wished to
settle on the land. Whtn they
came here, however, there was no
work, and the land itself could
give them no living.
Policansky acted swiftly. Com-
bining all the land holdings into
a joint project, he helped to bring
up a water supply, negotiated for
mortgages to enable the settlers
to obtain their homes, and pro-
ceeded to lay the foundations of
orange plantations and fruit
orchards.
Dozens of families took advan-
tage of this scheme and today this
is one of the most prosperous
farming areas in the entire
country. At first the prices
obtained for oranges were not
encouraging and there was always
the problem of a large quantity
of rejects. Chalm Joffe soon had
the brainwave of bottling the
surplus orange juice, and it was
not long before his product, Mitz-
Paz, was on the market. This


Mrs. Joffe thinks wistfully back subsequently developed into the
to those days 30 years ago whet, large enterprise Jaffora, which is
everything, however insignificant, so well appreciated on the British
was so important to them all. She and Continental markets.
cannot talk highly enough of the SOCIAL LIFE
tremendous generosity of Lou s
Poncansky, who always avoided I asked Mrs. Joffe what social
publicity and self-aggrandisement life was like in those days. Her
His happy financial -position face immediately lit up. "It was
enabled him to help many a de- wonderful," she said. "Tel Aviv
serving cause. Apart from his very was very much smaller in those
substantial holdings in the Cold days, and everyone belonged to one
Storage, the Binyan, and the family. We took pleasure in the
orange groves, Policansky was smallest things. Every time a tree
always seeking out other means of was planted it meant something to
helping people without thought of us personally.
reward. In those days they lived in Hess
One of his favourites was' the Street, just off Allenby Road. Per-
Jewish National Fund. In' those sons familiar with Tel Aviv will
days when land acquisition was a appreciate what it means when
very complicated affair, the J.N.F. she says that she could sit on the
used to acquire options on large verandah on .the first floor and
tracts of land by means of nominal look right out to sea. There were
deposits. After a lapse of time no buildings on Ben Yehuda or
which might mean several months, Hayarkon Streets. The Mograbi
or even years, the Arab owners Theatre (ame later.
would suddenly make up their The Joffes used to spend a lot
minds tha to hey wanted to sell,y ibut of their time with the Policanskys,
they had o have the money im- Gesundhelts, and Mr and Mrs.
mediately. Where was the Keren hn co sund-
Kayemeth to obtain it? There was Mark Levin. When Jacob Gesund-
one address which would never helt built his beautiful house in
fail, and whenever they turned to Ben Yehuda Street containing its
Louis Policansky he put his hand own shul, it was one of the won-
deep into his pocket. Thus he was ders of the generation. It was
directly responsible for many also regarded by the old-timers
valuable acquisitions of national as being at the other end of the
land. world. Today the site of that
Policansky and the Joffes were house is the scene of bitter con-
associated in those days with trov6rsy because that -is where
another valuable project. The Tel Aviv's first Supermarket has
area of their orange grove was a been erected -- just around the
neglected stretch of land. The corner from the Federation's
J.N.F. had adjoining tracts, but offices.
there was no water. It hadI During her 30 years, Mrs. Joffe
promised the area to a group of had more than her fair share of


KARAKUL INDUSTRY IN S.W.A.

ALSO CELEBRATES GOLDEN

JUBILEE IN 1958
THE Karakul industry was established in S.-W.A. in the year 1908. From modest begin-
nings it has grown in th. course of 'the 50 years to undreamt of proportions. Exports from
the Union and S.-W.A. currently sold on world markets realise 7,100,000.
More women the world over will in the karakul breed with the ex- out small fur fashions-stoles,
probably buy karakul pelt gar- ceptional lustre and suppleness capelets, jackets, hip-length capes,
ments this year than ever before. added to it which puts the South- boleros, etc., made of South-West
Karakul pelt, or as better known West African Persian lamb pelt African Persian Lamb.
in -the fashion world, South-West In a category of its own in the fur
African Persian lamb, comes from trade and fashion world. HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR
the young lambs of the karakul PERSIAN LAMB
sheep, which originated somewhere THE NAME
in Asia Minor almost 4,000 years By colour: Everybody knows
ago. The name karakl1 is probably black Persian lamb, and this beau-
The young lambs are slaugh- derived from the oasis of Karakul tifully textured, silky fur is the
tered, as soon as possible after in the province of Buchara border- most widely produced. You will
birth to retain the lightness in ing the Black, Sea. (Kara-kull find that there are silvery greys,
weight, the characteristic curly means Black Sea.) warm browns and milky chocolate
pattern, the lustre and the supple- Some. writers, however, insist tones. Most of these colours are
ness, without sacrificing strength, that the karakul breed originated obtained through the skill of the
which all contribute towards the in Persia and currently the name expert dyer -who knows just how
growing popularity of garments" Persian Lamb for the pelt derived to treat 'these furs to be so smart
made from South-West African from the karakul sheep is in- and acceptable.
Persian lamb. '. general use the world over. B texture: The distinctive curl


RENOWNED
The karakul sheep breed is a
branch of the fat-tailed (Afri-
kaans: -vetstert) breed of sheep
known-to scientists as Ovis platy-
cerca, native to the arid, hot
Middle East. The fat-tailed sheep
is renowned for the value of its
pelt in respect of its strength,
durability and fineness of grain,
which naturally has been retained


The first pelts from South-West
Africa were exported in 1920 and
fetched an average 6s. each. In
1924 total pelt exports were 12,000,
which were sold for 7,200.
Currently about 31 million pelts
are exported annually from the
Union and South-West and sold on
world markets for 7,100,000.
, Fashionable women in South
'Africa already agree that no
woman is really well dressed with-


varies and it Is very much a mat-
ter of taste whether you choose
a tight, springy curl. You might
find you preferred one type for a
jacket, another for a collar, but
whatever type or colour you do
prefer, the fur must be supple.
This is most important: it is the
sign that you are getting a really
good fur-Persian lamb from
South-West Africa or the North-
Western Cape.


PAGE ELEVEN


Spreading the message
W HEN a Jewish paper any-
where in the world celebrates
its golden jubilee it is a most o Z io
significant event. How much more
significant is a golden jubilee cele- '
bration of a Zionist paper pub-
lished in a young Jewish com-
munity such as South Africa!
The Zionist Record has faith-
fully mirrored the social, religious
and cultural life of the South
African Jewish community almost
since the inception of Its organised
life; and as the official organ of
the S.A. Zionist Federation it has
acted as a most vital instrument
for the achievement of the aims
and objects of this model terri-
torial Zionist organisation.
As one who has been associated
with the Zionist movement in this
country for many years, and in
my present capacity as the
national chairman of the Israeli
United Appeal, I wish on this
solemn occasion to pay tribute to
the members of the editorial and
management boards, the editors
and the staff, and to wish them a
hearty Mazeltov.
The outstanding successes of
our fund-raising campaigns in the
cause of Zion are due not only to and security. The Zionist Record
the devotion and enthusiasm ofasal ys Ted ostro
the campaign workers and contri- always eminent part in this fid eld.o-
butors but also to the Jewish eart nthsfe
Press, which has spread the in- Heartiest congratulations and
spring message of the ZionisL Chazak Ve'ematz!
aspirations of the Jewish people II. TROPE,
and of the heroic struggle of the National Chairman, Israeli
Yishuv for national independence United Appeal.


violence and political unrest. When
the 1929 riots broke out one Fri-
day morning in August, her hus-
band was on the high scan. Herr
cousin who managed the pardesa
was an Important link in Haganah
communications and often used toI
conceal Illegal weapons in her
sofa. Her only concern when the


troubles began was that hd should
be able to get home in time to
join her and her children.
Her son Harry, who was not
yet 17, was soon commandeered
by the British to act as inter-
preter and guide to the shiploads
of marines who were hurriedly
(Continued on page 98.)


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LAMB 7

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All Furs are mothproofed by the famous Kildew Process.


le







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


W HEN the leaders of the
Zionist Federation decided
to "launch its own organ, they
chose my father, the late Isaac
Abrahams, for the post of editor.
He was at the same time secretary
of the Federation.
I remember his first enthusiasm.
'The newly printed Record was to
replace the earlier duplicated
bulletins which consisted almost
entirely of lists of donations. My
father was determined to turn the
bulletin into a magazine. He
sought and found news and arti-
cles.
I recall my father, small in
stature, but tireless in energy and
quite unlike the members of his
committee. He was the product
of the East End of London, of
parents of Polish extraction, and
of thorough English habit and
manner. He spoke no Yiddish, but
understood it well. He was a man
of letters and wide education, not
only in English literature, but in
Orthodox Jewish custom and
ritual. He was deeply versed in
the English classics and was a
member of the Authors' Club in


HE WAS A FRIEND OF GHANDI AND ZANGWILL'


Isaac Abrahams


editor


his early London days.
Having grown up in an extreme-
ly religious atmosphere, he atten-
ded Synagogue daily as a "Thilim
boy" in his very early youth.
He was a pupil of the famous
Jews' Free School of Middlesex
Street, London (to-day affectiona-
tely termed "Pettycoat Lane.").
His best friend and constant
companion from his very early
days until he left for South Africa,
was none other than the famous
Anglo-Jewish writer, Israel Zang-
will. At an early age, Zangwill had
an ambition to establish a perio-
dical that would compete with
"Punch," the famous magazine


,~unuuuunnuuEunnuu..nuuuuuunauunuuu.innun.nnuuuu..ninu.ma.Imnuuununwnumnuininuu5


PR ETORIA

UNITED

JH[ E BR W E W


CONGREGATION

Extends best wishes to the Zionist Record on
the occasion of its 50th Anniversary.

No. 4 IN A SERIES


SASHELVING

SELF SERVICE UNITS
.. INSTALLED IN A DAY!
Full
from a
details AFRICA (PTY) LTD.


mUmmmo


An appreciation S
by his son
' Arthur G. Abrahams

of satire and wit. The name was
to be "Ariel" or "Puck." Zangwill
was to be the editor, an4 Isaac
Abrahams a regular contributor in
both verse and prose. yt1.'
My father graduated from pupil,
to teacher at the Jews' Free School
and later followed his profession
further afield. He taught at Han- .
bury and Deal Street Schools in i
London, and his evenings were
most often spent in giving lessons
in English to Jewish immigrants.
Not infrequently these evening-
classes were disturbed by the in-
trusion of "roughs" who sought
fun in trying to upset the
"foreigners." The East End of
London had its irresponsible youths .'.
even in those days.
In 1904, my father accepted an FIRST OFFICE OF
invitation from Oudtshoorn to be- I the Federation and
come headmaster of the Jewish i building above (withI
School in the thriving ostrich In 1908 +there were
centre. He sailed by steamship In 1908 there were i
and landed in Mossel Bay. In those only horse-drawn ca
early days there was no train
connection between Mossel Bay .... ...................... ........
and Oudtshoorn and he had to con- and Indian pupils. .
tinue his journey over the preci- Then came 1908 when
pitious Montagu Pass in a Cape editing the Zionist Re,
cart drawn by three horses and
driven by a coloured man.
He never forgot his seemingly
hazardous arrival in the compara-
lIA-- F1::!


The late Mr. Isaac Abrahams.
tively wild, mountainous and
barren land.
My father soon found himself
in the position of secretary of the
Synagogue as well as headmaster
of the school.
In 1907 my father decided to
move to Johannesburg, where his
brother A. M. Abrahams (later
chairman of the S.A. Zionist
Federation), was headmaster of
the Jewish Government School.
The school was then situated at
the bottom of Eloff Street, where
the Johannesburg station now
stands.
Ile taught at this school for a
short while and then accepted a
position in a Boksburg school.
Boksburg had no station at that
time and he had to travel each
day to East Rand station and then
walk two miles over the bare veld.
Those were the days of the wild
and lawless Chinese workers on
the mines. Having to pass near a
location he was advised to arm
himself and I can well remember
him coming home at night and
emptying from his pocket a
gleaming brass knuckle-diuster.
Already at that stage 1lis after-
noons were occupied with the Zion-
ist Federation. The excessive tra-
velling to and from Boksburg
proved unbearable and he found a
teaching post at Market Street
school and subsequently Newtown
school. These schools were in the
neighbourhood of Ferreirastown
and had a large number of Jewish
pupils.
Indeed, the face of Johannesburg
has changed over the years; since
today the two schools mentioned
are attended only by Coloured


-our first


THE ZIONIST RECORD: The office of
the Zionist Record was. in Goldreich
balcony). This picture was taken in 1913.
1o motor vehicles stationed outside, but
hbs. The building also housed the, law
offices of Ghandi.
......................................................................
office was in Goldreich buildings
he began (corner of Joubert and Commis-
cord. The (Continued on page 90)


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Phone 22-5589 JOHANNESBURG


PAGE TWELVE








PAIGE THIRTEEN


FROM THE ZIONIST RECORD OF NO VEMBER 14, 1913


Recalling


the


Beilis


trial


-AN EVENT THAT SHOOK THE WORLD
IN 1913 the civilised world was shocked by the infamous Beilis Blood Libel case in Czarist
Russia. Mendel Beilis, a Kiev Jew. was accused of ritual murder. There were storms of pro-
test and indignation in almost every Western country. In[ Johannesburg a special protest
meeting was held at the Wanderers. The Zionist Record of November 14, 1913, devoted a
special supplement to the meeting and reproduced a full page cartoon from the Rand Daily
Mail.
Mendel Beilis was -superinten-
dent of a brick-kiln at Zaitev, on
the outskirts of Kiev. He was
accused of the ritual murder of
12-year-old Andrei Yushinsky.
The mutilated body of this boy
was found in a small cave near
Kiev on March 25, 1911. His hands
were tied behind his back, and the
body had 47 knife wounds.
It was established at an aut-
tpsy that the clothes, surface and
er organs of the victim's body
were saturated with blood. Some
days before the discovery of the
body, however, the anti-semites of
the city spread rumours that the
boy' had been murdered by the
Jews.
Under the influence of these
allegations a second autopsy was
held and it was claimed that the
blood had been completely drained
from the .body.


VENOMOUS CAMPAIGN
This was the signal for a veno-
mous campaign by extreme reac-
tionaries, who thus hoped to offset
a bill before the Duma (Russian
parliament) to abolish the Jewish
Pale of Settlement and grant the
'Jews the right to live anywhere
in Russia.
These, reactionaries claimed in a
St. Petersburg newspaper and in
the Duma that a ritual murder
had been committed by a Jewish
sect of: Chassidim. The Russian
Government decided to press
charges of ritual murder.
This was contrary to the re-
port of the chief of the Kiev
Secret Investigation Police,
Mistchuk, who declared after an
investigation that the boy had
been killed, by a notorious band
of Kiev criminals, who had tor-
tured him to make him confess
that he had informed the police
about their activities.
Beilis was chosen as the scape-
goat and was arrested on the
testimony of two habitual drunk-
ards, a lantern-tender and his wife.
They alleged that the boy had
been abducted by a "man with a
black beard" and identified Bellis
as that man.
The chief of the Kiev Provincial
Gendarmerie testified for the de-
fence .of Beills at a trial in
February, 1912, that a criminal
gang, headed by Vera Cheberiak,
was suspected of the'murder and
that the evidence, against Beilis
was false.
Mistchuk, who had resigned
after the arrest, advanced proof
of the innocence of Bellis at the
trial and was then arrested and
sentenced to a year's imprison-
ment for "fabricating evidence."

FOR AND AGAINST
While various Christian church-
men in Russia expressed the
opinions that "Jews used the blood
of Christians in the preparation
of matzos as a symbol of their
mastery over Gentiles," and that
for Jews "the annihilation of non-
Jews was meritorious and would
hasten the Messiah's coming,"
others testified against the blood
charges.
The Russian Government decided
to press the charge and a second
indictment was made against
Bellis in 1913, openly charging himI
with ritual murder.
prominent people throughout
the world protested against this
accusation including Ajnatole
France, Gerhart Hauptmann.
After a farcical trial, which
lasted 34 days, the prosecution
witnesses broke down on theI


This cartoon was reproduced from the Rand Daily Mail on a
full page of the Zionist Record on November 14, 1913. It was
headed "ANNO DOMINI, 1913 "


stand, and retracted their testi-
mony.
The jury then brought in a
compromise verdict: Beilis was not
guilty, but there had been a ritual
murder. Thus the government
made no attempt to search for
the real criminals and adherents
of the ritual murder theory could
claim a victory.
Some time later, however.
Vera Cheberiak, confessed that
she and her gang were guilty of
the murder.
After the trial, Bellis went to
Palestine and worked in Jaffa for
eight years. He then went to
America and died in New York in
1934. He always resented any at-
tempt to exploit his extraordinary
fame saying he would not make
capital of the sorrows of his
people.
JOHANNESBURG MEETING
The mass meeting at the Wan-
derers Hall was attended by many
prominent people, stated the
Zionist -Record report. Among
those present were the Mayor of
Jbohannesburg, Mr. W. R. Boustred,
Archdeacon Seaton, the Rev. Mr.
D. Theron, Mr. Patrick Duncan,
-Senator Samuel Marks, the Clonsul
for Sweden, Mr. John E. Johnson,
town councillors and leading
Christian clergymen.
The Mayor, Mr. doustred, said
in his speech that Christendom
"frankly' acknowledged its indebt-
edness to Jewry for many of the
fundamental laws upon which our
moral civilisation is built, and one
of those great laws of the ancient
law-giver Moses is, 'Thou shalt do
no murder." (Applause.)
"It is unthinkable, that murder
is committed In the Jewish ritual
of today, and it our duty to do our
utmost to refute that calumny,"
he added.

RIDICULOUS CHARGE
Archdeacon Seaton moved a
resolution expressing "deepest
sympathy with Jewry on the re-
vival of the baseless present trial
in Kiev, and regrets that such re-
vival is possible in this enlightened
age."
He described the charge as
"ridiculous" and said that such
prejudice, misrepresentation and


persecution was alien to the
Christian spirit.'
Seconding the resolution, the
Rev. Theron recalled the history
of the Jewish people to prove that
the charge was malicious and
false.
He said that hatred, bitterness
and jealousy was at the bottom of
the "terrible persecutions" of the
Jewish people.
He saw two hopeful signs at
the present moment: the Zionist
movement and that the Jew was
seeing that he had neglected his
language far too long.
The resolution was put to the
meeting and carried unanimously.
SECOND RESOLUTION
Mr. Patrick Duncan tlien moved
a resolution requesting the Govern-
ment to make representations by
cable to His Majesty's Foreign
Secretary, and to request him to
bring all possible pressure to bear
on the Russian Government to pre-
vent, in the interests of humanity,
the outbreak of pogroms.
Mr. Duncan said that interna-
tional sympathies counted "for a
very great deal nowadays, if only
in one respect, and that is in the
international money market.
"There are some who hold that
the great powers of the world to-
day are so bound together in ties
of business that war has become,
or at any rate, is becoming im-
possible." (Hear, hear.,
"We have the right to protest
in the cause of humanity. We
have the right also of a com-
munity in which a large number of
the Jewish people have settled, to
the advantage of the community,
in which they are recignlsed as
law-abiding citizens, citizens who
take their share in the work of the
community in every possible way."
(Applause.)
Mr. C. F. Stallard, K.C., seconded
the resolution. He said:
"Here in Johannesburg we owe
a very great deal indeed, perhaps
more than in most towns, to that
element of our fellow citizens of
the Hebrew race.
"That race is always to the fore
In commerce, mining and industry,
and last, but not least, in the pro-
fession to which I belong. What a
dull place Johannesburg would be
if only the Hebrew community
were eliminated from It." he said.
Dr. F. E. T. Krause, K.C, said
that ever since he had come to


By Mervyn Harris


Johannesburg he had been in very
close contact with his Jewish
friends and he knew from personal
experience that acccusattons of the
nature the meeting was discussing
were entirely foreign to the Jewish
nature.
He said that it was time for the
Russian Government to see that its
people became educated, and that
It absorbs the civilization which is
the portion of the Western nations
of Europe; that it sees that its
own people get rid of that re-
ligious intolerance which was still
found in Russia.

MORAL DUTY
The resolution was then carried
unanimously amid applause.
Rabbi Dr. J. L. Landau proposed
the vote of thanks of r.ie Jewish
community to the speakers and
said that it was the moral duty
of every man who champions the
cause of civilisation to raise his
voice in protest and orerik a lance
on behalf of outraged humanity.


The supplement in the Zionist
Record also carried messages of
support for the meeting and a
copy of a letter, sent by Mr. Ben-
zion S. Hersch, hon. secretary of
the Russo-Jewtsh Committee, to
the Prime Minister, General Louis
Botha, informing him of the resolu-
tions adopted at the meeting.
CORRIDORS FULL
In the letter, Mr. Herscn said:
"The attendance at the meet-
ing was very large, the large
Wanderers' Hall being crowded,
the corridors were filled, and a
large number of people were
standing at the sides of the hall
outside, while many hundreds
went away on account of lack of
accommodation."
A reply from Mr. W. E Bok,
secretary to the Prime Minister,
was also printed in which he
assured Mr. Hersch that the Prime
Minister "will not fall to forward
these resolutions through the
proper channels."


ow"IzaI 'I v


THE LION

on the

ARMS OF JERUSALEM

This lion represents the historic connection with the Kingdom
of Judah, whose capital was Jerusalem. The two olive
branches symbolize peace. The background suggests the
Walling Wall. These arms were introduced shortly after the
War of Independence.
For 50 years the Avords Zionist Record have formed the
banner on a newspaper that has faithfully reported local and
world news and where necessary analysing and commenting
on it as it affected or concerned the Jews in this great
sub-continent.
For such service words of congratulation must
not be stinted. The men in the shops under the
sign of the lion rampant say with one voice-
"MAZELTOV."


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Be congratulated on your good taste-get yours at the shops
under the sign of the lion rampant.


$Supplep2nnt to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


Memories of the


ZIONIST


OFFICE


JN 1914, while at Mr. Maurice Smollan's Johannes-
burg Business College, I "received a call" to act
as assistant to Mr. I. Abrahams, who was secretary
of the Federation and editor of the Record in add;-
tion to his regular job as teacher at the Johannesburg
Commercial High School.
In those days the Record mainly consisted of official
bulletins received from Zionist headquarters in Berlin and
reports of Zionist doings in country centres.
There were two features which the Record now lacks, but which
at that time made up an important part of the "magazine," namely,
"Extracts from Executive Meetings" and "Contributions to Funds."
The executive was, of course, the S.A. Zionist Federation, and the
funds included J.N.F. stamps, telegram forms, J.N.F. and "Federation
Dues," which, however, were very inadequately and irregularly paid.
A frequent beneficiary was the Bezalel School of Arts and Crafts at
Jerusalem; a considerable proportion of Zionist funds was derived
from collections at simchoth and "Shnodering" at houses of prayer.
Publication date was 15th of the every copy was wrapped by hand
month, but almost invariably it and from here It was posted.
was nearer the end of the month The address was Goldreich
by the time the Record reached Buildings, where His Majesty's
its readers; either "The Bulletin" Theatre now stands. In addition
hadn't arrived, or an executive to the one room, the Federation
meeting was about to take place had the use of the phone in Gold-
and the printing of the paper reich Brothers' office, and of their
was kept back so that the meeting board-room for meetings. We
should be mentioned, also used their 1 etter-press, a
If an Important Zionist society heavy screw-down arrangement
wanted a function reported standing on the floor, between
"this month, and not the next," whose two heavy boards you
but hadn't managed to get the placed the leather-bound book con-
report off In time (no air-mail, training the letters you had writ-
remember!) the Record waited! ten, plus a -Sheet of wet blotting-
The Record's headquarters were, paper for each letter; which book
of course, the offices of the after being screwed down hard
Federation more correctly, the between the boards, would shelter
office. Here wrappers were ad- copies of the day's correspondence.
dressed; here the paper was de- If you did not work the screw
livered from the printers; here carefully the book would move


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and you'd have a blurred mess
of blue, wholly or partly, Illegible.
The original letter would then also
be illegible.
In well-staffed offices this was
the work of the office boy, but
since our work was as much an
ideal as a paying job-probably
more so-in the office of the Zion-
ist Record the editor or his female
assistant carried out these duties,
the latter always with a prayer
in her heart. There was one con-
solation regarding these copies-
they really were copies, with no
chance of faking. For the use
of this equipment, the office and
phone, we paid a monthly rent of
2 10s.
My duties on the "literary" side
consisted of drawing up and seeing
through the press the extracts of
minutes (in consultation with the
secretary), contributions to funds,


An early photograph of Harry :
= Moss-Morris. -
and reports from societies and
centres. These last often reached
the office in the form of letters,
loosely written, and had to be
condensed and put into shape. It
took some time before I acquired
the art of giving each person his
due-or rather what he expected.
(I'm not sure I ever did acquire
it.) I also, assisted in proof-reading
and with the set-up.
The posting had to be done
at the main post office in
Rissik Street, not at the letter
box outside the building, so
every day as anyone was leaving
the office (members of the exe-
cutive and visitors included)
they were given a number of
copies of the paper to post.
This was with the view to
getting the posting done earlier;
Goldreich's office-boy carried
down the bulk at the end of the
day.
Addressing wrappers was done
right through the month, mostly
by hand. There was no time to
type; writing could be done while
you were talking to one of the
many callers who thronged the
office in those days.
At-Goldreich Building, and later
at Portland House and at Stock
Exchange Buildings, Zionists from
the country ran what was almost
an unofficial club; they would
come to the office of the Zionist
Record when in Johannesburg, as
a matter of course, and they were
warmly welcomed and made to
feel at home.
What was their business? To
criticise, or to praise, but nially
to be with fellow-Zionists.
Sometimes they would bring
money, or call for JNF boxes,
stamps and telegram forms, bring
In names of likely subscribers.
Most of these things could have
been done by letter, but Zionists
from the country came to the


THE MELMEDS-left to right: Mayer Melmed, to whom the writer
refers in .this article; A. P. Melmed, the eldest, a man of piety
who helped immigrants in Cape Town when he ran a bookshop in
Caledon Street; Louis Melmed, brother-in-law of the late Isaac
Ochberg; Jacob Melmed, now lives in Port Elizabeth. The Melmed
family have played a notable part in Zionist affairs and in communal,
charitable and educational activities. Harry, son of the late Louis
Melmed, Is now settled in Israel.


office, nevertheless. They were
very welcome, but they had to
make their contribution by helping
to address the wrappers.
Some of the visitors would be
Johannesburg folk, members of
youth societies, etc., who would
perhaps stay on -longer in order
to help; those from the country
usually had to be more calculat-
ing with their time, but I don't
remember anyone who took amiss
the request to help, and it cer-
tainly was very helpful; it meant
taking fewer home for the family
to give a hand with!
Men predominated; among them
Mr. M. L. Genussow, Mr. S. Meyer-
son, of Pretoria, Mr. I. Epstein,
also of that city, and Rev. Cohen,


of Bulawayo. 'They all had a fine
sense of fun and were always pre-
pared to do their share of "dirty
work." Mr. Cohen, though living
so far from Johannesburg, had
occasion in those days to visit
Johannesburg fairly frequently,
often for political reasons. He
would arrive at the office accom-
panied by a Native carrying a
tray of tea' and toast for "the
whole staff."
Of the younger crowd, there
were Ludwig Frankel of Kinross,
Philip Mechanik, Solly Bloch, and
in a younger age group Nimie
Metz, Bobbie Spiro, and many
more from all along the Reef and
beyond, most of whose names e41
(Continued bn page 88)


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PAGE FOURTEEN






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


David Goitein, who was Jerusalem correspondent of the Zionist Record in the early 30's,

recalls the days when the Yishuv was small and when

there was so very little to write about.


When


we were young


The writer, whose first association with
South Africa was when he came here as
Israel envoy to the Union. He has since
served as Israel Minister in Washington
(1951-53) and is now a judge of the
Israel Supreme Court.


THOSE were the days! The Zionist Record was young. Jewish
Palestine was young. And I was young.


In those days I did not know South
Africa. From the Zionist Record I knew
that in that very distant country there
were good Jews and-better still-ener-
getic Zionists, I could read of their meet-
ings and speeches up and down the country
-but I wondered whether they really
knew much about the country in which I
had begun to live. For in those days-and
I am speaking of more than a quarter of
a century ago-apart from propaganda
literature, somewhat dull, very pompous,
always repetitive, there was very little live
stuff about Palestine written in English.
I had found life thrilling, vibrant and I
was anxious to share my own feelings and
my own views of the country with those
abroad who had the interest of Palestine
at heart.
I, had written for Jewish and non-
Jewish papers in the States and in Eng-


land and it seemed to me that the Zionist
Record might care to spread my gospel in
the southern tip of Africa.
In those days only a real madman
would have prophesied that within
another quarter of a century there would
be a Jewish State and an Israel diplo-
matic service and-still more fantastic
-that an Israel foreign office would
send me as the State's representative to
South Africa. I would- then be able to
tell the story of Palestine-now Israel-
not alone to Zionist Record readers but
to all, and sundry, to the Governor
General, to the Prime Minister-to the
whole of the Union.
What was there to write about in those
days? Jewish Palestine was so small.
Her activities were so confined. Her in-
dustry was almost non-existent. Apart
from oranges we produced very few agri-


cultural goods. What then did I, a new-
comer from London, find so thrilling, so
worth recording?
In the first place there was Tel Aviv,
which not only took itself very seriously
but imagined Itself a second Paris. Did
it not have a casino on the sea front?
Were not two of its streets called boule-
vards? Did It not have night clubs? Did
It not have its Quartler Latin where actors
-still acting today--sipped coffee after an
Habimah performance or suck the piece
of lemon, Bohemian style, that was served
with a glass-not a cup of tea ?
In addition to being a little Paris, it was
the only all-Jewish city in the world; It
was the only all-Hebrew speaking city In
the world. In short, there was always
something happening in Tel Aviv and If
you could just catch the spirit of It and
get it down In 1,000 words on paper, there
was always an editor ready to snatch it up.
THREADBARE
Then there were the kibbutzim. This
theme was worn threadbare by the propa-
ganda writers. They always said the same
thing in a hundred not-so-different ways.
They idealised.
Yet life in a kibbutz was so unlike any-
thing lived in the diaspora that the Jew
abroad was happy to lap up anything
that was readable on the subject.
It wai one thing for a Zionist Record


reader to have handed out to him an
Idealised picture which he could not easily
believe, except as a pious man believes
with the eye of faith, and quite another
to be presented with an account from the
inside of how our halutaim and halutzoth
made good in a particular communal settle-
ment.
Jerusalem in those days was much
harder to write about. It was really a
very small village and largely a Christian
village at that. There were no buses in
those days and it was so small a town that
the ordinary Jerusalemite went on foot or
in a gharry, pulled by a weary horse.
LITTLE TO SEE
Outside the Old City there was very
little to do or see. There was none of that
vibrancy that distinguished Tel Aviv.
Jerusalem looked to the past: Zionists to
the future.
So Zionist Record readers were given
much more information about impudent
Tel Aviv than about the staid and pious
Holy City. Except for this: the British
governed the country from Jerusalem, and
official life, lived there as the English loved
to live it in colonial countries, made an
occasional story. I remember shaking
hands with the Mufti of Jerusalem at one
of the High Commissioner's garden parties,
but I do not remember whether I wrote
about it for the Zionist Record. I imagine
Continued on Page 78


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PIONEER Zionist, scholar, bene- Harry Lo urie
factor and pat n of Hebrew
letters, Mr.HarryLourie was as- and a founder
from the day of its foundation. He f
came to South Africa in 1895 and immediately joined local Zionist and founder and first pr
cultural bodies. He was treasurer of the Johannesburg Young Men's chairman of the Frie
Friendly Association in 1897 and among the founders and first treasurer Hebrew University, a
of the Zionist Federation Share Club (1901). His wife, Mrs. 1
Harry Lourie was one of the founders of the Herzl Zionist Society, Zionist movement, a!
member of the S.A. Zionist Federation executive, executive member of in 1905.
the Board of Deputies, director of the Binyan Mortgage Co., the -S.A. Their eldest son,
Cold Storage Ltd., and other companies. He represented South Africa the second son, the I
at several Zionist congresses. Hebrew University ii
Mr. Lourie has done much for Hebrew culture and Jewish.education. Lourie, was founder
He was a vice-president of the Hebrew High School (1917-1920), a in Israel public life.


pioneer
of the


'r Zionist
Record


resident of the S.A. Board of Jewish Education,
ends of the,Hebrew University, a governor of the
and patron, of various Hebrew literary enterprises.
.egina Lourie, has been a pioneer of the women'd
nd was president of the first Ladies' Associatiol
Arthur Lourie, is a distinguished Israel diplomats
late Dr. Emanuel Lourie, was associated with the
n parasitological research; the- youngest,- Norman
of Habonim and Balfour Park and is prominent


WITWATERSRAND HEBREW BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION-1909


'ti,


,Left to right, back row: R. Rabb, Schaskonovitz, J. Ratzker, S Katz, S. B. As her. Middle row: E. V. Fine, N. Kawarsky, M. Reuvid, M. D. Sack, E. Levy,
J. Kark. Front row: A Rogaly, J. Berkmann (treasurer), M. Fine (chairman), B. S. Ginsberg, W. Begg (secretary). -


TheI
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ZIONIST RECORD

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VAGE SIXTEEN







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE SEVENTEEN


AFTER THE BALL IS OVER...


IThe Johannes~burg Zeirei Zion danc.e committee ol' 1923.


The Zionist Record may claim


-....by--


A SHARE OF.



THE CREDIT

IT was not my privilege to be "in on the ground floor"
of the Zionist Record; for it started life-as a monthly
bulletin of the South African Zionist Federation-almost
three years before I reached the shores of South Africa.
But I was able to watch its growing pains during most
of its first decade, and, from the small town in which I
then lived, I sent a regular feature article (published
under a "non-de-plume") for some five years.


By the time I took over the
editorship, in January, 1919, the
Zionist Record had blossomed into
a modest, 16-page magazine, with
an equally modest cover. It was
still part and parcel of the activi-
ties of the Federation, of all' of
which I was in charge; and, as a
staff of one, I combined the func-
tions of editor, leader-writer,
business manager, proof-reader,
printer's devil, and anything else
you can think of that appertains
to the production of a periodical.
As time went on this became
much too much of a good thing. No
one individual could handle the
Federation and the Zionist Record
combined. The Federation was
growing by leaps and bounds:
societies (including specifically
Women's and youth bodies), fund-
raising, propaganda, political acti-
vity, and what have you, showed
ever-increasing mass and momen-
tum; and the Record itself, faith-
fully mirroring this development,
grew to three and four times its
former size. Furthermore, it be-
came increasingly apparent that a
monthly contact with the public
was not enough. Finally, in July,
1924, we took the plunge; the
Record became a fortnightly (two
years later a weekly), with news-
paper in place of magazine format,
and Federation and Record from
then on were run separately.
POLICY
But the nexus between the
Federation and its official organ
remained in fact as close as ever.
Its policy, and many other Im-
portant aspects of its contents,
were guided by an editorial com-
mittee, appointed by the execu-
tive council of the Federation,
Which supplied its chairman; and
this committee functioned exactly
like the other committees which


supervised the various departments
of the Federation's work. And as
I continued, for the next 20 years
or so (up to my departure for
Palestine), to be the main leader-
writer of the Record, the journal's
line on any issue, controversial or
otherwise, could reasonably be
taken as a faithful reflection of
the Federation's viewpoint.
SAME BUILDING
The closeness of the tie-up was
further exemplified by the fact
that, throughout my time at the
Federation, the offices of the
Federation and of the Record were
always in the same building and
in close proximity.
For carrying the message and
driving home the verities of
Zionism to the South African
public the Record filled (as it still
does) a vitally important role. Its
influence was not merely an in-
valuable adjunct to official
Federation announcements and
communiques and other forms of
the written and spoken word; it
far transcended them in import-
ance, especially after its conver-
sion into a weekly.
For not only did It act as the
official mouthpiece of the Federa-
tion for the benefit of already or-
ganised Zionists. It did far more.
It came into individual homes, for
thousands of which it was the
main, sometimes the sole, source
of Jewish news and views. It
reached large numbers of half-
Zionists and non-Zionists, and
helped to strengthen and confirm,
sometimes actually to create, their
Zionist sympathies and convic-
tions.
Moreover, as a weekly news-
paper of repute and integrity it
reached wide non-Jewish circles.
It is the merest justice to
say that, for the almost nnl-


Jack Alexander


formly pro-Zionist attitude of
the South African Government,
people and Press, Irrespective of
racial and political divergencies,
the Record may claim its
modest share of credit.
As one's mind goes back to
those days, when the formative
years of South African Zionism
which preceded World War I were
followed by a period of notable
efflorescence, and when, following
the war and the Balfour Declara-
tion, the early tentative steps in
Palestine were succeeded by the
ever-growing i n t e n s I ty and
achievement of large practical
programmes, all s6rts of occasions
-critical, interesting or just
amusing-come back to me.
THE MANDATE
In the wider field of Zionist
affairs one recalls the coverage by
the little monthly of that time of
the events leading up to the Bal-
four Declaration and its after-
effects, such as the San Remo
Resolution of the Allied Council
and the conferment of the Man-
date for Palestine upon Great
Britain.
In this context, too, there falls
the publication in full of the great
historic speech on Palestine's
future made in November, 1919, in
the Johannesburg Town Hall, on
his return from the British War
Cabinet, of General Smuts, whose
subsequent unfailing and powerful
support of the Zionist cause for
more than 30 years, including his
very numerous appearances on
platforms and warm messages to
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W. P. M. KELLAM (Ply.) Ltd.
Directors: W. P. M. Kellam, A. F. Richardson, F. Pearce
Manufacturers' Representatives

Phone 22-7148 JOHANNESBURG P.O. Box 1664
22 Von Brandis Buildings, cor. Von Brandis and
Commissioner Streets, Johannesburg

Phone 2-1609 CAPE TOWN: P.O. Box 1111
Benson House, 57a Long Street, Cape Town

EXTEND THEIR BEST WISHES TO THE ZIONIST RECORD
ON ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE
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PAGB EIGHTEEN


MR. E. L. C. BIANCHI

of the


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extends Compliments
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on its Golden Jubilee'


U LII


Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


A SHARE OF THE CREDIT


our fund-raising campaigns, our
public meetings and demonstra-
tions, our significant anniversaries
and other occasions, were all fully
reflected in our pages.
The same applies to the many
moving utterances of his greatest
lieutenant, Jan H. Hofmeyr.
Other occasions which stand out
were the coverage of the Hertzog
Government's great declaration of
1928 offering sympathy and sup-
port to the Zionist cause, and of
the infamous British White Paper
of 1939, including a two-page
spread under the heading "The
Great Betrayal." These are but
a few significant items, out of
countless others, which rise to
one's mind almost at random.
On the domestic scene I recall
with special vividness our bom-


* Continued from preceding page. nonce, and my thoughts devoted-
often only by dint of locking my-
Safter week, of self in against the outer world of
bardment, week after week, of theFederation with its thousand
Reuben Brainin, when he came to and one pressures-to the message
South Africa to champion the which the Record was to deliver
Crimean colonisation scheme; and, that week.
no less exciting, our fight against Harking back to the very early
the disruptive eloquence of Vladi- days, I recall with pleasure the
mir Jabotinsky during the first of earnest and loyal co-operation of
his two visits to South Africa. devoted Zionists in all parts of the
Needless to say, however, the country, who indeed functioned as
Record's editorial columns were "honorary agents" of the Record,
primarily concerned with the con- encouraging people to subscribe,
structive rather than the polemical occasionally-mirabile dict-ven
aspect of our activity: the to give commercial advertising,
periodical campaigns for the Keren and once a year to insert their New
Hayesod, the Jewish National Year greetings as a means of
Fund, the Hebrew University, and swelling our meagre revenue: FOR
later Youth iyah and thyah and other IT IS ON OF THE PROUDEST
great tasks: the encouragement of BOASTS OF THE RECORD
South African investment andTHAT, EVEN IN ITS EARLIEST
business undertakings in Pales- THAT, EVNF INSIGNIFICANCE
tine, such as the Binyan and AND STRUGGLE, IT WAS RUN
Africa Palestine Investments; the ON SELF-SUPPORTING LINES.
stimulation of organised Zionism,
of Chalutziut and of Aliyah, up A FINAL MEMORY
and down the Union, the two A FINAL MEMORY
Rhodesias, Portu g u ese East And a final memory-the fight for
Africa, the Belgian aCongo and the retention of our name. Even
Kenya. manv dyed-in-the-wool Zionists


VIEWS ON ALL ISSUES
Nor did we confine ourselves to
specifically Zionist matters. On
every other Jewish issue of the
day, both local and world-wide, we
had our viewpoint and expressed
it clearly and vigorously.
Jewish education, religious
trends, and charitable en-
deavour; the impact of assimila-
tion, the ebb and flow of Jewish
prospects throughout the world,
the outbursts and rumblings,
happily rare in South Africa, of
anti-Semitism-these were but
some of the topics which en-
gaged our columns.
Well do I recall the strain and
stress of the day preceding pub-
lication, when my other activities
had to be swept aside for the


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favoured a more general Jewish
name on the ground that "Zionist
Record" smacked too much of
doctrinairism and would dis-
courage any but 100 per cent.
Zionists from reading it.
At successive South African
Zionist conferences the issue was
fought out. But the old name
prevailed, and has een justified
by .the constant progress of the
Record in circulation, authority
and prestige.
I am happy, as one who had
some hand in the work, to con-
gratulate the Record on the attain-
ment of the respectable maturity
of 50 years, and to join in wishing
it many more half-cenutries of
fruitful and beneficent endeavour
in the cause of Israel and of
Jewry.


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THE ZIONIST RECORD. FRIDAY, NOVEMER 21, 1958


PAGE NINETEEN


"covered".


the Dachau


"ALL I CAN SAY-I SAW IT!"
(Robert Browning)


I SOMETIMES feel very old-
not so much full of years and
experience and wisdom but merely
old and tired, without any physical
reason for it, thank God. But
what else can one expect in inter-
national journalism in the thirties
and forties of our century ?
One glimps at Dachau on Libera-
tion day, and I was never the
same man again. It is a terrifying
thought that a man can behold a
sight for a split second and under-
go a complete transformation.
I arm not capable of hysterical
protests, or of passing out and
finding temporary relief in
oblivion. I saw Dachau and felt
something very akin to physical
pain-and I was young and strong
in those days-and afterwards my


1958


MOSENTHALS

of


SOUTHERN AFRICA

offer their warm congratulations
to the


ZIONIST RECORD


on its


GOLDEN JUBILEE


Onh this notable occasion
we would also like to ex-
tend to our numerous
-clientele, whom we have

served faithfully for over

1100 years, as well as the
community at large our
best wishes for their con-
tinued progress ansd
prosperity.



BRANCHES- AND ASSOCIATE COMPANIES
THROUGHOUT SOUTH AFRICA AND THE
RHODESIAS. 0

9__


for


Record


soul became stone and I could not
react any more. I deemed it my
duty to try and describe what 1
saw, but how inadequate were my
articles during that period in Ger-
many! All those arguments about
detachment or involvement were
so utterly stupid in the face of
such dreadful and stunning ex-
perience. I just could find no words
to describe what I saw, and my
typewriter, a good and constant
companion for years, suddenly
became an-insufferable bore.
Of course, life goes on and I
work and play and talk and listen
and have fun and joke and quar-


By
S. J. GOLDSMITH


The writer of this article was
London correspondent of the
Zionist Record during the Sec-
ond World War. After the
liberation of the Dachau con-
centration camp, he went to
Germany as a military corres-w -
pondent and was amongst the
first Jews to meet the sur- |
vivors. He cabled to the Record
the names of the many sur-
vivors with relatives in S.A.
............-......n


Dr. Aar o.n A
Peretz (Perci-
kovitch), a sur- o
vivor o f Da-
chau, who was
found in the
camp by the
writer of this
article and re-
united with his
South Africa
through the list of names cabled to the Zionist Record. Dr. Peretz
now lives in Halfa where he is head of the Gynaecological Depart-
ment of the Government Hospital. He lost his child, who is pictured
next to him, during the war, and only learnt of his survival after
liberation. They were reunited in Israel. Dr. Peretz is known to
many Kovno landsleit as a former communal and Zionist leader
in pre-war Lithuania.
- - - - - - - - - - --"""" ""


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I


story


the


rel over unimportant things and
escape from vital issues when I
feel like escaping-but the ter-
rible pictures come up from the
recesses of my memory in sleep-
less nights and rob me of my
peace. Perhaps it is right that
it should be so. Why should I go
scot-free when others have suf-
fered so much? I don't complain.
Let me go a little back in time.
The first-ever story I had handled
was the opening of the civil war
in Spain. And since then there
was not one day of peace.
There were lulls and false hopes
-for those who indulge in them
-and misleading signs of a new
era, but no real peace.
When I was a small boy at
school, I used to wonder how
people could live through a 30
years' war, or even a seven years'
war. Silly, of course. They could.
They could even have a good time.
What was it all in comparison
with the first half of the 20th cen-
tury? And the second half does
not promise to be any better.
SCHUSCHNIGG
Starting from Spain I had
missed the beginnings of Nazism,
but Hitler soon caught up with
me. I soon found myself trans-
lating Schuschnigg's last defiant
oration from German into Yid-
dish, straight from text into
"lino" and afterwards handled the
story of the Anschluss of Austria.
Some of us knew it was only a
beginning, but little did I think,
as I was rendering Schuschnigg's
sonorous prose into Yiddish, that
eight years later I shall see him
liberated in Dachau and chat with
him there; and that half a year
later still I shall hear him give
evidence before the Nuremberg
Tribunal.
Czechoslovakia followed upon
Austria. I was already mobile at
the time and witnessed the tragedy
in Prague and other Czechoslova-
kian towns. Foreign correspon-
dents, even Jews, were left alone
for a time. From a mass of night-
marish recollections and crushing
Impressionfis one stands out as the
most poignant and unforgettable-
a visit to Karel Capek,- the great
Czech writer, in his country home
some fifty miles from the Capital.
It was the only thing to do. One
hoped that the articulateness of a
Capek would, perhaps, do justice
to the situation.
I had known Capek from pre-
vious meetings, and he had been
very kind to me.-his time I found
Capek In the depths of despair.
His remarks about men and affairs
were arrows dipped in curare and
accurately aimed. His parting
words, as he gave me a signed
visiting card as a memento, were
prophetic. I quote from my notes:
"WE CZECHS AND YOU
0 Continued on page 68


1839


-low.-Now 1


Ift






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE TWENTY


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE TWENTY-ONE


The late Rev. M. I. Mrs. Birdie Cohen Ziona Meyer (nde r. Harry Levin Naomi Sherr (nee Mr. Mark Lein, a M ichelle Sherr
Cohen, M.B.E., a (nde Levin), who as Cohen), who has been (brother of Mrs. Cohen), the writer of pioneer of the (daughter of the
pioneer of Southern secretary of the S.A. contributing articles Cohen), now a pro- the article below, who Zionist youth move- writer of this article),
Rhodesia, a foun- Z ionist Federation, to the Zionist Record minent Israel dip- was editorial secre- nment in Johannes- who maintains the
der of the Zionist was associated with from Israel dealing lo ma t, who was tary of the Zionist burg and one of the traditions of the
Record and a contri- the publication of the particularly with the an editorial-feature Record in 1944. She first local chalutzin, family by contribut-
butor from the first Zionist Record in its Histadrut and kibbutz writer and Jerusalem describes the associa- w h o s e activities ing to the Children's
day of its publication formative years. She activities and pro- correspondent of the, tions of the family were widely reported Circle of the Zionist
until his death. now lives in Israel. gress. Zionist Record. with this journal, in the early issues. Record.


With the Cohen-Levin clan the Record is


QUITE


A


I HAVE A STRONG attachment and forceful. He never did much
for the Zionist Record. All "sub-editing" and all the spaces
of us in the Cohen-Levin family and paragraphs had to be marked
have had direct and lasting ties off afterwards with pen strokes.
with the paper and are part of We waited in the office till Dad
the story of its-growth. had finished his article or book
The Zionist Record is closely review or letter for the Zionist
linked with memories of my child- Record.
hood. As a child in Bulawayo it I wonder exactly how many
seemed to me that the paper be- times he wrote for the Record
longed, at least, partly to my from its beginning in 1908. till his
father, the Rev. M. I. Cohen and death in 1939; or if anyone has
to my mother (formerly Miss used its columns as naturally, as
Birdie Levin) who had been freely and sincerely as he did-as
secretary of the Zionist Federation the mouthpiece of his life's great
and, therefore, one of the forces passion, Zionism.
behind the Record. Thinking back
I see a recurrent picture of my SECOND NUMBER
sister Ziona and myself arriving The second number of the
at my .father's office to persuade Record (November, 1908). is de-
him to come home a little earlier, voted to preparations for the third
perhaps to continue reading us South African Zionist conference,
"Tom Brown's Schooldays" or play and my father is named as the
cricket in-the back yard (he would Rhodesian delegate. In the Decem-
do both with enthusiasm).o A ber issue he appears on the photo-
cigarette between his lips, my graph of the executive and writes
father-sat typing very quickly with an article, "Impressions of the
two or three fingers amidst the Conference." His own enthusiastic
musty smell of hundreds of books. participation of the conference is
He had a rhythm of his own, quick also fully reported.
and irregular. He thought quickly His comments were typical of
and his words poured out 'fluent his many-sided personality, and


May the Zionist Record

always be a
BEACON of enlightenment

to its readers and the

Jewish community


This is the wish of the Directors
J. Buskin and W. H. Hooten

of


BEACON BATTERY
Manufacturing Co. (Pty.) Ltd.


The battery that has been proved!

12 BESSEMER ROAD, HERIOTDALE, JOHANNESBURG
Phones 25-6908/9. P.O. Box 64, Cleveland.


FAMILY

and fu
By editorial
and the
NAOMI SHERR years.
are sig
initials
known
indicated the manifold contribu-
tions he was to make for so many
years to come. He was that rare
mixture of the practical man of Looki
affairs, the worker, and of the at ran
idealist, the man of vision. He "War a
discusses details of organisation, Ideal,"
fund-raising and cultural activity a repor
with vigour and- logic. Yet he is a reptur
always the philosopher, the on thee
dreamer, the Chovev Zion. can Jew
can Jev
A regular feature of the Zionist interest
Record was "Sermon of the educatih
Month." My father's sermons, executi'
usually with one of the prophets tions c
as' his inspiration, ring out strong lasting


11 of hope. He was the
al writer more than once,
e official book reviewer for
Not all his contributions
ned, and others carried the
M.I.C. by which lie became
to many.
VARIETY
ing through the early files,
dom, I found articles on
and Zionism," "Our Jewish
"The Hebrew Language,"
rt of a lantern lecture on
n to Palestine," and essays
early history of South Afri-
wry in which he was greatly
ted. For years he was
onal councillor of the
ve and his many contribu-
on the subject reveal his
concern for education. And


PHONE
22-5551


side by side with the intellect mll
or lolty there were always the
detailed routine reports of per-
sonal or human interest: perhaps
a paragraph on n children's func-
tion, or an obituary: nothing was
too unimportant or small to beo
worthy of his attention. He used
the Record as a tool to express
what he had to say and what he
was doing and as n mirror of the
community which he .served.
INTERESTS
To the end of his days he mnain-
tained his Zionist interests and
activity. But he was a man who
felt everything very intensely, and
during Hitler's era and the period
of the "White Paper," his opti-
mism and cheerfulness were often
Continued on page 24.


P.O. BOX
1003


AFFAIR


. .........







Supplement to'THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


HI-ART WOODCARVING
incorporated in


H. LEWINBERG
(PTY.) LTD.

P.O. BOX 98, CLEVELAND,
JOHANNESBURG



Extend congratulations on the

GOLDEN JUBILEE

of the

ZIONIST RECORD






With the Compliments
of

the



SOUTHERN LIFE



ASSOCIATION



OF AFRICA

*i
A purely mutual and South African Office
founded in 1891.


ALL CLASSES


OF LIFE ASSURANCE


TRANSACTED
*

Branches and representatives throughout
the Union of South Africa and Rhodesia.

*

Head Office:
SOUTHERN LIFE ASSOCIATION
OF AFRICA
Great Westerford,
RONDEBOSCH, C.P.


MESSAGE


T H E Zionist Federation of
France extends its heartiest
wishes to the Zionist Record, organ
of South African Jewry, on- the
occasion of the celebration of its
Golden Jubilee.
This 'important event in the
existence of the Zionist movement
of South Africa takes place during
Israel's tenth anniversary year, in
a period when it is more urgent
than ever to strengthen the Zionist
movement throughout the world
and to contribute to the rebuilding,
the consolidation and the defence
of our State.
The Zionists of South Africa can
be proud of the part which they
have taken in the battle for the
implementation of the aims of the
Zionist movement for very many


I Greetings from

Australia anc
New Zealanc
IT gives me much pleasure
extend on behalf of our Zlc
Federation, representing all
tions of the Zionist movement
all* Zionist organizations in j
tralia and New Zealind. sin
and fraternal greetings and
gratulations to the Zionist Rec
We in Australia admire and
to emulate tne wonderful orgar
Lion and inst'i r" = Zic
.1*B'


movement ii, southh .-irrica and the
tremendous contribution they have
made and continue to make m
the up-building of our beloved
Israel. Amongst the foremost
achievements of the Zionist move
ment in South Africa, we rank
the Zionist Record which is re-
garded in our community as in
many other parts of the world. as
one of the foremost Jew len publica-
tions and certainly one of. if not
the best. Zionist journal published
anywhere.
The standar- of journalism
which is characteristic of the
Zionist Record. it,; world-%wide
coverage of Jewish events, and
particularly its magnificent cover-
age of new- and developments in
every sphere of life in Israel. has
made it a publication second to
none In the Zironit and Jewish
world.
We are hippr'v t:, jiin with Jew
i s h commun-ties and Zionist
organizations everv.. hr, in con-
gratulating the Zionist Record on
its Golden Jubile, and the Zionist
Federation of South Afiica. the
editor and Qtaff of the journal, and
the wonderful Je'wi-h community
of South Afric-, on their foresight.
their Je wish spirit, and their
Zionist enthusii'n' .ihich have
made this journal -u,-h an impor-
tant feature of Jewish and Zionist
life in South Afr-ca and indeed of
Jewish life and the Zionist move-
ment in the v- orll
I. SOLVE
President.
Zionist Federaiion of Australia
and New Zealand.


FROM FRENCH


ZIONIST


years. There is no doubt that the
Zionist Record has been one of
their main instruments towards
this achievement.
Today, at the beginning of the
second decade of Israel's young
existence, the strengthening of the
Jewish conscience everywhere, the
gathering of the exiles, Hebrew
education, Jewish day schools,
chalutziut and aliyah as well as
public relations work constitute,
with the financial and political
support of the Jewish State, the
main tasks for the near future.
We are convinced that the neces-
sity for all Jews in your country
to contribute to the realisation of
these tasks, will always be clearly
expressed in your columns and we
wish you the best of luck for the


Zionist Federation of
J


for


FEDERATION


continuation of your work.
ANDRE BLUMEL, President,
Federation Sioniste de France.


4 ,. -'
.. \^


j|W *^ |(;v^f


Maitre Andre Blumel


energy


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It is a pleasure for the makers of JUNGLE
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Immediate tasks of Zionism


c 4 4 4 4's


PAGE TWENT'f-TWO


l







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958



MESSAGES

From the President of the World

Zionist Organisation


Dear Mr. Gershater,
To the golden jubilee
of "Ihe Zionist Record I
send you my best wishes
Your paper has fulfilled
an- important taIk in
spreadirig knowledge c.
Jewish problems and c.
Israel, among South Afnr
cah Jewry, and in helpln.
to bring about the
wonderful spirit of sol.-
arlty with Israel and
everything Jewish itir,
the-South African Je.-;,h
Community.
May the paper cortinue.
for many years to fulfil ;ts
important mission w.th the
same success as "t h.5!.
had in the past.
Sincerely yours,
N. Goldmanr, .


Dr. Nahum Goldmann.
president World Zionist
L Organisation.


From Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver
My dear Mr. Gershater, I
understand that the Zionist
Record is about to celebrate its
golden jubilee.
Permit me to extend my
heartiest felicitations to you as
editor of the Zionist Record.
You have reason to be proud
,of the contribution which the
; Record has made to the life of
FrSouth African Jewry. It has
been the mouthpiece of all that
S is worthy and constructive in
Jewish life and has maintained
thtiough the years a high stan-
dard of journalistic integrity.
I" wish you many years of
continued service to our com-
mon cause.
With warmest regards, I
remain cordially yours,
ABBA HILLEL SILVER.


From London Jewish Chronicle
(By cable)
OLDEST Jewish newspaper in
the world, the Jewish
Chronicle, London, 117 years ,
young, salutes .and congratulates
South African Zionist Record on :
attaining golden jubilee. It pays ,
tribute to the Record's consistent '. ,H
high standard of journalism and .-
steady support of the causes it "
stands for, both Jewish and -
Zionist. Please accept our best
wishes for continued life and
prosperity.
John M. Shaftesley,
O.B.E., editor London
Jewish Chronicle.


From the house of O OLD BOND STREET. LONDON PARIS NEW YORK
A.1 a 'Is jo36s/a



Heartiest congratulations and best wishes from

CARL HAIR CREATIONS
107 TWIST STREET, JOHANNESBURG


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CARL & YVONNIE. 150 Commissioner
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MAISON ROY, 38 Huok Sireet, Julban-
nesiurg. Phone 44-9488.


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PAGE TWENTY-THREE







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


dimmed by his sufferings. After
the Zionist conference in Bloem-
fontein in 1939 it seemed that he
could bear no more, and he died.
My father and mother met
through their Zionist association.
Theirs was really a Zionist Record
romance. Mother was one of the
first secretaries of the Zionist
Federation (she preceded Jack
Alexander) and so the Record was
largely her concern too. She was
a conscientious and devoted secre-
tary. dedicated to .her mission.
WITHOUT FEIGELE
Only the -other day Mr. J. S.
Judelowitz, that repository of
memories, recalled how the late
Benzion Hersch once said to
him. "Without Feigele Levin,
who among other duties runs
around Johannesburg trying to
get the rent to pay for the offices
or persuading people to write for
the Record, our Zionist organisa-
tion would fall to pieces."
She was the recipient of a
flowing correspondence of Zionist
affairs from my father in Bula-
wayo, and was. impressed and
cheered by his enthusiasm.
During his frequent visits to
Johannesburg on communal affairs
the Federation was his head-
quarters, and no doubt his
presence transformed the office
with his infectious optimism and
ready laughter. The seventh South
African conference was held in
January, 1919, in Cape Town, and


Continued from Page 21

my mother and father both atten-
ded officially. On January 16 they
were married by Dr. J. L. Landau
in the Roeland Street Synagogue,
and the pole-holders and nearly all
the guests were delegates from
the conference. Speeches and
presentations were made. I quote
from one of the congratulatory
speeches made at the conference
which all appeared in subsequent
copies of the Record: "Miss H.
B. Levin, who has been secretary
of the Federation for the past 51
years, is leaving our service at
the conclusion of the conference
in view of her approaching mar-
riage to the Rev. M. I. Cohen, B.A.,
of Bulawayo. Miss Levin has
rendered faithful and self-sacri-
ficing service to us and is perhaps
more than any other person
responsible for the great develop-
ment which the last few years
have witnessed in the organisation
of the Zionist movement in this
country. Her intense devotion to
the Zionist cause has imparted
into her work as secretary a zeal
and enthusiasm which have in-
creased tenfold the value of her
services. Her future husband is
an equally enthusiastic Zionist
who needs no introduction to this
conference."
*
It is not surprising that we, the
Cohen children, felt we had some
sort of a stake in it all. Ziona,


Mendel and I were loyal followers
of Aunt Rachel of the Record, and
Ziona, particularly, received her
fair share of prizes from the
Children's Page. Reading the
Record was part of the Shabbas
ritual in our home, and there
seemed something personal about
it, like a letter trom a relative.
Ziona (Mrs. Walter Meyer) and
her husband have been living in
Tel Aviv for the past nine years.
She has written articles for the
Record about life in Israel, about
the kibbutz and the Histadruth.
During her stay in Johannesburg
a few years ago, she worked for
the Federation too, organising
student activities. My brother, Dr.
Mendel Cohen, is a chemist at the
Weizmann- Institute and the
Record recently described the work
he is doing.
TWO BROTHERS
My mother's two brothers, Mark
Levin and Harry Levin, both resi-
dents of Israel for many years, are
part of the family's association
with the Record and the Federa-
tion. At the big rally of South
Africans In Israel, held in Hulda
Forest recently, it transpired dur-
ing a quiz that Mark Levin was
organiser of the first Young Israel
Society in South Africa.
Paging through old copies of the
Record I came across his name
many times. There are letters on
communal issues, translations of
Hebrew and Yiddish stories and re-
ports of his Zionist activities. Mark
and his wife, Leah (Evian), were
amongst the earliest South African
Olim-37 years ago. They have
lived their Zionism in the com-
pletest sense.
Harry Levin was for years Jeru-
salem correspondent to the paper,
and many of his articles have
appeared in its columns. During
one of his longer visits to Johan-
nesburg, while engaged on J.N.F.
work, he was, I believe, the
Record's editorial writer.
In 1944. with firm ambitions to
become a journalist, I, the
youngest of the clan, joined the
staff of the Zionist Record, then
housed on the 7th Floor of Perma-
nent Building, Commissioner
Street. Officially I was to fulfil
both the glamorous positions of
cub-reporter and secretary to the
editor, Mr. Gershater, formerly my
Hebrew teacher in Bulawayo. I
was sent down to the Federation
offices on the 6th Floor to see
Mr. Jack Alexander, my mother's
old colleague. I waited in fear and
trepidation because of the rather
fiery nature of his reputation, but
was disappointed. He was mild
and gentle! I did not realise my
ambitions of becoming a famous
journalist, but it was a full and
interesting year. There was a
much smaller staff in those days
and a more intimate atmosphere as
a result. Also there is always
something special, I think, in a
newspaper .office-excitement and
a sense of cameraderie. We were
all working for one object-the
African staff, the Scottish printers,
and the business and literary per-
sonnel. A friendly but definite
rivalry prevailed between the
business side and our side which
consisted of Mr. Mann, Mr. Kriel
and myself. Mrs. Liknaitsky, more
"literary" than any of us I'm
sure, was now on the business
side, but took a very real interest'
in the spelling and proof-reading
efforts of our side. The peak pitch
of our lives was reached every
Wednesday: The paper had to be
put to bed and the friendly atmo-
sphere of the rest of the week
changed dramatically. We were
backwards and forwards to .the
printers on the phone or by car.
(I enjoyed the twinkle in Mr.
Dicson's eye when he discussed a
lady's meeting \in Ermelo or a
Purim party or "Ben.") There was
always the same last-minute rush
-urgent reports had to be fitted
in, elusive subtitles thought out
plus more and more galley-proofs
read. (I have never re-learnt to
read slowly much to my children's
annoyance). Even the business side
treated us with some respect on
Wednesday. (We were substrata
as far as salaries were concerned.)
Very often they went home at five
but we stayed on and had sand-
wiches and tea sent in at six or


The Cohen-Levin family


later. Mr. Gershater finished dic-
tating the editorial to me, and the
paper was finally tucked up.
- On Thursday morning there was
a welcome relief from the tension.
On Friday came the post-mortems,
but we generally cheered up in
time for the Luncheon Club at the
Carlton, where we hobnobbed with
the reporters from the other
Jewish papers, and compared
notes.
My critiques of piano recitals
by visiting Israeli celebrities
(pretty young girls with mothers
and wonderful dresses) ha d
nothing in common with those of
Oliver Walker, but the lavish and
worshipful praise I showered on
them must be closely treasured by
these artists to this day.
I "covered" a few art exhibitions
too. (I used to slink behind Mrs.
Milly Levy and hastily jot down
whatever she was saying.) My art
criticisms appeared highly profes-
sional to me.
Our exciting and exclusive inter-
view with Noel Coward has been
described, I believe, by Mr. I. Kriel.
(Although it is really my story)
But I don't think Mr. Kriel ex-
plained quite how much was made
of how little, and how for months
I, at least, lived in fear and terror
of receiving a summons from Mr.
Coward's attorneys.
On the whole, 1944 was a
serious, a sad, a cataclysmic year
-the year of weary relief as the
war neared its end. Liberation-
but for the Jewish world there
was little joy. The Jewish press
lifted a black veil and revealed the
face of .tragedy. Until then the
stories of death and torture had


Why do ft the



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P.O. Box 19. Telegrams "MUSHET." Phone 25-8311
Branches at: Durban, Port Elizabeth, Cape Town.
Rhodesian Distributors: Samuel Osborn (Rhodesia) Ltd.,
W1169 Bulawayo, Salisbury, .Ndola and Lusaka.


been second hand and- sometimes
unbelievable. iow it was in the
open at laat, first-hand unbearable
but true. Al ltne grim and ghastly
details, ail the worst we had shut
out of our conscious minds, was
unfolded Deto.e our eyes.
I still as.ociaLe the Russian
Jewisn autnor ilya Ehrenburg with
those snatering stories. Long
telegrams arrived weekly from him
and from other correspondents.
(Those from England came in tiny
photographed aerographs-we had
to use a magnifying glass to de-
cipher the meaning). News came
from the D.P. camps, the crema-
toriums; and fantastic stories of
survivors . those Jews, those
human beings emerging from
holes in the ground where they had
lain hidden and rotting for months
and years.
As we read and transcribed the
telegraphic language we wept. It
was all very near and sharp to
us on the paper, receiving the news
direct from eye-witnesses. So the
Jewish Press was in mourning in
1944. We were tense and shocked
and -couldn't look each other In
the eyes.
Another four years were to
follow before we achieved the
State of Israel as our fulfilment
and consolation. Today children
read the Children's Page of the
Z tonist Record and recently
Michelle, who was born in Youm
Ha-atzmaut, ten years ago, has
had a little story of hers printed
on the Children's Page. The family
tradition of the Record seems to
be maintained.


We congratulate the Zionist Record on its 50th
anniversary, and we are proud of the fact that
we were among the first advertisers in the

journal.


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PAGE TWENTY-FOUR







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


S.A.'s


Jewish


population


PAGE TWENTY-FIVE



has


trebled


itself


By Chief Rabbi Dr. L. I. Rabinowitz
i MMUIU t fflfflMWIHIIIIUI Iimi$HIIUtU:g^


The dwindling country
communities


]in


50


years


N 1904, the first year for which statistics for the whole Union of South Africa are available,
the. Jewish population of the Union was 38,101. The last census, taken on May 8, 1951,
showed a total Jewish population of 108,498. Allowing for adjustments as from 1904-1908, and
from 1951-1958, it can confidently be assumed that the Jewish population of South Africa has
almost exactly trebled itself in the half-century which- is the occasion of the Zionist Record
golden jubilee.
Any comparison between the state of the Jewish Jewish Jewish
population at these two extremes which are Souls Souls
separated by half a century, if it is based upon 1951 1956/7
statistics, must take this trebling into consideration. CAPE
If, for instance, statistics were to Show that in
these 50 years the number of children receiving Aliwal North ... ... ... ... 92 75
Hebrew education has doubled, it would reflect a Beaufort West ... ... ... 77 25
decrease instead of an increase; if the number of Bredasdorp .............. 39 17
Synagogues has trebled it would indicate that in Britstown ............. ... 19 9
this respect we are just holding our own. Caledon ............... 152 23
It is with this salient fact in mind that one can Calitzdorp ............ 20 a
begin to appreciate the almost devastating propor- Calvinia ........... ... 48 30
tions of a phenom-non in the distribution of the Carnarvon ....... ..... 11 4
Jewish population of South Africa, to which attention Colesberg ... ...... ... 22 8
has frequently been called, but which has failed to Cradock ... ... ... ... ... 121 50
take the increase of the Jewish population into De Aar ....... ... ... 54 42
consideration when dealing with it. George ... ... ........ 133 106
I refer to the dwindling, and in some cases Graaff-Reinet ... ......... 48 30
the total disappearance, of the once comparatively Humansdorp ... ......... 25 12
flourishing country communities. Kingwilliamstown ... ... ... 104 74
1In absence of reliable statistics of an earlier date, Knysna ... ... ... ... ... 30 17
I quote on this-page the comparative figures for a Komgha ... ... ... ... ... 12 4
number of these communities as given in the South Malmesbury ... .. ....... 129 71
African Jewish Year Books of 1929 and 1957, a Peddle ... ... ... ... ... 9 3
period of just over a quarter of a century, during Postmasburg ... ... ... ... 32 12
which the Jewish population increased by almost Taung .............. ... 8 3
exactly 50 per cent. f-om 72,169 In 1926 to 108.496 a Vanrhijnsdorp ... ... ... 31 18
quarter of a century later. -
-_ A-aMA.... ..... 1216 606


COMPARATIVE FIGURES
No. of No. of
Community Families Families
1929 1957
ORANGE FREE STATE
Frankfort ... ... ... ... 39 9
.Heilbron ... ... ... ... ... 42 26
Hariismith ... ... ... ... 50 27
Jagersfontein ... ... ... ... 19 2
Kopples ... ... ... ... ... 46 12
Marquard ... ... ....... 22 7
Paul Roux ... ... ... ... 12 5
Reitz ... ... ... ... ... ... 30 5
Steynsrust ... ... ... 20 6
Winburg ... ... *..* *** 20 7


Aberdeen ...' ......
Aliwal North ......
Beaufort West ...
Cradock .........
Kenhardt .........
Kingwilamstown ..
Robertson ......
Naauwpoort ... ... ...
Tarkastad ... ...
TR
Maquassie ... ...
Middelburg ... ... ...
Standerton ... ...


CAPE







,ANSVAAL
... ... *
oo. .,.


16
38
45
30
12
35
50
13
12

12
38
45 ,
637


6
25
16
18,
4
23
18
5
1

1
22
12
257


ELOQUENT BUT INCOMPLETE
These figures are eloquent, though very far from
complete. The 1929 list is most inadequate, especially
for the Transvaal. To take examples from each
Province. Piet Relief, which had a flourishing congre-
gation and a beautiful Synagogue which still stands,
is now completely "Judenrein,'' and Brandfort, in
the Free State, which has now seven Jewish families
had a flourishing community of some 40 members.
Colesberg, in the Cape, which also had a flourishing
little community is now reduced to three families
and the proceeds of the sale of its Synagogue will
eventually go towards building the Synagogue in
Ashkelon..
-Taking these figures, however, these 22 com-
munities, which according to the natural increase
in the Jewish population during the quarter cen-
tury, should have had just on 1,000 families, are
now reduced to almost exactly a quarter of that
number and the process of evacuation will con-
tinue.
1hat does not tell the whole story, however. The
last official figures which reveal the distribution of
the Jewish community are to be found in the Popu-
lation Census taken on May 8, 1951, which gives the
number of Jewish souls in the various communities.
Although the figures given in the S.A. Jewish Year
Book of 1956/7, cannot claim the same statistical ac-
-curacy, they can, from my knowledge, be taken as
substantially correct. The virtual Jewish depopulation
in six years is startling, as the following comparative
figures will show:-


NATAL


Estcourt ... ... ... ... ...
Newcastle ... ... ... ...


Jewish
Souls
1951
21
57
78


TRANSVAAL


Amersfoort ...
Belfast ... ...
Bloemhof ... ...
Brits ... ... ...
Bronkhorstspruit
Carolina ... ...
Christiana ..
Delareyville ...
Ermelo ... ..
Heidelberg
Lichtenburg ...
Lydenburg ...
Middelburg ... ...
Piet Retief ...
Warmbaths ...
Wolmaranstad


16
25
35
85
77
32
8
20
144
75
170
14
129
16
172
19
1037


ORANGE FREE STATE


Bethlehem
Bethulie ...
Boshof ...
Bothaville
Brandford
Clocolan ...
Edenburg
Ficksburg
Frankfort
Harrismith
Heilbron ...
Hoopstad
Ladybrand
Lindley ...
Reddersburg
Senekal ...
Thaba N'chu
Trompsburg
Vredefort ...
Wepener ..
Winburg ..,
Zastron ...


TOTALS: CAPE ... ...
NATAL ...
TRANSVAAL
O.F.S. ... ...


183
17
11
66
37
81
22
115
54
128
129
14
28
34
30
47
56
75
26
52
61
32
1248
1216
78
1037
1248

3579


Jewish
' Souls
195/7
8
18
21


9
14
18
35
20
7
3
10
75
30
70
4
77
0
95
10
477


150
10
50
24
20
10
50
82
94
58
6
3
10
20
22
13
15
45
24
21
683
606
21
477
683

1787


r.4 0.


z~~JE


NN~


.




11

I '


The Synagogue of Caledon (Cape). The local community dwindled |
from 152 souls in 1951 to 23S n 1956-57. j
C .. .. .. ...*.*.*.............. i.*...i.....i. n............


In other words, these 62 country
communities in only six years have
dwindled by half. It is true that
these figures have been selected,
and that there are a few com-
munities which have held their
own during these years, but the
figures are nonetheless impres-
sive.

GOLDFIELDS
It is also true that new com-
munities have sprung up during
this period, particularly where
new goldfields have been
developed, such as Carletonville in
the Transvaal and Welkom in the
Free State, but these are to be
regarded as embryonic urban
communities rather than country
communities.
The result of this shift of popu-
lation has naturally been to
increase the urban nature of the
South African Jewish community.
Whereas it was estimated that in
1929 about 75 per cent. of the


community lived in the nine
urban centres, the 1951 census
shows that in them, Vereenlging,
the Rand, the Cape Peninsula,
Durhban, Pretoria, Port Elizabeth.
East London, Kimberley and
Bloenufontein, the Jewish popula-
tion is 89,239 out of a total of
108,496, about 82.5 per cent. Of
this 82,23:1, no less than 61,210
live in Johannesburg and the
Reef, a little less than 70 per
cent. of the urban Jewish popula-
tion of the Union.

NOT NEW
I am the first to admit that
there is nothing new or original
ih this revelation of the drift from
the villages and dorps to the
urban centres which Is taking a
form which looks as though it is
leading to a mass evacuation.
Attention has been drawn to it
more than once, and it is the sub-
ject of an article by Rabbi Dr. J.
S Continued on page 60.


The Best


Gift


of the Year




!BE a ton



^Safsirin.


**.>' *>;,.';;


I






- Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE TWENTY-SIX-


ANSTEY'S


extend their hearty

congratulations to


ZIONIST RECORD

on the occasion

of their


GOLDEN JUBILEE



Norman Anstey Ltd., 380 West Street, Durban


I 1


"THE BEARE




GROUP"


DURBAN

EXTEND BEST WISHES TO THE
ZIONIST RECORD ON
FIFTY YEARS OF
PUBLIC SERVICE,


In the eyes

of an

American


editor

by


Gabriel


Cohen


Editor, National
Jewish Post of
New York
THE Jewish press of America
has very little circulation, un-
fortunately. All the independent
Jewish papers, printed in English,
lumped together, very likely do
not have a total circulation of
even 150,000 out of a possible
1,250,000 homes. This is about
one out of ten, and the figures
we have -used are, we believe,
quite liberal. What this means for
the American Jewish community,
or what It could mean for any
Jewish community, Is really disas-
trous.
It means that there is no avenue
for printed communication In the
United State's Jewish community.
There is therefore, no news-
paper-platform in the American
Jewish community where Jewish
public opinion can be created, or
reflected.
Other countries
We are persuaded that what Is
true -of the independent Anglo-
Jewish press in America is not
true of the Jewish press of Eng-
land; nor judging from our avid
reading of Chaim Gershater's
South African Zionist Record, is
it true of the Jewish press of
some other countries.
The Zionist Record's excellent
coverage of Israel activities rials
that of the Jewish Chronicle" bf
'London.
If life were all one series of
woes and not relieved by bright
and exciting times when happiness
and satisfaction are also part of
the lot of human beings; this
would be a sorrowful world. -So
it Is with a newspaper, it" must
reflect life as a whole, with Its
serious side of course, but with
Its human interest features, and
its lighter reports of progress" In
Israel and elsewhere. Like life it
must have balance, If'It is to'be
successful.
The South African Zioilst
Record seems to have won the
generous support of advertisers,
which means that It is not only
an organ of considerable Influence
In the Jewish community, but
serves as a market to which an
advertiser can afford to address
a message to stimulate new busi-
ness and retain old.
Real test
But the real test of- any news-
paper is Its editorial policy, and
herein American -Jewish .papers
can only applaud as far as The
Zionist Record is concerned, The
editorials take a vigorous, and
often surprisingly Independent
position and champion what- they
consider right regardless of the
consequences. Jewish life to the
editor of The Zionist Record. is
something that compares with any
other culture or even -excels -it
and there Is none of the- apolo-
getics that too often appear in
Jewish writings not so much
today as In the last several de-
cades. .
We wish to add our few- words
of congratulations to Mr. Ger-
shater and the Zionist Record and
its staff and its readers on the
publication's fiftieth anniversary.
Such a milestone can often mark
a new departure reading to greater
ascent towards greater goals. The
South African Jewish community
should be proud to allow its
reputation for creative activities
in the newspaper field to rest In
the capable hands of the Zionist
Record.


yne bros
OF DURBAN


coobL




I L. SAUL & Co. (Pty.) Ltd.


Telephones: 60386/7/8.


P.O. Box 1539.


Telegrams: "ELSAUL."
57 Sydney Road, DURBAN.
Extend best wishes to the Zionist Record on its Golden Jubilee


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FROM


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(PTY.) LIMITED
Illl

509/513 SMITH STREET,

DURBAN




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(PTY.) LTD.

66 Pine Street, DURBAN
0 .
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO
THE ZIONIST RECORD
ON ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE
and hopes their clientele will continue to derive the
same enjoyment in the future as they have in the past.


CONGRATULATIONS

,AND GOOD WISHES


To The Zionist Record
On Their 50th Anniversary


from


BAKERS LTD.


E5












........ ..






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN


FATHER


DEFENDED


CAPE


COLONISTS


The story of two pioneer journalists

By S. A. ROCHLIN


-and the son championed


the Boer Republic


IN the early 1930s, when I first
JL began to write for -the Zionist
Record, I often used to meet in
the centre of Cape Town an
elderly, medium-height, slig h t
man, scholarly in appearance and
serious in mien.
He was Marcus Rabinowitz, and
usually I used to see him in Cape
Town's oldest Public Library
where, it seemed, he spent most
of his time reading periodicals and
books. He passed away some 25
years ago.
Marcus Rabinowitz was one of
the first South African Jews to
be actively engaged in local
journalism and was generally re-
garded as one of the most
informed South African journalists
of his time. He gained fame as
a 'prolific correspondent to the
. Cape press of his times.
He wrote on a diversity of
themes, especially on political
questions, under the initials of
"M.R." and was the master of an
incisive and easy pen. He appeared


to enjoy polemics of whatever
character and topic.
He had good literary training,
having been one of the first Jews
to attend (during the early 1860s)
the South African College (now
the University of Cape. Town),
where he counted among his
fellow students and close friends
such men as Judge Sir John Kotze,
ex-President J. W. Reitz, the Hon.
J. W. Sauer (father of the present
Minister of Lands, Mr. Paul
Sauer), and Professor Marais (one
of the founders of the Dutch
Reformed Church Seminary at
Stellenbosch). Subsequently, he
acted for a while as private
secretary to the famous Barney
Barnato.
An important factor in his intel-
lectual make-up was the influence
of his father, the Rev. Joel Rabino-
witz (1828-1902). The latter was
not only one of South Africa's
pioneer Jewish spiritual leaders,
but also one of the first Jewish
correspondents to this country's


If you know your BEANS

Syou '11 enjoy I
I

jELLIS


I BROWN 0


i COFFEE .
I ROASTER FRESH! |


Freshly
ground
from
only
the
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coffee
beans


No has-beans in this coffee.
Only the cream of the coffee
crop is good enough for Ellis
Brown, because only the best
Is good enough for those who
know their beans.
Vacuum-packed in the
Flavour-Saver Tin


i JOEL RABINOWITZ I

press and overseas journals in-
cluding the London J e w I s h
Chronicle.
Like his son, he was also ever
ready to champion in the South
African and overseas newspapers
of his time, the cause of Judaism
when and wherever necessary.
Thus, Joel Rabinowitz replied
vigorously in the columns of the
Cape Argus of October 30, 1876-
and later his statement was
issued as a pamphlet-to the exer-
tions of the Rev. Frans Lion
Cachet to convert local Jews to
the dominant faith.
Then, again, he published In the
London Jewish Chronicle (June to
August, 1895) the first lengthy
essays on the history of the Jew
in this land-studies which are
still regarded as basic in any
investigation of the story of the
Jew in South Africa.
Both of the Rabinowitzes, father
and son, displayed a common
interest in the defence of the
Cape colonists against their de-
tractors.
On October 20, 1883, the Rev.
Joel Rabinowitz wrote in the

DURBAN I
I BENEFACTORS


SMr. IL K. Rosenoacn, Whou
died in June, 1954, was well
- known for bis magnificent
i contributions to the Hebrew
I University and other worthy
I cause. His father-in-law, Mr. L
Rosenbach, helped very mater-
lally in the building of the Park
I Street Synagogue in Durban.


Morning Post of London:
"Kindly permit me as a South
African colonist of 23 years'
standing to protest most emphati-
cally against the .baseless accusa-
tion of Mr. Baxter, M.P., who
stated in his speech at Forfar,
whilst alluding to South African
affairs, that that never In any
instance had the British settlers
in that part of the world done
anything approaching to their


duty in defending their lives and
their property.
"I will not retaliate by charging
Mr. Baxter with wilfully misrepre-
senting facts, but I venture to
charge him with gross ignorance
about South African affairs. I
have no hesitation in saying that
in no part of the British Dominions
have the colonists come forward
more readily and nobly to the call
Continued on page 82.


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PIONEER


LIFT


MANUFACTURERS


IN


- - --..


A view of Schindler's factory in Booysens, Johannesburg, with a mine dump in the background. I
the near future the size of the factory will be almost doubled by the erection of a new building on th
adjoining site.


..... ... OX


The new headquarters of the company, In Switzerland, photographed after the building was officially
opened, early this year. Situated about five miles from Lucerne, amidst picturesque surroundings, the
factory covers about 50 acres. It is one of the largest buildings in Europe erected as a single unit and
costs about 5,000,000. Over 2,000 people are employed in this factory. The company has five other
factories in Switzerland, as well as a foundry.


-A-

Mr. A. F. Schindler, chairman of the world-wide Schindler organisation, and party, photographed at Jan
Smuts Airport on their arrival in South Africa from Switzerland, In June 1958. From left to right:
Mr. B. Sidler (Technical General Manager), Mr. P. J. Pfeiffer (General Manager for Schindler Lifts
(S.A.) Ltd.), Mr. A. F. Schindler (Chairman of the company, in Switzerland), Mrs. J Bonnard (Mr.
Schindler's sister), Mrs. P. J. Pfeiffer and Mr. W. IUggenstorfer (Mr Schindler's secretary).


UNION


IN 1874, 12- years before Johannesburg was officially
/ declared a mining camp by Paul Kruger, the firm of
Schindler and Co., was established in Lucerne, Switzerland,
for the manufacture of .passenger, goods and other types of
'lifts. Today, 84 years later, Schindler and Co. Ltd., are a
world-wide organisation with branches in every major
city of the world.


While the story of
* Schindler Lifts (S.A.) dates
back only some nine years,
Sits roots go down much
further in South -Africa's
"-history. In the year preced-
ing the Union 'going off the
gold standard, in 1932, and
i the resultant biggest ever
n building boom on the Rand,
e the company appointed a
well-known engineering firm
as its agents in Southern
Africa.
Schindler and Co. Ltd.,
can rightly be called the
pioneers of lift manufactur-
ing in the Union and,
through their agents, have
installed numerous lifts of
all types in office blocks,
flats, warehouses, mines and
industrial concerns through-
out the country.
As a direct result of the
extensive development of the
Uniion in all its spheres, it
was decided to establish a
company in South Africa
and in 1949, Schindler Lifts
(S.A.) Ltd. was formed and
premises secured in Booy-
r sens Reserve where a large
factory, workshop and
offices were erected. At the
same time fully equipped
workshops, stores and offices
-were opened in Pretoria,
Cape Town, Durban, Port
Elizabeth, Bloemfontein and
Salisbury.
In March, this year, the
offices of the organisation in
Johannesburg were extended
to satisfy the administrative
requirements. In the near
future the size of the factory
will be almost doubled by
the erection of a^hew build-
ing, with a floor space of-
about 20,000 square feet, on
a site adjoining the present
building, the whole area
totalling more than 10 acres.
As a result of these exten-
sions the firm will not only
be able to manufacture more
lift parts for local supply,
but will also export parts as
well as cars and doors, to


NMI


PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT


the Far East and South -
America. Production costs.
will be reduced to the bene-
fit of the: South African
market.
In this connection, the
visit to South Africa, some
months ago, of Mr. A. F.
Schindler, chairman of the
company, in Switzerland, is
significant. Mr. Schindler
paid. visits to the main
centres of the Union and
the Central African Federa-
tion. He made a full survey
of the requirements of the
local market and its future
possibilities.
Today the company under-
takes the supply, manufac-
ture, erection and servicing
of all kinds of electric lifts,
ranging from the passenger
carrying type to a wide
variety of goods lifts. Coim-
plete cars and all door
equipment are manufactured
in South Africa at the
company's factory.
From time to time the.
company has been called
upon to manufacture lifts
away from the conventional
models, e.g. for carrying ex-
plosives and in coal pits. The
company was commissioned
to construct the special
orchestra, lifts at the Colos-
seum Theatre, Johannesburg,
which entailed the making
of large revolving platforms.
Schindlers use an elec-
tronic system, called, the
"Super-matic" which .auto-
matically controls the move-
ments of the lifts. They
pride themselves on the
service facilities they pro-
vide to their clients. A
24-hour service system has
been in operation for some
time now and with the new
developments taking place
in South Africa, this day and
night service is available in
all centres.
This policy of the company
and the painstaking con-
sideration it has always
given to sound manufactur-
ing -techniques, research
design, and the development
of its products, has assured
for it a definite place in the
future of this sub-continent.







Supplement to' THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE TWENTY-NINB


* Benzion S. Hersch-builder of the


Congratulations

and

Best Wishes

for the

future

to the

ZIONIST

RECORD

on the

occasion of

its

GOLDEN,

JUBILEE

from


WOOLWORTHS


MOSHAL GEVISSER





PARTNERS LTD.






Associated Companies




Extend Golden Jubilee Greetings
to the Zionist Record and -
its readers




The company is proud of its
record of service and reputation
in the field of wholesale distri-
bution and look forward to
celebrating its own Golden
Jubilee in the near future.


-Zionist



Record

B ENZION ZUNDEL .HERSCH
helped the Zionist Record to
develop from a small monthly
bulletin of limited circulation to a
widely distributed and leading
weekly newspaper in the Jewish
and Zionist world.
In 1923 a decision was taken by
the S.A. Zionist Federation to
separate the publication of its
official bulletin from its own
offices and enable the Zionist
Record to develop into -a journal
of general Jewish interest.
An Editorial Board was estab-
lished with Benzion Hersch at its
head; A room was rented and an
editor and business manager were
appointed. Were it not for the en-
thusiasm, dynamic effort and
devotion of Hersch, it would not
have been possible to weather the
first few years.
GRADUAL DEVELOPMENT
Progress, however, was made.
The quantity and quality of news
rose and this led to increased cir-
culation. The Federation was en-
couraged to change the monthly
into a fortnightly, and some years
later, into a weekly publication.
The gradual growth of the
Zionist Record to the position as
one of the leading weeklies of the
Jewish world, is due to the loyalty
of its staffs at different periods.
The work of its honorary workers,
however (particularly in the early
days of its transformation), under
the inspiration of Benzion Hersch,
undoubtedly served as a founda-
tion for the journal.


Mr. Isaac Pincus, of Johannes-
burg, who has been a subscriber
of the Zionist Record since it was
started, 50 years ago.
Mr. Pincus came to Johannes-
burg in 1901 and the following
year, started a jewellery business
in which he is still active. In the
early years he travelled with
horse and cart in many par.s of
the country selling his wares. Mr.
Pincus has a remarkable memory.
He vividly recalls the early days
of the Zionist movement in Johan-
nesburg and the hectic meetings
which he, as a youth, attended in
the first Zionist hall, in Commis-
sioner Street, in the heart of
Ferreirastown. In those days, he
says, Zionist workers did a tre-
mendous amount of foot-slogging,
collecting funds and selling "she-
kolim."
He married Miss Edith Lurle,
of Johannesburg, and they have
two children. Dr. Charles Pincus,
who is now studying overseas, and
Mrs. Thelma Goldberg, of Durban.


meetings were forbidden and had
to be held secretly. The Russian
authorities then looked upon
Zionism as a subversive activity.
At the age of 19 Hersch came to
South Africa to join his parents
who had settled here. He became
a leading spirit in the Zionist
movement of this country-


He was the founder of the
first J.N.F. Club and in 1911 was
elected to the executive of the
S.A. Zionist Federation. He re-
signed, owing to Ill-health, in
1931.
He was a gifted speaker and
with his fiery Idealism and oratory
he roused audiences to great en-
thusiasm for the national cause.
THE JEWISH CONGRESS
With his deep-felt sympathy for
the suffering of East European
Jewry, he initiated the Jewish Con-
gress in Johannesburg in 1916. The
resolutions adopted by the Con-
gress were submitted to the Union
Government, and to the leading
governments of the world.
For many years Hersch devoted
himself to writing and for a period
established a Yiddish weekly, the
Jewish Standard, of which he was
editor. At the same time he acted
as correspondent for leading
Jewish newspapers in Europe and
America.
He participated In the work of
the Board of Deputies and worked
valiantly for the recognition by
the Union Government of Yiddish
as a European test-language for
immigrants to this country.
H-ersch had married Balbina
Kornblum in Warsaw and their
home in Johannesburg became a
centre for the Jewish intelligent-
sla.-DAVID DAINOW.


_ _ _


1883


1958


Benzion Hersch threw himself,
heart and soul, into the work of the
Record. His offices were in the
same building and he was in daily
and sometimes hourly contact
with the staff. He supervised
every aspect of the paper's work-
editorial, advertising and circula-
tion.
A gifted writer, he translated
articles and stories from Yiddish
newspapers for the journal and
wrote original contributions of
his own.
On June 16, 1935, this utterly
devoted idealist passed away to
,the deep grief of all Zionists
throughout South Africa. The
sense of loss was deep and cast a
shadow over the community. The
funeral at the old Brixton ceme-
tery was the most largely attended
in Johannesburg for some years.
Benzion Hersch was born at
Yashini, Lithuania, and his
parents later moved to Shavel.
At the age of 11, he was taken to
Warsaw. His father was a strong
adherent of the Chovevei Zion
movement and for this reason
named his son "Benzion.".
Imbibing national ideals from
his home surroundings, the boy
became an adherent-and later a
leader-of the Pirchel Zion Society.
Although only a young movement,
SUBSCRIBER FOR
THE LAST 50 YEARS


J. W. JAGGER & Co.
LTD.
MANUFACTURERS AND
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS


75 Years of Service!



When our.first advertisement appeared
in the Zionist Record, in 1919, 1. W.
Jagger & Co. had already been selling
merchandise in South Africa for 36 years.

In 1883 the late Mr. J. W. Jagger opened
a wholesale business in CapeTown and
later branches of the company were
started in Johannesburg, Durban and
Port Elizabeth.

Three generations have learnt to trust
and respect J. W. Jagger & Co. Ltd.

We are as proud of our good name and
.our history as we are of the merchandise
.we sell.

As we have served in the past so we shall
continue to do in the future.




We extend hearty greetings

to the Zionist Record on

its Golden Jubilee








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE THIRTY


A cartoon of the writer at work on a I
Children's programme.

M Y career, for what that inflated word
is worth, began on the Zionist Record.
I was aged about 16 when I first began
to wield pen and typewriter in the offices of
"The Record" in Progress Buildings, Com-
missioner Street, under the editorship of
David Dainow.
I'm not sure what degree of compassion
on the part of the editor operated in my
engagement as a sort of learner proof-
reader and sub., for I was a pretty pathetic
figure in those days. I had not long before
come out of hospital, where I had lingered
for four years following the attack of
polio which laid me low in 1928, ten days
before my barmitzvah.
Education and the world at -large had
passed me by during those formative years
of 'teen-hood, and I was quite unaccus-
tomed to dealing with people on any plane
other than that of hospital patient and
doctor.


Broadcaster Percy Baneshik says:



MY CAREER BEGAN AT



THE ZIONIST RECORD


I was still very infirm and slow-moving.
My handwriting-a skill which I had had
to reacquire by dint of sweaty concentra-
tion and gritted teeth-was still spidery and
sometimes illegible. I had taught myself to
type, however, and fancied I could turn a
pretty phrase in the way of literature. :
For example, in writing an obituary
notice of the great German impressionist
painter, Liebermann, I was exceedingly
gratified to find that whoever wrote the
"Record's" leader on him in the same issue,
had borrowed one of my best turned
phrases quite shamelessly.
These were terrifying years for me. My
colleagues were Edgar Bernstein and a
young woman named Rose. She was a-
qualified barrister, but had found the pre-
judice against women at the Bar (at that
time) too powerful, and had turned to Jew-
ish journalism. Edgar was my mentor-it
was he who introduced me to David
Dainow-butf Rose was a different kettle of
fish.
THE BARBS STILL REMAIN
She bore a grudge of some sort against
humankind, probably for her frustration
in the law, and found in me a ready- butt
for an acid wit. As I say, I was still tender
and inexperienced in any human relation-
ship, as sensitive about my appearance and
my ignorance as a tortoise deprived of its
shell, and her barbs sank deep and pain-
fully.
As you will detect from my vivid
memory of them, I have not yet extracted
them from my hide, though 26 years have
passed.
Edgar Bernstein was something of my
idol and ideal-as, indeed, he still is, liter-
ally, to this very day. He could write like
the angel in "Abu-ben-Adhem." He had the
sensitive brow
iand the poetic
pallor that I
yearned to own,
and he knew
his journalistic


Phone


Benny


Goldberg


ONLY AT


LYNDHURST from
Mr.


e d i t o r a
BOTTLE STORE staff fo
also bf
the cop
40-5101/2 40-2376 One
away,
office
40 JOHANNESBURG ROAD, 'LYNDHURST, his fee
bell wl
JOHANNESBURG hurryir
press
Half-mile off Louis Botha Avenue from Balfour Park. arrived
sheepis
The
Goldbe
Sunday
THE SMALL BOTTLE STORE not'

WITH THE BIG DELIVERY young
Afte
Mr. G
many
he wa,
and at

YOU RING -WE BRING ab
family
several
No connection with any other bottle store wara
Motte
in hav
-stalled,


business ina way I knew I never would.
He was an authority on Sarah Gertrude
Million, and an intimate of hers; and I felt
then that these were heights of Olympian-
ism that I would never reach.
I can't recall how we met, but Edgar,
while still in his 'teens, had started a
journal called (after 0. Henry's youthful
journalistic venture) "The -Rolling Stone,"
to which I contributed a short story. It was
a very bad short story-I found it at the
bottom of an old trunk not long ago and
read it with horror-but Edgar assured me
it had merit, and this was the sort of
assurance I had great need of as I emerged
from under the dark boulder of my devas-
tating illness.
(I don't want to lay too much emphasis
on how sorry a wreck of a human youth I
was at that stage; but I think it is interest-
ing that in all those years in hospital, I. had
only managed to read by turning the pages
of the book with a bamboo stick gripped
between my teeth.)
David Dainow himself was, I think,
sometimes, puzzled by this youth he had
landed himself with. He gave me the Child-
ren's Page to write, and I saw my first out-
put in print under the nom de plume of
"Aunt Sarah."
DOUBLE IDENTITY
Later, when I had become "Uncle
Percy" on the radio-I joined the old
African Broadcasting Company under Mr.
Schlesinger in 1934-I continued to write
as "Aunt Sarah," and one day received a
letter from a girl in Kingwilliamstown en-
quiring whether "Aunt Sarah" had any
acquaintance with "Uncle Percy." I didn't
enlighten her as to the identicalness of the
two, and subsequently she undertook to
embroider a petticoat for "Aunt Sarah,"
and asked for information as to Auntie's
bust measurement!
But David was patient and kindly, and
took some pains with "Aunt Sarah's Page"
when my knowledge of Judaism, which had
slipped with all the rest of my education
during the dark yeais in hospital,, led me


into error.
There were other members of the staff
I shall not, forget. Occasionally still, I
bump into Barney Amdur, who was office-
boy and copy-runner between the office and
the works. Barney had, and still has, aln
ear-splitting grin, and a gentle, bumbling
nature which I much appreciated after my
,encounters with Rose.
He was succeeded by Bennie Goldberg,
who was a dark, puckish lad, mostly dis-
tinguished in my eyes then by the fact that
he rode a motprised pedal-cycle through the
Johannesburg traffic on his errands. It was
the forerunner of the present-day "moped,"
and I yearned to ride it. I never did.
Bennie is now-or was, at last hearing
of him-a bottle-store tycoon. I could have
guessed that from his perky manner when
I first knew him.
LEARNING THE CRAFT
I spent a year, on and off, with these
folk on "The Record" before I branched
out into the wider field of broadcasting. I
can't recall any memorable articles I wrote
for its columns, but the travail of writing
anything at all was so immense at that
time that I learnt a lot of my craft in that
year.'"
'"The Record" has grown out of all re-
cognition since. Its alertness and moder-
nity is a constantt source. of surprise to me,
picturing it as I do in the memory-guise of
the rather staid and conservative "Organ
of S.A. Jewry" it was when I first knew-it.
But I owe a lot to that early year of
experience, and even Rose must take some
credit for the crust I wear today over my
extreme sensitivity, enabling me to deal
with all those celebrities I interview for
the microphone today.
And I will declare that 90 per cent. of
my Jewishness today derives from my as-
sociations with these good Jews on the
Zionist Record, for I might have been lost
to Jewry as a result of those empty years
when I lay on my back with polio, with
no provision for my education, either reli-
gious or secular


AT 13 HE WAS OUR MESSENGER BOY


OB at the Zionist Record An ardent Zionist, he used to down to their new life. Mr. Gold-
as been the first rung op meet new immigrants at the 'berg is a contributor to many
dder to success for many station and help them to settle Zionist causes.
people. But Benny Gold-
of Johannesburg, can claim
e started at a more tender
han other youngsters. H "
Lly 13.
was- a wild kid and never
i to go to school," Mr. Gold-
confessed. "My headmaster
tol gave me a week in which

Goldberg did not let the
unity slip by. A week later
32) he was employed as a
nger-boy at the Zionist
.He had to carry copy
he offices to the printers.
David Dainow was then
and the offices were in Pro-
Buildings. Mr. Goldberg is
bered by members of the
or his youthful vitality and
because he used to deliver
py on a motor-cycle.
day, when Mr. Dainow was
young Benny went into his
and sat in his chair with
t on the desk. He pressed a
which brought the secretary
ng in and was about to
another when Mr. Dainow
. Young Benny slunk
hly out of the office.
staff then,. recalled Mr. Head Office, Tor6nto, Canada.
rg, had to work every
y morning from nine to
* "That's why my golf is
tch good today; I never had HEARTY JUBILEE GREETINGS
time to practise as a
ster." to the
r leaving the "Record,''
*oldberg was employed in ZIONIST RECORD
capacities. Eight years ago
s granted a liquor license and its readers
present owns a bottle store
rdhurst.
tried with two children, he
orn in Johannesburg. HisANUFACTURERS
came to South Africa
l years before the Boer
and his late grandfather, INSURANCELE COMPA N
Goldberg was instrumentalL
ing the kosher kitchen in- (Established 1887)
1at the General Hospital.







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958




50 YEARS OF

Wi y r KT This is the first of a
SI series of articles dealing
W O R K l with the .history of the
women's Zionist movement
y in this country. The series
1y will be continued in forth-
coming issues of the

Sarah Leftwicb Zionist Record.
IA MONG the 161 delegates to the first Zionist congress in
1897 there were 13 women. It speaks well for the equal
status*accorded them in this first parliament of the Jewish
people that at a time before women were politically enfran-
chised and when they were subject to legal disabiilties Jewish
women took their place as co-partners in the movement for
Jewish national regeneration.
Women had shared with fervour in South Africa and Rhodesia.
equal to men's in the Jewish Women's names figure in the
national, awakening inspired by many Zionist societies in the early
the Chovevei Zion in Russia even part of this half-century. They
before the light of Herzl dawned; helped in collections and were
and from the beginning of coloni- always in charge of social arrange-
sation experiments in Palestine ments.
they took part in the life and They often held the position
work of the pioneers. of secretary; women even
The ideas that were stirring headed societies, for the presi-
Russian Jewry were brought to dent of Springs in 1909 was
this country in the 'eighties and Mrs. Sarah Epstein. wor
'nineties by immigrants from But although women worked to- tori
Eastern Europe. So strongly were gether with men in the societies bur
they imbued with-the Zionist ideal established by the latter and con- social
that they at once began to form tinued to do so, they soon began four
societies, and by the end of the to form their own groups for tow
Anglo-Boer War some dozens of Zionist work. Dur
Zionist societies had been founded Fifty years" ago there were Eliz


h I


THE DIRECTORS AND STAFF
OF













BOWATER PAPER COMPANY

(PROPRIETARY) LIMITED


A member of the


Bowater Organisation


11 FFENNELL ROAD, VILLAGE 6EEP,

P.O. BOX 4663, JOHANNESBURG














EXTEND BEST WISHES TO THE


ZIONIST RECORD ON


THE


ATTAINMENT OF ITS GOLDEN
JUBILEE


-MEM


PAGE THIRTY-ONI


WOMEN'S ZIONIST


mens -Aonist societies in Pre-
a, Cape Town and Johannes-
g. In the next 10 years women's
ieties or committees were
ended in Oudtshoorn, Queens-
'n, East London, Wynberg,
urban and Bulawayo. In Port
zabeth, a stronghold of Zionism.


the "Daughters of Zion" did all
the work of an adult society.
Between 1920 and 1930 societies
were established or revived in
Worcester, Port Elizabeth, Ger-
miston, Krugersdorp, B e n o n 1,
Heilbron, Vereeniging, Boksburg,
Pretoria and Bloemfontein.
The full story of women in the
South African Zionist movement
cannot be recounted within the
limits of an article; but though it
may seem invidious, some names
must be mentioned.
Anyone with a sense of history
is interested in beginnings and
feels that those who were active
in a cause in its first visionary
days, should be acknowledged as
the pioneers they were. It is they
who made possible the continua-
tion of the work, And secondly,
credit is due to those who, be-
cause of their strong Zionist con-
viction, their ability and long and
signal service in a leading position,
were able to exert an influence
not only in their local circle, but
beyond.
PRETORIA FIRST
Pretoria is credited with being
the first town in South Africa to
form a women's society, in 1899;
but there are no records of its
activity. Another society was
formed in 1917 and lapsed in 1919.
The present society dates from
1928.
For all practical purposes, the
Bnoth Zion Association of Cape
Town is really the doyen of
women's Zionist societies, having
been founded in 1901.
In 1908 its chairman was Ruth
Alexander, a protagonist of Jewish
culture and Hebrew. Her intellec-
tual gifts were also exercised in
the writing of articles on litera-
ture. For a few years she wrote
the Children's Page in the Zionist
Record. Her contributions fostered
among Jewish children in South
Africa a love for and interest in
things Jewish.
Rebecca Zuckermann was a
builder of the Bnoth Zion in its
formative years when her devotion
and determination laid the founda-
tion of the influential force that
this society has become. She was
its chairman for 16 years and re-
mained associated with Zionist
work throughout her life.
Every chairman of the Bnoth
Zion who followed made her mark
for some outstanding ability or
quality, and each played a part
in Cape Town's solid contribution
of Zionist inculcation and achieve-
ment.
Besides Rebecca Zuckermann,
chairmen in this long period have
been Eva Pepper, Dina Zucker-
menn, Schrire, Feodora Clouts,
Shoshana Gordon, Betty Herbstein,
Maggie Oblowitz (Taylor), Rose
Mo'vsovic, Mary Segal, Helena
Liebermin, Freda Winokur, Miriam
0 Continued on page 65.


Kalmin, Q. Shapiro, B. Sacks, D. Leibowitz, L. Welnronk. Sitting
Miss E. Kruss, Miss E. Shultz, Mr. B. Weinronk, R. Rubln, Talts.
Front row: Misses J. Bloom, R. Zinober, G. Martinson, K. Slipert.




: NEW CONSOLIDATED GOLD




FIELDS LIMITED

DIRECTORS
R. Annan (Chairman), Sir G. S. Harvie-Watt, Bt., T.D., Q.C.,
M.P. (Deputy-Chairman), Sir G. Joseph Ball, K.B.E., F. R.
Cottell, E. S. Hallett, P. S. Hammond, M. Maclachlan, R, H. A.
Neuschild, G. G. Potler, D.F.C. The Hon. R. M. P. Preston,
D.S.O., Sir Richard Snedden, C.h.E., A. R. 0. Williams, O.B.E.
GENERAL STAFF

(Managers), C. L. Waterhouse (Secretary).
South Africa: P. S. Hammond (Resident Director and General
S Manager), W. J. Busschau, L. D. Browne, O.B.E., W. M.
Barclay, J. M. M. Ewing, J. W. A. Wright, R. M. Strachan,
IM.B.E., (Managers).

ENGINEERING STAFF
London: F. H. Upcott, B. G. Skelton, D. J. Rogers (Consulting
Engineers).
South Africa: R. B. Smart, G. B. Batty, J. B. Bocock, R. R. M.
Cousens (Consulting Engineers), Dr. R. A. Pelletier (Con-
sulting Geologist), A. T. Moir (Consulting Metallurgist),
L. T. C. Pitt, O.B.E. (Consulting Mechanical and Elec-
trical Engineer).

REGISTERED OFFICE: 49 Moorgate, London, E.C.2.
SOUTH AFRICAN OFFICE: 75 Fox Street, 'Johannesburg.
AMERICAN OFFK.CE: 123 William Street, New York, .38, New
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AUSTRALIAN OFFICE: 141 Elizabeth Street, Sydney, New
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EAST AFRICAN OFFICE: Bank Chanibers, Hardingi Sroeet,
Nairobi, Kenya.
CENTRAL AFRICAN FEDERATION OFFICE: Delamere
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MINING COMPANIES ADMINISTERED IN SOUTH AFRICA
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The whole of the issued shares of New Consolidated Gold
Fields Limited are owned by The Consolidated Gold Fields of
South Africa, Limited.I








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


of duty than in South Africa."
After giving a list of local cam-
paigns in which the colonists were
militarily active from 1846 to 1879,
he proceeds to state that
"thousands of colonists- left their
families and property and went to
the war, or front as some call it.
During the Indian Mutiny the
good citizens of Cape Town per-
formed garrison duty -in order to
enable 'the Governor to send all
the troops to India, and if I re-
member rightly, the Cape Town
citizens repeated the same
after the unfortunate defeat in
Zululand. This, Mr. Editor, is the
reward we receive from Mr.
Baxter, M.P., apparently with the
connivance of his party.
"GOOD WAR"
"Mr. Baxter further said In his
speech that a South African
merchant once said to him, 'there
is nothing that improves business
so much as a jolly good war,' and
he consequently charges the whole
Colony with the wicked propensity
of delighting in war. I appeal to
the bar of public opinion to
judge whether this is not a libel.
I will not deny that there may be
in the Colony some such mis-
creants, but these are happily the
exception and not the rule. And
pray, Mr. Baxter, are you in Eng-
land so immaculate? Have you not
in England some wicked people
who would be delighted to see a
big war breaking out in order to
derive profit from it? And will a


Continued from page 27.

sane and just man charge the
whole English nation as being en-
dowed with that wicked propen-
sity, as Mr. Baxter charges the
colonists of South Africa? Mr.
Baxter laments that the British
taxpayer has- to contribute to-
wards the protection of the
colonists. Sir, none are so blind as
those who do not wish to see. The
gentleman in question is, therefore,
quite ignorant of the fact that
hundreds of thousands from the
colonies are residing in England,
spend their hard-earned money
here which they have earned in
the colonies, and in doing so the
colonists become taxpayers and
contribute largely to the revenue
of England.
"There is, however, one grain of
truth and common sense in Mr.
Baxter's speech. He finds fault
with Mr. Gladstone for not re-
storing the Transvaal to the Boers
as soon as he came into power. In
this he is quite right. Had Mr.
Gladstone done so, his name as a
consistent politician would have
been permanently established, and
the lasting gratitude of the Boers
obtained. Having declined to re-
store the country till the British
troops were thrice defeated, Mr.
Gladstone has forfeited his claim
to political consistency as to the
gratitude of the Transvaal Boers,
whilst causing every true English-
man to blush.


AUSTIN A55



is a family affair!




0 Here's the car the whole family
will enjoy-for its sleek looks, its

roomy comfort, its dependable

performance. Yet the A55 is ex-
tremely economical to run, and

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Congratulations to ZIONIST

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"The South African colonists
look to the mother country with
love and affection, but this makes
them all the more resent with
indignation to be treated like step-
children and calumniated either
through gross ignorance, or to be
made a scapegoat in order to
atone for the vacillating and un-
statesmanlike policy of Downing
Street."
THE SON
As for the writing career of
Marcus Rabinowitz, .the son: He
began to contribute articles to
South African and other periodi-
cals at an early age and much of
what he penned, in the decade or so
before the year 1900, was devoted
to the defence of the persecuted
Jew in the pogrom-ridden Russia
and *Rumania eighty years ago
and also to descriptions of the
cultural advance made by the Jew.-
His name became particularly
known shortly after the out-
break of the South African War
(1899-1902) through his articles
in local newspapers in defence
of the Boer cause against
Chamberlain's a n d Milner's
England.
For the most part these contri-
butions were published in the well-
known pro-Boer Cape Town daily,
The South African News, a paper
that had close associations with
distinguished Cape personalities
like F. S. Malan (later a member
of General Botha's Cabinets) and
Samuel Crouwrlght Schreiner.
His articles aroused so much
local interest at the time that
he deemed it necessary to reprint
42 of them in two pamphlets under
the designation of "Letters and
Articles Relating to the War
between Great Britain and the
South African Republics Cape
Town, 1900 and 1901." Copies are
very difficult to procure today.
A little while, ago I read these
pamphlets and found them most
interesting. The following is typi-
cal of his presentation of his view-
point: Replying to an editorial
criticism of him in the Cape Town
Cape Argus of 1901, he said:
ENEMY OF PEACE
"No reader of the afternoon
journal can be insensible to the
fact that the matter daily appear-
ing in its columns is alike in spirit
and in form about as unhappy, un-
wise and impolitic to use no
harsher phrase as the worst
enemy of the peace of South Africa
could wish for. Apart from gratui-
tously offensive features which it
shares with other prints, its
leaders have for long past been
distinguished by a mixture of un-
reason and brutality, unfavourable
to the last degree, to the restora-
tion of that tranquility for which
the Press is supposed to labour.
Could anything be more unfortu-
nate, more foolish, or barbarous
than for a leading paper, in its
leading columns, to advise the mili-
tary authorities no longer to re-
gard the enemy as "belligerents,"
but "to hunt them down" as if
they were a pack of brigands and
murderers? The military are
recommended to hunt down a
whole male population (because,
remember, every Republican, man
and boy, is now in the field), a
population engaged in defending
their homes, amid' trials, difficulties
and perils, and against odds which
recall deeds that shine forth with
perennial light in the history of
all the ages. Take the venerable
President of the South African
Republic. When I think of the
weight of his years and infirmi-
ties-driven forth from his home
in the rigour of winter, with no
rest for the sole of his foot-I
know not how he endures his
toils and privations, and cares,
and sufferings, except through-
'man's unconquerable mind.'
"The situation of these men is
such as might well excite-and
does excite-the sympathy, re-
spect and admiration of humanity.
War, however, brutalises some
people; it has brutalised a portion
of our press which is angry,
mortified and disappointed because
the Boers persist in laying down
their lives for their country, in-
stead of abandoning it to the
uitlanders, who want to take
possession.
"On the other hand, if the
Republics had surrendered, who


can doubt that our "loyal" press didn't. In fact, we had a sample
would have had their jeers at the- of it when I overheard, an op-
poltroons who were going to pressed uitlander, whose valour
"stagger, humanity," but when is so far mingled with prudence
Johannesburg was occupied, I (Continued on page 101)


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*


U


TWO PIONEER JOURNALISTS


PAGE THIRTY-TWO


I 4b






* Supplement to THE ZIONISTRECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE THIRTY-THRS5


hae last50yea Rise of a new type
have seen the


of


leader

By MAX MELAMET

T HE social and economic
changes experienced by South
African Jewry during the past half
century are reflected, as one would
expect, in the leadership of the
community.
The Jewish community is econo-
mically more homogeneous than
any other in the Union. It is over-
whelmingly middle-class; the per-
centages below and above this
class are both very small. Most of
the Mutual Help, Benefit and
other societies established in the
early years of this century by
struggling Jewish immigrants as
-a form of economic self-help,
exist today merely -as fraternal
organizations; sometimes they are
kept alive solely for sentimental
reasons by the sons and even
grandsons of the original founders.
So, too, organizations which
were established decades ago by


LIONEL


Jewish members of the working The, economic transformation
class and which avowed a social- of the community has been ac-
ist ideology or a proletarian companied by the spread of secu-
approach to communal affairs, still lar education. The vast majority
exist but their class basis has dis- of the community consists of per-
appeared. For the most part their sons who were either born and
members are indistinguishable, educated In the Union or have
socially and economically, from been here long enough to become
those organizations which do not completely integrated, culturally
deny their bourgeois Gharacter or and otherwise, into the general
their dependence on the "capital- population.
ist" system. The so-called "greener" has


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virtually disappeared.
There is, to be sure, still a
Yiddish-speaking section but Its
members speak Yiddish as a mat-
ter of preference and culturally
they are often superior to those
who know no Yiddish at all.
My own impression, based on
an experience of communal affairs
extending over more years than I
(Continued on page 46.)


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3JubIgee






.Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


With the compliments of

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IPAOB-THMTY-FOUA







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE THIRTY-FIVE


WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF THE

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AND HOLLOW-WARE CO., LTD.
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Congratulations from


London associations with


the Record
I AM glad to have the opportunity of being
associated with the Golden Jubilee of the Zionist
Record. It is something nostalgic. For my connection
with the journal off and on, dates from 1912. Not a
bad record. It began in that year through the
instrumentality of Samuel Goldreich, one of the
Zionist pioneers.
I first got to know him through Leopold J. Greenberg being
editor of the London Jewish Chronicle and Joseph Cowan,
both friends of Herzl.
I was a young but busy publicist in English and Yiddish.
I had contributed a series of Ghetto portraits in the Jewish
World under Lucien Wolf's editorship and was editor of the .
Yiddish supplement to that journal. Later when Wolf gave up ""
his editorship I contributed a number of Jewish character
sketches to the Jewish Chronicle and wrote on Hebrew and
Yiddish literature.
Goldreich saw some of my writings and asked me to
contribute some articles from time to time to the Zionist Jacob H
Record., .a journal I had seen once or twice. It was, I think, of this ill
a monthly. is a vete:
With his characteristic generosity, he paid me for one or journalist.
two contributions, and undertook to forward them to Johannes- the famous
burg. New Judea
*I don't know who edited the paper at that period. I, however, lished in
knew that Abraham Meir Solomon, whose acquaintance I had made Zionist org
some years earlier through his future father-in-law, Wolf Sacks,
occasionally wrote'for it. Sacks himself, an old type of Maskil (a r c garden
distant relative of my family), was not a Zionist, though it was he authoritati
who in later years instilled in the brilliant grandson, Aubrey Eban, the Zionist
the Hebrew spirit of Jewish knowledge. But Solomon was an ardent Mr. Ho
Zionist. For me, a Lithuanian by birth, with many relatives of friends
of the family in South Africa. it was a nice experience to be asso- many yeal
ciated with a Jewish journal there. respondent
Earlier I had made the acquaintance of E. L. Heyman, who was Record. Hi
the original owner of the Jewish World and became one of the the Recor
directors of that journal, which was taken over by a number of
prominent leaders of the Anglo-Jewish community with Lucien Wolf 1912.
as editor.
Heyman. a shrewd little man,
who I gathered came from Tovrig.
or Torigen, in Lithuania, after
making a little fortune In South
Africa, lost a considerable part of P.O. BOX 5003, BENONI SOUTH
it in London, through the losses
sustained by the Jewish World. He C H A R LE
took an active part in the forma- ff
tion of the Jewish Colonial Trust
and is mentioned by Herzl in his C H A R L--
Diaries.
The paper sustained losses but
was Instrumental in promoting
Zionism which in those days was Directors: C. T. Brand, C. Brand, I
"staunchly opposed by The Jewish
Chronicle. BUILIEF
Jacob de Haas was one of its
editors, prior to his departure for ** **
the United States. It may there-
fore be said that a South African
Jew from Lithuania had paved
the way for Zionist journalism in COR. BRAD
Great Britain. Then*there was Leo-
pold Kessler, an early Zionist
pioneer who played a prominent
part In the Herzl days and wasExtend G
originally connected with South E ten (
El Arish Commission). And at a
Africa. (Kessler was head of the R ecord
later stage, there was, of course, R c
Dr. Joseph Hertz, who succeeded
Dr. Herman Adler as Chief Rabbi
of the Bfitish Commonwealth.
Continued on page 36


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Eillululululuiiiiiiiiiiiiif luiiii ii uiiiiinIIII llullllliii i u lii llliuiii i llu i llliiiiiliiniliiiiiiiliiiiii i numu I


Congratulations from


lodess, the writer
uminating article,
ran Anglo-Jewish
He was editor of
s Zionist monthly,
a, which was pub-:
London by the:
'anisation and was:
d as the most
ive periodical in
t world.
odess served for
rs as London cor-
t of the Zionist
is association with
d dates back to


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I







Supplement, to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


THREE
It is generally believed that Dr.


CHIEF
*' Continued from previous page


With the compliments of
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T.C. TIPPED DRILL RODS


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Hertz's appointment was due to munity and above all a great force
the efforts of Lord Milner on his in Zionism. He rendered great and
"behalf with Lord Rothschild. It is lasting service for the national
far from true. Lord Milner, no cause at every critical stage.
doubt, spoke to Rothschild about If at the end of his career he
huis old friend who supported him was somewhat at odds with some
in South Africa. But as a matter of the heads of the community, it
of fact, there was no other posi- was partly a result of his coura-
tive candidate. geous stand for Zionism especially
Dr. Drachman, a scholarly, on the eve of the Balfour.Declara-
staunch Orthodox rabbi, had a tion.
good chance to succeed Herman As I write I am reminded that
Adler, but he was Inflexible and a week or so before his death,
uncompromising and In the end when at his request I visited him
withdrew his candidature. The two on a Sabbath afternoon, he told,
other candidates were Dayan me, among other things, that it had
Haymson, whowas not very popu- been his intention for some time
lar with the mass of Jewry, to recommend Dr. L. Rabbinowitz
and Dr. Daiches, whose chances as his successor. I don't know
were small. Hertz, therefore, was whether the present Chief Rabbi
the man for the job. of South Africa, whom I -know
He proved to be a tremendous from his early youth, was ever
asset for the Anglo-Jewish com- made aware of it. But had Hertz

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RABBIS
lived longer he would have exer-
cised his influence in favour of
Dr. Rabbinowitz as Chief Rabbi
of the British Commonwealth on
his retirement.
And, writing about chief rabbis
and South Africa, I must recall
that I was personally acquainted
with the late Rabbi Dr. Landau
long before he was appointed head
of South African Jewry. I was a
youth when first I met him at the
Fourth Zionist Congress in London
in 1900. It was that assembly that
remained ingrained in my mind for
all-time, having been in such close
proximity to Herzl.
Jacob de Haas, who organised
the Congress, had appointed me, a
youngster of the Pirchel Zion, as
a member of the reception com-
mittee and honoured me with the
task of being a steward on the
platform.
I moved among the great-
moved forwards- and- backwards
handing notes, delivering messages
and performing all the duties of a
shamash on, the platform. My re-
ward for all times was when after
the conclusion of Congress, when
all had left the platform of the


Queen's Hall, I sud-
denly saw the hand-
some figure of Herzl
coming back, and ap-
proaching me,
stretched out his hand,
called me by my name
saying that he was
looking for me to say
farewell and thank
you. Overpowered by
emotion that he knew
my name and came to
take leave from me, I


The late Chief
Rabbi Dr. J. L.
Landau. The
writer met him
at the Fourth
Zionist Confer-
ence in London
in 1900.


kissed his outstretched hand, to
which he reacted with a gentle
warning, "Nein, nein Lfeber Herr
Hodess, das nicht."
The spot on the platform at the
Queen's Hall of this memorable
scene remained the centre of my
gaze at every concert-hundreds
of them-that I attended at the
Hall which was destroyed by the
Blitz.


THIS SPACE SPONSORED BY












PILKINGTON BRIERS




(SOUTH AFRICA)


(PROPRIETARY)


LIMITED

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PAGE THIRTY-SIX


It was at that congress that I.
met Dr. Landau, who was pleased
that a youth in London had read
one or two of his Hebrew books
under his pen-name "Hilel ben
Shachar." He came to the con-
gress as a delegate, but like the
man who came to dinner in that
well-known play, he remained. He
was befriended by a man who had
Continued on page 58





npltement to THE ZIONIST-RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN


A


UNIQ UE


THE Zionist Federation of Great
1 ., Britain and Ireland have long
followed with great interest the
important contribution made by
the Zionist Record of South Africa
in the vital task of the dissemina-
tion of news and features about
Israel and our Zionist movement.
There can be little doubt that
the extremely important position
and the universal prestige enjoyed
by the South African Zionist
movement is in no small measure
due 'to the valuable contribution
.made by the Zionist Record.
To have achieved the milestone
of a 50th anniversary is surely a
relatively unique position of any
communal or Zionist organ and
we, your colleagues in the British
Zionist Movement, send you our
heartfelt congratulations and our
sincere best wishes for even
greater achievement in the future.
With Zion's greetings,
WOOLF PERRY,
Chairman,
Zionist Federation of Great Britain
and Ireland.


~ributr


W. Perry


to nur


On the occasion of its 50th anniversary, the Zionist
Record respectfully pays tribute to its illustrious pre-
decessors in the field of the Jewish Press. Above is a
reproduction of a postcard giving a display of Hebrew
and Yiddish newspapers in Eastern Europe before
World War I. The postcard has a South African
association. It was received in this country by the late
Mr. I. J. Hersch before the first world war.


POSITION


LILAC SALON
7B FOURTH STREET, SPRINGS
Extend their Best Wishes to the Zionist Record
on its Golden Jubilee




CeS9 Biscuits



BEST BY EVERY TEST



TASTE THE RICH GOODNESS IN

PEACHES AND CREAM PUFFS
LEMON CREAM PUFFS AND
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FRESHLY BAKED EVERY DAY IN THE MOST MODERN
BISCUIT FACTORY IN SOUTH AFRICA AT NEW ERA,
SPRINGS




WE EXTEND OUR CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE ZIONIST RECORD ON ITS
GOLDEN JUBILEE

SOUTH AFRICAN

BOARD MILLS LTD.
MANUFACTURERS OF PAPER BOARD
(Incorporated in South Africa)
Managing Agents and Secretaries:
STAFFORD MAYER CO. (South Africa) LIMITED
P.O. Box 1381, Durban, South Africa.
Head Office:
GOODRICKE BUILDINGS, 39 BEACH GROVE, DURBAN
P.O. Box 1381 Telephone 22341 Telex DX139
Mills:
P.O. BOX 5, UMGENI PRIVATE SIDING 438, UMGENI
Telephone 833815/6
P.O. BOX 608, SPRINGS PRIVATE SIDING 1203, SPRINGS
Telephones 56-1712, 56-2673








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PROOFS, SCOOPS, CHARACTERS


T HE Zionist Record was my first job and like all first things,
it is vested in memory with nostalgic connotation.
In 1943, when I joined the Record, I was a very callow 17, and
added to my rusticity was the fact that I had just come from the
platteland and was as raw and unsophisticated as a velskoen.
I am not quite sure now why I directors in my favour.
was employed in the first place, In the early months I alter-
nor in what capacity. Perhaps the nated between making tea and
fact that I had a matriculation running to and from the printers.
certificate and was fully bilingual, Occasionally I was given a tanta-
plus having more than a smatter- llsingly brief taste of real news-
Ing of Yiddish, influenced the paper work when I was allowed


Tra nsvaal


Enamelware Enamel


to assist with galley proofs or to
do simple little translations from
Yiddish or Afrikaans.
I soon found---as many budding
invaders of the kingdom of Fleet
Street- have before and since--that
a distinction in matriculation
English is not an automatic quali-
fication for top-class journalism.
Had the editor asked me to write
on "Sunset Over the Lake," I
could no doubt have produced a


Steel


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Extend their good wishes



and congratulations to the



Zionist Record on the



occasion of its



Golden Jubilee


to us with preoccupied abruptness,
and continued In his own direction.
He left us with our mirth and an
uncompleted story.
I liked him, finally because he
employed a whole string of pretty
secretaries, and I fell in love with
each of them in turn. It was an
essential in the apprenticeship of
being 17.
Mr. Gershater is still the editor
of the Zionist Record. Under his
guidance it has changed radically
from what it was 15 years ago
when he first came to it. Once
little more than a "Zionist
gazette," it has become today a
lively, virile journal, reflecting the
Zionist and Jewish scene here and
abroad, and in addition has an
intelligent finger on the pulse of
South African affairs. Its opinions


Pressing


SYNDICATE LTD.


INDUSTRIES Rd., NEW ERA, SPRINGS.











Manufacturers of Tuskware


pseudo-poetic, verbally-saccharined
essay-but he never asked me.
The Zionist journal of the time
had little use for sunsets or for
lakes (unless perhaps when the
latter were situated on either or
both sides of the Jordan) and my
first two-finger-typed offerings met
with dismal rejection.
The editor, who had to be cruel
only to be ultimately kind, con-
signed my literary pearls one .by
one to the journalistic mortuary-
the dreaded wastepaper basket. I
went back to making tea. I
realized that I had a lot to learn
and this acceptance acted as some
salve to the initial shock of dis-
illusionment.
NEW BROOMS
A major consolation during this
first difficult period was that I
was not the only new broom about
the place. The editor was new;
the news editor was new; and so
was the African boy in the back
office who used to help me with the
tea. It made a man feel a bit
better.
In fact there was about the
Record of the time a certain
glossiness which one associates
with things that are new, and I
had the satisfaction of seeing that
I was not the only one to whom
the whole set-up was a bewilder-
ing mystery. The only genuine
old-timer on hand was the business
and advertising manager, Mrs.
Miriam Liknaitzky, who brooded
over us all with maternal despot-
ism and was a 'bastion and an
anchorage in times of "crisis and
confusion.
The newly-appointed editor was
Mr. Chaim Gershater. A graduate
of the Remalles Yeshiva of Vilna
as well as of the University of
South Africa, he was rooted in an
interesting and rich blend of cul-
tures, and he brought to the edi-
torial chair of the Record an intel-
lectual refinement which was to
prove a most positive influence in
the subsequent development of the
journal.
Having freshly come from the
hero-worshipful milieu of the high
school, I immediately transferred
Mr. Gershater to the pedestal so
recently vacated by my school
principal. What awed me in par-
ticular was his.ability to rattle off
an editorial on any subject at all,
In less than two trices, and the
imposing batch of foreign news-
papers which he always carried
under his arm and which he could
read as easily as English.
ANECDOTES
The new editor was liked be-
cause he was friendly, un-bossy,
interesting and mainly because he
knew how to write. Fledgling re-
porters are precociously critical
and they expect from their editors,
first and foremost, a fluent, facile
pen.
In his writings Mr. Gershater
revealed a deeply grooved
humanity and a humour which was
essentially European. Having been
associated with Zionism since boy-
hood, he was richly steeped in the
history, lore and tradition of the
movement, and as a spice to this
was a very thorough knowledge of
political theory imbibed from uni-
versity studies in this country. In
his articles he was able to draw on
a richly-variegated background,
and his literary and political con-
tributions of the time were among
the most outstanding in local
Zionist literature.
One of his most endearing
qualities was his absent-minded-
ness. It is the sort of thing that
every young journalist expects
from his boss and I exchanged
with others on the staff a myriad
of giggle-provoking anecdotes,
many of them inevitably embel-
lished and exaggerated. Once-I
know he will deny It. but it's
absolutely true once, he was
walking with the news editor and
myself, and was in the throes of
relating some intriguing story. We
came to an intersection and he
branched away from us and con-
tinued telling his story to the
mute and muffled pavements.
About a block further on he
suddenly discovered the absence nf
his audience, and turning, waved


THE EDITOR
(A cartoon by Ivanoff of Die
Vaderland.)
and comments are widely quoted,
and it occupies a respected posi-
tion in the local newspaper world.
The news editor was Mr. Monty
Mann, a newcomer like myself,
and like myself as raw a Platte-
lander as you will find this side of
the mine dumps.
Monty came from the famous
Cape dorp Oudtshoorn, which has
for some inexplicable reason, pro-
duced more outstanding Jews
than any similar place of its size.
The immediate bond between
Monty and myself was the fact
that we were both Afrikaans-
speaking, and quite spontaneously
we fell into communicating wit
one another in this language. 0
one occasion while we were deeply
absorbed in discussion, a grump
old lady, who was waiting to se<
the editor, listened to us witi
quizzical fascination. Later sh(
asked the editor whether the "Afri
kaners" in the next office are
really employees of a Zionist paper
ASSORTMENT
When I had graduated to th
status of a reporter I shared
office with Monty. He helped m
generously with my first awkward
ventures into print, and I learn
much from him. Later we ofte
collaborated on important storie-
To our office-which also serve
as a waiting-room for person
waiting to see the editor cam
many types and personalities, th
sort that inevitably get them
selves interviewed at some tim
or another intellectuals, re
former, cranks, poets, historians
set-the-world-on-firers, letters-to
the-editor-writers-a motley an
interesting assortment. It w
fascinating work, and a man could
really feel himself growing up
a place like that.'
A regular caller was a Mr. S.
Yudelowitz-a fine type of Easte
European Jew. he had somehow
blundered into Africa. -He was
engineer, a Talmudist, a jou
and an historian all messed in
one. He often wrote for
Zionist Record, and then wou
come and sit in the office


APAGE THMTY-E;lCxHT







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE THIRTY-NINE


...AND F
Thursday mornings, waiting like a hawk for the
first copies to arrive. He had an acrid sense of
humour, a saucy tongue and was, of all things for
an immigrant from Eastern Europe. a punner of
the first order. Because English was not his first
language, he left it to Monty and me to lick his
articles into shape. He hoped, he said, that the
pepper in them would not affect our palates too
badly.
On one occasion he gave a very involved and
abstruse offering to Monty Mann. We battled with
it madly before it went to print, and hoped for
the best. When Judelowitz ultimately read the
finished product, he said in tones of deep and pious
resignation: "It is better to fall into the hands of
God than into the hands of Mann." (A paraphrase
of the words of David, "Let us fall now in the
hands of the Lord; for His mercies are great; and
let me not fall into the hand of man."-Samuel II,
24:14.)


R INTERSI


Congratulations from


CASON ENGINEERING WORKS
(PTY.) LTD.
Directors: W. Hedley, G. Walmsley, D. C. Roxburgh.
GENERAL ENGINEERS AND FOUNDERS


CASON ROAD, BOKSBURG NORTH


P.O. Box 48, Boksburg.


A former member of

the staff gives

an intimate picture of

the Zionist Record

office in the war years

Working on the Record at the time was a Mrs.
Sadie Levin, a journalist of qualification and ex-
perience who had taken the-job for the duration of
the war. Her husband was a medical officer in the
Royal Navy, and as she could hear from him only
sporadically and never really knew where he was,
she was in a state of continuous anxiety.
On one occasion she reported an important
women's function in Orange Grove. That morning
she had heard of the sinking of some British ships
and was'naturally highly distraught and preoccupied
-so much so that she forgot to get down the name
of the name of the lady who proposed the vote of


telephone 52-1511


By Isaac Kriel
The writer, who is principal of a leading college
in Johannesburg. His first job was with the
Zionist Record.
thanks.
When she submitted her report she wrote that'
Mrs. . ... had proposed the vote of thanks, I
meaning of course, to fill in the blank before the
Continued on page 60 $


P.O. Box 5010


P. KATZIN & CO.

STRUCTURAL & GENERAL ENGINEERS



VIAIN REEF ROAD (opp. Satmar), BOKSBURG NORTH



Extend their best wishes to the
Zionist Record on its
50th Anniversary


When Smuts had his doubts
SOME doubts whether Dr. Weizmann would live to see the fulfilment of his dreams were ex-
Spressed by General Smuts in a message he sent to the Zionist Record on the occasion of
Dr. Weizmann's 70th birthday. genius we might have been in
The message appeared in our issue of November.24, 1944 a sorry plight when the great
-during a gloomy period for Zionism and was widely crisis of munitions came upon
quoted in overseas newspapers. At the conclusion of his us and munition production be-
message General Smuts wrote: came our first priority in that
"The greatest Jewish leader thirsty time. All my warm good war.
before him failed to enter the wishes to a true friend and a "At that moment Mr. Lloyd
Promised Land and died on the great man." George called for Weizmann's
mountains of Vision and Dis- Earlier. in the message Gen. services, and the situation was
appointment. This is a hard Smuts wrote: saved. At that time also his
S"I am profoundly pleased to power as an organiser was re-
"I am phearothttheewishpeommu vealed, and in due course he
tiesar throughout the word wil became the acknowledged leader


deserved honour, buIt is more, can say without exaggeration
deIn honouring Dr. Weizmann, that but for him, the respect
owry ins honDring Ief entertained for his profound
Jewry is honoring itself. For judgment, and the confidence
there can be n who know that felt In his character and per-
Sminds of those who know that sonality, the cause of Zionism
Dr. Weizmann is the greatest might have met with much
Jewish leader that has appeared smaller success. He became
not only today but for a very acknowledged leader and in a
long time. His services to his sense the soul of the Zionist
people are immense and no cause.
honour can be great enough for
him. HIS TRIALS
"I have known him for a very "He has had his trials, his
long time now and I can claim "He has had his trials, his
long tim as a personal friend. I looaimk setbacks and bitter disappoint- \
upon him as a great man, as ments. You cannot be a great
one of the outstanding men of man without stirring other enthvy
our age. His character, his in- and theopposition. ofthI
tegrity and devotion to the nu.Tous small men. But I
cause to which he has dedicated think The real greatness of the
GENERAL SMUTS his life arkwh him out as one of manhas appeared more clearly
the most exceptional leaders the in these years of strife and
world, hardest for its greatest Jewish people has produced, and opposition. He had a difficult
sons. But whether he sees the that is saying a good deal. people to lead and trouble from
fulfilment of his vision or not, that is sayng a good deal. within and without his Zionist
he himself has been a vision SOUL OF THE CAUSE circle grew thick upon him. But
and a revelation to all those he held on valiantly, unswerv-
who have known him intimate- "He is not only a great leader Ingly. And I might add this:
ly. He was worthy to be the of men, and an outstanding that if the Zionist cause does
leader of a great and just figure of our age. As a scien- not reach its full fruition the
cause, and his figure will not be tist, a thinker and scientific blame will not be on Dr. Welz-
less, heven if like Moseshe does r 'discoverer he belongs to the mann. He has poured out his
fruit of his immense labours. first rank. Tribute from the strength, his genius, his soul
His mark is made on time and highest quarters has repeatedly for his people with a single-
will not be washed out. May been paid to his scientific ser- mindedness which has been the
this anniversary celebration be vices to the Allies in the Great admiration and wonder of all
a refreshment to him in a very War. But for his inventive who know him Intimately."


WITH COMPLIMENTS OF


NATIONAL BOLTS



& RIVETS LTD.


PAUL SMIT STREET,
BOKSBURG NORTH, TRANSVAAL,
SOUTH AFRICA




Telephone 52-2931
Tel. Add.: "Natbolts"
Post Office Box 5063




MANUFACTURERS OF
BOLTS, NUTS, RIVETS, SCREWS, RAIL
FASTENINGS, SPECIAL FORGINGS
AND ALLIED PRODUCTS


Telephone 52-1163.


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wm mommil








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


WOOLF SENIOR-BENEFACTOR.


AND FRIEND
;A LAD of 14 arrived on the tunity of gaining a formal educa-
shores of South Africa 62 tion. Life itself became his
years ago from the Ukraine. He university. The brothers worked
came to join his brother-Jacob hard In the Cape for a few years
Senior -who had settled in and during the Anglo-Boer War
the Warrenton area In the Cape lived in Durban.
a few years earlier. Young Woolf Senior and his
As the lad grew he learned from brother Jacob had a bitter struggle
his environment, but had no oppor- together. Schemes well-set at the
WITH COMPLIMENTS FROM

BERNHARD MENDELSOHN
(PTrY.) LTD.
Manufacturers of Simba Mealle Meal and Menbok Balanced Rations
Telegratphl address: "Mendelsaoh." 1Phone 52-2534/5/6. Box 43. BOKSBURG
Offices, MIa and Stores, David Street, Industrial Sites .
Private Siding 1225, BOKSBURG EAST'


With the compliments of

KOTTON BROS.
80, Cason Road, BOKSBURG NORTH.

WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
M.M.B. (PTY.) LTD.
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERS
MANAGER: D. Z. MARE

Manufacturers of: All types of Wheelbarrows, Builders' Steel
Trestles, Wrought Iron Gates and Railings, Farm Gates,
Diamond Mesh Gates, Gutter Brackets, Fire Grates, Diamond
Mesh Wire, Fencing Contractors.


Office and Works:
INDUSTRIAL SITES, INDUSTRIAL ROAD,
Telephone 52-1975. -- P.O. Box


BOKSBURG EAST
43, Boksburg


I BARTONS TUBE

AND CONDUITS "

LIMITED
Manufacturers of Conduit and
Precision Steel Tubing


Corner of BAIN & WILLIAM STREETS, INDUSTRIAL SITES, 5
BOKSBURG EAST, TRANSVAAL (
Telephone 52-1775. P.O. Box 198, Telegrams: "CONTUBES."


Wish to congratulate the
ZIONIST RECORD on the
occasion of their Golden
5 Jubilee.





Congratulations from . .




WILLIAMS BROS.

(PTY.) LTD.

V ff$ v8#,

Directors: H. J. WILLIAMS, M.P.; J. E. WILLIAMS,
R. T. WILLIAMS



47' Cason Road, BOKSBURG NORTH,
Transvaal

Telephones 52-2531/2 P.O. Box 5020 Boksburg North


beginning went awry, but they
pulled through by sheer deter-
mination and courage. When they
were finally blessed with means,
a deep love for their people was
shown in the generous contribu-
tions they began to make to
Jewish causes.
The First Issue
The Seniors came to settle in
Johannesburg at the end of 1908,
a few months after the Zionist
Record had made its first ap-
pearance.
"I remember," says Mr. Woolf
Senior, "the small office in those
days of the Zionist Federation
which I and my late brother Jacob
visited.
"Zionism was not popular then.
It was misunderstood and there
was much opposition. We joined a
group of young men who used to
come uninvited to wedding recep-
tions and Simchas to collect for
the Jewish National Fund a
newly-created activity.
"Often we were made unwel-
come at these happy functions.
Occasionally we were thrown out
of the front door-.-as it were-
but quietly crept in again through
the 'back-door.' We succeeded in
making everyone present contri-
bute at the time, a shilling or
two."
"The offices of the Federation
were at that time in the old
Goldreich Buildings, which is to-
day the His Majesty's Building In
the centre of Johannesburg. Sam
Goldreich was the chairman of the
Federation and Barney Guinsberg
was the Treasurer.
The J.N.F. Club
"On our arrival in Johannes-
burg we found the J.N.F. Club'in
existence and we joined it. Chair-
man was the late Sir Harry
Grauman. Enthusiastic workers in
those days were Benzlon S.
Hersch, Joseph Janower and Isaac
Levy-all who have since gone to
their eternal rest. We used to
meet in Balfour Chambers-a
building that still exists today.
"I remember," went on Woolf
Senior in reminiscent vein, "the
sensation which was caused when
we received our first 'large' dona-
tion for the J.N.F. It was 5-and
It nearly took our breaths away."


EAST RAND

BAZAARS
50 CASON ROAD, BOKSBURG
NORTH
Phones: 52-2624, 52-2282.
Stoekists of high-class dinner
services, tea services ani cut
glass. Gifts for all occasions.
Extend their beat wishes to the
Zionist Record on its 50th
Anniversary.


With the compliments of the

Masonic Motors

& Service
Stockists: All Brands of Oils,
Tyres, Tubes, Spares,
Accessories, etc, etc.
Phone 52-1440
15 COMMISSIONER STREET,
BOKSBURG.


WITH THE COMPLIMENTS
OF



M. GREEN

74 CASON ROAD,
BOKSBURG NORTH.


7


"I remember a Madame Pevs-
ner, a striking personality, who
bullied us all to donate for a fund
I have completely forgotten about.
There' was Kretzmer Israeli, who
came to interest us In making
land purchases in Palestine, but
whose mission did not meet with
much success.
"The man who made the deepest
impression of all came after the
First World War. He was detained
here by the big miners' strike on
the Witwatersrand. Dr. Shmarya-
hu Levin was a rare orator and
exciting personality.
First Advertisements
For many years Mr. Senior has
been a member of the Board of
Management of the Zionist Record.
He may not remember--but I do
that his firm was one of the first
to place a permanent advertise-
ment in the columns of the jour-
nal when It became a fortnightly
and later a weekly. The example
set by so reputable a firm helped
the journal to secure other adver-
tising announcements. Toda y,
whenever he is in Johannesburg,
he never misses a Board meeting.
"I really must congratulate the
Zionist Record on reaching Its
50th birthday. It had to go
through much fire and water. I
remember during the miners'
strike and in later years during,
the period of business depression,
that the journal was faced with
extinction but ft happily survived,
to reach the fine position it holds
in the Jewish world today."
Such a compliment has an


CONGRATULATIONS FROM
WILCO TIMBERS
(PTY.) LTD.

TIMBER AND HARDWARE
MERCHANTS


P.O. Box 184,
BOKSBURG


Congratulations from

ASTOR
PHARMACY
L HYMAN, M.P.S.,
F.O.A. (&A.)
Chemists and Opticians

46 CASON ROAD,
BOKSBURG NORTH
Phone 52-2746


SMr. W. Senior is seen here
being- presented with a Bible |
by the Prime Minister of Israel, I
Mr. Ben Gurion. The presenta- j
tion was made when Mr. Senior I
Swas on one of his periodic :
visits to Israel. While in Johan- i
nesburg he seldom misses a
Board-meeting of the Zionist I
Record.' I

added value coming from a man
who has always been the "beloved
friend" of Zionism behind the
scenes. When, 22 years ago, the
idea of a central Zionist hall and
headquarters was mooted, it was
Woolf Senior who gave a cash
donation of 5,000 towards a
transaction which led to the pur-
chase, of the Coronation Hall
property.
When Leon, the gifted airman
son of Mr. and Mrs. Woolf Senior,
lost his life in the Second World
War while on active service, they
gave 20,000 to the Jewish
National Fund in his memory.
Another 20,000 was contributed
at the. same time in the form of
a J.N.F. living legacy.
Indicative of the modesty of this
man of generous character, Is the
fact that when he became 70 years
of age, the S.A. Zionist Federa-
tion began arranging a banquet In
his honour. The elite of South
African Jewry was .to be present
to pay tribute to a loyal Jew of
sterling merit.
When Woolf Senior heard about
it, he refused to attend and the
holding of the testimonial banquet
was abandoned.
DAVID DAINOW.


Al


~i3 'IL ill


With the Compliments of

POPULAR

CYCLE & SPORT
30 Cason Road,
BOKSBURG NORTH

Phone 52-1678


With the compliments
of


Ferrar Bros.

(Pty.) Ltd.

26 Commissioner St.,
BOKSBURG


I


oil


Kim Fit


PAGB FORTY


t







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


JEWISH ENTERPRISE CONTRIBUTED TO THE



Industrial Revolution in South


O a considerable extent, South African material pro- A *
gress has been conditioned by periodic contacts be-
tween ethnic groups of widely different backgrounds and
cultures; gradually these heterogeneous elements have
coalesced into a single economic society. Even if contact
and conflict between "White" and "Black" is, for the *---N1 by m
moment, left aside, the assertion still remains a valid one:
the economic dominance of the Europeans is itself the Marcus Ar]
product of a continual fusion between peoples of various
origins the periodic additions of new strains adding (Department of iB
complexity and strength to the country's economic fabric. University of Cape Tou
, This process was set in motion One of these results, large-scale 1111111111111lllm Bll E
as early as the rule of Governor immigration from Europe, was to
Simon van der Stel, when a few transform a small Jewish com- more than 40,000 strong
hundred French immigrants of munity of under 4,000 into a group time of Union; it was i
Huguenot stock -were added to quantitatively greater 1
the ranks of the original Dutch Huguenot, British and
pioneers, bringing with them- a immigrations combined,
specialised knowledge of viticul- achieved without Goverms
ture and wine-making (though Icial assistance or any ot
many more decades were to of official aid.
elapse before the country could
boast a wine-exporting business From Lithuani
of any significance).
The arrival of British colonists The new arrivals front
in 1820 was followed by the ania were to discover tha
development of commercial sheep v their co-religionists had
farming in the Eastern Cape. And A left a strong Imprint
this year a special postage-stamp country's economic life,
issue has commemorated the brothers Mosenthal, whose
settlement in British Kaffraria a station of the merino
hundred years ago of some three business had helped to
thousand German peasants, who he Cape Colony's chief
brought greater security and money-arners; or Jonas chief
more intensive farming methods t who had done much to e
to the troubled frontier commercial farming and


Basic pattern
Yet all these people Dutch.
French, British and German -
failed to alter the basic pattern
of South African life, which re-
mained self-sufficient and rural,
uncomplicated but unprogressive.
But just as the Great Trek serves
as a traditional watershed in
South African political history,
the discovery and rapid exploita-
tion of the High Veld's mineral
wealth in the late 19th century
denotes the major dividing line
in the country's economic develop-
ment; and, just as every event
before 1836 can be regarded,
directly or indirectly, as a "cause"
of the Trek, it may well be simi-
larly held that all economic
development since the 1870's and
80's are "results" of the diamond
and gold discoveries.


The writer of this
Is a graduate of th
of Cape Town, hold
with distinctions i1
and Commerce. H
lecturer in Economi
that University.
of more than a d
for overseas and SA
journals on various
the economic hist
Jewish people, he s|
part of this year
leave in London, do
on the Cape of Goo
tory Records of
East India Co


m Lithu-
t some of
1 already
on the
like the
ie organi-
a export
sake wool
overseas
Bergthell,
encourage
immigra-


T .".tion into Natal; or the family De
Pass, with its whaling, sealing
and shipping activities along the
south-west coast; or the many
lesser-known itinerant Jewish
traders, who, in their "smous"
wagons, had begun to follow the
article, who Voortrekkers beyond the Orange
e University River.
ding degrees In short, long before the open-
n Economics ing of the first mines -In Griqua-
le is now a land West and on the Rand a con-
ic History at siderable share of the thin stream
The author of commerce which sufficed for the
lozen papers sparsely-populated country flowed
south African through Jewish hands.
s aspects of In spite of the attraction of the
story of the mines themselves the majority
pent the first of Jewish newcomers followed in
* on study- the footsteps of their predecessors
)ing research and found their economic niche as
d Hope Fac- small-scale middlemen; through
the English self-denying frugality, dogged
)mpany. persistence and sheer hard work
there followed a gradual improve-


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ment of status, some emerging as
sedentary shopkeepers, others be-
coming wholesale distributors -
and a small but significant group
helping to lay the foundations of
South African secondary industry.
The mineral discoveries provided
the first Impetus to local manu-
facturing: until that time such
manufactured goods as were
needed were either imported from
abroad, or, where possible,
fashioned in town or village work-
shops; but industrial units of the
factory type, using elaborate
equipment and employing large
numbers of workers under a
single roof, were virtually non-
existent.
Lower cost
By the beginning of the present
century, some assembly-plants for
semi-manufactured goods were
supplying finished articles at
slightly lower cost than that of
the imported commodity.
Yet the low productivity of a
working population to whom fac-
tory employment was something
.quite new, the still limited pur-
chasing power of the domestic
market, the dislocation of three
years of bitter warfare, and the
widespread prejudice prevailing
against locally produced goods-1


a,


all these were major obstacles
which could not easily be over-
come.
Under such circumstances,
before heavy industries (like steel
processing) could emerge to
create capital equipment, light
Industries turning out articles
for direct consumption had
first of all to appear on the scene.
Pioneering role
The recently arrived Jewish
Immigrant from Eastern Europe
was eminently qualified to play
a pioneering role in this connec-
tion. As an Itinerant trader, he
had acquired an expert first-hand
knowledge of the location of indus-
trially useful raw materials, and
he was familiar with the market-
ing prospects for goods which
could be processed from such
materials. Of necessity, both on
the outward voyage to South
Africa and on first arrival, he had
learnt to speak English; but his
country travels had made him
familiar with the emergent Afri-
kaans language, which, with Its
Germanic elements was not unlike
Yiddish in many respects; such
bilingualism gave the prospective
Jewish industrialist a marked ad-
vantage over the urban English
Continued on page 50.


East Raub Euginertg



(Incorporated In the Union of South Africa)


General Engineers

Iron and Brass Founders


Telephone 51-6221


P.O. Box 198


Telegrams: Foundry"

Siding Nos. 1469/1693






SMIT STREET,

INDUSTRIAL SITES (WEST),

GERMISTON, TRANSVAAL







Extend their best wishes

to the Zionist Record

on its Golden .

Jubilee


Also at Cope Town, Durban and Windhoek. I--
Hearty j-------------ubilee Greetings to the Zionist Record and its readers
Hearty jubilee Greetings to the Zionist Record and its readers. j


i


PAGE FORTY-ONE


11







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


WAS


THE


OFFICE


BOY


BEFORE joining the staff of
the Zionist Record I had a
position in the office of Messrs
Judes and Gluckman, two famous
South African business men of
that time. The late Mr. I. E. Judes
was a fascinating personality. A
militant Zionist and an intimate
friend of the late Mr. Michael
Heskel, who played a considerable
role in the Revisionist movement
in this country. Both he and Mr.
Gluckman had been pioneers in a
number of ventures of a national
character in this country, particu-
larly the early development of the
vast Letaba Citrus Estates.

Mr. Gluckman
Mr. Gluckman was a giant of
a man with the gentleness of a
child. He was one of the most
level-headed and well balanced
persons I have ever met. In the
office of my employers I heard
fascinating stories of early days
in South Africa. Both Judes and
Gluckman had a number of in-
teresting friends among the lead-
ers of the Government of the day.


*


The work I was doing had
. become redundant. Since I had
been active in the Zionist youth
S. movement and with a good
reference from my employers I
S .. was accepted -by the Zionist
Record for the position of office
boy and general factotum at a
salary, considered fair in those-
days, of 15 a month. Mr. David
Dainow was then the editor of
S' the paper.

SThe atmosphere
I How vividly I recoJlect the
atmosphere of that office with -its
odour of paper And printer's ink;
I can almost hear the noise of the
By S. HIRSCHMANN constant rush and tumult. This
occurred especially during the two
days prior to publication day.
Everything seemed to be wildly
I recall with a certain degree disorganised, yet all the pieces
of awe my visit in the capacity gradually fitted themselves into
of a messenger boy to the home the strange jig-saw puzzle and the
of Piet Grobler, then Minister paper came out each Friday in a
of Native Affairs. The house reasonable time.
was near Pretoria.- Its stately The editor's desk was a source
character r and magnificent of eternal mystery to me. Pieces
library remains to this day a of paper in various colours
vivid memory. littered the top of it. There were


ORMAN
Builders of Rolling Stock
Designers, fabricators, erectors in Steel

DORMAN LONG (AFRICA) LTD.*

VZ io


-4
I.
4 .4
I-


FIELD WORKERS ON

BEHALF OF ZION
After serving with the Zionist Record the writer of this
article, Mr. S. 11irschmann (right), became associated with
the late Rabbi Zalman Schwartz (left) and formed with him
a team of emissaries to outlying districts on behalf of
Zionist funds.
Mr. llirschmann speaks of Rabbi Schwartz with rever-
ence and describes him as "my good friend and teacher."
They were two opposites: Rabbi Schwartz was an Eastern
European Jew, and young Hirschmann was a son of northern
Transvaal. The one appealed to the older generation and
the other to the young.
It was part of their duties to seek out lone Jews in
distant areas of Africa, and they often travelled scores of
miles to visit a single contributor.
They visited every nook and corner of the Union. They
went to the Rhodesias, South-West Africa,-Portuguese East
Africa and to the Belgian Congo.
They were members of a group of field workers who
served Zionism for years past The picture was taken
in the veld.


heaps of big and little books, and
pamjihlets of all kinds. Mr.
Dainow, however, appeared to be
able to find anything he needed at
the right time. Some attempts I
made to tidy the desk and its be-
longings met with a rather unen-
thusiastic reception. I left every-
thing in what appeared to me to
be a veritable chaos.
A proud day was when Mr.'
Dainow called me into his .anc-
turn sanctorum and informed me
that I was due for promotion. It
appeared that the lady writer of
the Children's Page who had ap-
peared in print under the name of
Aunt Sarah had relinquished her
task and the editor calmly ap-
pointed me to take her place. I
became "Aunt Sarah."
Aunt Sarah was a benevolent
creature to whom children would
write and relate their little
troubles. She would deal with them


sympathetically in her feature
article.
Strange as it seems to-day, ]
entered into the spirit of this
unique assignment. My contribu-
tions were well received and
gradually I gained quite an affec
tion for my numerous and ever
growing juvenile correspondents.

The cabinet
I remember, too, that I wa
accorded a great privilege a little
time later: I was permitted t
design the cabinet which was t
house the ever-increasing number
of pictorial blocks which wer
gradually over-flowing the empty
spaces in the office The bloc
were all a jumble and the cabin
I designed made it possible t
classify them in proper order.
Yet the cost of the cabinet I
i Continued on next page


PAGE FORTY-TWO






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


pwl i.


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE ZIONIST
ORGANISATION OF AMERICA
M Y associates of the Zionist Organisation of
America join with me in heartiest felicitations
on the Golden Jubilee of The South African Zionist
Record.
Throughout its half-century of publication the
Zionist Record has consistently held to a distin-
guished standard of journalism, rendering invaluable Al
service to the Zionist movement and our people's
highest interests.
The attainment of its 50th anniversary is a
notable event in Jewish community annals and a
cause for celebration. We congratulate The South
African Zionist Record and wish for it many, many
more years of fruitful service to Jewry and Zion.
DR. EMANUEL NEUMANN, DR. E NUEL NE NN
President, Zionist Organisation of America. DR. EMANUEL NEUMANN


THE FEAR OF JACK ALEXANDER


those days was a matter of some
financial concern. I explained to
the honorary members of the
management board (including
that colorful personality, Mr.
Woolf Senior), that the cost in-
volved would pay for itself many
times over in the labour-saving
process of finding a block when


* Continued from previous page
needed. Wisely the directors
agreed to pay for the much-
needed cabinet.
I often think of the personali-
ties who pervaded the scene
around the journal in those days.
There was, of course, Jack Alex-
ander, an Anglo-Jewish bachelor


I










NATIONAL CHEMICAL


PRODUCTS LIMITED
(Incorporated in the Union of South Africa)

Power Street, Industries East,

P.O. Box 344, Germiston,

South Africa


Telegrams: "Maderite" Johannesburg.


express their congratulations to the
Zionist Record on the occasion of
its Golden Jubilee


who for a number of years reigned
supreme as the secretary-general
of the South African Zionist
Federation. He was a loyally
devoted servant of South African
Zionism, but he was a man who
had a "temperament."
Grim stories were told of the
fate of anyone who dared enter
his own office without a previous
appointment having been made.
I was terrified of this "majestic"
personality. Every time I took
a message from Mr. Dainow to
him I suffered a nervous tremor.
Alexander had a brilliant pen.
He wrote the chief political edi-
torial of the week. He would
usually leave this writing to the
last minute when the printers were
"screaming" to "put the paper to
bed."
During the period of the writing
of his editorial it was real danger
to approach Jack Alexander. A
whisper went around the offices
that he was "creating"-and no
one dared come near him until
that "creation"-in fine, classical
English-had been duly delivered
and passed for publication. It was
only years later that I was able to
appreciate in its true value the
agile brain and splendid loyalty
and devotion of Jack Alexander to
our,. national cause.
KINDLY PERSON
As for the editor himself, Mr.
Dainow proved a gentle and kindly
,person, possessed of considerable
ability and a deep knowledge of
Jewish life. With all due respect
to the fine work carried out by
those who dominated the Zionist
scene of those days, their attitude
towards senior Zionist civil ner-
vants left much to be desired.
Dainow suffered considerably from
this attitude.
I often marvelled at his unique
patience and quiet philosophy. He
had an innate respect for the
part played by honorary workers
in the cause. He was ready, there-
fore, to pass over lightly any em-
barrassment in which he was in-
volved" by unappreciative leading
workers. By his forbearance
David Dainow often avoided an on-
coming clash with people who had
a particular. "axe to grind."
The editor's ability to carry
on his work In spite of almost
weekly crises was a fine demon-
stration of devotion to an ideal
All his life, since he was a boy
in London, when he heard Theodor
Herzl address a mass meeting in
the East End of London, Mr.
Dainow was a devoted Zionist. As
a journalist he often rose to great
helghtW.
(Continued on page 62).


Acme Clothing


Manufacturers

Makers of


IUX
RECD.
Quality Clothes


with compliments and best wishes on the
achievement of your Jubilee


compliment



The


Zionist Record


on the


occasion


of their



Golden Jubilee




Oyl


Telephone 51-7711


Telex: J.X.71


PAGB FORTY-THREN







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


-GERMISTON *

CONGRATULATIONS FROM
CUT STEEL AND METAL CO. (PTY.) LTD.
STEEL "CUT TO SIZE"
Directors: S. J. Wainstein, L. A. Glass, B. Genn.
DEKEMA ROAD, WADEVILLE, GERMISTON
Phones 51-1474, 51-4183 P.O. Box 581, Germiston

P.O. Box 113 Telephones: 61-1731, 51-3464
EVANS, LEIGH, MACKAY &
KNOWLES
(Leonard Cecil Knowles)
(Established 1905)
AUCTIONEERS AND ESTATE AGENTS. SWORN-
APPRAISERS. AFSLAERS EN EIENDOMS AGENT.
BEEDIGDE TAKSATEUR. KOMMISSARIS VAN EDE.
Cor. Library and Meyer Streets, GERMISTON

WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
PREFABRICATED HOUSING
CORPORATION (Pty.) Ltd.
Directors: R. W. Rumble, J. H. Beukes
REFINERY ROAD, INDUSTRIES WEST, GERMISTON
P.O. Box 857. Telegrams and Cables: "PREFORM."
Telephones 51-5311/2.
Manufacturers and Suppliers of:
Pressed Steel Doors, Jambs, Window Surrounds and Shuttering
for Housing and Civil Engineering Projects

CONGRATULATIONS FROM

MORLITE
CONSTRUCTION CO.
A Division of Tufco Industrials (Pty.) Ltd.
Directors: S. Seeff, S. Greenberg, C. S. Herbert, L. Plllemer.
Manufacturers of: STEEL WINDOWS, STEEL DOORS,
BURGLAR BARS, DOOR JAMBS, STEEL GARAGE AND
COMBINATION DOORS, STEEL YARD GATES, ETC.
Works: HANGAR No. 7, RAND AIRPORT, GERMISTON
Phones 51-6511/2 P.O. Rand Airport


With the compliments of

Pickett's Bottle Store-
(PTY.) LTD.
Directors: N. Pickett, L. A. Rocher. Manager: C. J. Bester.

WINE AND SPIRIT MERCHANTS

275 PRESIDENT STREET (opp. City Hall),
GERMISTON. Phone 51-1265.

With the compliments of

R. GULLE & PARTNERS
(PTY.) LTD.
Directors: R. V. Guile, J. Schmitz.
Manufacturers of Canvas, Webbing and Awnings

VAN LINGEN STREET, INDUSTRIAL SITES EAST,
GERMISTON
Telephone 51-6586. P.O. Box 352.

Congratulations from

R. GULLE & COMPANY
(PTY.) LTD.
Directors: R. V. Guile, F. Lethaby.
ENGINEERS AND WELDERS
VAN LINGEN STREET, INDUSTRIAL SITES EAST,
GERMISTON


Telephone 51-6586.


P.O. Box 352.


~IlI


WITHTHE COMPLIMENTS OF

MAVOR & COULSON
(SOUTH AFRICA) LTD.
(Incorporated in Scotland)

ENGINEERS

Telephone 51-5571/2 :: Tel. Add.: "PRODIGIOUS"
P.O. Box 601. -
C/o Gamma & Zeta Roads,
INDUSTRIES WEST, GERMISTON


WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
L. NEIFELD & PARTNERS
S<(PTY.) LTD. -
trading as 1
!East Rand Clothing
Manufacturers 9
P ARK & RAND ROADS, GERMISTON, A
TRANSVAAL
Tel. Address: "Sterstrong." -
P.O. Box . . . 87
Phones.. 51-1261, 51-2762.
Manufacturers of the famous
L "ADVOCATE" brand of clothing for
gentlemen. .

With best wishes from

Cohen & Sons
(GERMISTON) (PTY.) LTD.
Timber, Iron and Hardware
Merchants
Licensed Dealers in Arms and
Ammunition
Tools and Engineering Supplies
72 KNOX ST., GERMISTON
P.O. Box 225
Phones: 51-2533/4, 51-2040


WITH THE COMPLIMENTS 'OF

GAFRONE
FURNISHERS
(PTY.) LTD.
S. Erster.
LADIES', GENT'S AND ACCOUNTS
DEPARTMENTS:
'107 VICTORIA STREET, GERMISTON
Phone 51-5635
FURNITURE DEPARTMENT
107 VICTORIA STREET. GERMISTON
Phone 51-3033.

With best wishes from

GLORIAA" I
* FLORIST j
EFresh cut flowers always ong
hand. Wreaths a speciality.-
* Wedding bouquets, etc. =
= Flowers delivered anywhere In the N
world.
P5b HUMAN ST., GERMISTONi
iTelephones: 51-3023 &. 51-2486
i After hours: 51-1214. -


Congratulations from


AFRICAN SHOVEL CO.
(PROPRIETARY) LIMITED

Manufacturers of
LASHERR" PRODUCTS-



P.O. BOX 254, GERMISTON




FRANK MARTIN & CO.
(PTY.) LTD.
GERM ISTON
Producers of Industrial Base Minerals
(SILICA FLOUR, ACID-GRADE FLUORSPAR, ETC.)
EXTEND THEIR BEST WISHES
ON- THE OCCASION OF
YOUR GOLDEN JUBILEE


Make "Champions" your No. 1
source of supply for:
Motor Spares, Accessories,
Tools, Paint Spraying and
Garage Equipment, Seat
Covers.
Champion Motor
Supplies
(PTY.) LTD.
GtiRMISTON P.O. BOX 518.
Wholesale distributors to the
trade only.


With the compliments of
Acme Motor &
Cycle Works
48 VICTORIA STREET,
GERMISTON
Phone 51-6535 P.O. Box 496
Repairs to all makes of motor
cycles.
All work guaranteed.
Good used motor cycles always
in stock.
Motor cycle graveyard.


With compliments
from

S. & M.
MOTORS
(PTY.) LTD.
Specialists in
Auto Wiring, Engine Tuning,
all Engine Overhauling, Panel
SBeating and Spray Painting,
Visualining, Analysing and
Wheel Balancing.
NEW AND SECOND-HAND
CAR DEALERS

Cor. Park and Charles Sts.,
Germiston
Phone 51-8178 P.O. Box 749

With the compliments.
Of :

BARRIS

BROS.
(PTY.) LTD.
120 Victoria Street,
Germiston

With compliments from

S.A.
CLOTHING
INDUSTRIES
LTD.

P.O. Box 274,
GERMISTON


With Compliments from




A. STAR



LIMITED

STRUCTURAL & CIVIL
ENGINEERING
CONTRACTORS



Registered Office & Works

HARRIES STREET,
INDUSTRIAL SITES
SOUTH EXTENSION,
GERMISTON
TRANSVAAL
Railway Siding 1673
Ph. 51-8511 P.O. Box 3


PAGE FORTY-FOUR







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


DIE


JOODSE


BYDRAE


TOT


PAGE FORTY-FIVB



DIE


DIE Portugese en Spaanse ontdekkingsreise word be-
skou as een van die belangrikste gebeurtenisse in die
Yeskiedenis, en die Joodse bydrae daartoe was van geen
,eringe aard nie. Weliswaar, dit word soms ges6 dat die
'eise van Columbus as sowel 'n Joodse as 'n Spaanse on-
lerneming bestempel kan word.
In die Spaanse skiereiland het. berekeninge. Vir nagenoeg drie
rode sedert die tyd van die eeue was hierdie instrument in ge-
lomeine gewoon en onder "albei bruik.
dohammedaanse en Christelike In sigself was die kwadrant nie
)ewind het hulle, met uitsondering voldoende as 'n bystand in die
ran vervolging nou en dan, vry- skeepvaart nie. Teen die einde
ieid en burgerregte geniet, en 'n van die vyftiende eeu het Koning
iog peil van geestelike en kul- Johan II van Portugal 'n kommis-
;urele ontwikkeling bereik. In
lie Middeleeue was hulle die aris-
.okrate van die Jodedom. Maar
een die einde van die veertiende
.u het die onderdrukking en mar- Abam Zacuto,
eling wat die .lot van hulle
eloofsgenote benoorde die Pyrene6 die Joodse weten-
vas, hulle ook te beurt geval.
Die vervolging van die Spaanse skaplike, ,op wies
Tode het gepaard. gegaan met 'n so astronomiese
'anatieke ywer van die kant Van
lie Roomse Kerk om hulle tot die tafels Vasco da
Mhristendom te bekeer. Menige
let na Portugal en Noord-Afrika ; Gama staatge-
revlug. En Jode derduisende het
lie Christendom omhels. Laasge- maak het vir sy
aoemde staan bekend as die berekeninge. Da
Marrano's of nuwe Christene. ge. Da


Geheim Jode
Van die Marrano's het menige
lie Christendom hart en siel aan-
raar, maar die oorweldigende meer-
lerheld, terwyl hulle gereeld kerk
:oe gegaan het, en uiterlik goeie
'hristene was, -het in geheim,
igter geslote deure en toegetrekte
,ordyne, hulle Judaisme :beoefen,
lie Joodse Sabbat gehou, Joodse
!eeste gevier, en hulle kinders in
lie Judaisme onderrig. Hulle het
,rehoop dat die tyd spoedig sou
Lanbreek wanneer hulle weer open-
ik as Jode sou kon lewe. Dit
vas teen diegene dat die Inkwisisie
ao wreedaardig en meedoenloos op-
,retree het.
Die Jode wat openlik as Jode
)rgebly het, het ook gehoop en
rertrou dat die pogromme gou ver-
3y sou gaan en die vorige toedrag
ran sake herstel sou word. Maar
n die jaar 1492 is alle Jode wat
,eweier het om die Christendom te
>mhels uit Spanje verdryf.
In Portugal is elke poging, met
nbegrip van geweld, aangewend
im die Jode to bekeer, en in 1497
s ai!e onbekeerde Jode uit daardie
and verban. Menige Marrano's,
vanneer die geleentheld horn voor-
;edoen het, het na ander lande,
vaar hulle weer openlik as Jode
con lewe, gevlug.
Ons het hierdie beknopte his-
oriese oorasg verstrek om lesers
vat nle met die geskiedenis van
lie Jode in Spanje en Portugal
>ekend is nie, in staat te stel om
lie bydrae van die openlike Jode
,n die Marrano's tot die ontdek-
:ingsreise better te begryp.
Skeepvaartinstrumente
Teen die einde van die Mid-
leleeue het die skeepvaart nog
iteeds met veel moeilikhede te
campe gehad. Weens onvolmaakte
keepvaartinstrumente, onjuiste
andkaarte, onbetroubare astro-
tomiese tafels en swak skepe kon
lie. seevaarders dit iae wang om
lie groot oseane in te vaar nie.
belfs nadat die kompas in ge-
Iruik gekom het, was dit nie
poontlik om die posisle van skepe
br see te bepaal nie. Tot die
Yetenskaplike en tegniese uit-
indings, wat dit moontlik gemaak
tet vir skepe om die wye, on-
ekbnde oseane aan to durf, het
ode 'n utters belangrike bydrae
,emaak.
Rabbi Jakob ben Machir Ibn
Ribbon het 'n belangrike ver-
etering aangebring aan die
'utydse kwadrant, en die nuwe
keepvaartinstrument, Quadrans
udalcus, wat na hornm genoem is,
,et wAreldwye erkenning geniet.
taar 'n ander Jood, Levi-ben-
thersjon van Suid-Frankryk,
leter bekend as Ghersjonides
288-1344) was die ontwerper
an 'n verder verbeterde kwadrant,
at Jakobsstaf genoem is. Dit was
p die Instrument dat Vasco da
qama, Magellaan, Columbus en die
der beroemde seevaarders hoof-
aklik staatgemaak het vir hulle


Gama so skepe
was ook toegerus
met die nuwe
yster astrolabiumn
wat Zacuto ont-
werp het.


sie .van drie wetenskaplikes aan-
gestel met die opdrag om
navorsing te doen om die outydse
astrolabium of sterrehoekmeter
van die Grieke te adapteer ten
einde die bestek van bestaande
skeepvaartinstrumente ult te brel.
Twee lede van die kommissie,
Rodrigo en Josef Vecinho, was
Jode, en sommige gesaghebbendes
meen dat die derde, Martin
Behaim, ook 'n Jood was. Ten
gevolge van hulle navorsing is 'n
nuwe astrolabium ontwerp wat
dit moontlik gemaak het om, in
verbinding met tafels wat deur
hulle voorberel is, deur waar-
neming van die son te vaar. Hier-
die prestasie is deur Portugese
geskiedskrywers met trots ge-
boekstaaf, met die opmerking dat
seevaart in die wye oseane nou
moontlik was.
Astronomiese tafels
Josef Vecinho, wat een van die
koning se belangrikste raadgewers
in sake wetenskaplike aangeleent-
hede was, het tydens die gedwonge
kerstening van die Jode in 1497,
die Christendom onhels,, maar 'n
eeu later vind ons sy afstamme-
linge in Italie as openlike Jode.
Daar was 'n verdere vereiste
waarsonder al die instrument nie
voldoende was nie-betroubare as-
tronomiese tafels.. Joodse weten-
skaplikes, in die Middeleeue het
veel aandag aan astronomiese
berekeninge geskenk, en die
belangrikste tafels wat teen die
einde wan die Middeleeue bestaan
het was meestal 6f die oorspronk-
like werk van Jode 6f vertalings
deur hulle ult die Arables. .Ten
einde oor die betroubaarste berek-
eninge te beskik, het Alfonso die
Wyse van Kastili opdrag gegee
aan die Joodse aterrekundige, leak
ibn Sid. die mees gevierde weten-
skaplike van daardie tydperk in
Kastilil, en Judah ben Moses
Cohen, 'n Joodae medikus, om
nuwe tafels saam te stel. Hlerdie
berekeninge staan bekend as die
,,Alfonsiese Tafels" en was deur
wetenskaplikes tat in die sewen-
tiende eeu aangewend.
Landkaart-opstellers
Dit staan bekend dat die voor-
aanstaande landkaart opstellers
destyds inwoners van die eiland
Majorca was, maar wat nie so
welbekend is nie, is dat dit meestal
Jode was wat hierdie utters belan-
grike bedrywigheld aldaar gevoer
het. Die baas-landkaart-opstellers


ONTDEKKINGSREISE


was dip Joodse familie Crescas.
Abraham, die vader, is deur die
Koning van Aragon aangestel as
,,Landkaart- en kompasmeester,"
en sy seun Jehuda het bekend ge-
staan as die ,,Landkaart-Jood." Die
landkaart waaraan hulle Ar twee
jaar (1376-1377) gewerk het -
tans bekend as die Katalonlese
Atlas-het destyds die bewonder-
ing van Europa afgedwing. Waar


hulle al hul inligting ingewin het,
is nie bekend nie, maar dit word
vermoed dat hulle veel geleer het
van die Spaanse Jood, Yuceff
Faquin, wat horn in Majorca ge-
vestig het nadat hy, so is dit ges6,
die hele destydabekende wqreld
bevaar bet. Abraham Crescas is
in 1387 oorlede en Jehuda, tydens
die anti-Joodse uitbarstinga in
1391, was daartoe gedwing om die
Christendom te omhels en het ay
naam tot Jayme Ribes verander.
Prins Hendrik die Seevaarder het
horn uitgenooi om in Portugal te
kom woon en horn aangestel as die
eerste direkteur van die sterrewag
wat hy by Sagres, waar die fonda-
mente van Portugal se prestasies
ter see geld is, opgerig het. In
Sagres was hy bekend as ,,Maestre
Jacoma de Majorca." Jehuda
Crescas het verdere prestasies


*** deurl
Abraham Rosen


behaal deur verbeterings aan di6
skeepskompas en die astronomiese
astrolabium aan te bring.
Ander gevierde Joodse land-
kaart-opstellera van Majorca, wat
later die Christendom omhels het,
was Mecia de Viladestes en Juan
de. Vallsecha, voorheen bekend as
Haym ibn Riach.
Abraham Zacuto
'n Wetenskaplike wie so werk,
ultvindinga en raad van die
grootate belang vir die seevaar-
(Vervolg op bladsy 47.)


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE FORTY-SIX


Jewish leaders -old and new


0 Continued from page 33
care to remember, is that "Ying-
lish" has vanished, from our com-
mittees at any rate. Those who
do not, for one reason or another,
speak in English, use a gramma-
tically flawless, almost literary
Yiddish.
One result of this acculturation
and integration is that there is
no longer any need for the com-
munity in its dealings with govern-
mental, provincial or civic auth-
orities, or with other sections of
the general 'population, to seek
the assistance of a "go-between."
I am not one of those who speak
contemptuously of "shtadlanuth"


as a technique of survival; not
every shtadlan was the kind of
assimilated, alienated Jew who, in
Kurt Lewin's words, was prepared
to speak for the Jews but not to
them.
The Jewish community no longer
runs to offer a position of leader-
ship to the individual who has
achieved fame and influence in the
general community unless such an
individual, as is often the case,
has a record of service within the
Jewish community entitling him to
recognition.
In its dealings with outside
authorities the Jewish commu-
nity today elects its spokesmen


from its own representative
organizations.
That a Jew may be prominent
and influential in social, economic
or political circles outside the Jew-
ish community and yet occupy no
position within the community
entitling his views to be regarded
as representative of those of the
Jewish community, is a fact that
many non-Jews find difficult to
grasp. This misunderstanding has
more than once caused confusion
in the field of inter-group rela-
tions. And one must confess that
there was once a time when pro-
minent Jewish politicians, for
example, were often called upon


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to act as a channel of communi-
cation between the Jewish com-
munity and the government. Today
we make our approach direct.
One change is as yet not very
evident, but it is there, all the
same. Slowly but surely the
community is beginning to re-
quire Its leaders to be reason-
ably bilingual.
The development of the Union
since the end of the last world
war has made at least a working
knowledge of Afrikaans an essen-
tial in any Jewish leader who
must have dealings with the non-
Jewish population.
Progress towards bilingualism
among leaders has been rapid in
the towns and villages, slow in the
cities. At a recent regional .con-
ference where I presided, I was
struck by the fact that the formal
discussions were in English, but
many of the informal discussions
were. in Afrikaans.
The increasing economic homo-
geneity of the community has
brought about a far wider diffu-
sion of power. Gone are the days
when a few wealthy persons
could impose their will on a major
institution by the threat of finan-
cial sanctions. The Income base
on which a major institution to-
day rests, is far broader than be-
fore. I have myself heard some of
the "grand dukes" of Cape Town
Jewry in 1939 threaten to "starve"
a certain national organisation
into submission and, if necessary,
start an "opposition," because f
their strong disapproval of a re-
solution adopted at a meeting, as
a result of Zionist pressure.
In those days a threat of this
kind was not to be lightly dis-
missed; today it would be laughed
at.

The intellectual
Money is still indispensable, of
course; indeed, in certain depart-
ments of communal activity fund-
raising has assumed a greater im-
portance than ever before, and the
canvasser-the man who is pre-
pared to go from door to door
-is assuming the importance the
big donor formerly possessed.
I hope I shall not be thought to
be under-estimating the impor-
tance of fund-raising for the Zion-
ist movement, or to be lacking in
appreciation of the enormous
sacrifices of time and energy made
by voluntary, unpaid fund-raisers,
if I say that the intellectual, the
philosopher, the thinker, the
dreamer-call him what you will-
has been pushed into the back-
ground a little too readily.
It is undeniable that at pre-
sent Israel needs our practical
help more than she does our
philosophies, but we neglect at
our peril the intellectual, spirit-
ual and emotional appeals r.f
Zionism-particularly to youth.
It is my sincere opinion that the
Zionist movement is the poorer be-
cause of the decreasing emphasis
on what its ideology represents not
only in terms of self-fulfilment in
Israel, but also in terms of the
fructification of Jewish life in the
Diaspora.
While on the subject of Zionism,
one must acknowledge the tre-
mendous contribution made by
this movement, during the last 30
years in particular,. to the demo-
cratisation of all our communal
institutions.
It was Zionism which first
gave the ordinary Jew In- the
street a voice in Jewish affairs.


-
















The late Mr. Jacob Gitlin, a
brilliant representative of the
old school of pioneers, who
came from Eastern Europe and
built Jewish life and Zionism in
South Africa.


I Mr. Justice H. M. Bloch, an
outstanding example of the new
generation of Jewish leaders,
who were born in this country.

The increasingly important part
played by Jewish'women in our
communal leadership was first
made possible by the Zionist
movement. There is no doubt in
my mind that in the years which
lie ahead of us, women will make
an even greater contribution to
Jewish leadership.,
I have left for the last the role
played by the Jewish intellectual
in Jewish life in general.
I do not pretend that the intel-
lectual's influence is nearly as
great as it deserves to be-indeed,
I have already deplored his dim-
inishing influence within the Zion-
ist movement-but it cannot be
gainsaid that the intellectual elite
which now exists in our civil ser-
vice, our rabbinate, our journalists,
our teachers, represents a source
of communal inspiration and guid-
ance that has grown considerably
in the past few decades.
The direct power that this
intellectual elite exercises Is
limited, but its influence is great.
Looking back, then, after 50
years, we see a new kind of Jewish
leader, sprung from the new com-
munity moulded by the social and
economic changes that have taken
place.
But although there .have been
these great changes, basically our
South African .Jewish community
is confronted by the same chal-
lenges and dilemmas as have con-
fronted diaspora Jewry since the
French Revolution and the col-
lapse of the Ghetto walls. And not
only need the new type of Jewish
leader in South Africa claim nD
superiority over his predecessor
as regards sincerity, devotion an
self-sacrifice; he need not It
ashamed to learn from those wh<
in past years assumed response.
ability for Jewish survival







Supplement to' THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 1. 198


DIE JOODSE BYDRAE
0 Vervolg van bladsy 45


ders was, was die Joodse astro-
nQom, Abraham Zacuto. Hy was
hoogleraar in die sterrekunde aan
die Universitelt van Salamanca,
waar Columbus horm besoek en
met horn beraadslaag bet. Toe die
JOde in 1492 ult SpanJe Verban is,
het Zacuto na Portugal gevlug,
waar hy as koninklike astronoom
aangestel is. Toe die Jode in 1497
ult Portugal verdry'f is, het hy
na Noord-Afrika ontanap.
Die nuwe en verbeterde qstro-
nomiese tafels wat Zacuto, tydens
sy verblyf in Salamanca, opgestel
het, Is deur Vasco da Gama,
Columbus, Albuquerque, Cabral en
di. ander seevaarders vir hulle
berekeninge gebruik. In Portugal
het Zacuto 'n nuwe astrolabiumn
ontwerp wat uit yster, Instede
hout, vervaardig is. Die skepe van
Vasco da Gama is met hierdie
nuwe astrolabium toegerus.
S Bemannings
Voordat da Gama se epoque-
,makende reis deur die Koninklike
Hof gemagtig is, is die meaning
" van Zacuto ingewin. Onderwyl
die vloot gereed gestaan het om
uit Lissabon ult te vaar, het da
Gama en Zacuto vir laas 'n ern-
stige beraad gehou, en. vpor die
hele bemanning 'het die twee van
mekaar 'n toegenee afskeid ge-
neeim.
Tot dusvcr het ons die weten-
skaplike sy van die onderwerp
behandel, maar Jode het ook deel
uitgemaak van die bemanninga.
wat die groot ontdekkingsreise
meegemaak bet. Dit is onmoont-
Ilk dm juiste getalle vas te stel,
maar sekere inlfgting: is beskik-
baar. Ten einde- bemannings vir
die. gevairlike .togte te verkry is
ter dood veroordeeldes vryge-
spreek, op. voorwaarde dat hulle
by die ontdekkingsvlote aansluit
en onderneem om enige gevaarlike
daad wat van hulle verels word
ulit te voer. Onder die degradado's,
soos hulle bekend gestaan het,
was daar mentge Marrano's wat
op die brandstapel gewag het
weens hulle afdwaling terug tot


die Judaisme. Diegene moes,
natuurlik, weer die Christendom
omhels. Dit wil voorkom dat laas-
genoemde die meerderheid van
die degradado's, wat Suid-Amerika
vir die Portugese gekoloniseer het,
ultgemaak het.
Daar was 'n aantal Marrano's
wat saam met Columbus Amerika
ontdek het-Luis Torres, 'n tolk,
wat slegs 'n paar dae voor die
vloot ultgevaar het die Christen-
dom omhels het, en die eerste
Europedr was om in die Nuwe
Wdreld aan wal te stap, Marco en
Bernal, twee medict, Alonso de la
Calle, Roderigo Sanches, Rodrigo
de Triana, en moontlik andere.
In Vasco da Gama se vioot was
daar ten minste twee Marrano's,
Fernao Martins of, Fernam
Martinz, en die degradado, Joao
Nunes. Toe die vloot by Mosam-
biek aangedoen het, het Martinz,
wat Arabies magtig was, as tolk
gedien. Nunes, wat albel Hebreeus
en Arables geken het, is, toe die
vioot Kalikoet bereik het, die ge-
vaarlike task opgel4 om alleen
aan wal te gaan en ult te vind
water soort ontvangs die vreem-
delinge daar kon verwag.
Weens die tale wat hulle magtig
was, was Jode dikwels die tolkers
in die vlote van die groot relsigers.
Was Columbus 'n Jood?
Dat Columbus, soos die geskie-
denisboeke verklaar, 'n Itallaner
ult Genua was, is deur 'n aantal
gesaghebbende Spaanse historic
in twyfel getrek. Hulle opper die
meaning dat Columbus 'n Spaanse
Jood was wat die Christendom
omhels het. Ten gunste van hier-
die veronderstelling word aange-
voer, onder meer, dat Columbus
noolt op 'n Saterdag 'n reis begin
het nie, dat hy dikwels ult die
Ou Testament aangehaal het en
frases, wat regstreekse vertalings
van die Hebreeuse idiometwas, ge-
besig het, dat daarAin sy skrywe
'n sterk Bybelinvloed geopenbaar
word, dat sy seun uitdruklik ver-
klaar dat sy vader se voorsate ,,uit
(Vervolg op bladsy 76.)


A tribute from



EDITOR


A FAMOUS

"Livliest and best periodical
in the diaspora"


.9mv~esl

Irn~~ n~n~ fllni 19-WI' 'MS' 1 N .111915911' 51.1
go-" Il19 -ov'I> 9D0 'a 1 f 1fl S'S *111 0-92 fl9. 's -IMA160'1'
09, 0~~K?~99'i'l ~3~ 110'111~1 fl ~ l~1 'Jg nW o


1,-a v nip nnis a misv Wnno


This letter was written to
the editor of the Zionist
Record on May 18, 1952, by
the late Dr. A. Carlebach,
editor of Ma'ariv and leading
figure in Israel journalism.
The letter says:
"Dear Gershater,
"I was happy to see Just the
shape of a letter from you--a
token of friendship and attach-
ment.
"Furthermore, If not for the
very busy time I would have
written to you not once, how I


am Impressed by your news-
paper whenever It comes Into
my hands and It seems to me
that within its framework it is
the liveliest and best periodical
In the diaspora. If I were to
conduct a school in Journalism
for Zionist and communal
periodicals In the diaspora, I
would use your Journal-Just as
It is-as a text book.
* "In the meantime I am send-
Ini you my photograph-Just so
-may we have no occasion
to use It.
"Yours In friendship,
"A. CARLEBACH."


The last sentence is written In
Yiddish Idiom and was intended to
convey that "may no misfortune
befall us."
Dr. Carlebach died In February,
1956, and was deeply mourned by,
all sections.
The labour paper Davar wrote:
"Journalists have lost a virtuoso,"'
while the right-wing Haboker said
"He had an influence that was per-
haps unequalled in the Hebrew
Press."
On several occasions he contri-
buted articles to the Zionist Record
under his own name and various
pen-names.


Serving


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ArE or a T Sepplememt to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 2 19. 58 Spplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1 N PAGE FORTY-NI M

* OUDTSHOORN JOHANNESBURG THE HULDA FOREST *
........... GOLDEN J.ublee Iet an oca- ntt8.eni ta enjoyed, ehr at ew 1-e and.s.. er e ily budreportedIa l st, my hable self-the c ourt A pemonality to whom many The late Rev. M. WoosIeon whe
SlionforreatIon mle- It wooa. an tntotae JewIsh life th cr dl tht th m bd te n llled order i whoh our ofloet mwera South Arlean Jews ine cluaude g my- molintered to three treeo tlo of
By A .to"n noywhisk.oe ... o 00 cla l a ud w rlty ae blieen Karoo town was the cradle' Ta king h. ... ..... sl f... .. .. sr greatly Ind bted, ..M. .o.t.hoo Jew. (mome than W
T bha eyo newis.....nt- A omasoty. D oe felt here o Jewish attachment and of.he h c. .. rwo p of en en t a s

S- ce e atw sa e ".a st public service in Afica -. -lh^o.. .. r- n n n t y e or ut ws m -
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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 19,S


(Continued from page 41.)


businessman (who, in any event;
tended to maintain close commer-
cial ties with "home," and was
thus inclined to import rather
than manufacture for sale).
Moreover, while such a Jewish
immigrant would have no know-
ledge: of the involved techniques
of the engineering and other
heavy industries, he or his father
may well have been a petty arti-
san in Lithuania (a tailor, baker,
or shoemaker, perhaps) with a
tradition of Industrial craftsman-
ship.
AS RECENT ARRIVALS
Of equal significance, as a re-
cent arrival, he would know
nothing of the white man's con-
tempt for manual labour, and
would not consider it below his
dignity to perform humble, rou-


tine operations in an embryo fac-
tory, training Coloured or Bantu
personnel in the process, and keep-
ing "overheads" at a minimum.
SMALL SAVINGS
Finally, he was 'often more
favourably placed than others to
raise sufficient capital to make a
start: if his own small savings
from petty trading were inade-
quate, the strong family ties and
sympathies existing among the
new community would usually Ihi-
duce close friends and relations
to invest some of their funds in a
likely project; and, since he al-
ready had dealings with farmers
and enjoyed urban business con-
tacts, this often implied the pur-
chase of raw materials on favour-
able credit terms.
With such advantages, the pros-


pective Jewish -manufacturer -
now enjoying full freedom of en-
terprise often denied to him in
eastern Europe was ready to
assume risks in an industrially
backward society.
Once the plunge was taken -
often at great personal sacrifice-
and he had begun, haltingly, to
meet demands In spheres previ-
ously ignored by his contemporar-
ies, the First World War came to
his assistance by dislocating ship-
ping services and raising Euro-
pean price levels, thereby causing
foreign competition to slacken off.
It was a breathing-space fully
taken advantage of, and at coas-
tal cities, like Cape Town and
Port Elizabeth, and especially on
the Rand, Jewish-owned factories
(some of them make-shift affairs
employing only a few workers


'I


each) began to turn out' South
African glassware, processed food-
stuffs and confectionery, clothing,
blankets, tobacco products, furni-
ture, and a host of other con-"
sumer articles. "
After further setbacks during
the late 1926's, a new wave of
prosperity was initiated by the in-
crease in the price of gold result-
ing from the international cur-
rency-disturbances of 1932; and
the Jewish industrialist now-began
to seek markets beyond the
Union's borders, particularly In
the Rhodesias. -.-
GERMAN JEWS
Then followed a further signifi-
cant contribution to South African
industrial progress with the, in-
jection into many branches, of
production of the special skills and
aptitudes of the German immi-
grants who had come out after
the advent of Hitler-their con-
tributions to the fashion industry,
to the diamond-cutting trade, and
as manufacturing jewellers appears
to have been particularly import-
ant.
The accumulated demand for. all
types of factory products arising
from war-time shortages. in the
period 1939-45, and the various
difficulties and delays in securing
adequate imports during the im-
mediate post-war years, provided
further stimuli to the Union's
manufacturing developments in
which Jewish enterprise once again
played a notable part, branching
out into newer (and heavier)
fields, such as agricultural and
electrical equipment.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Throughout, this half-century of
progress, Jewish industrialists, in
-the course of building-up their
factories, assumed social, respon-
sibilities which, at the time, were
novel innovations: attention was
given to canthen and rest-room
facilities; in some instances, both
European and African employees
received free medical services and
were able to take advantage of
provident-fund schemes and to
secure loans for houses; care was
taken to avoid accidents caused
by faulty equipment, and to pro-
vide adequate ventilation and
lighting facilities.
In short, Jewish factory-
owners displayed a keen interest
in the welfare of their workers,
introducing Improvements in work-
ing conditions long before these
became statutory obligations.
It is, of course, notoriously diffi-
cult to arrive at a concrete assess-
ment of the contribution made by
MEM


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any ethnic group to economic pro-
gress in a diverse society. In
countries like the United States
and Canada, where there is great
and increasing interest in business
history,' and a voluminous litera-
ture exists which enables historians
to clearly trace "the growth of
specific branches of industry, it
is still impossible to measure with
any reasonable degree of accuracy
which people in the American
"melting pot" have been mainly
responsible for particular lines of
development.
The, question of estimating the
Jewish share in South African
industrial progress is beset by Its
own special problems of evaluation .
and interpretation.
Few firms in this country have
yet reached the stage of wealth.
or maturity where they are in
a position (like their American
counterparts) to sponsor research
into their own origins and, growth.
Yet, certain industries as a whole'
(textile production comes readily
to mind,, for example) are ready,
for such assessments:A series of,
case-histories would help to fill in
the quantitative details which are
now missing; they would reveal
groping experiments, dismal fail-
ures, and some spectacular succes-.
ses. It is a rich, virgin field of .
historical research which awaits
investigation.
RECOGNITION
At the present stage, therefore,
It is merely possible to recognize
certaip trends, and the drawing
of inferences based on the skimpy
data available remains a highly
speculative and dangerous busi-
ness.
Yet, giving due allowance to
the tentative and empirical nature
of existing knowledge on the sub-
ject, it seems unlikely that mono-
graphs on various aspects of
South African business history-
should they ever be published-will
upset the impression of an indus-
trial revolution brought about in
no small measure by Jewish entre-
preneurial ability and initiative.
Perhaps the next fifty years will
bring general recognition of this
fact and add another colourful
collection of centenary stamps to
the albums of philatelists;



With the compliments
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(Pty.) Ltd.
Directors:
M. A. Shein, C.A. (S.A.),
C. J. Katz.

Offices and Factory:
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JOHANNESBURG.


PAGE FIFTY-


.AMMIL- AM mwmlh mooll, m


m


a L W n MI


0 rm l.


-777


16-W A m m m m M


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0


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.----kLYCETTJE







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958

KIMBERLEY JEWRY DURING THE LAST 50 YEARS



THEY SHONE LIKE

of South Africa.
S"Jews ,ire diamonds," Sir Ernest
Oppenheimer, himself known as
the "King of Diamonds" and for-
mer chairman of De Beers
TUDGEDby any standard, 50 its part, nobly and with distinc- Consolidated Mines, Limited, was
years mean a long span in the tion, in the economic, industrial, once reported to have said to a
history of a community, especially financial and educational advance- friend. With equal truth, it may
when that community is only 83 ment of the country. Such a place be mentioned that the Influencial
years old and has already played is Kimberley, the -"glamour" town leaders of Kimberley Jewry, like
the diamonds themselves, have
shown their many facets and have
proved a shining example to
F others while playing a dominant
Role in the development of the
S8 country of their adoption.
The earliest Jews were among
the adventurers who first swarmed
Limited into the area to try their luck at
(Established 1897)


258 Schoeman Street, PRETORIA

Telephones: 3-4916 and 3-8228
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DISTRIBUTORS OF
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AND MONZA MOTOR CYCLES

AND SCOOTERS







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to the Zionist RecorAd


by
Cyril B. Harris


Klipdrift on the banks of the Vaal.
Soon at least 10,000 river diggers
were at work by 1870, feverishly
sifting the river soil through their
sieves.
Many of them did not forget
they had a faith to support; and
their general activities go back
to 1875 when the foundation
stone of the first synagogue
was laid on the Diamond
Fields.
Ambitious
In those early days in the his-
tory of this country some poor
but ambitious young men came
out from London to join the new
diamond rush. Among them were
such people as Barney Barnato,
his cousin David (later Sir David)
Harris, Ikey Sonnenberg (one of
the earliest executive officials of
the local congregation), Louis
Cohen and many other diamond
buyers and diggers who dispensed
unusual acts of generosity for the
sake of their time-honoured faith.
Then there was Mr. F. Hirsch-
horn, a leading figure with a
heart of gold who gave liberally
and unostentatiously.
There have, of course, been a
succession of presidents over the


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GOLDEN JUBILEE




238 Vermeulen Street, Pretoria

___~~ *--


PAGE FIFTY-ONE


Encased In glass on a stand in the entrance to the communal
hall of the Griqualand West Congregation is a solid silver replica
of the Kimberley Synagogue, pictured above.
There is a fascinating story behind this miniature of the
synagogue; the foundation stone was laid by Mr. G. H. Bonus, who
made a large contribution towards the building fund. In recognition
of his generosity the community presented him with a replica
of the synagogue in solid silver, exact to the extent of the words
on the foundation stone being clearly decipherable.
Subsequently Mr. Bonus left Kimberley and settled in England.
About 85 years ago a member of the congregation, strolling through
the streets of London, noticed the miniature in a pawnbroker's
shop window. It was bought on behalf of the congregation and
presented to the president, Mr. William Sagar, in 1020. Upon his
death in 1052 It was presented to the congregation by hisn on.


past 50 years-men imbued with
the urge to serve, and who have
done so regardless of personal or
financial sacrifices.
Among these may be mentioned,
not necessarily in the order In
which they held office, such men
as Louis Goldsmith, Joseph Saber,
Flavien E. Lezard, Abraham
Greenberg, Isaac Lewis, Bnrnett
Rigal, Louis Isaacson and M. M.
Aronson.

Later years
In later years one recalls the
ever-stern Sam Stone, the genial
William Sagar (one-time Mayor
of Kimberley), the energetic Dr.
S. Zwelback, M.P.C., the redoubt-
able Bernard Goldberg, the metho-
dical Dr. N. Kretzmar, the enter-
prising "Gus" Haberfeld (also an
ex-Mayor) and the present day
leader, Dr. Harry Wolfsohn.
At the consecration service of
the first local synagogue in 1876
a full-time Minister, Rev. B. Albu,
was In charge. In 1878, the first
resident minister from England
was appointed. He was the Rev.
M. Mendelssohn, of Bristol: then
in 1884 the Rev. Abraham Orsi-
stein, of London; and afterwards
Rev. M. Woolf.
But among the succession of
ministers who followed, none
could have been more popular and
efficient than the Rev. Harris
Isaacs who, for a longer period
than any other minister, set the
tone and raised the community to
a status respected by every
Christian. organisation on the
Diamond Fields. From .this stan-
dard of dignity the Kimberley
Jewish community has never
looked back.

Ministers
Much to the regret of everyone,
the Rev. Mr. Isaacs in the fullness
of time retired to Muizenberg
where years later he passed away.
Among his successors were
other eminent clerics including the
Rev. Dr. Wald, Rabbi M. Kon-
visser (now in Salisbury), Rev.
W. Yesorsky (now in Bulawayo)
and the Rev. C. M. Bloch
(Potchefstroom), each of whom
succeeded in adding their
knowledge, teachings and culture
to a united and enlightened com-
munity.
Today the Rev. 0. M. Werner,
a wise and able spiritual leader
presides over the religious desti-


A diamond-studded T o r a h-
pointer, probably the only one
of Its kind in South Africa,
which Is used at the Kimberley
Synagogue.


nies of his congregants and does
so with a charm and efficiency
which have endeared him to alg
No history of the Griqualand
West Hebrew Congregation would
be complete without mention of
the name of Sam Levin, who de-
voted his entire life to the
secretarial side of the work, and
whose labours in this direction
over some 50 years will live as
long as there is a. school in
Kimberley.
If the Jewish male population
has observed the laws of God
according to the dictates of their
hearts, It has been the loyal
Jewish women of several genera-
tions who have worked arduously
in the conferring of monetary
gifts and the dispensing of sweet
charity to the deserving poor.
Their labours, however, have not
been confined solely to their own
co-religionists, but have extended
far beyond their ken.
(Continued on. page 55).






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD,


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- - - - - -
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Aw


FR]]DAy, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


rAGE FHTY-Two







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE FIFTY-THREE


The Oudtshoorn Story



POPULAR


MEN
(Continued from page 49.)
Johnny (Yankele) de Jager, an
Afrikaner, who spoke Yiddish, as
well as many a South African Jew,
and, by way of illustration, fre-
quently quoted from the Talmud
and the Bible in Hebrew. He was
able to assimilate this knowledge
because he virtually grew up in a
Jewish. atmosphere.
Working for the late Mr.
Herman Lewin, a "Talmud
chochom," he mixed with the
* ostrich feather buyers who traded
with Lewin. Many of them were
erudite people and "Yankele,"
proving himself an apt pupil, be-
came their favourite.
His Yiddish was so fluent
that one is inclined to- believe
the story that he was once
counted as a tenth to make up a
minyan for a "yahrzelt."
He was, however, best remem-
bered among his contemporaries
for an incident which occurred
while he served Oudtshoorn as
Mayor during the visit there, in
1922, of the well-known Yiddish
writer, Peretz Hirschbein.
WELCOME IN YIDDISH
"Yankele," heading a deputa-
tion of representatives of the Jew-
ish community, officially welcomed
Hirschbein in fluent Yiddish when
he arrived at the railway' station.
Elated at being received by a
"Jewish" Mayor, the author com-
plimented the community when he
replied in Yiddish. Only later did
he discover the true position.
The incident so impressed
Hirschbein that he subsequently
devoted a chapter to de Jager
when he wrote a book on his
visit to the country.
Another well known man who,
even then, was a national figure,
was the late Senator C. J. Langen-
hoven, the great Afrikaans writer,
poet and .politician, who counted
many Jews among his friends.
Foremost among them was Miss
Sarah Goldblatt, his collaborator
on the newspaper, "Het Zuid
Westen," which he founded at
Oudtshoorn at the beginning of
the century.
She later became his secretary
and literary executrix.
Another was the.late Mr. Max
Rose, the well-known ostrich
feather "king," with whom he was
on first name terms. The late Mr.
J. I. Mann, of Ladismith, Cape,
who for a number of years was
an executive member of the Cape
Provincial Council, was also a
much respected friend and politi-
cal opponent of Langenhoven.
A man who won the high es-
teem of Langenhoven and was
immortalised by him in his book,
"Sonde Met Die Bure," was the
late Mr. Marcus Hotz, a pioneer
of Oudtshoorn Jewry. Langen-
hoven described Mr. Hotz as the
only "sensible man in the village,"
adding, "I shall never understand
how on earth he was chosen as a
town councilor."
Langenhoven was a man -of
mercurial temperament with as
many moods as the sea. One mo-


ment he would be quiet and
serene and the next moment he
would rage like a tempest.
I heard him once, in a fit of
temper, denounce reporters as
"anonymous people paid to lie with
impunity" (the occasion was a
political meeting at which the
Editor'of the Courant and I were
present to report him). I also saw
him dropping a one pound note
into a Jewish National Fund box
and seal his charitable deed with
a kiss demanded from the charm-
ing collector, fondle little children
and play hide-and-seek with his
famous dog, Jakkals.
It was my sad experience to see
him in death as he lay in his coffin
in his home "Arbeldsgenot" (now
a national memorial) and to re-
port his funeral at which homage
was paid to his memory by thou-
sands of people from all parts of
the country.

CELEBRITIES
[UDTSHOORN, with its famous
Cango Caves,_ was often
visited by celebrated people from
abroad. I interviewed many of
them. Perhaps the most outstand-
ing figure I had the privilege of
meeting was the late Srlnlvasa
Sastri, Agent-General for India in
South Africa.
A dynamic personality, a bril-
liant English scholar and orator
and a great statesman, his repu-
tation had overawed me even be-
fore I was commissioned to inter-
view bi'. I was so overwhelmed
by hiS magnetic presence that I
found my pencil hanging limply
between my fingers and I was
unable to ask him a single ques-
tion. The story of his impres-
sions of his visit to Oudtshoorn
and the Caves, which I subse-
(Continued on next page.)


BACK ROW (left to right):
Mr. S. Lichter, Miss G. Lichter,
Miss L. Manasewitz, Miss R.
Kaplan (treas.), Mr. G. Lichter,
Mr. D. Jappie, Mr. M. Goldstein:
SECOND ROW: Mrs. Leah
Toubkin (vice-pres.), Miss Z.
Barnardski (pres. Herszl Ladies
Zionist Society), Madame B.
Pevsner, Mr. David Mierowsky
(pres. O.M.Z.A.). Mr. E. Sacks
(vice-pres. O.M.Z.A.), Mr. E.
Bernstein.
FRONT ROW: Miss Leah
Mallinick, Miss Eva Weinstein'
(hon. sec. H.Z.L.S.), Mr. Mark
Levin (hon. sec. O.M.Z.A.), Miss
R. Mallinick, Miss Ethel Sieff,
Mr. J. Glick.
This historic photograph of the
committees of the Herzl Ladies
Zionist Society and the Oscal
Marmorek Zionist Association,
of Oudtshoorn, was taken in
December, 1910, some three
months after the Herzl Ladies
Society, the second oldest
women's Zionist society in South
Africa, was established. The
occasion was the visit to Oudts-
hoorn of Madame B. Pevsner
(third from left, second row).
The founder of the Herzl
Ladies Zionist Society is Mrs.
L. Schneiderman, who lives at
10th Avenue, Mayfair, Johannes-
burg. She is in the second row
on the extreme left. She was
then Mrs. Leah Toubkin.
Others in the photograph are:
Mr S. Lichter (extreme left
back row) who resides at 31 Kin-
fauns Street, Sydenham, Johan-
nesburg. On his left is his sister
(Miss G. Lichter) now Mrs. M. J.
Freedman, of Pretoria. On her
left is Mrs. L. Scolnik (Miss L.
Manasewitz) who lives in Kroon-
stad. Her brother, Mr. J. E.
Manasewitz, formerly of Pretoria
and now of Cape Town, was
honorary secretary of the Oscar
Marmorek Zionist Association in
the early part of this century.
Miss Leah Mallinlick (extreme
left, front row) is now Mrs. L.
Boerbaitz, of Oudtshoorn. Miss
Eva Weinstein (on her left) is
now Mrs. S. Kramer of Observa-
tory, Johannesburg. Her father,
the late Rev. J. L. Weinstein,
served the Oudtshoorn com-
munity faithfully for over half
a century. On her left is Mr. Mark
Levin who was then a teacher at
the Oudtshoorn Hebrew School.
He left South Africa as a chalutz,
some 40 years ago, for Palestine
and has been senior English
master at the Gymnasia Hertz-
liah, Tel Aviv, for a number of
years. Miss R. Mallinick is now
Mrs. Isaacson, of Cape Town.
Miss Ethel Sieff is now Mrs. E.
Lazard, of Salisbury. Mr. J.
Glick died in America about two
years ago.


_________________________|1


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE FIFTY-FOUR


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Continued from previous page

particularly manifested on the
occasion of the visits of Dr. Chaim
Weizmann in 1932 and Nahum
Sokolow two years later. I had
the pleasure of interviewing both
these great leaders for the Courant
and felt particularly proud when
Dr. Weizmann brought me a per-
sonal "gerus" from my uncle, Mr.
Herman Manaschewitz, whom he




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Phone 55-1348/9. P.O. Box 201.


I well remember the rousing Director-General to the Israel
send-off given to the late Max Ministry of Foreign Affairs and
Bernstein, in 1925, when he left Israel's first Ambassador to
Oudtshoorn as a chalutz for Canada, and Dr. Simon Herman,
Palestine, thus setting a fine of the Hebrew University and head
example to South African youth. of the Youth Institute Department
I also recall my happy associa- of the Jewish Agency.
tions with other societies like the
Oudtshoorn Jewishl Guild and the DRIFT OF COMMUNITY
Zeire Zion Society (founded by
Mr. M. Lazar, now of Johannes- During the years preceding
burg), which made valuable con- World War II the close bond
tributlons to the cultural and which had existed between the
social life of the community during Jewish community and its non-
their brief existence. The Zionist Jewish neighbours, particularly
movement, however, received its the Afrikaners, was subjected to
greatest stimulus from/the Ladies' certain stresses and strains. Even
Herzl Zionist Society, established Oudtshoorn could not escape the
in 1910. It is still going strong. impact of events which had
The arrival of a Zionist emis- originated beyond its borders
sary in the town was always a The arrival from outside of Grey
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*quently wrote, was drawn entirely
from my imagination.
I interviewed the British stars,
Bebe Daniels and Ben Lyon
in a railway carriage and covered
the visit to Oudtshoorn of the late
Prince George (Duke of Kent)
whose host was the then Jewish
mayor, Mr. Sol Green, now, again
the town's deputy-mayor.
The Courant, as any newspaper,
reflected the varied activities of
all sections of the community and,
therefore, as was only to be ex-
pected, frequent references were
found in its columns to Jewish
communal life and Zionist endea-
vours. In the early part of Ihls
century I already found recorded
the activities of the now defunct
Oscar Marmorek Zionist Associa-
tion, which laid the fouflations
of a flourishing Zionist movement
in Oudtshoorn.
Later I was to become secretary
of the society.
THE LEADERS
It was an uplifting experience
to serve with some of the leaders
of the society who also contributed
much to the educational and
cultural life of the community,
men like the late Dr. L. H. Lewin,
David Mierowsky, P. Agranat, E.
Sacks, A. Locketz and Jacob
Wilck. Some of them were also
associated with the establishment,
in about 1910, of the Max Nordau
library which, for a number of
years formed a section of the
Oudtshoorn Public Library. A
Zionist, Hebraist and educationist
of the finest calibre, Mr. Mierow-
sky taught at the Oudtshoorn
Hebrew School and later became
the first Director of the S.A.
Board of Jewish Education, in
Johannesburg. He will be remem-
bered for the scholarly and pene-
trating series of "Letters of a
Jewish Father to his Son," which
first appeared in the Zionist
Record before being published in
book form. Before World War I,
Mr. Mierowsky founded a youth
society which later blossomed
forth as a flourishing Zionist
youth society, which I had the
honour to serve as chairman.
Its members are today
scattered throughout the length
and breadth of South Africa and
some of them occupy prominent
positions in the Zionist move-
ment both in this country and
In Israel.
Among them are Simie Wein-
stein and Abraham Tooch; of the
Zionist Federation office in Israel,
Bennie Miller, formerly secretary
of the Western Province Zionist
Youth Council (now in Israel),
Bernard Medintz, who also worked
for some time in the Federation's
Cape Town office and Barney
Borkum, of the Zionist civil ser-
vice, in Johannesburg.
FIRST CHALUTZ


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Mrs. Leah Schneiderman, of
Johannesburg (formerly Mrs.
Weiner, of Selborne, Cape),
founder of the Oudtshoorn
Herzl Ladies' Zionist Society,
the second oldest women's
I Zionist Society in South Africa.
She was its vice-chairman for
10 years.

described as a "Zionist after my
own heart."
Then a land surveyor at Pieters-
burg (he now lives in Heilbron),
he accompanied Dr. and Mrs.
Weizmann on their visit to the
Kruger National Park and was the
"expert Lithuanian guide" re-
ferred to by Dr. Weizmann in his
book "Trial and Error."-
This uncle of mine distinguished
himself at the Oudtshoorn Boys'
High School and, in 1900, obtained
one of the highest marks in the
Cape, of Good Hope matriculation
examination. He was one of a
large number of talented boys who
later made their contributions to
Jewish communal life and the
Zionist movement. Through the
same school also passed Mr.
Michael Comay, now Assistant


turbed the Jewish community-the
visit of Sokolow to the town in
1934 coincided with a meeting
organised by these gentry.
This fact, coupled with the
economic depression, hastened the
drift of Jewish families to the
larger cities in the Union. Hun-
dreds of young men and women
established themselves in careers
in Johannesburg and elsewhere.
It was, therefore, not surprising
that I, too, should have followed
in this stream. I was fortunate
indeed to join the Zionist Record as
assistant editor in March, 1943,
thus enabling me to continue my
long and intimate association with
Zionist and Jewish life.
I had developed a sentimental
attachment to the Zionist Record.
I recall that in my childhood days
in the Cape village of Calitzdorp
(where, incidentally, I played with
a boy, Ian Maltz, now Joharnes
burg's first citizen) the arrival of
the newspaper was looked forward
to by the small and isolated Jewish
community as eagerly as the par-
cels of kosher meat brought by
post cart from Oudtshoorn.
The newspaper was one of the
few links the community had with
the Jewish world and the families
who did not subscribe to it had no
qualms in borrowing it from those
who did.
In later years at Oudtshoorn I,
like so many others, appreciated
the Record for the valuable infor-
mation and background news we-
gleaned from it .for our Zionist
work. In its columns were regu-
larly recorded the activities and
events appertaining to the com-
munity and the monies raised for
the Jewish National Fund.

SPOKE AFRIKAANS
On the editorial staff of the
newspaper, I found a young man
from the Orange Free State where
he had just passed his Matricula-
tion examination with distinction
in Afrikaans. He was Isaac Kriel,
who has since made his mark in
,the educational field in Johannes-
burg. We were Immediately drawn
to each other by our common
background and af happy relation-
ship developed between us. We in-
variably spoke Afrikaans and this
sometimes led to embarrassing and
amusing situations.
Those were stirring and drama-
tic days with the fluctuating for-
tunes of war and the fate of
Jewry in Palestine and Europe
daily in the balance. Apart from
other duties I was also responsible
for recording the activities of
South African Jewish soldiers serv-
ing at home and abroad in the
"On Active Service" page.
Later, when the allied liberation
armies entered Nazi occupied terri-
tories, the greatest thrill for those
of us on the Zionist Record was
the news trickling in daily of the
finding of Jewish survivors and
writing the stories of their con-
tacts with relatives and friends.

VISIT TO ISRAEL
In 1950, when as sports editor
-of the Zionist Record, I covered
the Maccabi Games for the paper,
the first story I despatched from
Israel was that of a moving re-
union between trainer Les Wol-
chuk, of the South African team,
and his two .brothers whom he
had not seen for over 30 years and
whom, he had, in fact, given up
for dead. My visit to Israel 'was"
the realisation of a life-long dream
and I shall never forget it.
The Zionist Record was produced
under much more difficult condi-
tions than it is today and at times
Continued on page 56








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE FIFTY-FIVE


KEEN AND HEALTHY RIVALRY AMONG EARLY ZIONISTS


K EEN but healthy rivalry
existed between the various
Zionist societies in Johannesburg
in the early days, Mr. H. L.
Karnovsky (left),
a pioneer of the
Jewish com-
munity and a
veteran Zionist,
told the 'Zionist
Record. When
the Johannesburg
Ladies' Zionist
Society and the
Johan nesburr g
Zionist Associa-
tion were at their
height in 1904
there was never-
theless room for
the formation of
Sthe J.N.F. Club
and the Herzl Zionist Society. Mr.
Karnovsky, then a young man of
20, had just returned from Cape
Town, where he had served his
apprenticeship as a pharmacist.
The Herzl Zionist Society, with
its stress on social and cultural
activities, made an appeal to him
and he was elected on its first
committee. Others associated with
its society were his late partner,
S. L. Sive; A. M. Abrahams, who
became its first president, L. H.
Cohen, E. H. Eliovson, M. J.
Harris, Max Langerman, David


Interview with Mr.
H. L. KARNOVSKY


Starfield, P. Michaels, H. S. Metz,
and Manfred Nathan. Two foun-
dation members, B. I. Joffe and
N. Rosenfeld, now live in Johan-
nesburg.
The society met in private
homes and public halls, one of
which was on the site of the
present Yeoville Cinema.
In later years Mr. Karnovsky
continued his interest in the
Zionist movement, and for a
number of years was vice-chair-
man of the S.A. Zionist Federa-
tion. He headed various Keren
Hayesod and Keren Kayemeth
campaigns. He is closely asso-
ciated with the South African
companies in Israel and is chair-
man of Peltours, vice-chairman of
Palestine Africa Shippers Ltd.,
chairman of the Binyan and a
director of Africa-Palestine In-
vestments Ltd.
He visited Israel on several
occasions and each time came back
more inspired. Last Passover Mr.
and Mrs. Karnovsky were guests
at a memorable first Seder at the
home of Chief Rabbi Herzog. They
were the only two South Africans


among the gathering, which in-
cluded visitors from all parts of
the world.
Mr. Karnovsky, who was born
in Wilke, Lithuania, also made
his mark in his profession. He
was not yet 21 when he qualified
as a pharmacist in 1905, and his
diploma was the 11th to be issued
by the newly-established Trans-
vaal Pharmacy Board. He joined
the late Abraham Sive and S. L.
Sive and for some time they
traded under the name of Sive
Bros. In 1907 the firm developed
into wholesale chemists and drug-
gists and was registered as Sive
Bros. and Karnovsky Ltd., with
Mr. Karnovsky as life managing
director of the company.
In 1935 the company, with its
associated companies, was con-
verted into a public company
under the title of S.A. Druggists


Ltd., with Mr. Karnovsky as
chairman and managing director.
Mr. Karnovsky retired from active
participation in the company on
January 1, 1958, but still retains
a seat on the board in the capacity
of consultant director. The second
generation is now in the firm in
the person of Mr. S. R. Karnovsky
as managing director.
In 1907 Mr. Karnovsky was
elected a member of the committee
of the Pharmaceutical Society of
the Transvaal, of which he be-
came president in 1922-23. He
was also an executive member of
the Associated Pharmaceutical
Societies of South Africa for some
years, serving as' its president for
two years. In 1949 he was elected
an honorary life member of the
Southern Transvaal branch of the
Pharmaceutical Society of South
Africa. Two years later he was


the recipient of an illuminated
address from the Pharmaceutical
Society of South Africa.
Among others he is a member
of the Rand Pioneers Inc., the
Associated Scientific and Technical
Societies of South Africa and a
member of the American Pharma-
ceutical Association.
Mr. Karnovsky was married in
1917 to Miss Florence Rosenberg,
who frequently rendered service to
the Zionist cause.
They have three sons and one
daughter. The eldest son is Man-
fred L. Karnovsky, professor of
bio-chemistry and blo-physics at
Harvard University, U.S.A.
Another son, Morris J. Karnovsky,
is on a fellowship at the Harvard
Medical School. The daughter is
Mrs. H. B. Gonski, of Cape Town,
a graduate of the Univeristy of
the Witwatersrand.


THE KIMBERLEY STORY


Continued from page 51

It would be of great interest
to learn-if ever such a figure
were available-what astronomical
amounts have passed through the
various congregational societies
for benevolent and patriotic pur-
poses not to mention the loyal and
practical support for Israeli funds,
over the past 50 years, without
taking into reckoning the earlier
spell. It is surely more likely to
run into millions than into thou-
sands!
When the present synagogue
was built at the turn of the cen-
tury, it was regarded as a
handsome addition to Kimberley's
most dignified edifices. And even
today, more than 50 years later,
It is still classified as one of the
most decorative and charming
houses of worship in the Union.
The vestibule bears an air of
stately elegance by reason of its
handsome hand-beaten b r a s s
memorial tablets, with reproduc-
tions of British flags in their
natural colours. The scrolls carry
the names of fallen local Jewish
soldiers who lost their lives mainly
during the siege of Kimberley,
with details of their respective
regiments.

THE ARK
Then there is the stately gran-
deur of the Ark itself, worked out
in Italian marble (said at the time
to have been made by a secret
process), with its superstructure
of miniature gold-gilded domes
illuminated by hidden coloured
lights a veritable fairyland of
colour and beauty.
The new Communal Hall adja-
cent to the House of Worship built
in 1950 serves a most useful pur-
pose in the holding of charitable
and other social functions; and it
is here that the Jewish people of
Kimberley-and non-Jewish orga-


B. r wrh ..

Mr. Cyril B. Harris, writer of
this article, is editor of the
Diamond News and South
African Jeweller, Kimberley.
He joined the editorial staff of
the Diamond Fields Advertiser
in 1909 and retired in 1941)-
during the latter half of which
he served as news editor. He
has done Press Gallery work In
the House of Assembly and next
year will complete 50 years of
Journalism in South Africa.
He founded the first air ninga-
zine in the Union In 1937 on
behalf of the Argus News-
papers, Ltd., and this South
African Alrnews (by, which
name It was known) held the
field for many years. At about
the same time Mr. Harris was
also editor of the Saturday
Evening News, a branch of the
Diamond Fields Advertiser. He
has also represented news in-
terests overseas for many
years. He is the author of the
life story of Sir David Harris,
"Pioneer, Soldier and Politi-
clan," and part author of the
work "Kimberley Siege."


nisations as well for that matter-
assemble in this spacious and well-
lit hall from time to time to cele-
brate and be entertained to lec-
tures, music, song and dance.
Readers will have gathered by
now that the course of Jewish
communal life in Kimberley has
followed a distinct pattern, and
the impact of early-day colorful
characters has certainly left its
mark on Jewish affairs as they
exist in the northern Cape today.
Sketchy though this story is It
will serve to show all who read
it that these, then, were thl
pioneers -- that hardy breed of
Jews whose footprints are still to
be seen on the Sands of Tl'ime.
Though they laboured in an area
which at one time formed ithe
main stream of economic develop-
ment, the effect of their ente.r-
prise and Initiative has been felt
far beyond the boundaries where
men first rushed to get rich.

MADE GOOD

Given the opportunity of wider
education, their children moved
out of the one-time tin-shanty
town Into the world beyond where
the majority made good, each one
In his or her own particular line
or profession. Many remained In
the town and district to build
firmly on the foundations laid by
their parents. And how they have
succeeded is now a matter of nld-
tory.
Though seemingly smaller In
numbers today than the original
community of fortune seekers, they
are by no means lacking in public
spirit or private enterprise. Glad
of the opportunity of settling on
historic and romantic ground and
making a new life for themselves,
they are repaying Kimberley and
South Africa for that opportunity.


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


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Oudtshoorn
(Continued from page 54)
the staff was sorely tried. I
recall with pride our effort in 1947
when the present editor, Mr. C.
Gershater, was away overseas at
the time of the Basle World
Zionist Congress. Due to unex"
pected resignations of several
members of the administrative and
advertising staff an extra burden
was thrown on the small editorial
staff, yet they rose to the occa-
sion magnificently.
I found myself very much at
home in Johannesburg, where a
colony of former Oudtshoornites
had become established. These
plattelanders were easily distin-
guished by their strong Afrikaans
accent, their geniality and warm-
heartedness. There is also a cer-
tain clannishness which hall-marks
the Oudtshoorn Jew. It is, there-
fore, no wonder that a unique re-
union of former Oudtshoorn Jews
was spontaneously organised 11
years ago in the old Coronation
HalL
On the night of August 28, 1947,
four generations of former Oudts-
hoorn Jews, numbering nearly 300
(almost equal to the town's
present Jewish population), came
together. Dr. I. J. Balkin, the
well-known Johannesburg com-
munal worker, who left Oudts-
hoorn more than 50 years ago,
presided. Guests of honour were
the well-known opera star Mabella
Ott-Penetto (Mabel Lewin), born
and reared in Oudtshoorn, Miss
Sallie Kussel, national organiser
of the Union of Jewish Women of
Southern Africa, a founder of the
U.J.W. branch at Oudtshoorn, and
a past chairman of the Herzl
Ladies Zionist Society, and the
late Mr. D. Mierowsky. The versa-
tility of this group of people was
evidenced by the fact that speeches
were delivered in Yiddish, Hebrew,
English and Afrikaans.
Unprecedented and moving
scenes were witnessed at the con-
clusion of the proceeding's when
old friends, some of whom had not
met for 40 years, fraternised until
the early hours of the morning.
Reunion in Israel
The same spirit which animated
the sons and daughters of Oudts-
hoorn at the Coronation Hall
meeting must have been present
among the group of Oudtshoorn
settlers in Israel who attended the
recent reunion celebrations of
former South Africans in the
sylvan surroundings of the Hulda
Forest.
I wonder what nostalgic mem-
ories this event aroused in the
mind of my colleague and friend,
Simle Weinstein, with whom I was
happily associated as convener and
host of the Coronation Hall func-
tion.


My work on the Zionist Record
brought me into close contact with
all facets of Jewish communal life
on the Witwatersrand from
landsmanschaften to national
bodies, from sports clubs to shull"
committees.
One of my most interesting con-
tacts has been with the Hebrew
Order of David. In due course I
became editor of the H.O.D.
Journal and, through that medium,
was able to mark the Golden
Jubilee of the Order, in 1954, by
the publication of a special com-
memorative issue, in collaboration
with Mr. George Solarsh.
In the H.O.D. I discovered that
its motto of "Kol Yisroel Chave-
rim" (all Israel are brethren) was
not an empty phrase. I found that
the spirit of brotherhood which had
originated in the mining camps of
Fordsburg and Ferreiratown, still
permeated the children of those
pioneers.
What particularly attracted me
to the H.O.D. is the fact that in
this body the only thing that
matters is that a man is a Jew. It
makes no difference whether he is
rich or poor, young or old, a
worker with his hands or with
his brains, the fact that he is a
Jew makes him your brother. This
has brought home to me the uni-
versality of the Jew which is per-
haps the secret of the success of
Zionism, the secret which enables
Jews of different colours and vary-
ing backgrounds, Jews of different
climes and different times, to work
together for the achievement of
the one ideal-that of perpetuating
their race in their own State.


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- 11 -


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PAGE n4lPTY-SICYC


The Management of the




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BULAWAYO,

SOUTHERN RHODESIA

extend warm greetings to the Zionist
Record and its readers throughout
Southern Africa on the occasion of
their Golden Jubilee.
- - - - - - -







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21. 1958


PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN


: he writer who was a member
of the staff of the S.A. Zionist !
SFederation (1924-1935) and is |
: today a leading figure in the i
Women's Zionist movement in I
the Cape. _
A -lnU -l.n........ su...........................a


LOOKING l
Stock Exchange Buildings down I think of Joseph Janower,
Commissioner Street; I am back Lazar Braudo, Sam Gordon, with
at my desk in the corner of the whom, as the successive "Minis-
cheerless Board Room in Oceana ters of Finance," I, as the Federa-
Buildings, and then in my sunny tion's Accountant came most into
little office in Progress Buildings. contact. Inseparable from them Is
Memories come to me of my happy Benzion Hersch-but of him later.
association with those old stal- Then there is Jack Alexander. But
warts of the "vision amazing" who who does not remember Jack
left their indelible imprint on Alexander, who for more than a
South African Zionism their quarter of a century ruled supreme
sincerity and devotion, their faith in the offices of the Zionist Federa-
and enthusiasm, their single- tion ?
mindedness and tenacity of pur- With Janower I became more
pose, their "hitlavuth." closely associated when in 1928 he

7-


R ECENTLY I visited the new
Zionist Centre in Johannes -
burg. I was proud and happy to .
see this up-to-date building with
its well-equipped offices, board
rooms, halls and other moderr
amenities and was most impressed
by the wonderful library. This is
"tachlis" the fulfilment of a
much-needed want and a long-
cherished dream.
Involuntarily my mind went \ "
back to the days when I was a
member of the staff of the S.A.
Zionist Federation (1924-1935)
The forthcoming celebration of the
Zionist Record's Golden Jubilee,
too, stirred up memories.
And so, looking back over the
years, I find myself again in the
dreary dusty offices in the old

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The visit to South Africa in
1929 of Reuben Brainin
created a storm. The tense
scene at the Bloemfonteln
'. Zionist conference when
'7 the aged writer sudden-
ly entered the hall
uninvited is described
In this article.


became chairman of the newly-
created Jewish National Fund De-
partment, and I, his first secretary
(part-time only-and woe betide
if on occasion I attended to some
Keren Kayemeth matter during
the time I should have been at-
tending to my other duties. Jack
Alexander's easily-aroused wrath
would oon descend on me). How
vividly that period stands out in
my memory. How we struggled to
put the Keren Kayemeth on the
map.
There were differences of
approach between' Janower and
Alexander. There were open con-
fiets. Nevertheless the work pro-
gressed; the first Dunam Drive
was carried out; the first instal-
ment was raised towards the
175,000 tract In the Sharon Valley
to which S.A. Jewry had pledged
itself. This in spite of Arab riots
in Palestine which broke out to-
wards the end of that year (1929).

Women's devotion
Behind this effort was the
inspiration and driving force of
Janower. The women, too, began
to play their part Largely
through Janower's influence the
women's societies committed them-
selves to devote solely to the Keren
Kayemeth all the moneys they
raised by means of functions. This
later became 'enshrined in the
constitution of the Women's
Zionist Colncil of Southern Africa.
(Fund-raising periods for WIZO
and Youth Aljyah came later into
being.)
Loyaly aiding Mr. Janower was
Katie Gluckman, the first woman
elected to the executive later
joined by Ethel Hayman. Katie,
living in Israel now, Is still re-
membered with warmth and affee-
tion by many friends and admirers
throughout Southern Africa What
a tower of strength she was to
the movement in those days, and
how she and Ethel Hayman had
to fight for their rights.
I remember the endless dis-


By
ACK.. ........

cussions before Keren Hayesod bitter and acrimonious.
campaign banquets (which were A turning point in the struggle
always strictly for men only) of the women to gain recogni-
centring round the important tion and independence came
question whether the two women when Dr. Vera Weiznmann, who,
members of the Executive Coun- together with her husband,
cil, elected in their own right, visited South Africa in 1932. She
were to be invited. Sometimes Continued on page 59.
the discussions lasted until well
past midnight-the fights often
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I WROTE
just been recruited to Zionism
with the ambition to become a
leader in local Zionism; he began
to cultivate a Herzl beard. Realis-
ing the value of Dr. Landau, whom
they had hoped of making a mem-
ber of the family. In the end he
found his wife as well as a rab-
binate chair in Manchester.
These are but indirect associa-
tions with South Africa.
In the course of time I became
permanently connected with the
Zionist Record, especially under
the editorship of Benzion Hersch,
whom, by the way, I got to know
years before he left for South
Africa.
I was also associated with his
somewhat adventurous enter-
prises of publishing a daily Yiddish
journal-I forget its name. I be-
came the regular correspondent
from London throughout its
existence.
When it ceased publication
owing to heavy deficits I had little
or no hope of receiving anything
for my efforts. It was therefore
a most welcome surprise that
when shortly after the outbreak of
World War I I received a cheque
from the Standard Bank for a
considerable sum in those days.
For the Zionist Record I wrote
regularly and in due course weekly.
The leading Zionists in South
Africa of those days must have
been fairly aware of me, for they
honoured me with the election, or
was it a selection, of a delegate to
the Twelfth Congress at Karls-
bad. The second delegate,, if I re-
member correctly, was Mr. Ktretz-
mer-Israeli.
How I voted
Never a party man, I think I
reflected the spirit of South Afri-
can Zionism-when as a delegate
I voted on the merits of each issue
and, found myself voting with the
Mizrachi on some questions, at
other times, more with the Pro-
gressives and on one occasion at
least-with Labour.
In my correspondence I endea-
voured to be objective, though I
frequently had occasion to criti-
cise the methods of the Revision-
ists.
I say the methods because I
had a measure of sympathy with
some of the views of some of the
Revisionists.
But I always had In mind a
saying by Herzl that to be a good
Jew one must frequently protest,
but to be a good Zionist one must
obey. Discipline has its limits in
a living movement, but a total
lack of it leads to anarchy and
disintegration. /
Whether I wrote under my own
name or under the pen name J.
Myrtle (a translation of the
Hebrew name) I invariably wrote
as a Zionist and not as a party
man. I was frequently made aware
by the editor of the Zionist
Record that some members of the
Board took exception to my severe
criticism of the Revisionists.
Jabotinsky, with whom I had
been on the friendliest relations
and with whom I was closely asso-
ciated for the period he was head
of the Keren Hayesod propaganda
department and a member of the
executive, once made a pointed
reference to my critical observa-
tions on the Revisionists in the
Zionist Record.
It Is worth recalling. There was
in the 'thirties an attempt to reach
some understanding with the Revi-
sionist leader. A special executive
meeting was called at which
Jabotinsky was present.' In the


`E AS A -ZIONIST
0 Continued from page 36 five definite groups.
The varied and many forces, the
course of the discussion the Revi- play and interplay of motives, of
sionist leader in .his remarks on intentions and the circumstances
possibilities of closer relations were too complex to present a
referred to constant recrimina- simple, unbiased account.
tions in the Zionist organ of South The outstanding fact was Dr.
Africa by a writer holding an Weizmann's withdrawal from the
_____leadership, a tremendous fact, the


Vladimir Jabotinsky


"He asked me to
write for the
Record"


Samuel Goldreich. pioneer of
S.A. Zionism.

important position with the execu-
tive.
The members of the Zionist
executive said they knew nothing
about it-which, of course, was
quite true; they did not know who
J. Myrtle was, nor probably did
they read him. It was out of
place for me to say anything,
though I enlightened the members
later. In any case nothing re-
sulted from the attempt for a
rapprochement; Jabotinsky was
unyielding. Furthermore his objec-.
tion to my criticisms was not quite
relevant.
I write these lines rather hur-
riedly but I have before me several
of the surveys. The most difficult
Congress to review was the Seven-
teenth in 1931, at Basle, at which
Weizmann was obliged to retire
from his position as president as
a result of a motion of censure be-
cause of an undesirable interview
he gave.
I quote a few of the reflections:
".. why the raging storm, the
fierce struggle? What fundamen-
tal principles were at stake to have
provoked such bitter disputes and
remorseless conflict? Why was
Congress wound up to the highest
pitch?"
I pointed out that it was diffi-
cult to convey the meaning of the
intense irritation, the wrathful
wranglings; the morals, minds and
manners of the hundreds of dele-
gates sharply divided into at least


significance of which was too soon
to appraise. The parting with the
man who shaped the destiny of
Zionism and shouldered the re-
sponsibility of the movement for
16 years was bound to affect the
mind and nerves of everyone in
the Congress.
Only first-class dullards failed to
grasp the meaning of the sever-
ance. There may have been Indi-
vidual pygmies trying to attract
attention by fighting giants. But
no group, including the Revision-
ists, wanted the exit of the'presi-
dent to be accompanied by un-
pleasantness to him. This was
clearly shown by Jabotinsky who
did not, at the conclusion of the
debate, move the vote of no con-
fidence as originally fore-
shadowed.
Rejection
Commenting In the same review
on the rejection by Congress of the
proclamation of the final tachlit of
Zionism, the "Endziel," as it was
called, I- pointed out that every
Jew knows the aim of Zionism
and it was unnecessary to pro-
claim it in a new "Ani Maamin."
When one battles for life, strugg-
ling to overcome obstacles, one
does not speculate on ultimate
aims. The 17th Congress was not
the place to proclaim the "beachrit
Hayamim." Zionism, as the crys-
tallisation of Jewish life, I wrote,
was in-itself a tachlit, releasing
the energies of Jewry and stimu-
lating the national faculties to
move onwards in accordance with
Jewish destiny. An observation,
it strikes me, which is as true
today, when we have a Jewish
State, as it was throughout Jewish
life.
And I may be permitted one
more quotation from my review in
the Zionist Record of the Nine-
teenth Congress in 1935 under the
pen-name "J. Myrtle," the Congress
which brought back Weizmann to
the leadership. Ben Gurion played
an important part in reconciling
the divergent elements.
And I wrote then: "Ben Gurion
who has grown in strength and
influence by virtue of his sterling
'character, high-mindedness and
ethical qualities, was engaged day
and night with the various groups.
His address at Congress full of
contempt and pregnant with con-
centrated thought, evoked irresist-
ible tributes. But his greatest
triumph was his successful nego-
tiations with the various groups.
Inextricably bound up with the
labour party he revealed a non-
sectarian Zionist spirit as few
others in the movement." This was
my assessment of the man 28 years
ago who is Prime Minister of
Israel today.
I continued to act for the Zionist
Record throughout the Second
World War; wrote a survey of
events every week on a letter card
in accordance with war regulations
by the censor. I continued my as-
sociation with your journal till
shortly before my departure to
Israel and so I feel a real mechu-
tan in its golden jubilee. May the
paper continue and prosper,
morally and materially. Grow In
influence on behalf of Israel and
in the advancement of Zionism in
the widest sense of the term.


PAGE'FIF'rY-EIGEET








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958

LOOKING BACK (Continued from page 57)


Excitement, tension


and arguments d


urged that the women Zionists
of South Africa should form
themselves into an independent
WIZO Federation. There was
very strong opposition from the
men, who feared that by form-
ing a separate women's organi-
sation, the existing mixed societies
of both men and ,women would
become weakened and the whole
structure of S.A. Zionism under-
mined,

New chapter
The women led by Katie and
Ethel and leaders of the Johan-
nesburg Women's Zionist League
put up a magnificent fight. Finally
after an all-mnight stormy session,
dramatically the Women's Zionils
Council of Southern Africa came
into being, not as a separate WIZO
Federation, but as an integral part
of the Federation, autonomous
except in matters of major policy,
and affiliated to WIZO. A new
chapter in South African Zionimst
history had begun.
Memory brings me back to the
daily life at the office-to the
"dry drudgery of the desk's dead
wood-prisoned from the sun eight
hours a day." (Did I say eightht?
How often it was nine to ten with
a few evening meetings lasting un


I LAZAR BRAUDO a minister I
of finance. I

til midnight thrown in for good
measure!) "Drudgery" to be sure,
yet ne-; r really "dry." There was
meaningand purpose in the work
one was doing! And there were
always diversions.
The ,ta-ra-ram of -a campaign,
the excitements of the visits of
overseas delegates, biennial con-
ferences, crisis in Palestine -
never a dull moment really. Be-
sides the office was never dull in
Jack Alexander's time. There was
usually an atmosphere of excite-
ment over something or other-
tempestuous arguments over the
telephone, a violent disagreement
with at member of the Executive,
or with a "nudnik" of a caller.
(He did not suffer fools gladly.)

A fortnightly
Then there is Thursday morn-
ing. But here I must digress.
Round about the time I came to
the Federation in 1924, the Zionist
Record, which until then had been
run as a monthly journal, was con-
verted into a fortnightly. (Did I
say "monthly?" I remember that
friend Judelowitz, the wit, who
spoke of Alexander as "the man
who nearly broke the Zionist
Record," complaining at a confer-
ence that the Record came out on
the 35th [or was it 45th ? ] of every
month.) The Record then became
a separate department and David
Dainow was appointed full-time
editor and business manager.
Hitherto Jack Alexander had com-
bined his duties as secretary of the
Federation with that of editor of
the Ziomst Record.
Alexander, however, continued
to write the editorials for many
years. It was generally his custom
to devote Thursday morning to
this task. How well I remember


those mornings. There was a sort
of hushed atmosphere in the office.
"Whisper who dares" Jack
Alexander is writing HIS EDIT-
ORIALS! It was my duty or self
imposed task to intercept callers
that morning, and every now and
then David Dainow would come
hovering around in anxious expec-
tancy. The paper was ready to go
to press, but for the editorial. On
the rare occasions when he had.
the temerity to push his head
through Alexander's office door,


SSAM GORDON treasurer and
man -of few words. |

he had It literally "chewed off"
and beat a hasty retreat.
I was always reminded on those
occasions of the Yiddish story by
Mordecai Spektor. The author
relates how one Friday morning
he decides to call on his book-
binder for a book he wanted to
read on the Shabbat. The book was
not quite ready, would he please
wait a little while. As he sits wait-
ing he notices the bookbinder
every now and then casting
anxious glances in a certain corner
of the room; agitatedly he would
come over to him and very
apologetically ask him to wait
just a little longer. Very intrigued
the author waits, Eventually he
hears a cackle and a few minutes
later the bookbinder, all smiles
now, triumphantly hands him the
book, beautifully bound and neatly
finished with gold lettering on the
cover. It transpires that the book-
binder needed the white of an egg
(to buy which, he did not have
the necessary kopeck) in order to
stick fast the gold lettering, and
the hen was unwilling or unable
to oblige.
Perhaps the analogy of this
story could be carried a little
further. The editorial written in
Jack Alexander's classic style
was indeed the "gold lettering"
which gave the Record its stamp
and seal.
Fanatical devotee
Presiding over 'the destiny of'
the paper, guiding and guarding
its interests during that period,
was its almost fanatical devotee,
Benzion Hersch. He gave to it all
his bouyant and ebullient
enthusiasm, his alert mind and
whole-hearted devotion. What
Janower was to the Jewish
National Fund, Hersch was to the
Zionist Record-its inspiration and
moving spirit. His devotion to the
Record, as an expression of his
intense Zionism, was only equalled
by his friendship and devotion to
Janower and Gitlin." Invariably in
any question, Hersch would con-
sider its possible effect on the
Record or its reaction on Gitlin.
"What will Cape Town think?"
("Cape Town" being synonymous
with "Gitlin") or "What will


JOSEPH JANOWER Federa-
tion treasurer and J.N.F. head |
"inspiration and driving force."

be the policy of the Record" was
his invariable test of any problem.
I call to mind one difficult
problem which arose in 1929-the
visit of Reuben Brainin in the
interests of the Russian Colonisa-
tion Fund. It is impossible to go
into all the issues involved. Suffice
to explain that the Federation on
principle and for very good reason
was opposed to his mission.
Reuben Brain's name and stand-
ing in Zionism, however, placed
them in an exceedingly awkward
predicament. After a great deal
of heart searching, it was decided
to take up an attitude of com-
plete neutrality. His visit was to
be ignored-no official welcome,
no publicity. All that appeared in
the Zionist Record was a bare
announcement of his arrival.
Imagine the consternation when
at the Zionist Conference in
Bloemfontein held shortly after-
wards (May, 1929), Reuben
Brainin, uninvited, suddenly
walked in. His request to address
Conference (which came to the
executive the previous evening,
and which they had spent half
the night considering) had been
put to the delegates and turned
down half an hour earlier. It was
one of the tensest moments I can
remember. For a moment there
was a breathless silence. What
now? Will he be invited to the
platform? Reuben Brainin takes
his seat at the back of the hall.
President A. M. Abrahams, in his
school-masterly manner, calmly
proceeds with the Conference
agenda. What a stir this incident
caused, and what repercussions
later!
Dramatic moment
Another dramatic moment
comes to my mind. It was the
beginning of Hitlerism in 1933,
and on the South African scene
the rise of the anti-Semitic Grey-
Shirt Movement. Maurice Samuel,
the well-known author and
lecturer was visiting South Africa
on an educational tour. He was to
address a meeting in one of the
large halls in Johannesburg on a
.Sunday evening following Yom
Kippur
On Friday morning, Erev Yom
Kippur, Mr. B. Gordon, the Federa-
tion's hon. vice-president, received
a personal call in his office from
the Chief of Police intimating that
trouble might be expected and
advising the Federation in its own
interests to cancel the meeting.
Mr. Bernard Gordon came to my
office looking very mysterious and
alarmed. Jack Alexander was
away in Pretoria that day on some
Zionist business. I hastily con-
sulted with the chairman and one
or two other members of the
executive. An emergency meeting
was summoned for 2 o'clock that
afternoon. Every member of the
Council was present. A decision
was soon come to. The meeting on
Sunday night was not to be can-
celled, but the venue changed to
the H.O.D. Hall Certain pre-
cautionary measures were decided
upon. Admission was to be by
booking only and a small admis-
sion fee charged. Needless to add
Continued on page 61.


PAGE FIFTY-NINE


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


Continued.from page 39


paper went to press. The printer
substituted "MacTavish" for the
anonymous gap; it was a little
joke and he obviously expected the
proof-reader to make the neces-
sary correction.

AWFUL FUSS
The proof-reader was me, and
in the perpetual love-lon dreami-
ness of 17, I let the "MacTavish"
pass. Unfortunately for Sadie and
me the woman who had' been the
thanks-proposer made an awful
fuss. She confronted the editor
and suggested a diabolical plot on
the part of one of her rivals on
the committee to discredit and
ridicule her. It was impossible
to explain that the error was the
result of a chapter of accidents
based on his reporter's emotional
problems, his printer's bedevil-
ment and his proof-reader's sleepy
unvigilance.
I am sure that Sadie still
flushes when she thinks of the
incident. I might mention that
she is now reunited with her hus-
band in London, and is a feature
writer for the London Jewish
Chronicle.
One of my first associates on
the Record was a Mr. S. A. Roch-
lin, familiarly known as "Rocchi."
A remarkable historian, he has
covered South Africa from end to
end, and from the first settler to
the last statesman. The initials of
his first names, S. A., are a happy
accident indeed. "Rocchl" is South
Africa's Rochlin In the fullest
sense.
A whimsical character with a


divine touch of eccentricity In his
soul, he was one of the most in-
teresting people in my association
with the Record. I met Rocchi dur-
ing my first week of work. He was
bringing the research department
of the paper up to date and clip-
ping newspapers with demoniac*
fury. I was sent to him with a pair
of extra scissors, and when I
handed it to him, he looked at me
with a profound frown. "What do
you want to work on a paper like
this for?" he asked. "You must be
mad in the head, madder than
me."
To tell the truth, I wish I was
as mad as Rochlin and I wish I
knew what he knows. He still con-
tributes a weekly article to the
Zionist Record. It is based usually
on some little-known facet of
history, like an anecdote on Vasco
Da Gama's pyjamas, or a story
about the Jewish associations of
Jan van Riebeek's barber in Cape
Town, or revelations about a
Hebrew linguist in Piet Retief's
laager. Whimsical Information,
perhaps, but anyone who thinks
so, has missed some of the point
of history, and all of the point of
Rocchi.

REPORTERDOM TO
SCOOPS
As my journalistic ability
developed, and I did more actual
writing for the paper, I began to
realise that the Zionist Record was
much more of a newspaper than a
magazine or journal. I mention
this because I feel that the appren-


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THE ZIONIST RECORD ON

ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE


ticeship I served on the Zionist
Record was a training in genuine
newspaper journalism. In later
years when I free-lanced for a
variety of newspapers, including
the daily and Sunday press, I
found that the journalistic back-
ground I had acquired at the
Record was invaluable.
The most thrilling "story" I
ever covered for the, Record was a
meeting at which the late Jan
Smuts was the main speaker. I
think the occasion was an im-
portant anniversary of the estab-
lishment of the Jewish community
in Johannesburg. I found that
Smuts did not speak beautifully,
not even very well, but there was
about the man a dynamic magne-
tism and an impressiveness that
was wholly compelling. No poli-
tician-and I did in my time inter-
view and report hundreds of them
-ever made so deep an impression.
Smuts radiated greatness; to be in
his presence was to experience an
actual moment in history.

A "SCOOP"

My greatest scoop on the Record
was an interview with the elusive
Noel Coward. He had come to
Johannesburg to raise war funds,
but for some inexplicable reason
had decided to make himself in-
accessible to journalists wanting a
story from him. He had appeared
at a general Press conference, but
'beyond that had refused point-
blank to give private, interviews.
Previous to his coming to South
Africa, he had spent some time in
Israel (or Palestine as it was then
called) and the editor was highly
keen on his impressions of that
troubled and deeply dramatic little
land.
A colleague, Miss Naomi Cohen
(now Mrs. Sherr) .and I, were
assigned to the task of getting an
interview. Being cub-reporters,
both of us, we were madly elated
at the prospect of a front-page
story.
We waited for the famous
Englishman outside his door at
the Carlton Hotel. Various waiters,
stewards, maids and uniformed
hotel dignitaries tried to shoo us
Saway, and at one stage even
threatened to call the manager. We
fought them off, and waited, know-
ing that what goes out must come
in again. We stood outside that
door for about seven hours and
then the big man himself suddenly
appeared.
I think we had fallen asleep
against the window ledge and were
so overcome by his sudden
presence that we gazed at him in
mute stupefaction, our pencils
hanging limply in our hands. He
smiled at us in a kindly, patronis-
ing way and moved towards his
door. As we saw our front-page
dream disintegrating before our
eyes, we both sprung to furious
life and fired a volley of questions
to him about his experiences in
Palestine. He burst into sophisti-
cated laughter, and made us relax,
and answered all our questions. He
did not invite us into his suite, it
is true, but he gave us five minutes
of his time, and the first scoop of
our career.
Naomi and I were the only two
local journalists who had managed
a private interview with Noel
Coward, and while the lay public
may wonder why that represents
such a great metziah, fellow-
pressmen admired, praised and
envied us, and for a while we were
paradisial creatures in a journalis-
tic Eden. We were real reporters
at last. When, however, we partly
bungled our next joint assignment,
we were banished from the Garden
like our first parents of old, and
thrust back to the wilderness and
anonymity of cub-reporterdom.
PRINTERS


There are newspapermed and
there, are printers, and the twain
have to meet whether they like it
or not. Usually they do not. The
Zionist Record during those days
was printed at a place called the
Magazine Press and the printer-
demogogue was a fellow called
Jack Dixon. He knew all about
print, linotoype and layout, and he
also knew the winners at Benoni.
It is a tradition with printers
to treat their journalists roughly.


The printer who does not gall life
for the sub-editor is not worth his
ink. And Jack .Dixon was worth
his ink right to the depth of his
blue-black soul. He made me cut
articles that simply could not be
cut; he made me leave out stories
that were the best of the week;
he mademade me revise the layout of a
complete page because my
measurements were. a millimetre
out. Despite this tyranny, he was
a good sort and a good printer.
And once one mastered the art
of handling him delicately a
diamond-cutter's sort of. delicacy
-one usually got one's own way.,
We were often at loggerheads
over layout. I used to love an
ornate and elaborate composition


NUEL UCOWARlU
of a page, and Dixon would
muster all the unprintable state-
ments in a colourful vocabulary
to tell me what he thought of my
layout. More often than not, how-
ever, he followed it, em for em.

HORSES

Apart from pandering to my
layout, he also kept me in pocket-
money. His tips on the horse
races were remarkably reliable.
Sometimes his voice, clearly
audible over the intercom in our
office. p ro ved embarrassing:
"Where the devil," he-would roar
at me, "is that article on Jews in
the Diaspora, and if you want to
eat back 'British Lion for the
3.30 this afternoon . ." On such
occasions the editor, if he hap-
pened to be by, looked mystified.
He could not for the life of him
fathom the link between the
Diaspora, the British Lion and my
dietary needs.
On one occasion he was short
of a "filler" to make up the page.
He took the initiative and inserted
his own journalistic contribution.
It read: "This week's Zionist
Record selection for the July
Handicap . Fortunately his
item, which might have given him
a place in history as the first and
only racing editor of the Record,
was spotted by the proof-reader.
In my view the Zionist move-
ment during the period I write of
was a more vital and pulsating
one than it is now. It was a move-
ment that was constantly fighting,
struggling, battling, failing and
achieving. It had not -yet tasted
the first fruits of success and be-
come a little smug with victory.
Strange how the staging of the
revolution is always more exciting
than the establishment of the re-
public, even though the revolution
has as its primary purpose 'that
very republic.
During the crucial 1940's, the
Zionist movement encompassed the
whole Jewish community of this
country. The struggle in Palestine
and the war against Nazism en-


Proofs, scoops and printers


dowed Zionism with a realism ane
an urgency that it had never ha(
before and has not had since. Th(
Jewish non-Zionist was a freakish
exception.
Many mass meetings were held
and great crowds attended eact
one of them.., The Zionist leaders
of the day' were r. fortress ol
intellect and idealism, and their
words resounded throughout the
land.
The Zionist. Youth Movement
was at its height. During lunch
hours, the ,gerr office of the
Zionist Record waL often crowded.
with Zionitt youths=-boys Of 16
and 17-who -were debating,
quarrelling' intellectualising. -
and goftgi on Hachsharah. Their
c.-unterpartU today tend toward
long hair and rock 'n roll tunes,
and their badge 4! an Elvis Presley
medallion.

WAR PERIOD
Perhaps I tend, as we all do, to
glorify the' days that are no more,
but I feel that I was fortunate In
having -worked on a Zionist news-
paper during the. most exciting and
wonderful period of the movement.
The period 1942-1945 was the
climatic period of the war against
Hitler. Naturally the tragedy of
those years found reflection in a
journal which served a people who
were more concerned with it than-
any other group. Monty Mann ran'
a column called "On Active Ser-
vice," which gave a graphic week-
by-week report of the life and
death of Jewish boys up North.
Apart from covering the South
African war effort,, the Record
gave an extensive picture of the
fate of Jews throughout the .whole-
war-afflicted world. We received
many articles on suffering and
atrocities, of brutal debasement
and diabolic deed.
The Russians sent us copious
cables, all free of charge. Their
most prolific correspondent was
Ilya Ehrenburg who wrote some
of the most brilliant-accounts of
the war.
I remember opening the pack-
age which contained the first pic-
tures from the Buchenwald and
Belsen camps. We received about
100 photographs and we printed
four. Those'four made our readers
sick-the other 96 are grooved in
the consciousness of those who
saw them, for ever.

LOOKING BACK
When I was first asked to write
this article, I took a walk to the
archives Qf the Zionist Centre, and
paged through the volumes of the
"Record" published during the
period I worked there. It was a
peculiar sensation-a little like a
reincarnation into an earlier
youth which had been dimmed into
remoteness by the passing years.
I saw on the front pages the
names of people that mean very
little to the generation of the
1950's-references to Jan Smuts
and Chaim Weizmann and Lloyd
George, to Brigadier F. A. Kisch,
who was Chief Engineer of the
Eighth Army, to the White Paper
on Palestine, to the refugee pro-
blem and the sinking of ships with
children aboard, to Streicher con-
demning .another million to the
gas chamber, to Jew-baiting in the
South African Parliament, to
someone called Eric Louw letting
off steam about Jewish Commu-
nism, to Henrietta Szold, to
Yehuda Kaufmann and Menahem
Usisshkin, to a Jew boy from
Doornfontein who had won the
M.C., to a Labour man called
Bevin who spoke about Jews
jumping their place in the queue,
as if fighting for the homeland was
like buying groceries, to Nikolai
Kirschner of Benoni, to -Rabbi
Rabinowitz throwing medals, to a
crisis in the Chevra Kadisha and
the first plants blossoming in the
Negev, to cabbage production in
Bethal and the Kings of Jordan,
to youngish men of promise who
have since become leaders in grey'
serene balebatishkeit, to Reform
Jewry versus Orthodox Jewry, to
a man called Weiler and another
called .Kossowsky, to Muftis and
Pashas and princes and greyshirts,
to a whole world of thinking and
experience.
I worked on the Zionist Record
for a short period really, about
four years, and I have done many
things since, but I will always re-
member it, because it was my first
job and because it was the best
part of my youth.


I 'I


PAGE SIXTY







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


PAGE SIXTY-ONKS


I did not reach home that evening Continued from page 59
until well after Kol Nidre time.
Booking was thrown open on rushed from place to place to hear
Sunday morning. Within a few them speak. A memorable experi-
hours the hall was booked out. In ence indeed was the graduation
the crowded hall that evening ceremony when Dr. Weizmann had
Sarah Gertrude Millin, opening the the Honorary Degree of Doctor of
proceedings said "Ladies ..and Laws conferred on him by the
Gentlemen, we were told that if University of the Witwatersrand.
this meeting takes place, the hall How proud and elated one felt-
will go up in smoke. We are not an elevation of one's own dignity
intimidated . ." The meeting and prestige as it were! And the
went off without incident, but I brilliant banquets and receptions;
still remember how tense the at- the mass meetings, the social
mosphere was. gatherings and the "faribles" that
inevitably followed!
Happier moments So many recollections crowd
one's. memory of the prominent
But let me recall some happier personalities who came to our
moments. There is Nahum Soko- shores and whom one had the
low's visit in 1926, and the visit privilege of meeting and getting
of Dr. Weizmann in 1932. Can one to know. One remembers their
ever recapture the thrill of meet- idiosyncrasies and foibles, their
Ing the greatest Zionist leaders of vanities and pettiness, as well as
our time? How we hung on to their greatness. One recalls with
.every' word they uttered, and warm regard that dreamer and


E.


I BRIGADIER F. H. KISCH-
staunch Jew and perfect
Englishman.


philosopher Dr. Immanuel Olsvan-
ger, who, in Israel now, recently
reached the psalmist's span. He
would pace up and down the plat-
form as he spoke, holding his audi-
ence spellbound with his silver-
tongued Yiddish oratory. Or the
popular and dynamic campaign
organiser Dr. Alexander Goldstein
(alas no more with us), who set
the pattern for all subsequent
Keren Hayesod campaigns in
South Africa. He spoke of "elter
zeides, and bobes and tachrichim,"
and never failed to touch the
heart-strings and pockets of his
audiences; the scholarly Rabbi
Zlotnik, some of whose pithy say-
ings we still remember; or that
staunch Jew and perfect English
gentleman (alas so tragically
killed in North Africa during
World War II) Lt.-Col. F. H.
Kisch, at that time newly-
appointed head of the Jewlsli
Agency, and his charming newly-
wed wife, Ruth, who accompanied
him on this his first visit in 1929;
the late Leib Jaffe, who came with
Nahum Sokolow on the latter's
second visit in 1934 and dreamily
spoke "of the greene fielder and
the greene beimer." And the two
chalutz delegates for the Keren
Kayemeth Joseph Baratz and
Abraham Harzfeld, who with their
tireless energy and deep attach-
ment to the soil brought to us
the spirit of the Yishuv. How on
the least provocation they would
break into song and dance, often
continuing to the wee small hours
of the night!
So many more memories spring
to mind of people and events, in-
cidents and episodes during my
11 years at Zionist headquarters
in South Africa, but how to re-
cord them all?
Travelled far
Yes, we have undoubtedly pro-
gressed since those days. We have
travelled- far since the "cow by
cow and dunam by dunam" stage
of development In Zionist history.
So much has happened in the past
20-30 years. The Jewish State
has been in existence for over a
decade, and South African Zion-
ism has grown and developed to
meet the challenge of the chang-
ing and changed circumstances.
The dreams have become reali-
ties, yet there is a strange han-
kering for "something that is
gone"-the spirit of those days,
.the youthful enthusiasm, the fer-
vour and Intensity of our striving!
And echoing in one's brain come
the lines of the Yiddish song:
"Ip traum is mir heller, in traum
is mir besser,
In cholem der himmel noch
blauer wie blau"!


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958


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Continued from page 43.
At that time we had in our
editorial department two women-
Miriam Liknaitzky who possessed
a sharp and accurate mind and an
expert knowledge of the English
language; the other was Marcia
Gitlin, a serious and earnest jour-
nalistic writer. The two women
were somewhat "temperamental,"
but were filled with a deep loyalty
for the welfare and reputation of
the journal.
Young Edgar Bernstein was our,
sub-editor and busily developing
Into the mature writer he is to-
day. He was deeply absorbed, 1
remember, in Sarah Gertrude
Million. Today he is a penetrating
and critical admirer of this lead-
ing South African literary per-
sonality.
In 1937 David Dainow was pre-
paring to go on his first trip to
Palestine as the leader of the first
large Zionist tourist group. Edgar
Bernstein was made temporary
acting editor and I was promoted
to the position of junior sub-
editor.
Red pencil
Although I felt at the time that
Bernstein's red pencil was too fre-
quently employed on my contribu-
tions, I am indebted to him. for
the lessons he unconsciously gave
me In the basic art of writing.
Occasionally I was allowed to
review a book and today I retain
In my library a number of
volumes presented to me as a re-
ward for my reviews. Neatly stuck
in many of the covers of these
books are printed reviews which
I wrote with a certain amount of
joy and sweat. They were written
in the heat of youthful enthusiasm,
and when I peruse them I am
thrilled at the memory of my.
literary chutzpah.
I rather appreciated the oppor-
tunity afforded me to attend vari-
ous communal functions, for I had
also become a reporter. I would
meet the leading personalities in


.e la. I do not quite remember why
I was forgiven for my "crime."
Perhaps I was useful in other
directions.
Yes, they were great days. I
Sswould not have missed them for
anything. The Zionist Record was
a modest journal but had played
a vital role in the growing life
of the community and recorded
weekly its progress in many
directions.
The editor and his team were
devoted, to the task of encourag-"
ing Jewish activity in South
Africa. The main task was to
arouse enthusiasm for the national
ideal so that the Jewish State
could be built in our day.
At that time there was little
The late Mr. I. E. Judes "a immediate communication be-
fascinating personality and al tween South Africa and other
militant Zionist" with whom the :
Writer was associated in his i Jewish centres throughout the
earlier days. I world. The present remarkable
......u... .--- -.----- international chain of cable news
services had not yet developed.
the growing South African Jewish For all that, the journal did
scene and also the Interesting manage to get all the latest Jew-
famous folk who came here from ish news into the homes of co-
overseas.religionists in this country.
I still have a guilty conscience
when I think of a journalistic Make-up
"crime" I committed in those e p
days. There was a Jewish Par- The printing of the journal too,
liamentarian, prominent in the at an old printing works, pre-
public eye, who had a habit in his sented enormous difficulties to the
speeches of often saying, "We staff. I remember how we all had
must resist the law of the jungle." to remain late at work on the
I heard him repeat it on several night previous to publication. We
occasions, had to paste pieces of cut galley-


The "jungle"
One day I was asked to report
a meeting which -he was due to
address, but I could not face hear-
ing again the hackneyed expres-
sion of "resisting the jungle." So
I quietly stole into a bioscope and
enjoyed the picture. In my sub-
sequent report of the function I
naturally indicated that the
"jungle" expression had been used.
Imagine my consternation when
I heard that the parliamentarian
had been taken ill that evening
and that another speaker depu-
tised for him.


proofs on to what were called
"make-up pages." We then had
to wait until the pages had been
printed on certain forms and pass
them. It took hour upon hour be-
fore an issue was satisfactorily
printed.
All this great trouble and stress
is largely and happily avoided
today with the advanced develop-
ments in modern printing. The
work, however, which was done in
the Zionist Record of 23 years
ago was indeed a labour of love.
The camaraderie which existed
among the staff will always remain
with me, and I am sure with the
others, an ever cherished memory.


I WAS THE OFFICE BOY


Congratulations

to the


ZIONIST RECORD

on the occasion of their


Golden Jubilee


FROM





a reatermans


Lil -


PAGE SIXTY-TWO







,Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 21, 1958



I MET THE SURVIVORS


JEWS SHALL SUFFER INDES-
CRIBABLE AGONIES, BUT IN
THE END WE CZECHS SHALL
START A LONG NIGHT IN OUR
HISTORY AND YOU JEWS
SHALL START A LONG DAY IN
YOURS; FOR OUR HISTORY IS
LIKE THE ARCTIC WINTER:
VERY LONG NIGHTS AND
VERY SHORT DAYS, WHILE
YOUR HISTORY IS EQUA-
TORIAL: LONG NIGHTS FOL-
LOWED BY LONG DAYS."
A Jewish friend of mine in
Prague could not make up his
mind whether to go to Palestine
or not. This was before the Nazis
entered Czechoslovakia, and there
was still time to go. My friend
was consulting me every day, not
because my advice mattered to
him, but because he wanted me to
say that the calamity was not yet
upon ,us, but I could not oblige
him.
ni
Last aircraft
One day, at the Cafe Ascher-
,:mann, I said to him: "It is about
time you made up your mind, be-
cause it may soon be too late." To
which he replied: "Well, you do
not seem to be in a hurry your-
self." I told him what I told him,
among other things that if there
be one seat on the last aircraft out
of Prague it would be given me,
not him not because I am a
better man or a more deserving
case, but because I am the holder
of an international Press pass. As
usual, he did not take my advice.
Seven years later I met him in
Belsen .
No, I did not say to him, "I told
you so." There are times when
one must not be too clever. I am
relating the story now for quite
different reasons .. .
How does one react to finding
several close friends in Dachau?
There was a man who worked
with me on the same newspaper;
there was a pal from the Maccabi
days; there was my former doctor
and friend. . Incredible as it
may seem, they made it easier for
me. My friend from the paper
reminded me about a funny story
I: had once written. My Maccabi
pal just said, "Chazak,". and my
doctor shook hands solemnly and
asked how I was .
Fortunately, they all recovered,
but many others did not. It was so
painful to see them gone too far,
now. that the day of liberation had
arrived after all those long and
bitter years. Those of the survivors
who could walk and think sat
down. with me. on the grass-the
grass of Dachau!I-and prepared a
list for Aliyah. It was the only
thing to do . I brought the list
to London and gave it to Ben
Gurion In person. His remarks,
after letting me speak for a long
time, were, in fact, the rough
Notes for his famous oration about
,,bringing the survivors home and
rehabilitating them. There were sc
few certificates for Palestine avail-
able. B.G. ordered to send 25 tc
Dachau, as a token and a slgn
that they were not forgotten. He
.left it to them to decide as to
who should go.
All those who wanted to go tc
Israel did go eventually, but ]
still meet people in Israel who tell
me: "You remember those 25 cer-
tificates-I had one of them .'
Belsen was not,, of course, the
only concentration camp, nor ever
the biggest. Some of the .camps
were more horrible than Belsen Ir
their organised and calculated
scientific inhumanity. But Belser
was the first concentration cami
to be liberated, and thus became
the symbol of the vileness of the
Nazis and man's inhumanity t(
man. It became a prototype, as It
were, of the Nazi system of exter-
Inination.
No, I am not capable of going
into details. I would not be
ashamed to copy a couple of verses
out of Dante, but they would nol
convey the whole story, so wh3
indulge in plagiarism in vain?
An American reporter gave us
a description of Hiroshima-an(
we have some idea. Nothing llki
It was achieved by any of ul
about Belsen. No one received
the Pulitzer Prize for a story o:
a concentration camp . Afte
the Belsen trial, one of the wit
nesses said to me: "The judge
did justice manifestly, but I doub


Continued from page 19

whether they really grasped what
we told them . ."
The barrier between those who
actually went through that hell
and those who only had second-
hand experience of it-must re-
main!- It can never be removed.


I Ernest Bevin-"I always fixed
If up with the Jews of White-
chapel." I

In this respect humanity is divided
into two parts.
It must be said here that not
only Jews are on the other side
of that barrier. The fact that
Dr. Adenauer, the West German
Chancellor, also saw a concentra-
tion camp from the inside, has
doubtlessly a bearing upon his
personality and attitude. The
same would apply to other leaders
and several countries.
By one of those strange coin-
cidences which abound in Jewish
history the Belsen trial was opened
at Luneburg on Yom Kippur, which
added poignancy to the event. In
terms of the calendar, it was Sep-
tember 17, 1945.
Does a Jewish 'war correspon-
dent ride to the opening of this
historical trial on Yom Kippur, or
does he. go to pray with the Jewish
soldiers instead? There was no
question of walking; it was many


9 1 I


miles from the Press camp. I left
it to a Jewish army chaplain to
decide for me.
He pondered over It for a whole
night and told me early on Yom
Kippur morning: "Go to the trial."
I did not ask him .why, but he
volunteered. "Look- here, it is
Pikuach Nefesh and more than
that. Not so much that we shall
not have your story; this we could
survive; but it will do good the
witnesses and other Jewish sur-
vivors in court, to see a Jewish
war correspondent at the opening
of the trial. Go and stay there
until after Maariv."
. I did so.
T-was baclkeln London for a few
days when Bevin's notorious press
conference took place at the
Ministry of Information. It was
a fair and straightforward ques-
tion of mine about the D.P.s which
provoked that remark: "Every-
body will be looked after but the
Jews must not push themselves
at the head of the queue."
This had nothing to do with'
Palestine policy. It was Septem-
ber, 1945, long before the
Palestine problem became acute..
This one was just a crude and
undiluted piece of anti-Semitism
erupting from the subconscious
mind of an anti-Semite. We did
not know until then that the
famous trade union leader was an
anti-Semite.
Then came the Palestine policy
which climaxed In the return of
the Exodus to Germany. All along
there was an anti-Semitic under-
tone accompanying Bevin's policy.
That remark about New York
Jews Interfering; that reply: "I
always fixed it up with the Jews
in Whitechapel," and many more
choice sayings.
I was always present when Bevin
uttered his notorious sayings. I
even heard him say at a Labour
conference, that the standard of
living of British workers would go
down if the British left Palestine.
To me, as I watched history in
the making in our generation, the
last quarter of a century of Jewish
history is like a symphony, open-
ing in gloom and foreboding, sink-
ing in the next movement to
depths of despair, and then rising
in the last movement to a trium-
phant finale THE STATE OF
ISRAEL.


PAGE SIXTY-THREE


- 413.


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-Supplement to THE ZIONIST'RECORD, FREDAY) NOVFZvIBER,' 21, 1959


PAGE SIXTY-FOUR







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE SIXTY-FIVE


WORK


0 Continued from page 31.
Epstein, Sylvia Smaller, and at
present, Jane Comaroff. One
wishes it were possible to mention
the numerous members who did
the spade-work with them.
The Bnoth Zion today has 3,500
members divided among its 37
branches.
In Johannesburg in 1908 the
"Ladies' Zionist Society," founded
four years earlier, was having an
uphill struggle to maintain its
existence. About that time Regina
Lourie was its chairman, and
Katie Cohen (Gluckmann) its
secretary.
A.reorganised society came into
being in 1914 under the chairman-.
ship of Annie Landau, who re-
tained that position for 18 years.
(The constitution was later
changed to limit a chairman's
tenure of office to three years at
a time.)
The progress made by the
Johannesburg Women's Zionist
League in these 44 years is almost
an epic of enthusiastic and con-


p,










<




*" i l






CONGRATULATE THE

ZIONIST RECORD ON ITS

50th ANNIVERSARY AND

WISH IT CONTINUED 4

SUCCESS IN THE FUTURE .





BMU /^


i Inez Gordon, present chairman
of the Women's Zionist Council.
-. . . . .


tinually expanding work for the
Zionist cause and is an example
of the work done on a smaller
scale by most of the societies in
Southern Afrca.
In its first few years the League
helped in all the small-scale
collections, and its "literary"
afternoons gained in popularity;
but the four years of war and
the influenza epidemics halted
activities.
GREATER EFFORTS
i The decision of the Peace Con-
erence to grant the Mandate for
Palestine to Britain was an en-
couragement to greater efforts. A
Restoration Ball was held; and in
the decade that followed the
League set its foot firmly on the
active path it was to tread. Func-
tions with the now delightfully
old-fashioned sound of Musicalo,
Conversazione, and Cinderella
Dance were arranged. Branches
were formed in the suburbs and
resulted in a big increase in Jew-
ish National Fund receipts. Keren
Hayesod campaigns became im-
portant undertakings.
All activities gained momentum
in the thirties. New young workers
were enrolled who were prolific of
ideas and full of enterprise, and
zealous in carrying out the work.
Setting a quota for the J.N.F. was
instituted and proceeds rose
steadily. More systematic educa-
tional schemes were set in motion:
series of lectures for members and
talks to non-Jewish organizations.
A study circle and public speak-
ing class were instituted; Hebrew
classes were started. There was
enthusiasm and excitement in the
planning conscientiousness in the
accomplishment of the plans. At
the beginning of the decade there
were 15 branches and 850 mem-
bers; at the end of the decade 23
branches and 2,000 members.
A most revivifying factor In
Zionist feeling and activity is a
visit to the revived Homeland; and
probably under the auspices of no
other society have so many mem-
bers had the opportunity of hear-
ing so many accounts of that
dreamt-of land.
The stream of visitors who have
gone to Israel since then was no
more than a trickle in the 'thir-
ties. Papers and talks on their
visits were still rare when they
were given by leading Zioilist
workers in Johannesburg-Annie
Landau, Clara Patley, Anna
Braudo, Deborah Katzen, Ethel
Hayman, Katie Gluckmann; and
though "impressions" are fre-
quently heard today, they continue
now as then to draw eager
listeners.
S To be continued in a forth-
coming Issue.


50


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I The writer of this series of
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who has made a careful study
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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY,.NOVEMBER 21, 1958


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Extend their greetings to the Zionist Record on its 50th
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Continued from page 25.
Newman in the South African
Jewish Year Book of 1956-7.
What does not seem to have
been fully appreciated, how-
ever, is how this shift of popula-
tion has affected the structure
of the Jewish community, and
consequently its problems.
The complaint is often voiced
by these country communities
that they are regarded as so much
"cannon fodder" by the authori-
ties, the "cannons" being the
guns which fire the silver bullets
which fill the coffers as a result
of our national "Campaigns."
To be less hyperbolic and more
prosaic, their complaint is that
the only time they are taken
notice of Is" when a delegation
comes to visit them to invite them
to contribute towards these funds.
There is, incidentally, much less
truth in this allegation today
than there was in previous years,
but in voicing it they take much
too low a view- of their status.

SOCIAL LIFE
The smaller the community,. the
more a member of it counts. He
is an integral part of that com-
munity sharing fully in all its
activities,. of which' contributions
to the funds is a minor aspect.
He knows that unless he attends
service in synagogue there will
be no Minyan. As a matter of
course a Simcha of one member of
the community is a Simcha of the
whole community, and in times
of sorrow all equally are present
whether at a funeral, a Shiva, or
a Yahrzeit. The same considera-
tion applies to their social life.
Recently a Minister to a, com-
munity consisting of some 15
members summoned the com-
munity to a Din Torah. The whole
committee arrived--comprising 11
members! When the Beth Din
gave its decision it was naturally
accepted, but the chairman
insisted that it must be ratified
by all the members at a general
meeting.
My first thought was that it
was an attempt to hedge, but
wiser counsel prevailed. Even the
four Jews who were not commit-
tee members- had to be made to feel
that they had a say in the affairs
of the Congregation. In other


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OUTFITTERS
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CONGRATULATIONS
FROM

CONTINENTAL

TEAROOM


261 a Louis' Botho Avenue,
Orange Grove,
Johannesburg.


aIlljI


Chief Rabbi Rabinowita
words the Jew in the small com-
munity is a "mensch," an indivi-
dual of some importance.
He decides to move to town,
probably on account of the edu-
cation and future of his children.
He probably becomes a member
of the local congregation, but he
finds that membership strikingly
different from that in his dorp.
If he wishes to take some interest
in its affairs he finds himself up
against the "vested interests" of
those who had been associated
with the conduct of its affairs for
years; a simcha or a sorrow is
something which affects not the
community as a whole, but the
inner circle of the intimates of
the person involved.

IMPERSONAL
There is not that feeling of be-
ing a "Poresh Mih Ha-Tzibbur"
which failure to contribute to the
various appeals involves, in the
,small communities. He becomes
anonymous, an impersonal being.
All the loyalties which tie him to'
the community are weakened, and
he is to all intents and purposes
lost as a positive force within it.
I know scores of such people who
played a prominent and active
part in the affairs of the small
communities as chairman of their
congregation, or of the Zionist
Society who are at a loose end
communally in Johannesburg.
On the other hand, this increas-
ing urbanisation has brought about
a tremendous expansion in Johan-
nesburg, and it is noteworthy that


lw


TI


Dwindling country communities


CVULCAN)




CATERING EQUIPMENT

by



GREEN & BENHAM



194 Main Reef Road, Westgate, JOHANNESBURG
22 Sir Lowry Rd., CAPE TOWN 75 Pine St., DURBAN


PAGE SIXTY-SIX -


the only visible gauge of this ex-
pansion is in the increase in the
number of congregations. It is be-
yond the scope of this article to
deal with the internal shifts from
the older suburbs to the newer;
the fact is that compared with 12
Orthodox congregations, half of
them small, listed in 1929, there
are no fewer than 30 today, in ad-
dition to three Reform Temples.
Only in this one respect is the
increase in population reflected in
the growth of comnmual activity.
The trebling is a fact, in less than
50 years.
- It appears to me that once these
facts are realized and borne in
mind, they should bring about a
fundamental revision in our atti-
tude towards the important ques-
tion of the unattached Jews. One
of the most praiseworthy activities
of the community in recent years,
is the increased preoccupation
with the country communities: It
is definitely a worth while activity
and it does not lack its romantic
and emotional appeal.
There is an element of mission-
ary activity in it, in which other-
wise the Jewish community is woe-
fully lacking. "I seek out my
brethren" makes a definite appeal,
with its corollary of making those
isolated Jewish groups feel that
they are not abandoned or forgot-
ten but that on the contrary there
is -a constant care for their wel-.
fare and spiritual well-being.
GREATEST GOOD
But viewed from the point of
view of practical activity and
effecting the greatest good for
the greatest number with the lim-
ited resources at our disposal, one
should consider where the' greatest
number of unattached is to be
found, and where therefore the
greatest good can be achieved.
One example will be instructive,
though I admit that I am over-
simplifying the issue. Even taking
as one's yardstick the highest
number of contributors ever
reached in an I.U.A. campaign in
Johannesburg, there is a larger
number of Jews in Johannesburg
who escape the dragnet, however
fine its mesh may be, than all the
Jews in the country communities
put together.
The same applies to the number
of Jews who, not belonging to a
Congregation, and who do not
contribute to the U.C.F. escape
completely any communal com-
mitments whatsoever. The impli-
cations of these facts is tremen-
dous; the shift of the Jewish popu-
lation in these fifty years demands
a corresponding shifting out of
the groove in which our communal
thinking and planning has settled.







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958

A MINUTE BOOK OF 1910-11 |


PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN


The


J.N.F.


An interview with
Mr. S. Wunsh


THE Golden Jubilee of the Zion-
ist Record has a special signi-
ficance for Mr. Sebia Wunsh, of
Johannesburg. This grey-haired,
dignified Zionist veteran, who has
been a reader of the Zionist Record
since its inception, can. look,\back
to the earliest years of the Zion-
ist movement in the city with
which he has been closely associ-
ated.
Speaking to him while he was
paging through a 48-year-old
minute book of the United Johan-
nesburg Jewish National Fund
Club now an historical Zionist
souvenir-Mr. Wunsh recalled to
me some of the trials and
struggles of the Zionist worker
among the pioneering Jewish com-
munity of the Golden City.
Born in Eluxt, Kurland, in 1882,
of a rabinnical family, Seb'a
Wunsh left for Riga at the age of
14. Here, for nearly six years, he
was an active member of the Zich-
ret Zion. Zionism was an illegal
movement in those days and Mr.


Wunsh recalls how the members
of this society had to conduct their
activities secretly, meeting at
various houses in groups of ten.
Mr. Wunsh arrived in Cape
Town in 1903, carrying with him
a letter of introduction from the
Zichrei Zion to the Dorshei Zion
Association, which had been estab-
lished in the Mother City four
years earlier.
He recalls vividly the sad oc-
casion, in July, 1904, when Cape
Town Jewry gathered at the Zion-
ist Hall to mourn the death of
the late Dr. Theodor Herzl.
Mr. Wunsh settled in Johannes-
burg in 1904 and immediately
joined the Johannesburg Zionist
Association, which then held its
meetings in the Zionist Hall, at
24 Commissioner Street, in the
heart of Ferreirastown. The
various Zionist societies in the
city, resuscitated after the Boer
War, were at their height, and
the humble Zionist hall was the


AT J.N.F. BAZAAR IN 1910
centre of great activity conducted
under the auspices of the S.A. Front row, left to right: Mrs. Hernier, Madame Pevsner, Mr. Harry
Zionist Federation. Josselowitz, Mr. Isaac Levy, Mr. S. Wunsh, Mr. J. B. Shaksnovis,
But for all this, certain rifts Mr. Joseph Japower. Second row: Mrs. S. Wunsh (formerly Miss
were beginning to show within the Annie Jacobs), Miss Silverman, Miss Schlosberg, Mrs. Silverman,
movement. Dissatisfied with the Miss Lissus, Miss Rabinowitz, Mrs. I. J. Hersch (formerly Miss
complacency shown by the Feder- Savell), Mrs. Schlopobersky (formerly Miss Rabinowitz). Back
action in its work for the Jewish row: Mr. I. J. Hersch, Mr. Per, Mr. Jack Shapiro (youth), Mr.
National Fund, a group of spirited Herman, Mr. Jacobs, Mr. Harry Marcuson and Mr. Oserowitz.
idealists under the leadership of
Benzion S. Hersh, founded the Johannesburg Ladies Zionist still active in Zionist affairs. Also
Johannesburg Jewish National Society, David Getz, L. H. Cohen, very sympathetic to the Club was
Fund Club. Among them was Saul Pincus, Woolf Senior and the late Dr. J. H. Hertz, the
Mr. Wunsh. H. L. Karnovsky who are both (Continued on page 78)


MINUTES IN YIDDISH
The minute book of Mr. Wunsh
reflects the activities of the Club
from November, 1910, to June,
1911. Ordinary meetings were held
every fortnight at the Zionist
Hall, Balmoral Chambers, Com-
missioner Street. General meet-
ings were held twice a year. The
minutes were kept in Yiddish,
except for one general meeting on
November 6, 1910, which is in
English.
The minutes record the resig-
nation from the Club of its chair-
man Mr. J. B. Shacknovis, and the
report for the half year was given
by the vice-chairman, Mr. Joseph
Janower, who played such a pro-
minent part in the upbuilding of
the Zionist movement in this
country.
The highlight of the activities
for that period was a bazaar
which yielded the then "magnifi-
cent sum" of 460. The function
was officially opened by the late
General Louis Botha, who had be-
come the first Prime Minister of
the Union in May of that year.
Also present was the mining mag-
nate, the late Sir Lionel Phillips,
to whom Mr. Wunsh sold a small
medicine chest (made by Mr.
Harry Chenick, still resident in
Johannesburg) and Madam
Pevsner, who had come here from
Palestine to sell Bezalel goods.
The minutes recall that "besides
being a decided monetary success,
the bazaar had a good moral
effect as was reported in the
general press."

COMMITTEE MEMBERS
The following office-bearers
were elected at the meeting:
Chairman, Mr. Benzion S. Hersh:
vice-chairman Mr. Joseph
Janower, treasurer Mr. S. Wunsh.
secretary Mr. Bashew.
Among the committee members
appear the names of N. Herz,
now of Durban, Feldman, B.
Chaimowltz, a great organiser,
Hershler, Herman, Jankelowitz,
Jacobs, Ginsberg, Harry Josselo-
witz, Levitt., Ospovat, Riefkind,
Miss Becker (now Mrs. D. Getz),
Miss Fine (now the widow of the
late Mr. Joseph Janower), the
Misses Reuben and Shulman, and
Mr. Kisseloff and Mr. D. Getz.
Others who actively supported
the Club were Mr. S. Friedlander
who later left for Israel, Isaac
Levy, an energetic secretary, Mr.
A. M. Abrahams, Harry Grau-
mann, (later Sir Harry), who be-
came Mayor of Johannesburg,
Harry Lourie, I. J. Hersh (who
was life president of the S.A.
Jewish Board of Education),
U. Melzer, another secretary, Tilly
Michalivsky and Mrs. Glazer, who
were prominent members of the


AFRICAN


OXYGEN


LIMITED



-- -extend their


congratulations to the


publishers of the


Zionist Record upon


the completion of


50 years of service


to the community


AOI4IU







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD,. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


-" W t


m p-.),:m r. .r A Ir r I i


fo NT TAINKEXT6


I~ 1


They helped

AAS has been the case in most countries of Europe and America,
the contribution of Jews towards the development and
establishment of music in South Africa is very considerable.
Admittedly we cannot claim the achievements of overseas
standards as yet, but from a modest beginning music is gradu-
ally improving and gaining ground, and before very long it
will not be inferior to the general universal level and will
ascertain itself as a cultural necessity in public life, especially
in tAe larger urban centres of this sub-continent.
Before the South African War there was very little
organised serious musical activity, apart from concerts given
by visiting artists, opera companies, periodical seasons of
musical comedy troupes and local amateur performers.
Very often some enterprising Jews risked their capital
to finance visits by overseas entertainers, both of serious as
well as of light music.
One of the earliest Jewish ar- Eduard Remenyl, who at one time
twists to visit this country was the toured the continent of Europe
Hungarian eccentric violin virtuoso with Brahms.
















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to furt

by

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her


music


South


-He arrived in the Cape in the Madame Albu, the singer, ap-
year 1887, and after touring that peared in concerts in the eighties,
province, visited Johannesburg in and the 'cellist August van Biene,
the same year; he also. composed composer of the "Broken Melody,"
some light pieces for orchestra and also appeared in those early days.
Most prominent among musi-
cians in that early period was the
late David Foote. He hailed from a
musical family, his father had
been Court Singer in Holland.
Foote was born in Kimberley in
1873, studied music and law, even-
,.. tually abandoning the latter for
the former.
He is, perhaps, better, remem-
bered as the popular conductor
of the old Empire Theatre,
where many ofhis compositions
were performed, the most im-
portant and successful being
"The Wrath of Wrah."
Foote also conducted several
seasons. of orchestral symphony
concerts, and until his death in
1927, occupied the position as
chief musical director of the Afri-
David Foote can Theatres.
He was also the founder and
in South Africa. He was said also first president of the Johannesburg
to have brought a number of Musician's Union, founded in 1913.


valuable violins, which he sold In
several towns of the Cape
Province.
.The first large organised
orchestra was established by the
Wanderers Club, which gave regui
lar concerts (under the baton of
the late James Hyde) and one of
the leading violinists was the late
Ernest Lezard, who also composed
some light pieces for orchestra and
piano as well as songs.
. I 1


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Radio Corner Boksburg North. Ewins
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Congratulations to the
ZIONIST RECORD
on achieving its
Golden Anniversary


"KLEZMORIM"
The Weinbrenn family hailed
from "Klezmorim" stocK in Lithu-
ania and settled in Johannesburg
They were Lazar, Notel and Isaac.
-before the South African War.
The most prominent was Max, a
graduate of the Warsaw Conserva-
toire, and a brilliant violinist,
conductor and teacher. His pupils
-and they counted by the thou-
sands-have gained distinctions in
local and overseas examinations,
as well as bursaries and fame.
Among the pupils were: the late
Harry Cantor and David Taylor,
Wulfe Wulfinson, Anne Sacks and
many others.
Gustave Jaretzky was an
interesting musical personality in
the early years of this century. He
was a pianist of no mean ability,
he conducted a cinema orchestra,
and for many years was choir-
master at the President Street
Synagogue, beginning at the time


CHARLES MANNING


6.-+.-A. g--7 -4.3-L6S4


e
th
Go


in


Africa

when the late Dr. Herz was
minister.
Among those active in chamber
music were the late "Doc" Landau,
as viola player, and Mr. Elias, a
business man and an efficient
violinist who devoted much time
and energy to music making in
Johannesburg.
VERSATILE
Another well-known musical
family are the Chosacks. Papa
Robert played on all instruments,
rana business and acted as beadle
in a synagogue. Louis was a
clarinettist and the owner of a
large musical library (his
daughter, petty Chertkow, is a
piano teacher and her daughter
Bedana Chertkow, a talented
young pianist, is now in England);
a younger son, Joe Chosack was a
pianist of light music; Issy
Chosack is a brilliant xylophone
virtuoso and a. capable tympanist
of the Cape Town Municipal
Orchestra.
The Kofsky clan is another
musical family. Robert was a
pioneer 'cellist of considerable
merit, who settled in Johannes-
burg almost half a century ago,
to be followed later by his brother,
the late John, a viola player whose
sons, the violinist Nat and 'cellist
Len, still follow the musical pro-
fession.
Of the great number of meri-
torious pianists which our people
have supplied the local concert
platform is Adolphe Hallis, born
in Port Elizabeth. He is perhaps
the best musical talent this
country has produced, and is still
a front-rank exponent on a key-
board instrument. His public
performances are always welcomed
by the musical public. As a teacher
he has gained considerable pro-
minence with his successful pupils.
Isadore Epstein settled in Johan-
nesburg some years ago, is a bril-
liant performer and runs a school
for- piano students. His singing
0 Continued on page 72.


9 AIrl u ti J1j-L 'L'Lj I
9 (PTY.) LTD. ,


BOSMAN'S ARCADE, .
ELOFF STREET,
9 JOHANNESBURG.

Phone 22-4606 _ _ _ _ _
P.O. Box 5935


Wnsnet good wishes to
te Zionist Record on its
olden Jubilee.




Charles Manning'
u *jcrr QAfflfhftl


p I! I 911--Md. a


i f i Im i of i qR IN M i In PC pf hp rm
F9 F FE F--- l 2 ; i i F -*! I


" r-u' 'i-'-"T"


I L to 36--7


rAcft -sixTy-miGiFiT.


Pft a MEWOOPS4


abb.- hN.-


: ME.,

Wi


f







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE SIXTY-NINE


F^ ,^ ^ ^ ^ ,l^ Ki PONS .n ~ ^ ^ K- .^ K- -
*(o*^ i q 731 *! _* 13 1 =NO J N 'f' 3-gja1d^^ ^ ^ ~ ^ ^ ^


From


Yiddish theatre Ann


5 The writer of this article which I
i surveys the story of the contri- I
ioution by Jews to South African I
| theatre. :
!......................... .. ... ..... ... .-,
r HE first steps of Jewish
L theatrical activity in Johan-
nesburg are hard to assess with
absolute accuracy. Time has veiled
some of its authenticity and
sources are often contradictory.
Very few original programmes
of the early beginnings of Yiddish
theatre are available as documen-
tary evidence. Our information Is
based on personal reminiscences of
actors, producers and old-timers,
as well as an occasional earTy
press notice.
"YIDDISH WORT"
In one of the first. numbers of
"Dorem Afrika" (1928), we find
an article on the Yiddish Theatre
by the veteran actor Hannan
Hersch. At that time he had al-
ready been 25 years on the Yiddish
stage. Hannan Hersch describes
the solitude of the Jewish immi
grants at the beginning of the
century, most of whom first came
without their families: t he ir
longing for a "Yiddish Wort" was
great and they flocked to Yiddish
performances.
Hersch describes how in 1895 one
Rosenfeld had arranged a concert
of Yiddish songs and a one-act
vaudeville A Klap for a Klap at
the Grand Hotel, corner of Presi-
dent and Diagonal Streets. The
cast comprised, besides Rosenfeld,


Ellis Corner
A new landmark, destined to
play a major part in the welfare
of thousands of South African
shoppers, has come to Johannes-
burg at the corner of Eloff and
President Streets.
Ellis and Company, furnishers
to the nation and backed by a
magnificent reputation, extending
over 56 years, for square dealing
and sound honest trading, have
now extended their premises with
a new large three floor electrical
and radio showroom on Eloff
'Street and which offers direct ac-
cess to their existing showrooms
in President Street.
The radio and electrical division
of Ellis and Company, created
nearly four years ago has, because
of its enterprise and ability to
buy keenly and thus be able to
.sell competitively has enjoyed
phenomenal success and is today
undoubtedly one of the largest
radio and electrical organizations
in South Africa. Indeed, the name
ELLIS which spells TOP VALUE
and TOP, QUALITY, promises to
offer even more sensational oji-
portunities for the South African
buying public in the not-too-dis-
tant future.
ELLIS CORNER IS A CORNER
TO BE WATCHED!


to E

A. Auerbach and Anny Kaplan-
bky. mie suucccs was u'erwueuii-
ii 1896 the first Yiddish Dra-
ii.ia.c society is said to have been
louileu by uoe "bnmool." With a
giuup or amateurs he presented
aue play Bar Uoctnoah, followed by
a c-m.euy The 2'aree Orphans of
Loaz.
These performances took place
at tne Baltic House (a former
convent), situated at the corner
of Fox and Small Streets. After-
wards this site was occupied by
the Castle Breweries, which is
In the process of demolition to-
day.
Tne first professional company
with the grand title of "The He-
brew Oriental Opera Company of
New-York" arrived in South
Africa. in 1897. The director, Mr.
Silberman, was also the leading
man. His company, consisted of
Mr. and Mrs. Mandeltort, Mr.
Grinberg, Leibele Schwarz and
M. Feingold.

CROWDED
The performances of Judah
Amachbee, Goldfaden's Shulamith
and "Die Zvei Kuhne Lemels" in
Jargon (as Yiddish was referred
to then) drew "bumper houses"
and were "crowded nightly to the
doors by Gentiles as well as Jews."
The plays were popular fare.
Melodramas and comedies evoked
the mental climate of the Eastern-
European Shtetl-the small-town
:lfe. The homesick settlers of the
Rand found some kind of self-
'dentification, fulfilment of their
nostalgia for "die alte Helm."
After the Boer War, the many
Jews who had left the Rand, re-
turned from Cape Town and from
Europe.
From 1903 till about 1906, M.


english


, An early photograph of Muriel |
Alexander, pioneer of the Eng- |
lish stage in South Africa.

Waxman from America, played
with his company at the now for-
gotten Gaiety Theatre, terminus
of the horsedrawn trams in
Ferreirastown. Among the favour-
ite plays were: King Solomon,
Joseph and his Brethren, Kol
Nidre, Captain Dreyfus, King Saul,
The Converted Priest, Jehudah
Abarbanel, The Time of the
Meshiach.
On July 14, 1903, M. Waxman
and the famous South African-
actor-producer, Leonard Rayne,
gave a "Kishineff Matinee" in aid


With compliments from

RECO RDIA

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Bosman Building, 97b Eloff Street,
JOHANNESBURG.
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My Yiddlsher Mormnne; Life Begins at Forty;
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JEWISH. MUSIC
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stage

of victims of the Russian pogrom.
The performance was at-
tended by Prince Arthur of
Connaught.
In 1906 the two rival companies.
the Waxman Company and the
Wallerstein Company. amalga-
mated and gave regular per-
formances at the Gaiety Theatre.
Amongst the well-known actors
of those days were: Hannan
Hersch. Sarah Sylvia, Sam Weller,
Mr. Lurle. Mrs. E. Wallersticln.
Mrs. S. Wallerstem. Miss Dora
Nathan. Miss S. Wcissman. Mr.
H. Fineberg. Mr. S. Wilkomirsky,
Mr. Fisher, Mr. H. Berman.
Amongst the plays produced were:
Dotid's Fiddele. Anna Karenina,
The Kreutser Sonata, Ahasuerus,
Die Goldene Medineh. Medea,
Uriel Acusta and Mirele Efros.


I Sarnh Sylhla. |pioneerI of o liri-
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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


With compliments from



OPTICIANS
ALSO AT
0 ADMIRALS COURT
TYRWHITT AVENUE
Phone: 42-5535
R 0 S E B AN K
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* Head Office:
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CONGRATULATIONS ON
THE ACHIEVEMENT
OF YOUR
50TH
ANNIVERSARY

-ANONYMOUS

WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
Alan Campbell
(PTY.) LTD.
Directors':
J. H; Griffin and J. E. Griffin.
Telephones 42-4206, 42-5979.
ESTATE AND INSURANCE
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Phone 42-6100
6 TYRWHITT AVENUE,
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In conveying our good wishes to the
Zionist Record on its Golden Jubilee
May we remind our numerous Jewish
friends throughout South Africa that it
has been our pleasure to serve them
for 80 years.
Yours always,




ROSEBANK


PAGE SEVENTY







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958



EARLY YIDDISH PRODUCTIONS


Mensh und Teifel, were presented
as operetta, or- vauaevwie, aind
hlerd y seasoned witi songs anu
dances.
Tne plays followed each other
in rapiu succession and the position
of pompt was one of tne most
Important. -
An indigenous play about the
Boer War, y A. L. Joffe (known
as "Jaffe the Cab-driver") was
presented on May 3, 1907, in Johan-
nesburg. The name was Der Afri-
kaner- Yiddisher Volunteer, (in
English "Love in Africa."
The Hebrew play "Hurdus"
(Herold), by Chief Rabbi Dr. J.
L. Landau, was presented after
it had been translated into Yid-
dish by the author.
A "Complementary Night" was
given for Hannan Hersch at the
Gaiety Theatre on August 9,
1907. The play was The House
of Freedom (Sholem Bayis) by
Moishe Richter. Mr. Hersch later
also gave an outstanding perform-
ance of The Wandering Jew.
"SNOBBISH"
About 1910, the richer people of
Johannesburg. having become
somewhat "snobbish," stopped pat-
ronising the Gaiety Theatre, which
by now was situated In the poorer
quarter of town. Consequently the
Yiddish Theatre declined. With the
outbreak of the First World War,
the Waxman Company having
previously left for London, there
was little or no theatre in Johan-
nesburg.
A number of performances were
staved in 1913 for charity by the
Yiddish Literary and Dramatic
Society at the Palladium. The


Continued on page 69.

plays included Die Yesomeh and
-Lv Walwneit, by Jacob Gordin.
AImoUg Lne cast mnenwiued are me
oulow ig: Miss A. Kaminer, Miss
turltel, Mrs. Friediand, Mr s.
tticnter, Miss Rubin, Miss Lissoos,
Mrs. L. Shambam, Miss S. Michal-
ski, Mr. I. Stutzin, Mr. Klotz, Mr.
Trachtenberg, Mr. Rabinowitz, Mr.
Lurie, Mr. M. Stone.
Can one recall Yiddish theatre
in Johannesburg without giving a
place of honour to Sarah Sylvia?
Born in South Africa, in English
surroundings, she spoke very little
Yiddish when she joined the Wax-
man Company at the age of seven.
The early settlers on the Rand
adored young "Serke."

ARTISTRY
For more than half a century
she has delighted Jewish audiences,
non-stop, with the consummate
skill of her artistry, in Europe,
South America and South Africa.
She made Yiddish so much her
own, that it became part of her
character-interpretations. In Lon-
don, and during the First World
War, she played for 14 years as
leading lady opposite Maurice Mos-
kov;tch, until he went over to the
English stage.
After her first return visit in
1922, she brought to this country
a number of producers, actors and
actresses who have entertained the
Public with their repertoires of
Yiddish dramas and comedies. The
imported companies always made
good use of the local talent. (B.
Abramoff, Max Angorn, L. Gal-


H annan Hersch-He was a
pioneer of the Yiddish theatre
in Johannesburg where he be-
gan his career at the beginning
of the century.

vin, H. Hirsch, Esta Stein, Men-
orah Gold and others).
There were the companies
headed by Joseph Sherman and
Joseph Kessler. The African
Theatres Trust brought the Isako-
vitch Company with Vera Kan-
evska.
The Breitman-Teffner Company;
Miriam Kressin; Jacob Welslitz;
Morris Scharz; Myer Zelniker with
his hit "Bel Mir Bist Du Shein";
Maurice Moskovitch with his pro-
duction in English of The Merchant
of Venice and The Great Lover.
In more recent years the Sarah
Sylvia Company presented a series
of musical comedies with Max
Perlman and Guita Galina. After
the performance of Tel Aviv, the
whole of Johannesburg went about
humming "Ich Lieb a Meldel" .

GOLDEN JUBILEE
Other visiting artists to Johan-
nesburg were Ossip Runitsch.
Hymie Jacobson-Mollie Picon,
Chayele Rozenthal-Markov and
Etta Topel, Buloff, Jacob Mans-
dorf, Nusia Gold.
Sarah Sylvia celebrated her
Golden Jubilee on the Yiddish stage
in 1952 with her performance of
"The Eternal Mother." Shortly be-
fore she had scored a great
personal success in her true-to-life
portrayal of the wife of Willy
Loman, in the powerful English
drama Death of a Salesman, by
Arthur Miller. Jacob Ben-Ami
realistically re-created the "Sales-
man." Others In the cast were
Leon Gluckman and Molly Seftel.
The World of Sholem Aleichem
brought Sarah Sylvia together
with the guest artist David Kos-
soff. This play presented by Pro-
ducer Cecil Williams, at the Reps
Theatre, brought to life the
familiar Jewish types of yester-
year, created by Sholem Alelchem
and Peretz.
Still vivid in the mind Is Sarah
Sylvia's very latest success as the
wife of the Russian ambassador
In Leon Gluckman's production for
the Reps of "Romanoff and Juliet"
by Peter Ustinov.

ZYGIELBAUM
Unstinted efforts to prevent the
declining Yiddish theatre from
complete extinction, have been
made by artists like Faivel Zygiel-
baum. With Sarah Sylvia he
played in Mirele Efros, with
Zelniker in the' musical Comedy
"Bel Mir Bist Du Shein," with
Weislitz in Doe Leben Ruft. Zygiel-
baum's brilliant production of
Goldfaden's Spectacle made thea-
trical history in Johannesburg.
With The Gold Diggers by Sholem
Aleichem, the thirtieth anniversary
of the death of the great humorist
was commemorated.
In "The Jews of South Africa,"
(Chapter 9), Dora Sowden writes
that "the Jews -were among the
most conspicuous promoters of
dramatic enterprises, Edgar Hay-
man and Harry Friedman being
names which appear in- contem-
porary newspapers as managers.
Those were the days when Barney
Barnato acted (very badly) scenes


from 'Othello' for charity."
."The .plays presented were
usually those that were popular
in-the -Victorian theatre in Eng-
land; and -even professional
companies were more ham than
excellent. Though some sur-
prisingly good companies did
come to the Rand, the general


S.A. LIMITED




P.O. Box ]

BOKSBUJ

Transva
PHONE 52-6


U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
i
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Ill,

RG,

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731


U. m


PAGE SEVENTY-ONE


standard of entertainment was
crude. In the arts the Jews
shared the general level of ap-
preciation and the same rich
appetite for whatever was going
on."
In the late eighties the pioneer
theatre company of Luscombe
Searelle arrived in Johannesburg.
Hedley Chilvers, in his book "Out
of the Crucible," writes that
Searelle, who came from Australia,
brought everything (including an
Continued on page 96


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Proprietors:

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Congratulations



to



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on their


GOLDEN



JUBILEE



1958






VENEERED PLYWOODS








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


MUSICAL FAMILIES


Continued from Page 68.


MADE


THEIR MARK


ELLIE MARX ...
soloist and teacher.
L.... .....


brothers will be well remembered
by old-timers.
Heinz Hirschland hailed from
Germany about a quarter of a
century ago, and he, too, has
gained prominence both as a con-
cert pianist and a pedagogue.
Of the younger generation of
concert pianists there are Ade-
laide Newman, Lionel Bowman,
Maisie Flink, Eunice Robinson,
Lessie Samuel, of Pretoria, Ivan
Melman, Phillip Levy and a num-
ber of others.
The most prominent of singing
teachers has been Olga Ryss, who
during her 20 years of sojourn in
the Golden City had been particu-
larly active with the local opera
productions.
In Cape Town there were a


number of Jewish musicians who I cord for overseas scholarships


contributed their share to propa-
gate love of the public- for their
art.
The violinist Ellie Marx was
born In Wales in 1879, commenced
lessons at the tender age of five;
in 1890 his parents brought him
to Oudtshoorn, when he showed
such remarkable talents that on
the advice of the late Sir Henry
Juta he was sent overseas for in-
tensive study, first to Leipzig and
finally to Ysaye in Brussels, where
he won the Grand Prix of the Con-
servatoire.

TOURED ENGLAND
He toured England and the Con-
tinent and then returned to South
Africa. In 1898 he visited Johan-
nesburg accompanied by his sister,
Gertrude, giving some successful
concerts, finally settling in Cape
Town as soloist and teacher.
He was one of the founders of
the College of Music in Cape
Town, and when the Municipal
Orchestra was founded by Theo
Wendt, in 1914, he was, appointed
its first leader and sub-conductor.
At the same time he continued
with his string-quartet concerts
and teaching at the college.
He held the South African re-


won by his pupils, many of whom
have become prominent artists.
Recently a fund was founded
in Cape Town in memory of
Ellie Marx to award bursarles
to talented students.
The violinist Adolphe Feinhols
and his sister, the pianist Bertha,
have also contributed towards
music in the Mother City.
George Tobias studied the violin
at the College of Music in Cape
Town, and at the Royal Academy


MAX WEINBRENN I


of Music in London. On returning
to Cape Town he became the con-
ductor of the S.A.B.C. orchestra
there, unfortunately his life and
promising career was cut short
by his early death.
Two gifted violinists are still
active as members of the Cape
Town Orchestra and as soloists.
They are Ralph Kurland and
Monia Mindlln.
In the early days there lived
in Cape Town an Italian Catho-
lic musician, Angelo Casiraghi,
who was for a time the choir-
master of the Garden Synagogue.
ACTIVE IN DURBAN
Active in Durban was the late
David Cohen, a gifted concert
pianist, teacher, choirmaster of
the synagogue, and conductor of
many productions at- the Jewish
Club.
The family Fainsinger claim
the unique distinction of having
several generations of musi-
clans.
Lazarus lived in Cape Town,
was an amateur violinist of merit,
composed a string quartet and
some songs. His brother, Maurice,
was a promising composer, but his
life was cut short by being shot in
the South African War.
Continued on Page 74.


Jerry Idelson, the writer of this
article, has been connected-
with general musical activities.
in Johannesburg and particu-
larly with the cultivation of
Jewish music. "He has given
concerts and lectures and
written articles on the subject
of Jewish music. He was the
i founder of the Society of South
African, Composers, and served
as its secretary and chairman,
for 15 years. His compositions
include some 200 songs and
choral, Instrumental and or-
chestral works. Two volumes of
his Hebrew and Yiddish songs
were published In Israel a few
Years ago. His recent major
work "Sacred Service" was per-
formed at Temple Israel. He is
the Director of Music of the
United Progressive Jewish Con-
gregation, of which he is :liso a
Founder. During a visit to
Israel a few years ago, he con-
I ducted the Kol Zion Orchestra
I In programmes of his own com-
I positions. He also conducted
the civic orchestras of Cape
Town, Durban and Johannes-
burg in. programmes of his own
orchestral works.


The Shell Company of South Africa Ltd.



extends its heartiest congratulations to



the Zionist Record on the occasion of its



Golden Jubilee


limlli:I


I i


rAGE SEVENTY-TWO







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


When we were young
(Continued from page 15)

The Arabs, when they were not rioting, '
played a picturesque part in the life of the
country. Because I was a partner with an
Arab lawyer I got to know my Arab
cousins very well, and until A month or two
before the Mandate came to an end Arab
clients would come to my office. I would
write about their life on the edge of the
desert in Beersheba. I would visit them
when they held their primitive circumcision
ceremonies. I would be invited to their
homes. I would defend them when they
had committed a murder in defence of
their family honour.
Although non-Jewish papers were more
addicted to these stories than Zionist
journals, Zionists who read about Arab
riots were happy to know that when they
were not rioting Arabs were just people
like the rest of us.
There was one subject that was abso-
lutely taboo. Not a word was to be writ-
ten about it, neither In the Zionist Record
nor elsewhere. This was a self-imposed .
censorship that worked with greater effi-
ciency than any imposed by law, even possible for the Zionist Record to
on a willing a public. That 'subject was chronicle them all. So much is attempted
the haganah, the underground army, which and so much accomplished from January
finally secured this country for the Jewish 1 to December 31 that a Talmud-sized
people. It affected the lives of every one Zionist Record could not hope to do more
of us. Our children played this highly than touch the fringe of all Israel's
dangerous game from an early age. activities.
We all knew-and did not know. Here Because it has ploughed the Zionist
were stories that would have excited field over half a century it has prepared
South African readers-but the stories the husbandman for the crops that the
remained unwritten and a thousand gal- new Israel is now producing. If in my
lant deeds remained untold. small way I sowed a few seeds when
So now the Zionist Record is celebrating Palestine was the National Home and
its Golden Jubilee-a rare triumph for a they are now sprouting in the Jewish
Zionist newspaper in English. And I who State of Israel, I owe it to the Zionist
wrote in it before it had celebrated its Record, which gave me in South Afriea
silver jubilee am privileged to add my few rich earth in which to plant them.
words to its golden number. I Here is to the next quarter of a
Today there is no question of a century!
shortage of subjects. Israel is too rich in Jerusalem,
good men and good deeds to make it June, 1958.


PAGE SEVENTY-THREE


I The day on
which the
Israel Consu-
late General
was opened at
the Volkskas
Building, Jo-
h a n n e sburg
(September 1S,
11989), was a
festive occa-
sion for local
Jewry. While
the writer of
this article,
who was the
first Consul-
General for r
Israel, entered
the office, the
Shofar was
blown by Mr
Simple Wein-
stein out of
the office win-
dow to the
large ,and
cheering
crowd outside.


ACCENT ON YOUTH IN

B'NAI B'RITH EFFORT
LONG-TERM expansion is the operative idea at the basis of
plans for the development of B'nai B'rith in South Africa.
The accent is placed upon the youth.
9 Financial support has been which will be known at the
pledged by B'nal B'rith to the Students' Association as the B'nai
Jewish Board of Deputies for the Brith Library.
formation of an organisation akin WritiJohannesburg," the B'20th anniver-
to the Hillel Foundation.. The"Johannesburg," the 20th anniver-
practical conclusion of this action sary souvenir brochure, Mr. A. H.
which is linked up with the actual James, president of the Lodge, had
creation of that organisation, has this to say about their work:
creation of thatured, as there are "It is always of importance to
not yet matured, as there ar measure up one's actions, in ser-
S- vice work, to the actual problems
.,, ,., and needs of people, because only
then will we be aware of tho
smallness of our contribution, and
of the vital necessity of giving
more and more to humanity. It is
rather an anomaly that, of all the
a standards of the world's activities
--scientific,, economic or ethical-
the moral standard is the one
which has not progressed as mnuc
as the rest. This is reflected in
the actions of people and nations,
and accounts mainly for the
eternal troubles which face
h"As I belong to a categorY
which believes in the final solu.
tion through optimism, I know
that there is in every one of us a
very strong instinct of conserva-
tion which directs us towards the
right road. Reading 13'nman B'rith
and other publications, it becomes
.- -- apparent that the number of
MR. A. H. JAMES Brotherhood associations is on the
increase, and this Is due to the
many difficulties still to be over- fact that organizations such as
come, but progress is being made. ours fill a necessity in the corn-
0 Then there was the launching munify and in the world. The
of an essay competition among first reaction to dnangetr Is unity,
Jewish youth. Through the S.A. and I do not know of many better
Federation of Student Jewish ways of achieving unity outside
and Zionist Associations a large an international brotherhood of
number of students were reached men.
and the name of B'nai B'rith was "I am sure that nimany members
spread among quite a number of share with me the view that our
young people. Order must fulfil a vital necessity
0 B'nai B'rith has also helped the in our community, and that it is
S.A. Federation of Student Jewish important to continue until final
and Zionist Associations to create success is achieved with our policy,
a library of basic Jewlsh books of expansion.


Is*a*Sesoo*e**Soo eoegoee*oee*eeeoe@o.efso*66666oe060eO 00o 0 0S066O6a 08000006006go**Oe **ee eg o a g eeo *ge e**so* Goo**** 0000 *NO goo* ae***.e e eSeese oe oo 66660 Soo* e9*000SSO
0


The United Progressive Jewish


Congregation of Johannesburg



The Constituent Temples

TEMPLE ISRAEL
TEMPLE SHALOM
TEMPLE EMANUEL
TEMPLE BETH AM


The Subsidiary Bodies

THE UNITED PROGRESSIVE HEBREW SCHOOLS
THE UNITED SISTERHOOD
THE ALAN ISAACS CAMP
THE TEMPLE SOCIAL CLUB
THE MONTAGU COUNTRY CLUB
THE TEMPLE GUILD
THE YOUTH COUNCIL



Extend Congratulations and Best Wishes
ON THE OCCASION OF


The Golden Jubilee of the Zionist Record
*So o
7 0000oooooooooooooooooooo oo0oo0ooooooooo.... o0ooo 0oooo.... oo......oooo o0ooo0000o-0o00o0o06ooo094900o0oo






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958
IIn - -- -I I M 11.. ...


MUSICIANS IN SOUTH AFRICA


Continued from Page 72
Joseph Fainsinger is a flau-
tfist, now residing in Port Eliza-
beth; his daughter, Cecilia
.u lUiiIuIuuIiuiiiiluguinii uniii MiiiiiiuIuillII |lM


i Bothaville -I
5 * 5-


Hebrew


Congregation 1


extends best wishes to
Ithe Editor and staff of I
the Zionist Record on
the occasion of its
50th Anniversary

_..- ................ .. ........ .... ..."-.... _..


Yutar, is a well-known flautist
and pianist.
The only Jewish conductor of
eminence who has "made good"
is Jeremy Schulman, the senior
conductor of the S.A.B.C. Orches-
tra. He was born In London,
where he received his -early musi-
-cal training. His father was a
real patriarchal old-style Hassid,
of extreme piety. Schulman came
to this country as a very young
violinist during the First World
War, and soon established himself
as a competent performer in cham-
ber music and as a Soloist.
A VIOLINIST
When radio broadcasting was
begun in 1924, he was engaged as
a violinist, and worked his way
up the musical ladder to become
eventually the senior conductor of
the S.A.B.C. Orchestra.
The name of Alex Cherniavsky,
the impresario, is well known in
South Africa, but many remember
him as a very talented pianist. He
is a member of a highly gifted
musical family.
Jos6 Rodrigues-Lopes is a pian-
ist, born in HoLand, who is res-
ponsible for introducing many


On the occasion of the


Golden Jubilee

of the



ZIONIST

RECORD


the


HEBREW ORDER

OF DAVID

reciprocates the good wishes
extended to the Order on the
occasion of its own

Golden Jubilee in 1954

May we each in our respective
spheres grow stronger for
the welfare of Jewry
0 0 0 0 0 0 _ J


i


conte-.tporary compositions to the
local audiences, and also for bring-
ing out some famous artists to
this country.
Solly Aronowsky studied law
and music in Kovno. Since his
arrival in Johannesburg he has
been active in the -capacity of
violinist, concert impresario, con-
ductor of the Jewish Guild Youth
Orchestra. He is the head librarian
of the S.A.B.C.
CREATIVE MUSICIANS
There have been quite a repre-
sentative number of creative
musicians among our people. When
th Society of South African
Composers was founded, about
half the membership was Jewish.
Here again their contribution was
very noticeable. Besides the above
mentioned David Foote, Hallis and
Hirschland often performed their
own compositions, as did the
pianist Sydney Rosenbloom, now
residing in East London. Sydney
Richfield and the late Ernest Loe-
wenhertz have composed numerous
Afrikaans songs, which are in-
cluded in the repertoire of most
Afrikaans concert singers.
A young composer whose
career ought to be followed is
Stanley Glasser, who often
takes his thematic material
from Indigenous Bantu themes.
NO JEWISH MUSIC
It is regrettably noticeable that
nearly all the above-mentioned
musicians do not particularly in-
terest themselves in Jewish music,
either by performing or creating
it, but devote themselves to the
general art of music.
It is possible that I may have
omitted some worthy names unin-
tentionally, for which I beg and
hope to be forgiven, as I am only
human.

Congratulations and best
wishes to the
ZIONIST RECORD
on its
GOLDEN JUBILEE
from
The Chairman,
Executive and
Committee of the


MOSHE


SAD'OWSKY
FORDSBURG-
MAYFAIR

HEBREW

BENEVOLENT

ASSOCIATION
(Founded in 1918)
P.O. Box 22,
Fordsburg,
Johannesburg.


Extend best wit
Zionist R
on its
50th Anniv


shoes to the
record
versary


The Chairman, Executive
and Committee of the


Mayfair

Hebrew

Congregation


17 ELEVENTH AVENUE,
MAYFAIR,
JOHANNESBURG


SAMUEL MOCH
TALMUD TORAH
and the
MAYFAIR
LOMDI TORAH


With the compliments of


E. H. Torr and
E. H. TORR


H. W. Johns, of
(PTY.) LTD.


ESTATE AGENTS
1st Floor, Security Building, 95 Commissioner St., Johannesburg




The National Executive

of the


UNION OF JEWISH


WOMEN OF


SOUTHERN AFRICA

on behalf of its 64 branches and
10,000 members throughout
Southern Africa congratulates
the


ZIONIST RECORD

on its fifty years of service
to the community and its
attainments both. in the Zionist
and journalistic fields


-am- -amw Now -dow 4"W -Now mv


........... ......


; I


I I FIL 'III


I


rAGE SEVENTY-FOUR


PARTY





SOUTH AFRICA

extend best
wishes to the
ZIONIST
RECORD
on its
Golden Jubilee







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958



EARLY DAYS OF


FOR more than 60 years there
have been organised Jewish
youth groups in South A'frica. The
first such group was formed in
1895 by the English-born Rev.
Alfred Philipp Bender, who was
the religious leader o the Cape
Town Jewish community. It was
called the Cape Town Jewish Boys'
and Girls' Guild and aimed "to
promote social intercourse among
thehyounger members of the Jew-
ish community '(and) to stimulate
their active sympathy on behalf
of the poor and sick, without dis-
tinction of colour, class or creed."
At that time Cape Town was
the academic centre of Southern
Africa and many young Jews from
Johannesburg and elsewhere had
their schooling in the town. The
Guild met their social and intel-
lectual needs and through it they
met the local Jewish youth. Soon
it had more than 200 members. On
returning to their home towns they
formed newer Guilds, 'and in 1897,
for example, the Johannesburg
Jewish Guild was formed. Many
of the Guilds faded out during
the Boer War. The Johannesburg
Guild, however, was revived soon
after the war-this time by young
adults who as youths were the
original founders a few years be-
fore. By now the Guild had
changed its character and catered
not for youth but for young adults.
A LONG WAY
The Johannesburg Jewish Guild
has grown through the years and
other centres have followed its
example. Jewish Guilds have
come a long way from the time
when they were youth organisa-
tions catering for young Jews who
had recently arrived from Eastern
Europe, often with but a few words
of the English language.
Another idea borrowed from
English Jewry was the Jewish
Lads' Brigade, which was formed
in Johannesburg in 1898. The
Brigade taught its members "drill,
discipline and manly sports such


h..i I


Mr. Harry Tucker

President
of the


United Hebrew


Institutions
OF


Benoni

Extends congratulations to
the Editor and Staff
qf the
ZIONIST RECORD
on the occasion of its
50th ANNIVERSARY


PAGE SEVENTY-FIVN


JEWISH YOUTH


S 1 This is the first of a
publ
MOVEMENTS yout mmt


I CHAIMj
ROSENBERG~


as cricket, football and athletic
exercise," thus preventing them
from "loafing and gambling." It
had its own uniform with a star
of David sewn on to a blue jersey.
It formed its own band and was
presented in 1899 with a blue flag
with a white shield of David.
While on a visit to Johannes-
burg in 1899 President Paul
Kruger asked to meet the Brigade,
but it was- a Sabbath and they
were unable to be present. Soon
afterwards the Brigade visited Pre-
toria to give an exhibition of squad
drill at a Zionist concert. It called
on the President at his residence
with the blue and white flag as
its banner. On learning that it
was a Jewish flag President
Kruger refused to see them unless
they carried, the Vierkleur. The
captain of the Brigade managed to
procure a flag at the Volksraad,
and with it the boys marched to
the stoep of the Presidency to be
presented to Kruger.
JUVENILE DELEGATES


He was much pleased and re-
marked: "Now I can call you my
children. You have my flag."
He shook hands with all the
boys, promised them the protec-
tion of the State and hoped that
they would be good burghers. And
when they marched off he pre-
sented them with the Vierkleur
they carried.
These two organizations were
both founded by English Jews and


THE MEMBERS

AND STAFF
OF


BALFOUR

PARK

(THE MOTHER

OF JEWISH

SPORTS CLUBS IN

SOUTH AFRICA)

*

EXTEND GREETINGS

TO THE ZIONIST

RECORD ON ITS
GOLDEN
JUBILEE.


were modelled upon similar groups
then functioning in England. (The
London Jewish Lads' Brigade in-
cidentally still exist today with its
cadets, camps, pipe bands and
uniform.)
But such organizations could not
fully meet the needs of a com-
munity which had only recently
come from Eastern Europe
(especially from Lithuania) and
which was strongly Zionist.
In their stead came the Zionist
youth groups. The first Zionist
group was formed in Krugersdorp
only a year after the war (in
1903) and within a few months
another group came into being in
Cape Town. These two small
groups were called Pirchel ZIon-
the Flowers of Zion. Two years
later a Pirchei Zion society was
formed in Johannesburg which
aimed: (1) To teach "English-
Jewish" boys the meaning of
Zionism and Jewish history and
(II) to imbue them with Jewish
national ideas.
It was intended primarily for
"English Jewish" boys because it
is they who require to be reminded
of their Jewish origins and to be
initiated in Jewish national feel-
ings.
These groups and others with
similar names (e.g. The Rose of
Zion. the Sons of Zion, the
Daughters of Zion) were all
modelled on the Pirchel Zion
children's Zionist societies in
Russia. Quite a number of early
Zionists in this country had been
in the Pirchel Zion during their
youth in Eastern Europe, and it
was they who helped form similar
groups in South Africa,.
AFTER THE BOER WAR
In July 1905 the first South
African Zionist Conference was
held in Johannesburg. Seventy five
delegates attended of whom three
were "Juvenile delegates" repre-
senting Juvenile Zionist Societies.
I stress this point purposefully
for, apart from a few attempts
to form non-Zionist youth groups,
the Jewish youth groups in this
country have always been Zionist-
orientated and directly affiliated
to the Zionist Federation. This
link between the youth and the
Federation persists unbroken to
this day. The first youth societies
began as junior branches of the
senior Zionist societies, and
already in 1905 youth societies
were directly affiliated to the
Federation and were paying one
shilling per annum per member
Federation dues.
In 1906 David Wolffsohn, presi-
dent of the Zionist Organisation,
was In South Africa and the
Second Zionist Conference was
hastily called. At this conference
Continued on Page 89


I I I --


series of articles on the history of the Zionist
South Africa. Further instalments will be
shed in forthcoming issues.


It is with very great pleasure that

THE JEWISH WOMEN'S BENEVOLENT

AND WELFARE SOCIETY
Greets your celebration of the
50th Anniversary of
THE ZIONIST RECORD
and wishes you every success in the future.


MRS. V. MARCUS,
Chairman of the
Jewish Women's
Benevolent
and
Welfare
Society


We, THE JEWISH WOMEN'S BENEVOLENT
AND WELFARE SOCIETY which has been in
existence for 65 years, is an Organisation which
assists Jewish Women and Children.
This is achieved by a Committee of Women who
give their services entirely voluntarily.
REHABILITATION is our first object.
THE AGED AND MENTALLY AFFLICTED are assisted
financially.
THE PHYSICAL HANDICAPPED are assisted financially
and wherever possible occupation is found for them.
Our Occupational Centre, 136 Sivewright Avenue,
Doornfontein, serves exceedingly well and successfully
in this capacity.
EDUCATION ASSISTANCE is granted both for the
University where warranted, and Commercial Training
wherever applied for.
HEALTH is under the supervision of a Panel of
Doctors who give their services without remuneration.
We also supply free medicines. Patients in hospitals
and nursing homes are visited regularly by voluntary
workers of our Society
CLOTHING is distributed and our people, young and
old, are well taken care of.
HAMPERS: During the High Festivals food hampers are
distributed.
May we call uporr the Community (is a
whole for its support and assistance?


THE PRESIDENT, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND MEMBERS
OF THE JOHANNESBURG JEWISH GUILD AND COUNTRY
CLUB EXTEND BEST WISHES TO THE ZIONIST RECORD ON
THE OCCASION OF ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE.


JEWISH GUILD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
' ront row (left to right): L. Gecelter (Manager/Secretary), M. Katzoff (lion.
Treasurer), Dr. S. Horwitz (Vice-President), M. Hermer (President), L J. Kriei (Vice-
President), S. Kovalsky (Hon. Secretary). Back row (left to right): 0. Sacks, P.
Robinson, M. Hendler, L. M. Krlel, Dr. L B. Taylor, G. Gecelter, W. Dogon, J. Hurwitz.
Inset: L. Krasner.







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


die koninklike bloed van Jerusa- Vervolg van bladsy 47
lem afstam," 'n uitdrukking wat
Spaanse Jode destyds gebesig het het Columbus in Spanje om hulp
as hulle wou spog dat hulle van aangeklop. Ferdinand en Isabella
hoe afkoms was, dat sy seun ver- bet in die begin sy versoek ook
der verklaar dat sy vader ges6 van die hand gewys. Dit was 'n
het ,,ek is 'n kneg van dieselfde groeple hoog aangeskrewe per-
God wat Dawid van skaapwagter soonlikhede, waarvan die meeste
tot koning verhef het." Dalk sal Jode en Marrano's was, wat sim-
in die toekoms bewyse gevind word patiekgesind teenoor sy saak ge-
om meer lig op hierdie vraagstuk staan het. Die hooggeplaaste
te werp. Marrano, Santangel, het vir horn
Na sy mislukte poging om in die oudiLnsie met die Koningin
Portugal ondersteuning te verwerf, geredl wat uiteindelik tot die goed-


THE BEREA SYNAGOGUE


THE BEREA HEBREW

CONGREGATION
in offering its warmest congratulations to the

ZIONIST RECORD
on its GOLDEN JUBILEE,
recalls with pride its own achievements of
36 years.

SYNAGOGUE: Berea, as a House of Worship, has
won for itself a special place in the hearts
of the community, by the warmth and
beauty of its divine services. Berea is
proud of the fact that daily "shiurim" are
conducted at the synagogue.
HEBREW SCHOOL: The educational facilities
offered by the TALMUD TORAH are of
the highest order. The school caters for
children from kindergarten to matricula-
tion, thus filling a most important need in
the area.
COMMUNAL CENTRE: The synagogue's Com-
munal Centre, -which houses the Berea
Jewish Social Club, is the venue of interest-
ing social and cultural functions. The
congregation endeavours to do its utmost
to promote the welfare of Jewish youth.
The council of the congregation is gratified in
having secured the services of Rabbi and Mrs.
A. H. Rabinowitz and feel confident that, under
their able guidance, the congregation will grow
from strength to strength.


k.


THE BEREA SYNAGOGUE COMMUNAL CENTRE


keuring van sy plane deur Hulle
Majesteite gelei het. Dit was
Santangel wat Columbus se saak
voor Isabella bepleit het en Haar
Majesteit oorreed het dat 'n ge-
slaagde onderneming tot groot
voordeel vir Spanje sou strek. En
toe die koninklike magtiging ver-
kry is, moes die finansies nog ge-
vind word. Santangel self het
1,140,000 maravedis sonder rente
voorgeskiet, en die bedrag wat
nog tekort geskiet het, is deur
don Isak Abrabanel, Ferdinand en
Isabella se Joodse Minister van
Finansies, gevind.

Reisigers oor land
,Kort nadat Bartolomeus Diaz
vertrek het om 'n seeweg om
Afrika na Indie te probeer vind,
het Koning Johan II twee Chris-
tene, Joao Perez de Covilha en
Alfonso de Paiva, op 'n reis oor
land deur Afrika gestuur om inlig-
ting insake die speseryhandel,
roetes en aardrykskundige liggings
in te win. In hulle voetspore het
hy twee Jode-Josef Capateiro van
Lamego, wat veel kennis van die
Ooste en die speseryhandel gedra
het, en rabbi. Abraham van Beja,
wat menige tale magtig was-met
'n dergelike opdrag gestuur. Die
twee Christene se web het later
uitmekaar geloop en de Paiva het
in die rigting van Abessinid koers
ingeslaan. Daar het hy 'n ander
Jood ontmoet en die twee bet
saam gereis. Hulle het intieme
vriende geword en de Paiva het
die doel van sy reise aan sy mede-
reisiger toevertrou. Toe de Paiva
ernstig siek word en op sterwe 1I,
het hy 'n belofte van die Jood ver-
kry om na Portugal te reis en aan
die Koning 'n noukeurige verslag
van die inligting wat hy ingewin
het oor te dra. Die Jood het sy
belofte stiptelik nagekom.
Perez de Covilha het die twee
Jode, Josef en rabbi Abraham, in
Kairo raakgeloop. Covilha het
teen die tyd inligting ingewin dat
dit moontlik was om om die suid-
punt van Afrika na Indie te sell.
Die inligting, sowel as besonder-
hede insake die speseryhandel, bet
hy in 'n brief neergeskryf en aan
Josef Capateiro toevertrou om aan
die Koning van Portugal te besorg.
Covilha en rabbi Abraham bet
saam na die Persiese Golf gereis,
en Josef het na Portugal terugge-
keer met 'n brief wat beskryf is
as een van die belangrikste briewe
in die geskiedenis. Dit word gese
dat as Bartolomeus Diaz oor daar-
die inligting sou besik het, welslae
sy onderneming sou bekroon het.
Gaspar Da Gama
Tydens sy terugtog na Portugal
in 1498, het Vasco da Gama by
die eiland Anchediva, sestig myl
van Goa, aangedoen. Daar het hy
'n Europedr, wat 'n poging aange-
wend het om op die -vloot te
spioeneer, gevange geneem. Da
Gama het die vreemdeling ge-
martel totdat die waarheid bloot-
geld is. Hy was 'n Jood, oorspronk-
lik uit Pole, wat na menige
indrukwekkende wedervarings die
Mohammedanisme omhels het en
later 'n minister van die regeerder
van Goa geword het. Da Gama het
onderneem om sy lewe te spaar
op voorwaarde dat hy die Christen-
dom omhels en die vloot' vergesel.
Die groot seevaarder was peetoom
by die doopplegtigheid en het sy
eie naam aan die nuwe Christen
verleen; en onder die naam Gaspar
da Gama, of Gaspar van Indie,
was hy voortaan bekend. Gaspar
het veel kennis van Indie en die
Indiese 'Oseaan gedra; hy was 'n
aantal tale magtig en 'n bekwame
diplomat. Die Koning van Por-
tugal bet onmiddelik van Gaspar
gehou en hierdie kleurryke per-
soonlikheid het Cabral, Vasco da
Gama (met sy tweede reis)
d'Almeida en Albuquerque vergesel
as tolk, gids, raadgewer en diplo-
maat.
In Cochin destyds was- daar
bale Jode en menige sinagoges.
Gaspar se eggenote, wat haar man
nooit na Europa vergesel het nie,
het deurgaans 'n religieuse Jodin
gebly, en by een geleentheid het
sy handel gedryf in Tora's (perka-
mentrolle van die Vyf Boeke van
Moses) wat vanuit vernietigde
Portugese sinagoges verwyder en
in een van d'Almeida se skepe na
die Ooste gesmokkel is.


DIE JOODSE BYDRAE


Chairmlall

of the





FIRST


JOHANNESBURG


SHEBREW ORTHODOX "


CONGREGATION

(Greener Beth Hamedrash)



One of the Pioneer
Houses of Prayer


COR. FORTESQUE ROAD AND

YEO STREET, YEOVILLE


Extends congratulations to the
Editor and Staff of the

ZIONIST RECORD
on the occasion of its
5th ANNIVERSARY
50th ANNIVERSARY


JTA EDITOR GREETS


ZIONIST RECORD
IT gives me great pleasure to
I congratulate the Zionist Record
oni its Golden Jubilee. May it con-
tinue to grow successfully in its
valuable service to South African
Jewry and to the interests of
world Jewry.
As one who is in close contact
with the world Jewish press in
all languages, I consider the South <.4
African Zionist Record one of the "
most outstanding Anglo-Jewish
publications. It is both informative
and inspiring. Its editorial quality
and journalistic ability of its
editor, C. Gershater, sets a stan- B
dard which few other Anglo-
Jewish weeklies can boast of
matching.
Not only the Zionist Move-
ment, but the South African
Jewish community as a whole can
justly be proud of the Zionist
Record. M AR Veteran Jewislh writer, Boris
BORIS SMOLAR, Smolar, who heads the JTA
Editor-in-chief of the Jewish office in New York.
Telegraphic Agency.


I

'Ji


rAGE SEVENTY-SIX


CONGRATULATIONS FROM
JOHNSON, MATTHEY & CO.
SOUTH AFRICA (PTY.) LTD.
Directors: E. C. Deering (British), P. U. Rissik (alternate J. E. Wagner),
J. A. Shaw (British).
ASSAYERS, REFINERS AND ENGINEERS IN PRECIOUS METALS
LIMELMAN ROAD, WADEVILLE, TRANSVAAL TELEPHONE-.51-2388/9.
P.O. Box 78, Wadeville, Transvaal Telegrams: "Precalloys." Germi.ton.











SMr' qM, I TINCI.







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN


OF


IS]


This is the second of a
series of articles by Mrs.
Fay Doron on Anglo-Saxon
settlers in Israel. An earlier
article appeared in the
Zionist Record of April 25,
1958.

M UCH thought is being devoted
in Israel to the problem of
how to attract immigrants from
the Western countries, who could
bring with them the virtues of a
democratic background. So much
consideration is being given to this
question that the fact that there
are already large numbers of such
settlers in the country is apt to
be overlooked. Some of the veter-
ans of this particular "Allyah" are
inclined to feel aggrieved at times
at the attractions now being held
out to Jews still in the West. They
grumble, with justice, that when
they came to Palestine, they came
unaided. They paid their own
fares and found their own housing.
They struggled, unaided, to learn
Hebrew and find employment
They expected no special treat-
ment. It was enough to be able
to live and work in Zion.
The special issue published by
The Zionist Record in honour of
Israel's tenth anniversary included
an article on the so-called "Anglo-
Saxon" settlers. Lack of space re-
sulted in mention being made in
the main only of such settlers
who. occupy governmental and
public positions in the State of
Israel today. The present article
is in the nature of a second in-
stalment of what -may be termed
Israel's "AngJo-;BaaMon chronicle "
But even now 1ere 'will IMn-
doubtedly be lacunae In the list,
not only because .human memory;
is not infalltbe, but also since
there is no -official register ot;
immigrants from the English-1
speaking countries, as in most:
cases such settlers arrive under,
their own steam and are not
chargeable to public funds.
There are probably today in
Israel many thousands of Anglo-
Saxons. They are to be found on
the land, in kibbutz and moshav
alike. They are to be found in the
cities and towns. Solid and de-
cent citizens, not all their names
reach the columns of the news-
papers. There are scores of young
women from the English-speak-
ing world who have married
Israelis and have ll but forgotten
their ".Anglo-Saxon" back-
grounds, except when they sigh
helplessly, at their sabra off-
spring's pronunciation of English.
. In view of their numbers-it is
estimated that there are nearly
2,000 Israelis of South African
origin alone---it is impossible to
mention them all in this article,
even if their names were avail-
able to the writer, and human
memory even collective -
infallible. To those Anglo-Saxon
Israelis, therefore, whose names
do not appear here, author and
editor alike offer their apologies
in advance. Since "feribel" is not
a particularly Anglo-Saxon
characteristic, it is hoped that
they will accept this apology in
the spirit in which it is proffered.
In order to avoid repetition,
and to save space, those settlers
who were mentioned in the Inde-
pendence Day issue will not be
referred to in this second Itnstal-
ment of the "Chronicle," which
begins with the pioneers who are
no longer among as.
Perhaps the earliest of ae
Anglo-Saxon tetders, *ogh she.
would not have regarded berseM'
as a settler, was Miles Annie
Landau, who came out from
England before the turn of the
century, to administer the Eve-
lna de Rothschild School for
Girls in Jerusalem. So indelibly
did she leave her mark on the


PIONEERS


S A E who were both killed during the lost his life last year when he to live in a gate-house in the Old
| 3 1936-1939 Arab riots; Julius crash-landed his 'plane near City of Jerusalem; Rose Slutzkin
Jacobs and Victor Levy, the most Haifa, in order to avoid catas- veteran settler and philanthropist
Senior Jewish officials in the trophe in the village over which from Australia, and her jovial
SMandatory administration, who he was flying); Joshua Gordon, architect son-in-law Tom Chaikin;
lost their lives in the blowing-up knowledgeable and literary, who Ester Caillngold, who was killed
school, that it was generally re- of the king David Hotel (Julius was for years in charge of the defending the Old City in 1948
feared to as "Mit wass Landau's" acobs' only son Sandy, who Jewish Agency's liaison work and Irving Glazer, of Johannes-
At onerrd to as "Miss Landau's."ti- served in the Royal Air Force with the British authorities; Isaac burg, who was killed in the Sinai
Zionist, Annie Land nonevermedth anti- during World War II and was a Snowman, an artist who gave up Campaign; Samuel Bloom, who
Zionless played a rolnnie Lain the creation member of the Israel Air Force, painting British Royalty in order Continued on Page 86
less played a role in the creation
of the Jewish State. Her school
educated generations of young
Jerusalem girls and turned out I
thousands of young women who
occupied thousands of secretarial M R. IN DUSTRIA LIST
posts demanding a knowledge of
English h, particularly in the Man- Take a look at NIGEL
datory Government's clerical ser-Tat
vice. Moreover, numbers of young
Jewish women came out from the
English-speakingp countries toEAREST REEF TOWN TO THE PORT OF DURBAN
take up teaching posts on the
staff of the Evelina de Rothschild
School and eventually married I l .l. ,. A. ........


by FAY DORON


into the old-establistied Jerusalem
families, thus becoming part and'
parcel of the Yi'shnv.
Miss Landau herself was an an-;
forgettable character, wivt her,
reminiscences of Tuidatsh times
and of her friendship with" the
TurkWh overlord, Jemal Pasha,
and with her strictly Orthodox
household. Her Friday night din-
ners and her ainmral Sedarim were
features of Jerusalem life. Many
an innocent guest from abroad,
invited to Friday night dinner,
earned her wrath when ringing
her doorbell or asking whether
they might telephone for a taxi
to take them back to the hotel.
She had friends among all sec-
tions of Jerusalem society and her
annual garden-party was for many
years the one occasion when Jews,
Arabs and British mingled, united
if in nothing else, at least in ad-
miration of her beautifully laid-
out garden. As she grew older,
Miss Landau mellowed in her op-
position to political Zionism. To-
day, the Evelina School is directed
by Mrs. Moss Levy, for many
years Miss Landau's second-in-
command, and under her guidance
is as loyal an Israeli institution
as any other in the country. Ethel
and Moss Levy themselves have
been landmarks in Jerusalem for
decades arid hundreds of Anglo-
Saxon settlers have enjoyed their
hospitality and friendship.
Among other settlers from the
English-speaking countries who
lived and died in the country, toth
before and since the establiaentJ
of the State, were such vard
personalities as Solomon Horo-
witz, patron of the arts, Governor
of the Hebrew University and the
eouttry's Saediig lawyer, who
beqneatbed bs ioey Jerusalem
home p the State-Talbieh is not
the same without the once-familiar
sight of small Mr. Horowitz taking
his large Alsatian dog for an
airing in the evenings; Jessie
Sampter, poet and humanitarian,
of Givat Brenner; Nellie Moschen-
son, American-born wife of the
gentle Swiss teacher, who helped
to edit the English edition of
"Davar"; gay and colourful Anne
Goldsmith, first Advertising
Manager of The Palestine Post;
Professor Billig and Mr. Tobias,


jINJUUaIKIAL KANISATI IUON ANU OGULD MINING
INDUSTRY SURROUNDING THE TOWN


GIVES ACCESS TO RICHEST FARMING AREAS ON THE
H IGHVELD


ELECTRICITY AND WATER AT SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL
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LOWEST-PRICED INDUSTRIAL LAND ON THE
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Fully-serviced Industrial Stands at only
100 per acre

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Enquiries to:

THE TOWN CLERK,
P.O. Box 23, NIGEL, TRANSVAAL




For all your Transport Requirements


LEYLAND ALBION (AFRICA) LIMITED
Headquarters:
North Reef Road, Elandsfontein, Transvaal. Phone 58-1361/2. P.O. Box 6226,
JOHANNESBURG.
JOHANNESBURG: Booysens Road, Selby. CAPE TOWN: Gunners Circle, Epping
Industrial Township. DURBAN: South Coast Road, Mobeni. BLOEMFONTEIN: 114
Church Street. P1ETERMARITZBURG: 293 Loop Street. NELSPRUIT: 8 Bell Street.
Represented at: East London, Port Elizabeth, Kimberley, Pretoria, Pietersburg, Rusten-
burg, Newcastle, Witbank, Middelburg (Transvaal), Klerksdorp, Windhoek, Louren;o
Marques and Beira.

LEYLAND ALBION CENTRAL (AFRICA) LIMITED
Headquarters: Salisbury, Ardbennie Industrial Township.
BULAWAYO: Mafeking Road. LUSAKA: Cor. Cairo and Bristol Roads.
N'DOLA: St. David's Road; and UMTALI.


ANGLO-SAXON


]









PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT


THE J.N.F. CLUB


minister of the first Hebrew con-
gregation in Johannesburg, who
subsequently became Chief Rabbi,
of the British Empire.
The Club had a clearly defined
programme. It raised funds by
selling J.N.F. stamps and sending
congratulatory telegrams to Jew-
ish weddings, barmitzvahs and
other celebrations. Another impor-
tant aspect of the Club's activity
was collections at slmchas and
functions, both public and private.
It was in this respect that
the Club incurred the odium of
many people, who resented the
appearance of young men and
women in their homes as an
impudent intrusion of their
privacy.
ABUSES AND INSULTS
Says Mr. Wunsch: "There were
occasions when we were virtually
thrown out of homes by irate
hosts and hostesses who hurled In-
sults and abuse at us. But we
remained undaunted and became
even more determined in our
tasks. Gradually the public gener-
ally became used to our presence
at festivities. We met with less
opposition and the celebrants gave
gladly to the funds."
A proud moment for Mr. Wunsch
and some of his co-workers was
when they were introduced to the


(Continued from page 67)


Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


ganisations, in particular, the
Johannesburg Benevolent Associa-


late David Wolffsohn, president of tion, the Fordsburg Gemillut
tesation Chesed, of which he Is a trustee,
the World Zionist Organisation and the S.A. Board of Jewish Edu-
during his visit to Johannesburg cation, of which he is an executive
in 1906. As a result of the visit member. He has endowed educa-
a David Wolffsohn Club was tional bursaries to the King David
formed in the city and lasted for School and the South African
about six years. Commercial Travellers' Associa-
tion.
ZIONIST ROMANCE toIn Israel, which Mr. and Mrs.
Mr. Wunsh received much in- Wunsh have visited several times,
spiration in his Zionist work from they have made generous contri-
his wife whom he married at butions to the Magen David Adorn
Krugersdorp in 1911-a romance (they are the first honorary life
which sprang from their Zionist members of the organisation In
activities. Mr. Wunsh recalls that South Africa), the Haifa Tech-
he was granted three weeks' nion. Their names are also perpetu-
"special leave" by the J.N.F. ated on a plaque erected in their
Club for his honeymoon. Mrs. honour at the WIZO Mothercraft
Wunsh was a daughter of the late Centre, Tel Aviv, for their gener-
Mr. W. Jacobs, one-time chairman ous donation of the equipment for
of the Lemaan Zionist Society a children's playground and out-
which was formed by members of buildings.
the Randfontein and Krugersdorp
communities, in 1898. Mrs. Wunsh PRIME MOVER
was a devoted Zionist worker and A pioneer clothing manufacturer
was secretary of the Lemaan in the Transvaal, Mr. Wunsh'was
Zionist Society for a number of the prime mover in the establish-
years. Among her most treasured ment of the Transvaal Clothing
possessions is a brooch presented Manufacturers' Association. This
to her by the late Mr. Benzion year the factory he founded in
S. Hersch, in appreciation of her Johannesburg c e 1 e rates the
services for Zionism. golden jubilee of his career as
Mr. Wunsh has been actively business man and industrialist in
associated with other Jewish or- this city. M.H.M.


"BEST EDITED PUBLICATION



Dear Mr. Gershater,
It is both a pleasure and a
privilege to join the countless
friends and admirers of the Zionist
Record in extending to you and
its publishers 'heartiest felicita-
tions and the best of good wishes
on the occasion of its Golden
Jubilee.
As one who has been for many
years actively associated with
Zionist and general Anglo-Jewish
publications both here and abroad,
I can testify to the outstanding
position which the Zionist Record
occupies among the leading Jewish
publications throughout the world.
I, for one, consider the Zionist Ernest E. Barbarash, editor
Record the best edited publica- "Ees i iBsh eor
tion of its kind reflecting as it "American Zionist" of
does in Its columns and feature New York.
material, a true and comprehen-
sive picture of Jewish life in
South Africa as well as the Jewish living, and, above all, to
dynamic progress of the State the mobilisation of maximum
of Israel. support for the Zionist ideal and
The Zionist Record, in the years economic development of t h e
since its inception, has rendered Jewish State.
and continues to render vital con- On this the Golden Jubilee of
tributions to the emancipation of the Zionist Record, I can only
South African Jewry, the enhance- ERNEST E. BARBARASH.
ment of its creativity and positive state: CHAZAK VE'EMATZ!


PROUD TRADITION OF THE REDRO FISH PASTE MANUFACTURES


WITH the advent of summer
one's thoughts turn to
lightweight clothes, iced drinks
and paper-thin sandwiches; and
what could be more delicious,
more edible or more nourishing,
than sandwiches made with Redro
Fish Paste.
Redro is a most delicious fish
paste because the unique recipe
** ----,-


calls for the use of the most care-
fully selected and blended ingre-
dients. It is also vacuum-sealed to
retain 'the full flavour of the fish.
It is ideal for cocktail snacks,
breakfast toast, morning and
afternoon teas and children's
lunches.
Not only do children love Redro,
but it is also a health-giving pro-
tein food, which helps build sturdy
bodies and gives them plenty of


energy on summer days when
swimming, tennis and other active
sports make demands on young
people.
Stephen Brothers, Ltd., the
manufacturers of this popular
fish paste, was originally estab-
lished as a family business at the
beginning of the last century,
when they started trading along
the West Coast.
Since its earliest days, Stephen


Bros. Ltd., has concentrated on
quality, and nothing but the very
best is used in the manufacture of
its products. Redro Fish Paste was
first introduced to the public i3
1932, and immediately established
itself as a leader in its particular
field.
When war came, certain essen-
tial ingredients were unobtainable,
and the manufacturers decided to
stop production. In 1956 the re-


laxation of import control made it
possible to start production again,
and Redro once again appeared on
the market in its original form.
Since then the sales have exceeded
the manufacturers' expectations,
and -Redro has once again estab-
lished itself as a favourite in
every home. Redro, appreciative of-
the support received from the
public, knows that in future
this confidence will be maintained.


" *," "-:; z . ^^,^

. A,, ,g ri ... f- -
IS .. .-TR R ,,. .F- .- .-I J -, ,
.- .c '-. ..-' --.:. -




IS TERRIFIC!


- I







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958 PAGE SEVENTY-NIN_


* AUNT RACHEL WROTE FOR THE CHILDREN


A T the present time there are
many Jewish youth move-
ments and Jewish youth clubs,
where boys and girls meet and
where they learn to take an inter-
est in Jewish affairs. In the early
days of the Zionistn movement in
South Africa there was little or
no provision made for such
activity.
It was then, that in 1914, Aunt
Rachel began to write the Child-
ren's Page in the Zionist Record.
Boys and girls who later became
prominent figures in the Zionist
world, first became acquainted
with Jewish affairs by correspond-
ing with this, "Aunt" through the
Children's Page of the Record.
Aunt Rachel first began to
write her articles in the little dorp
of Lichtenburg in the Western
Transvaal. Here,_ living a quiet
isolated life in the country, she
kept in touch with the outside
World, by interesting the youth of
South Africa in Judaism and Zion-
ism.
HOMELY ARTICLES ,
Her articles were simple but
much emphasis was placed on the
spiritual side. The sophisticated
ybuth of today would probably
not have enjoyed them, but the
very homeliness of the articles
seemed to appeal to the youth of
the First World War period.
She and her husband were
always interested in nature and
in gardens. Some of the houses in
which she and her family lived
were rambling, shabby and not
very comfortable, but the gardens
which they -created round them
were a joy.
Aunt Rachel found inspiration
in the simple country around her.


One of her most impressive
articles spoke of spring in that
small dorp, with its fruit trees in
blossom, willow trees with new
pale green leaves and water fur-
rows flowing down the streets.
She compared the spring to the
New Year-the time of new work,
new endeavour, new hope.
No Jewish festival passed by
without Aunt Rachel's comments
and explanations. Today there are
youth services in many syna-
gogues. In those days, she was a
pioneer in her articles, in her home
and, later, at the South African
Jewish Orphanage, in making the
festivals memorable for the Jew-
ish child.
In the same way, in some of her
articles, she tried to bring the
children closer to the Bible, to
explain certain passages, and to
inculcate into them a love for
Biblical language. She also did
much to interest the youth in
literature, both Jewish and
general. Current events played a
prominent part in her page,
especially as they affected world
Jewry.
WIDE APPEAL
The fact that her post-box was
filled with letters from Marquard,
Kimberley, Bloemfontein, Gra-
hamstown, East London, Johan-
nesburg and other towns from all
parts of the Union and even from
Rhodesia, shows that her articles
had a wide appeal. Her correspon-
dence collected large sums of
money for the Jewish funds of
those days. The shillings, florins
and half-crowns came in regu-
larly, helping to swell the funds.
Aunt Rachel wrote a short per-


INELS DAIRY






S""Crcam LInc"

S Pasteurised Milk, Cream i

SButter, Cheese, Eggs, 9

Yogurt

S Cor. Rustenburg Road and

S 2nd Avenue Victory Park


SPhone: 46-4991


Branches:
Emmarentiam "Rusthill" Phone 41-4774
Northcliff: Muldersdrift Rd. Phone 46-1718

Parkhurst: 22 6th Street Phone 42-4022

Protea: 4th St., Vrededorp. Phone 35-1539

Delarey: 12th Street, Vrededorp.

Phone 35-6314.


Extend best wishes to the
Zionist Record on its Golden

Jubilee


has been a pleasure to write to
the children, to keep in touch with
them and to share their troubles
and joys. I am happy to realise
that I have been able to inculcate
in the children a love of things
Jewish."


"AUNT RACHEL" . .
the late Mrs. Louis Shaer.
sonal message to each correspon-
dent.
In 1926 Aunt Rachel became the
Matron of the South African Jew-
ish Orphanage, and moved to
Johannesburg with her husband
who became-the superintendent of
the same institution. She con-
tinued her articles, but as her
duties kept her very busy, she
had difficulty in finding time to
write. Later, in 1932, her health
and sight began to fail and writing
became a great strain on her frail
physique.
She died in 1937, after many
long and painful years of illness.
The final tragedy, for a woman of
her intellectual attainments, was
her blindness.
SECRET REVEALED
Aunt Rachel kept her nom-de-
plume all the time she wrote.
Many boys and girls wondered who
this Aunt really was. When, in
1933, she decided to stop writing
for the Record, "Hamabit," of
the Record wrote: "At last the
secret is out!!" The Jewish public
then realized that Aunt Rachel
was Mrs. Louis Shaer-Matron of
the South African Jewish Orphan-
age. Before her marriage, she was
Iiss Rachel Neufliess, a well-
lnown teacher at the Jewish Gov-
ernment School in the early days
of Johannesburg.
I think that in writing about
Aunt Rachel and her work, a tri-
bute must be paid to her husband,
the late Mir Louis Shaer. He took
a keen interest in her "page" and
assisted her whenever he could. It
was suggested that Aunt Rachel's
articles should be published in
book form. How conscientiously
Mr. Shaer chose the most suitable
ones for publication, and with what
loving care, he annotated them
When no publisher would publish
the book, her husband's disap-
pointment was greater than her
own. Aunt Rachel felt that she had
done what she had set out to do.
Let me quote her own words on
her retirement from the Reoord.
"The work had its own reward. It

With compliments
from"

GERALD

RITCHIE

SPORTS
0 Stockists of all Sports Equip-
ment, Toys, Hobby Kits and
Electric Trains.
24-hour Repair Service for
Tennis Racquets.


134 Queen Street,
Kensington.
Phone 25-5128.


Aunt Rachel did not live to see
the formation of the State of
Israel, for which she had worked
and prayed all her life. But In the
Golden Book in Jerusalem is in-
scribed the name of this "Mother
in Israel." NAOMI SHAER.


Heartiest congratulations to the
g ZIONIST RECORD on their GOLDEN JUBILEE
from the manufacturers of:
' LITTLE LADY GARMENTS and MISTY ISLE SWIMWEAR


.WITH COMPLIMENTS FROM
NIGHT WATCH PATROL
(I"TY.) LIMITED
55 SIMMONDS STREET, JOHANNESBURG.
P.O. Box 7043.
Telephone 33-8084/5. Emergency Phone S3-8084 5.
Uniformed supervised watchmen available, nightly, weekly and
monthly-Phone 33-8034 (day and night).


With compliments from



LouAppel'sAuto Spares
(PTY.) LTD.
THE HOME OF MILLIONS OF SPARES

233 Booysens Road, Selby,
JOHANNESBURG


With the compliments of



Carlton Health Centre



Second Floor, Carlton Hotel, Eloff Street,
JOHANNESBURG.



The Continuous Towel

Cabinet Co. (Pty.) Ltd.
156 President Street
Phone 22-2127 P.O Box. 3884
Extend their beat wishes to the Zionist Record on its
50th Anniversary.




CARLTON FLORIST
OARLTON HOTEL, ELOFF STREET,
JOHANNESBURG. TELEPHONE: 23-0995


Extend their best wishes to the Zionist
Record on the achievement of their
Golden Jubilee


WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OB


H. Goldschmidt

All Classes of Insurance

26 HEATH'S BUILDING, 78 PRITCHARD STREET
(CORNER VON BBRANDIS STREET), JOHANNESBURG.
PHONE 28-5431 P.O. BOX 1483








AGE -EIGHTY


THE G

Phenomenal development
of the building industry
since 1908
BUILDINGS and construction
play a dominant role in the
history of the development of ever-
growing Johannesburg.
Over 72 -years ago the first
tents were pitched by prospectors
on the Witwatersrand. From that
handful of pioneers the growth of
the modern city of Johannesburg
and the flourishing Reef towns
has exceeded even the wildest
dreams of visionaries of long ago.
Figures tell us that the popu-
lation of Johannesburg today is
over the l1. million mark; the
municipal boundary contains an
area of 94 square miles; over
132,000 motor vehicles are regi-
stered in the city; thirsty Johan-
nesburg's average water consump-
tion is over 40 million gallons per
day, with the recently all time
high set at over 55 million gallons.
SOARING VALUES
Real estate values nave soared.
Building goes on at a furious pace.
It is reminiscent of the situation
In 1886. Then too land values rose
and permanent buildings replaced
the makeshift structures in the
newly surveyed area that is today
the centre of the city.
By 1908, the year the Zionist
Record was founded, Johannes-
burg's development as a built-up
area was well under way. In the
centre of the city the nucleus of
today's mammoth shopping centres
had already been built. Market
Square could boast such imposing
buildings as the Corner House,
which towered almost 182 feet
above street level, and the Rissik
Street Post Office, which had been
enlarged to four storeys in 1904.
Incidentally, Mr. M. C. A.
Meishke, a Johannesburg pioneer
who had built the Rissik Street


,ROWTH


OF


- o


A view of the centre of Johannesburg in 1908. This photograph
was taken from Cuthbert's Building.


Post Office, was the contractor
whose tender was accepted for the
building of the Town Hall in 1910.
Yet another fine building was
added when the South African
Institute of Medical Research was
established in 1912 and housed on
Hospital Hill.-
BUSY YEARS
From then on buildings mush-
roomed out all oyer the town and
there must have been busy years
for the building contractors.
In 1935 Johannesburg was pre-
paring to celebrate its Golden
Jubilee. The imposing Escom house
was under construction and the
Public Library Building taken
over by the Municipality.
From Escom House of 1935 to
the nearly completed New Escom


House of 1958, the history of Jo-
hannesburg is studded with stories
of the laying of foundation stones
by some dignitary or another.
Today it is .difficult to walk
along any pavement in the centre
of the City without making a de-
tour into the street past piles of
building material and pounding
power drills and compressors.
BUSTLING METROPOLIS
It is a far cry Indeed from the
rambling Johannesburg of 1908 to
the bustling metropolis of today.
With the ever increasing rate of
progress in building design and
technique it would tax even the
imagination of a- science-fiction
writer to predict the shape of
things to come in' the next fifty
years.


Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


JOHANNESBURG

.., ,. -.
2 ?.


5 Mr. M. Miodownik and Mr. I. I. Block, directors, Miodownik and 5
Co. (Pty.) Ltd. I
--


Congratulations and best wishes to the Zionist Record from




MIODOWNIK & Co. (Pty.) Ltd.


BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS

who are proud to have been entrusted with the erection and completion of the magnificent

NEW WITWATERSRAND JEWISH AGED HOME AND CHRONIC SICK HOSPITAL, SANDRINCHAM
B--- .,,< : *, .:-....., ....... .' .. ^.. '...
_------__~ ~ ~ ~ ~- -. --'.---(,..% .----- "


N Ali






RE.N


PHONES 835-7901
P.O.. Box 3359
Tel. Add. "MIOCO"


601/7 GARLIC HOUSE,
26 HARRISON STREET,
JOHANNESBURG.


. ......................... ... . .. . ....... ............... .... .............. ...... ...


a ;


I






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21,


IN


THE PAST 50 YEARS


. 198. i


Growth of

the city's
Jewish

community
Parallel with the growth of
Johannesburg has been the in-
crease in the size of the Jewish
community of the city.
* 1908-When the Zionist
Record was founded there
were approximately 10,000
Jewish residents. in Johan-
nesburg.
*
* 1938-Thirty years later the
Jewish population had more
than doubled. Census figures
show that there were 25,826
Jews in the city on the eve
of World War II.
* 1958-The Jewish popula-
tion has more than doubled
in the 20 years since then.
The last official figures,
taken at the 1951 census, show
that there were 53,423 Jewish
citizens but a conservative
estimate today sets the figure
nearer the 60,000 mark.


L. H. and A. BEHRMANN & ROSS
-
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
SINCE 1893.

FIRST FLOOR, MANSION HOUSE, 132 MARKET STREET,
JOHANNESBURG Phone 22-2791.


DISTINS SAGSEEDS GARDEN CENTRE
Corporation Buildings, 105b Commissioner Street,
(opp. C.N.A.), JOHANNESBURG. Phone 22-6981


With compliments from

HOUSE & GARDEN
16 Tyrwhitt Avenue, ROSEBANK, JOHANNESBURG
Telephone 42-6501
Antiques, Interior Decorating, Furnishing Fabrics,
Wallpaper, Iron Furniture, Lampshades


With the compliments of


CENTRAL GLASS WORKS

8 DELIVERS STREET, JOHANNESBURG


A. LUTZ VENTILATION
SPECIALIST IN VENTILATION AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Extend their best wishes to the Zionist Record
on its 50th anniversary.


III


Withl the Compliments of

WINDSOR

ELECTRICIANS
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
Phone 44-0983; Res. 44-6452
Installations Maintenance -
Repairs Stockists of Electrical
Appliances
135a CLAIM STREET,
HILLBROW,
JOHANNESBURG


With compliments from
A. TOBIANSKY
Director of

Market Building

Material Supply
Stockists of all
New and Second-hand
Building Material, Cement,
Points and Hardware.
142 BREE STREET,
NEWTOWN
Phone 33-0107


With compliments from
Cecil Onay and Father
Directors of
RADIANT
WHOLESALE
ELECTRICAL
EVERYTHING FOR THE
ELECTRICIAN
77 Plein Street, Johannesburg.
Phone 22-4361/2/8.


Established 50 years


J. H. ISAACS & CO. LTD.


REAL ESTATE 0 FINANCE
INSURANCE 0 SWORN
APPRAISERS



CORNER MARKET Cr KRUIS STREETS,
JOHANNESBURG


P.O. BOX 5575

PHONE 23-2561


WITH COMPLIMENTS FROM
GERALD R. BENDHEIM & CO.
(PTY.) LTD.
12 Bree ilree, NewtoOn. .hloannemburg.
EXPERTS IN SWIMMING POOLS AND PUMPING PLANTS
INSTALLATIONS AND MAINTENANCE
I'lone: 886-63l:4.


- w~mw 40. m mwm. 4mo ap11 ow 1O ap-o 10.w awsm W


WITH COMPLIMENTS FROM

Mr. B. Bilchik
Painter and Decorator Contractor
=ma 4 HANAU STREET, WOLHUTER,
SJOHANNESBURG
Phones:
Business ... ... 24-4745.
Residence ... ... 45-1581


-1 t -


hw-gnw-mw -a


4 in


PAGE EIGHTY-ONZ






Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


THE


CONTEMPORARY Y


ARCHITECTURAL


IN


AFRICA


THE modern movement first made an impression on the
architectural scene in the Union during the 1920's. Until
the outbreak of World War II, however, traditional forms of
expression held their own and contemporary architecture
formed but a small fraction of the total body of work.
Today the main body of
contemporary architecture
may justly be considered an
offshoot of the almost uni- By HAROLD H. LIE ROITH
versal "International Style."
The socio-economic changes
brought about by the war and
especially the change from a a correspondingly extensive
crafts to an industrial basis in body of building, with an ever-
the building trade have inevit- wider measure of recognition
ably enforced a break with accorded to contemporary
tradition, architectural expression.
The marked industrial ex- Only in the field of private
pension and prosperity ushered domestic architecture that
in by the post-war period in bastion of conservative and
the Union has been reflected by romantic tendencies is the


SCENIC

SOUTH


modern movement still encoun-
tering any concerted opposi-
tion, and even here such oppo-
sition is limited to such aspects
as external appearance.
If a wide diversity of expres-
sion is a feature of individual
family dwellings, the opposite
is true of multi-storey flat
buildings.
SENSE OF UNITY
In no other field has a more
homogeneous quality been
achieved a sense of unity
which prompted Nicolaus Pevs-
ner, the eminent art historian
and editor of the Architectural
Review, to express the con-
sidered opinion that there was
no other part of the Common-
wealth "which can offer the eye
so consistent and convincing a
vision of the style of today."
Unfortunately, the very
positive architectural character
of such high-density develop-
ment areas as Hillbrow, Johan-


nesburg, is largely vitiated by
unrealistic and unimaginative
town planning. In fact, it is
generally true to say that town-
planning practice has lagged
far behind architectural ex-
pression.
The wholesale adoption of
architectural, elements from
such varied sources as Europe,
the United States and South
America during the immediate
post-war years could with diffi-
culty be assimilated completely
without an initial transition
period, and inevitably resulted
in the development of certain
cliches.
FRAMEWORK
For example: the ubiquitous
plaster framework which im-
posed a measure of unity even
on an assortment of unhar-
monious elements.
Latterly,, however, and more
particularly among the sensi-
tive and imaginative members


Congratulations to the


Zionist


the occasion of its 50th Anniversary from




KOPILIS & SHIPPER

BUILDERS and CONTRACTORS
who erected
PHILADELPHIA CORNER
GUILDHALL
and many other
OUTSTANDING
BUILDINGS
i i and 0
11.. PALATIAL HOMES



I9tJ ,, 8 WOLHUTER STREET
u" a WOLHUTER
JOHANNESBURG


Telephones:
CORNER GU
streets, Johannesburg. 24-2251 /2/3 Cor. Esselen & Edith Cav


MR. D. SHIPPER


ILDHALL
'ell Sts., HiUlbrow, Johannesburg.


*inuuuinumuuuunununnumnmummuuiiniuinuunnninmnnuniuin.


P.O. Box 2174


The African City Properties Trust (1952) Ltd.
Directors: W. Bilhrmann (Chairman), S. L. blazer, J.P., B. Gl r (Joint Managing Directors), J. A. Hurter, B. Smither, J. E. eeler.

llllllllllH ililllllWllllIIIIIllllH liWllIlHIIilllDilllllll 36 ANNAN HOUSE, 86 COM M ISSIONER STREET, IUNilllIIIIllillIIIIIlIIIIIIIillllllHIlIIIIilIIIIIII lllllHlllllW
i lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll llllll JO H A N N ESBU RG II IIil l HIHllll Iil I IIIIIIIIIIIIIII iillllIHIII

.The. Directors and Staff extend best wishes to the Zionist Record on its Golden Jubilee


of the profession, there has
been a considered reassessment
of current modes of expres-
sion, and a revolt against the
unthinking repetition of stereo-
typed features, especially those
whose original functional basis
has been lost and which today
constitute mere extraneous
decoration.
TWO MAIN LINES
Generally speaking this re-
volt has followed two main
lines of approach: first, an
attempt to purify contemporary
South African architecture of
clicheis while still continuing
in the main stream of archi-
tectural development in the
free world.
These exponents willingly
accept the implications in-
herent in contemporary tech-
nological development and feel
that a true South African ex-
pression will arise naturally in
Continued on Page 84.


U


Record, on


PHILADELPHIA
Jeppe and Von Wielligh St


Telephone 34-3304


I


I I


PAGB EIGHTY-TWO


MR. L. KOPILuS


-








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE EIGHTY-THRRB


intiir rtratin4 1uantwnw fri


*. . ,',.
'J' ^.' -


\*. \:


*l F.,




fk#


.



THIRTY YEARS AGO a young man arrived in Johannesburg from Europe. Hard-
working, meticulous and ambitious, with invaluable experience in painting and
decorating-not only of homes but of theatres and opera houses-he set out to fulfill
his hope of developing this art in South Africa.
He firmly believed that it was taste and not money that was the most important
factor in decorating and furnishing, whether traditional or modern. As taste is not
always inborn, but has to be acquired, cultivated and guided, young Ephraim Bilchik
set out with enthusiasm and experience to guide the current taste.


Hopefully he sent out tender
after tender. Each one was
rejected with the comments,
"unknown untried what
would it look like?" Despair-
ing but undaunted, he gave up
tendering for a while and spent
all his time making samples of
his work. When all was ready,
he gathered them up and went
from architect to architect dis-
playing his "wares."
His efforts were not in vain.
Amazed, they stared unbeliev-
ingly at the exquisite crafts-
manship, never seen In this
country, which were displayed
on the samples. It was obvious
to them all that in the art of


painting and decorating, this
young man stood alone.
From then on his hopes and
ambitions prospered-but still
his dreams were not entirely
fulfilled. For although the
public recognized his firm as
foremost painting contractors
in the country, they were un-
aware of his skilled artistry In
interior decorating.
SWith this in mind, together
with a team of co-directors,
highly technical and practical
personnel and skilled crafts-
men, the organisation recently
incorporated an exclusive In-
terior decorating department
into the firm.
FROM A SMALL COTTAGE
Today, in the striking mod-
ern building which has sprung


from a small cottage in a back-
yard In Doornfontein, are
several unique showrooms, de-
signed especially for the dis-
play of wallpapers, murals,
simulated wood panelling,
plastics, vynides and other
decorative finishes,
What a magnificent rangel
I don't think there is any-
one who could fall to be en-
chanted by those fascinating
books and panels displaying
wallpapers of every conceiv-
able design and colour. The
selection is obviously the
finest In this country.
There are wallpapers from
Italy, France, Switzerland,
Britain, America, Japan and
Holland. Murals, designed by
world-renowned artists, avail-


An artist's impression
of the beautiful new
premises of Bilchik and
Co. (Pty.) Ltd., in
Doornfontein.


able on either silk, paper or
canvas-wall coverings of
vynlde and plastics in a bril-
liant spectrum of colours and
designs, which are washable,
scrubbable, fast to light, sun,
temperature-even time Itself.


Patterns range from ultra-
modern symmetrical designs
to the beautiful French flower
designs which bring the garden
right Into the home. It Is this
very fact which makes selec-
tion-without expert assistance
-almost Impossible.
Pattern confusion, discord-
ance In colour harmony and
period designs Incorrectly used,
are common faults when
decorating and furnishing. But
when a scheme is presented to
one, showing a complete lay-
out of the materials, coverings
and colours to be used-in fact
-a living picture of your In-
terior decor-then decorating
becomes a pleasure Instead of
a strain and all this is on
hand in Bilchik's unique show-
rooms.
Colour can be used subtly to
enhance the furnishings. One
lovely scheme for a bedroom
which I was shown incorpor-
ated the new French flower-
paper on a grey-green back-
ground with vivid touches of
coral red and birch green. The
carpets and curtains had been
chosen to tone with the green
leaves on the paper and the
overall effect was very gay.
When I think of how I went on
a desperate hunt for curtains to
blend with my new Swedish
furniture-I would have given
anything for some expert advice
-someone who would have
decidedly lightened my task.
In America, England and the
Continent today, people are
aware of the advantage of call-
ing on the guidance of interior
decorators. In South Africa
the idea Is gaining momentum,
but too many people are still
under the Impression that this .
Is a service for the wealthy-
they couldn't be more mis-
takenl
For the organisation has
proved Mr. E. Blichik's
original theory that It Is
taste and not money which Is
the most Important factor In
decorating. Renowned for
Its versatility, they will
undertake a Job from the
smallest to the biggest, any-
where-and each Job, no
matter how small, enjoys the
same meticulous care and
attention, and the advice and
assistance of their highly-
trained staff is always on
hand. Quotations are given
without obligation.
When I left the beautiful
showrooms (some of the dis-
plays were like glimpses of the
stately homes In Europe) I was
already making a mental note
to redecorate our home, to re-
create this minor miracle of
carefully-blended taste, assisted
of course by Bilchik and Com-
pany. S.P.


catr I aptive showrooms ~at Bilchik's.


The impressive entrance and enquiry desk.


A view of one of the attraeuve a-n---j---- --am


"'. ./*


I.


I







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


CHANGING


Continued from
page 82


ARCHITECTURE


the same way that a charac- a movement among certain in-
teristic and most significant tellectual circles ostensibly
expression has been achieved, aimed at creating a truly South
for example, in Brazil follow- African expression in the
ing just such a course. nationalistic sense. While this
Of late there has also been aim is laudable, to date the


ROSEN'S TIMBER YARD
NEW & SECOND-HAND BUILDING MATERIAL AT WHOLESALE PRICES
Phone 40-1694. P.O. Box 118, Bergvlel, JOHANNESBURG
With best wishes to the Zionist Record on Its 50th Anniversary


With compliments from
B. & R. FLOORING
MANUFACTURERS
(PTY.) LTD.
Director: H. Rest.
Parquet Flooring
Manufacturers
Office, Yard and Stores:
554 Mynhardt Street, Edenvale.
Tel. Add. "Paarlwood."
Telephone 53-1035.
P.O. Box 5, Edenvale.


With the compliments of
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(A. Stein)
SEWERAGE, HOT WATER,
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MANUFACTURERS
Quotations free Prices moderate.
Workmanship guaranteed.
Royal Theatre Buildings, 217
Louis Botha Avenue, Orange
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Phone 45-5205.


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Incorporating M. Chadwick & Co. (Pty.) Ltd.


58 Maraisburg Road,
Industria West, JOHANNESBURG
Telephone 854101. P.O. Box 7679. Telegrams: "JACKSFENCE."
.

Structural Steel Engineers,
Fencing Contractors.
0
Manufacturers of Garden Furniture,
Wire Screening, Balustrading,
Fire Escapes, etc.


Mr. Harold H. Le Roith, the
writer of this article. j


results achieved have with
hardly any exceptions repre-
sented no true advance but
rather the replacing of certain
cliches typical of the "verna-
cular movement" by another

With Compliments. from

UNIVA METAL
WORKS
(PTY.) LTD.
Directors: E. G. Frankiskos,
S. Themells (Greek)


21 Voorhout Street,
(Cor. 5th Street)
New Doornfontein,
JOHANNESBURG

Tel. Add.:
"UNIVA," Johannesburg.
0
Manufacturers of:
THE "UNIVA" COAL AND
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SANITARYW'ARE,
MATERIAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT


set of influences equally
foreign.
Paradoxically enough, it is
only too true that the most
characteristically South Afri-
can expression has been
achieved by architects whose
work follows most closely the
main stream of architectural
development with the due con-
sideration accorded climatic,
structural and socio-economic
factors which is ever stressed
by proponents of the so-called
International Style-a style
which, in its finest manifesta-
tions, has ever combined uni-
versal truth with a recognition
of regional variations.
TTTmTA.T "Tk" A nR


TRENDS IN CITY'S


With the compliments of
To sum up, it may be said
of contemporary architectural KENSINGTON
development in the Union that PTTTIM B
the initial phase characterized P LU DMBERSjij
by the wholesale adoption of P. J. Llebenberg
elements from the -common
store of architectural -REGISTERED PLUMBERS &
knowledge has passed, and that DRAINAGE CONTRACTORS.
we are on the threshold of a
new period in which our archi- 187b QUEEN STREET,
tects can in their turn make a JOHAKENSINGTON
positive contribution to the Phone 25-5876.
world's architectural heritage. '


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JOHANNESBURG


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ON ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE
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Phohe 33-8101


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THE FAMILIAR SIGN











QUICKER, BETTER, MORE

ECONOMICAL BUILDING


P.O. Box 6280


MANSION HOUSE,
132 Market Street, Johannesburg.


JOHANNESBURG 182 Market Street, Johannesburg.


TMR. URI MELTZER
The late Mr. Uri Meltzer was
associated with the founding of
the Zionist Record.
Born in Shaval, Russia, Mr.
Meltzer settled in Johannesburg
and took part in the early Zionist
meetings in the town. After the
Anglo-Boer War he lived for a
short while in Bloemfontein and
helped to establish a Zionist
society there.
He was a delegate to the third
S.A. Zionist conference in Johan-
nesburg and in 1908 became secre-
tary of the Johannesburg Zionist
Society. In 1917 he settled in
Jamestown in the Cape.
Mr. Meltzer instilled in his
children the ideal of aliyah and
left with his wife to join them--
his daughter, Mrs. Hannah Elion,
his son, Mr. Solly Meltzer in
Israel in 1956.
He made his home in Ashkelon
and carved for himself an im-
portant position in the community
by his hard work and zeal. He
died in February; 1957.


PERMANENT ISRAEL PAVILION,
Milner Park Showgrounds, Johannesburg.


Phone 22-5833


l


PAGE IUGFITY-FOUR


JOHANNESBURG







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958 PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE



* 35 SYNAGOGUES IN JOHANNESBURG


THE rapid growth of the Jewish
community of Johannesburg
affords an opportunity of taking
a glance at the religious develop-
ment of the Jewish population over
the last 50 years.
Fifty years ago, or shortly after
the turn of the century, there were
10 synagogues in existence. (Wit-
watersrand Hebrew Congregation,
Johannesburg Hebrew Congrega-
tion, President Street Synagogue,
Jeppe Hebrew Congregation, First
Johannesburg Orthodox Hebrew
Congregation, Ponevez, Wander-
ers, Doornfontein, Orphirton, South
Eastern).
These synagogues offered ac-
commodation to 4,400 worshippers,
at a time when the Jewish popula-
tion of Johannesburg was approxi-
mately 15,000 souls. Thus, accom-
modation in synagogues at the
time amounted to about 30 out of
every 100 souls.
FULL ATTENDANCES
From reports available,, it can
reliably be stated that the syna-
gogues at the time were full
to capacity during the High
Festivals, and additional temporary
seating was provided wherever
possible. The practice also pre-
vailed to hold services in public
halls and school-rooms, though no
figures are available regarding the
number of worshippers in these
temporary places of worship.
From 1908 to 1918, in a matter
of ten years, four more synagogues
were added, providing additional
accommodation for 1,570 (Chas-
sidim, Bertrams, Fordsburg, Forest
Hill). Meanwhile the Jewish com-
munity grew by another 5,000
souls. Thus the same ratio be-
tween the number of souls and the
number of seats available was
maintained.
A rather remarkable period in
the erection of new synagogues
followed in the next five years.
Though the community grew again
by a further 3,000 sours only, four
more synagogues were established,
providing a further seating
capacity for 2,500. (Yeoville, Pos-
wohl, North Eastern and Berea).
The establishment of these four
synagogues brought a welcome im-
provement on to the scene. The
seating capacity for worshippers
increased from 30 to nearly 40 out
of every 100 souls.
The increase in synagogal facili-
ties was undoubtedly due to the
fact that the early pioneers were
gradually settling down and to
the general improvement of condi-
tions In the Union after the first
World War.
During the next 13 years we
find a rather steep climb in the
Jewish population of Johannes-
burg. From a community of 23,000
in 1923, there were in 1936 not
less than 38,847 Jewish souls in
Johannesburg. The drift from the
smaller centres in South Africa to
Johannesburg, that had by then.
already started, plus a considerable
influx of refugees from Europe,
swelled the number of Jewish
people to a very appreciable
degree.
But the development of congre-
gations built in the same period
(Malvern, Mayfair, Orange Grove,
Central Orthodox, Kensington,
Emmarentia) added a further
3,000 seats, providing only for one
out of every five people with
accommodation in a synagogue.
Once again the economic factor
tells the tale. Both the new settler
from the country and the new-
comer from Europe obviously could
not easily provide the mbans for
synagogal structures immediately
upon arrival in Johannesburg. But
during the following year, 1937,
two synagogues were founded
(Parkview-Greenside, Etz Cha-
yim), destined to accommodate
another 1,500 worshippers.
The most rapid rise in the
Jewish population of Johannes-
burg, however, took place be-
tween 1936 and 1946, when, in
the course of ten years, 12,000
more Jews came to live in the
Golden City.
In the corresponding period, and
including the two latter syna-
gogues, a further seven congrega-
tions were established (Observa-
tory, Cyrildene, Adath Yeshurun,
Oxford and Sydenham/Highlands


In 1908 there were only ten
down or been swallowed up by
By RAB Dt others, there are a total of 32
By RABBI DR. J. NEWMAN orthodox congregations in exis-
tence. The total seating capacity
of the existing synagogues
North) adding in all 4,500 places amounts to 17,500.
for permanent worship. Of the total capacity of seats,
A comparative period of lull however, not less than 2,000 were
followed in the next decade, be- unoccupied during the last High
tween 1948 and 1958, as far as the Festivals. This figure is however
construction of new synagogues offset by approximately 1,000 wor-
is concerned. Two congregations shippers in temporary places of
only came on to the scene (North- worship. We are thus left with a
cliff and Northern Suburbs in total of 16,500 worshippers in
Bramley) with a third congrega- Orthodox congregations. In addi-
tion (Linksfield) rearing its head tion the Progressive Movement
bravely from the ground. These accommodated a total of 3,700
three congregations have absorbed worshippers during the High
during 1958 a further 1,000 wor- Festivals of 1958, in four houses
shippers, of worship.
Today, after some of the earlier We arrive thus at the figure of
established synagogues have closed just over 20,000 worshippers pre-


LITE ELECTRICAL SWITCH
MANUFACTURING COMPANY
(PTY.) LIMITED
-and-

SWITCHCRAFT
(PTY.) LIMITED
TWELFTH ROAD, KEW, JOHANNESBURG
Manufacturers of Quality Electrical Equipment and
Switchcraft Switchboards.
Extend best wishes to the Zionist Record on its Golden Jubilee.


We pride ourselves on the fact that we,
like the Zionist Record, which we heart-
ily congratulate on its Golden Jubilee,
have set ourselves a high standard of
achievement. Every step we took in the
property field, since our establishment
75 years ago, was one of progress in the
development of this great City---a mile-
stone pointing the way to a better and
brighter future.


L. K. JACOBS & CO.
(PTY.) LTD.
116 COMMISSIONER STREET, JOHANNESBURG.
Directors: S. Silberman, D. G. Ross, S. Marcus,
L. J. Silberman, M. Wainstein.


ma
..~


-,~ i,-
-..


sent in synagogues during the to prayers. The present Jewish
High Festivals. This figure could population of Johannesburg is as-
safely be increased to 21,000 if we sumed to be 53,500.
consider ex-service men's service, It would thus be a fair and safe
the Sephardim, the Israel society conclusion to state that the pro-
and the numerous youth and portion of worshippers today is
children who may not find actual 40 out of every 100 souls-higher
seats in synagogues but do come than it has ever been.

With the compliments of


S. M. van ACHTERBERGH
AND CO. (PTY.) LTD.
Directors: S. M. van Achterbergh, B. Vosloo, B. M. Henry.
Building and Thatching Contractors

12 ADMIRALS COURT, 35 TYRWHITT AVENUE,
ROSEBANK, JOHANNESBURG
Telephone 42-9281. P.O. Box 88, Saxonwold.


EQUITY




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(PERMANENT)



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,I-


Take this opportunity


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their best wishes to the Zionist Record

on its Golden Jubilee.




*


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11


11


1111


-Il


I.







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


SHIRTS E PYJAMAS


"ANGLO-S

was among the pioneers of ex-
port industries with his American
Porcelain Tooth Company's pro-
ducts and who presented Tel Aviv
with the Ohel Shem Hall, scene of
the famous Oneg Shabbat gather-
ings and until recently home of the
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra;
Mr. Janower and Mr. Policansky.
early settlers from the Union; Miss
Kallen, pioneer of progressive
education in Jerusalem; Sam
Wolfson, one-time teacher at the
Herzlia Gymnasia and later a
Mandatory Government official;
Mollie Gering; Dr. Miriam Levy:
Esther Adler; Sylvia Makoff, an
early "Evelina" teacher; Ruth
Chissick and Grace Mohl, daugh-
ters of a veteran English Zionist:
The late Dr. Henry Sonnabend.
first Mayor of Ashkelon and noted
academician; Josh Leibner, kib-
butznik and "shallach" par ex-
cellence; old Mr. Turtledove, of
Magdiel; Captain Aubrey Silver,
for many years conductor of the
Palestine Police Band; Henry
Becker, the engineer (who escorted
the writer of this article to Lydda
Railway junction on her return to
England from her first visit to
Palestine and lent her his hand-
kerchief to staunch her tears):
Monty Brown, and -Abraham
Tattenbaum one-tire Mandatory
civil servant; Dr. Bernard Homa.
Abraham Goldwater. who adminis-
tered the Palestine Economic Cor-
poration for many years; Mr.
Mohl, the engineer, and his wife,
the social welfare worker, better
known as Sari Berger, who was
also associated with the Univer-
sity Women's Association; Mac
Belkine, engineer,'soldier and good
friend: Moss and Deborah Epstein;
Samuel Broza, of the Jewish
Colonial Trust and later of the
Bank Leumi; Jack Brass, of
Habonim. who lost his life in the
El Al disaster over Bulgaria; Mr.
and Mrs. Harris: Dorothy Kahn-
Bar Adon, journalist and writer.
author of "Spring Up, 0 Well":
Mrs. Eliash, an early "Evelina"
teacher and wife of the eminent
lawyer who was Israel's first
Minister to Britain, and many
others .who lie at peace beneath
the soiF of the homeland.

S.A. SETTLERS
Settlers from Southern Africa
who are still with us and who
have become part and parcel of
Israel include, among others, Mark
Levin, the veteran teacher; Sol
Tor, lawyer and patron of the arts;
Louis Shapiro, who was the first
youth-settler and who served both
in the police and in the Army;
Herzl Zuckerman, associated with
many leading enterprises, includ-
ing the Tel Aviv Marine Trust
when Tel Aviv Port was estab-
lished; Bill Daleski, of the staff of
the Hebrew University, who has
just completed a year of post-
graduate studies at Cambridge
University; Katie Gluckman, who
"mothers" the Mothercraft Train-
ing Centre at the same time as
being an energetic business
woman; her journalist son, Philip
Gillon; J o a n Solomon-Comay,
recently elected*a member of the
WIZO executive; Peggy Hayman-
Schlossberg, the concert violinist;
Norman Lourie, modern type
hotelier, Whose Dolphin House is
Israel's nearest approach to the
country club; Abraham Levy, the
pioneer South African settler, for
many years connected with' the
Binyan Bank in Haifal Zelda
Kirschner-Irron, who works hard
for the under privileged; the
Braudo family; Rabbi Dr. M. C.
Weller, now a student at the
Hebrew University, his wife, Una.
now living in a kibbutz, and their
six children; Sam Levin, Symie
Weinstein and Abe Tooch, of the
Tel Aviv office of the South Afri-
can Zionist Federation, and their
assistants; Dr. Jack Medalie and
others of the Belt Mazmil Health
Centre; Naomi Nevo, of the
Hebrew University; Alec Rubens,
of the Palestine Cold Storage
Company, a veteran settler from
Durban; Mr. and Mrs. Moss-
Morris, formerly of Durban and
now of Savyon, where Mr. Moss-
Morris serves as chairman of the
local council; their daughters,
Joyce and Naomil; Mrs. Annie
Levi, as active a member of WIZO
in Israel as she was of the
Women's Zionist Council in the


IAXON"

0 Continued from page 77.

Union; Percy Mannheim, leadir
business executive; Max. Spitz,
Peltours, better known for having
introduced the bowling green
Israel; Nicky Dunsky, who wor
with her husband to put Isra
fashions on the world market; t
group of young South Africa
associated with the "Dunsk
enterprises such as the Jac
Japhet Bank, the Ararat Insu
ance Company, the Eilat Develo
ment Corporation, SAICCO, Me
Miromit and World Tours-amnor
them Dave Dunsky himself chaii
man of the Japhet Bank); N
Lee; Zundel Segal; Philip Zucke
man; Harold Stutzen; Solomi
Sokolowski and Zelig Dunsk
Miriam Kanner-Ben Chaim, corre


SETTLERS

pondent of the Zionist Record;
Judith Horowitz, of the Hassolel
ng Street "Tnuva" in Jerusalem,
of where dozens of newspaper people'
ng have snatched their meals; Haim
to Kampel; Les Sher, of the Lachish
-ks development area; Yashpan (both
ael on "shlichut" in the Union at
he present).
ns Phyllis Lankin, who writes the
y, excellent Law Reports In the
ob Jerusalem Post; Solly Friedman,
ir- the Haifa lawyer; Dr. Bernard
,p- Hershowitz and Dr. Maurice Kap-
6fi, lan, of the Government Hospital
ig In Haifa; Dr. Leonora Reinhold,
Ir- daughter of the first president of
at the Women's Zionist Council, who
er- lectures in botany at the Hebrew
on University; George Jameson, sur-
y; veyor.
as- To be continued in a future issue.


I


K. R. DODMAN & CO.
(PTY.) LTD.

REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE AND
FINANCIAL AGENTS

438 LOUIS BOTHA AVENUE .(Opp. Doll House),
HIGHLANDS NORTH, JOHANNESBURG.
Phone Nos. 45-6958, 45-4702, 45-6234.
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO THE ZIONIST RECORD
ON ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE


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I


II


I I


rAGE EIGHTY-SIX








Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958



An editor of the pre-aspirin age


PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN


EVERYBODY knows-even an editor-
that no two factors are so indis-
pensable to the normal functioning of any
journalistic enterprise as those twin in-
separables, the Printer's Devil and the
Office Boy.
In boldly making the claim to have held
the position of the Zionist Record's first
Office Boy, I can look back 44 years---
back to the time when an editor's lot was
more hazardous than it is today. For we
must remember that the year 1914 fell
within the pre-aspirin age.
In those days headaches were allegedly
cured by the homeopathic remedy of
binding the fevered brow with a folded
handkerchief soaked, in vinegar. So when
your qualified P.D. and O.B. really let them-
selves go, picture the groaning editor
paging his galley-proofs through the wee
small hours with no better comforter than
the smell of vinegar. Nevertheless, he sur-
vived. In fact, one might say he thrived!
For example, the man who edited the
Zionist Record in 1914 is still hale and
heartily with us. And I, his Office Boy
at the time, had the pleasure. of meeting
him again recently. after more than 40
years, as the accompanying photograph
shows, .
IN THE CLASSROOM
It 'is possible that I lift -the veil on a
long-forgotten secret when I make the
breathless disclosure, that in my opinion
much of the editorial work of the Record
in those far-off days was completed within
the confines of the classroom!
But I do know positively that in 1914
Mr. I. H. Harris was not only editor
(honorary) of the Zionist Record but, more
responsibly, the senior teacher at the
Jewish Government School. Old boys will
no doubt recall nostalgically the old school
and that other important centre of Jewish
life which was right next door-the old
Park Synagogue where the congregation
patiently suffered my services as a choir-
boy for several years. Both these institu-
tions of our early Johannesburg history
now, alas, lie buried for ever beneath the
sprawling acres of the new Park Station.
To continue: when I eventually pro-
gressed through-every grade and class to
reach the scholastic heights of Std. VI
(not without considerable trepidation be-


A reminiscence by

WILLIAM STONE (Durban)


cause of Mr. Harris's ogre-like reputation
as a sternly severe disciplinarian) I soon
found myself with a new job.
The job to which I was promoted was
"Honorary Office Boy" to the Zionist
Record. And it was the job I executed with
far greater alacrity than anything per-
taining to class work!
This is how it went: On one day of each
week the class-room became the editorial
office. Whilst forty grubby boys and girls
grappled with the problem of sorting out
fractions and decimals into a semblance of
order, the Teacher metamorphosed
into the Editor, Galley-proofs were
scanned and corrected; whilst the indus-
trious small fry wondered what all those
mysterious long sheets of paper were for.
But there was one' small boy who eyed
those long sheets of paper with. a pro-
prietary interest; he knew that sooner or
later the editor's work would be done. Then
another metamorphosis would occur and
a quite undistinguished scholar would be
transformed for a couple of hours Into a
most responsible member of the Editorial
Board.

MYSTERIOUS SHEETS
One day a week, throughout the year,
it was my job to convey that bulky packet,
containing the final proofs of the current
issue of the Record, to the printers.
In 1914 the Record was printed by
The Leader Printing Company whose
works were situated in Fox Street,
somewhere in the neighbourhood of the
old Stock Exchange.
The distance from the Jewish School to
the Leader office was about three miles.
No buses ran in those days although I
suspect from recent observation that some
of the derelict trams still plying along
Eloff Street today must have seen years
of service back in 1914. In any case, 44
years ago, amongst other things the Zionist


Record could not afford the tram-fare for
the Office Boy. But you may rest assured
(and herd Im sure of my facts) the Office
Boy did not mind!
The long, leisurely stroll through the
busy streets of Johannesburg, with Its
changing scenes and hurrying people
became elevated by a small boy's imagina-
tion into an exciting adventure. Doubtless,
this elated mood was not unconnected
with a sense of freedom from the drudgery
of the school-room. Whilst his miserable
classmates wrestled tearfully with their
arithmetical problems, the Office Boy of
the Record shouldered his responsibility
with all the aplomb of a nmn of the world.
Who would have guessed that the
Inoffensive schoolboy, meandering along
the busy city streets. h ld th his hand
for one brief hour, the destiny of the
Zionist Movement in South Africa?

ADVENTURE
Within that tightly-grasped, oversize.
envelope lay hidden the secrets, the policy
and the programme of the day, as compiled
by the Executive of the Zionist Federation
and the Editorial Board of the Zionist
Record!
Yet it can be happily. recorded that all
this was conveyed, week 'after week, from
the Jewish School to the printers without
a single mishap and with reasonable speed.
I seem to recall that the journey back took
a little longer but after all what had I now
to lose?
Back in the class-room, the editorial
task having been successfully aeconiplished,
the Zionist Record "office" closed down
for the week and the Sixth Standard of the
Jewish Government School resumed its
Years later I was once again to become
normal but less romantic character.
closely associated with the Record. Round
about the 1930's, during the editorship of
Mr. David Dainow, I served for three
years as the Durban Correspondent. That
was indeed a happy period. In my official
capacity it was _--
my privilege to -
interview and re- Wit
port on the visits
.of such eminent
giants in the
Zionist Move-
ment as Welz- Colour P


CHAMPIONING CAUSE OF JEWISH EDUCATION


Message from

MR. S. YELLIN

T IS INDEED a proud achieve-
ment for any newspaper irn South
Africa to celebrate its Golden
Jubilee, particularly for a Jewish
national paper. Our community
Is comparatively young, but In re-
cent years added responsibilities
have been placed on South African
Jewry to maintain the age-old
Jewish traditions of learning and
culture.
A national Jewish paper plays
an Important part in the life of
.the community, and I am happy
to state that the Zionist Record
has always endeavoured to mould
Jewish public opinion and to edu-
cate the. community to the true
values of Judaism.
We, of the S.A. Board of Jew-
Ish Education, are pare particularly
pleased to add our congratulations
to those of the rest of the com-
munity. While being the mouth-
piece of the Zionist movement In
South Africa, the Zionist Record
has always shown deep apprecia-
tion of the true essence of Zionism
and its mission In the diaspora
which Is the creation of a strong
bridge between Israel and the Jew-
Ish communities throughout- the
world.
We have no doubt that the
Zionist Record will continue to
champion the cause of Zionism
and of Jewish education and cul-
ture, which are interlinked and
indivisible. It Is only recently
that the great Zionist leader Dr.
Nahum Goldmann reiterated and
stressed that nothing will secure
our survival but Jewish tradition,
Jewish culture and Jewish educa-
tion, and it is In this spirit that
the Jewish community must be en-
lightened that our salvation, as
well as the future of Zionism In
this country, depend on a strong,
Jewishly-consclous community.
The past 50 years have been an


Important period in the growth
and development of our com-
munity and South African Jewry
owes a debt of gratitude to the
Zionist Record which commenced
publication during the formative
years of South African Jewry.
During this period, the Zionist
Record has contributed greatly to
the moulding of Jewish life in this
country, and together with the rest
of the Jewish community I wish
to express my sincere hope that
the Zionist Record will continue
to do so for the next half a cen-
tury and more.
S. YELLIN,
Chairman,
S.A. Board of Jewish Education.


Left: Mr. I. 1i. Hlarris, who was. editor
of the Zionist Record In 1111. Right:
Mr. WillhImn Ston>e, the writer of llis
article, who was his pupil aind i lso
served as : nmessenger ly of tlhe
Record.
mann, Sokolow, J.abotinsky, Brlodetsky,
Dr. Mossinsohn and Dr. ('Inldsitein, all
of whom illuminated the Zionist scene
with their illustrious presence.
I am hapllpy to reveal that by this mlle
the Record was in funds and could afford
a correspondent's stipend. It wits just about
enough to piay for mi-y Itrini-lI e and a
little over for postage.
May 1 now take this opportunity, as
an Old Boy of the stuff, to offl'r my
heartiest (ongratulatiOns to the Record on
achieving its Golden Jubilee.
distinguished journal continue successfully
In the years to come to serve thli commni-
nity in its dedicated task of lf'irt erling
thu cinuse of Zionlm in lit southern Al'frica.

*h the compliments of



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Phones 23-9686 and 23-9696-P.O. Box 630, Johannesburg.

Extend their best wishes to the Zionist Record on its Golden jubilee.


CONGRATULATIONS ON ACHIEVING YOUR

50TH ANNIVERSARY FROM


JOSEPH LUCAS (PROPRIETARY) LIMITED

Incorporated in the Union of South Africa


GIRLING DIVISION


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4 .44 # # # ..4''4, 4 4 4a


-- w







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT


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Phone 835-6198


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Extend best wishes to the Zionist Record on its
Golden jubilee.


Memories of the Zionist office


9 Continued from page 14
cape me now. The day of wide-
spread Zionist. activity among
women was not yet.
In the business field, my duties
led me to worry all and sundry
who were known to be Zionists,
in turn to worry manufacturers
and business houses to grant the
Record advertisements; also to
renew advertisements about to


Mr. J. Sternfield, a frequent !
visitor to the Zionist office In
those days. He recalls having i
helped with the wrapping and
Sdespatching of copies of the
= Zionist Record

expire, for it was difficult to per-
suade advertisers that "the five
hundred copies of the Record
actually printed, really represent
five-thousand readers, since every
copy was passed round in a large
circle right through the month"-
a stock argument in letters from
the office.
In the direction of subscribers,
the assistant secretary (by then
Acting Secretary) had an inspira-
tion. She had two rubber stamps
made, one reading MARKED
COPY, the other the shape of a
hand pointing. Everyone whose
name appeared in the Record
was sent a copy of the particular
issue bearing the inscription out-
side MARKED COPY. Inside,
where the name appeared, (if not
tQ the bearer's discredit) was the
mark of the pointing finger.
This was a frequent inducement
to become a subscriber, more
especially if it said "Little Florrie
danced beautifully" or "little
Johnnie recited!"
Mr. Abrahams was encouraging
and helpful, and I was .upset when,
after two months' training, I was
told he was staying only one
month. He had long been at
variance with some members of
the executive. Prolonged adver-
tising for a secretary-editor
brought no results.
Mr. Lennox Loewe, a devoted
but somewhat eccentric member of
the executive, offered his services
as hon. secretary of the Federa-
tion and hon. editor of the
Record, until "a suitable encum-
bent could be found. I was ap-
pointed acting secretary and as-,
sistant editor, with an increase in
salary of 2 10s. per month,
making the total salary 7 10s.
retrogressively for the past two
months.
Mr. Loewe was a full-time
employee of a bank and would
come to the office of the Federa-
ation at about 5.30 and usually
disapprove of most things that
had been done during the day.
His family was abroad and he
was quite prepared to 'stay on at
the office and, with the acting
secretary's assistance, undo the
day's errors. Sometimes he would
order dinner for two to be sent
up to the office, but that was no
great consolation. Fortunately
there were a number of good
friends and true among the mem-
bers of the executive and some of
them would come into the office
frequently. Their guidance and
encouragement was invaluable.
Isaac Caplan, the Federation's
hon. treasurer and the main cause
of Mr. Abraham's resignation, did


his best to be helpful; Benzion
Hersch and Joseph Janower were
veritable rocks; Harry Moss-
Morris, Mr. Caplan's successor as
hon. treasurer; was in and out as
his own office was near by.
The Record was the difficulty
and Mr. Loewe had most unor-
thodox ideas about running it. If
two numbers could be brought out
in three months, instead of three,
why, all the better for the trea-
sury! If the books sent for re-
view-a service which Mr. Abra-
hams had labouriously established
-could be sold instead of being
given to the reviewer, why not?
His retort to protests would be:
"We have to look after ourselves."
Fortunately for the Record's re-
putation the prices he put on the
books were so unreasonable that
none were sold, and. eventually
they were offered to reviewers
after all.
I cannot recollect whether Mr.
Harris's editorship was in two
spells or in one; if in two, then
he must have acted as Its editor
for the first time in this period,
before the arrival from England
of Isaac Goodman, brother of the
late Paul Goodman, well-known
English Zionist and author of
Zionist works, who had occasion-
ally written for the Record. Good-
man was doing well by the Record,
but secretarial work was not his
line, and the position was again
vacant after six months. It was
then that I was appointed secre-
tary, while Mr. Harris took over
the editorship, and a fine job he-
made of it.
The secretary's salary seemed
fair at first, but as the years went
by and both the cost of living and


responsibilities increased it became
grossly inadequate and members of
the executive were often apologetic
about it.
Paucity of income, however,
did not make for less work; on
the contrary, it meant more circu-
lars, more propaganda, more free
copies of the Zionist Record and
therefore more wrappers, more
envelopes, more wrapping, more
folding and more posting. Office
assistance was badly needed to
give the length of working hours
a semblance of normality.
Sunday mornings and all public
holiday mornings the office was
open, and if but little work jwas
done it was because of the number
of callers who themselves were
having the day off.
Occasionally, too, some meeting
would be held on such a morning;
or it was Shekel Day, ,or Tree
Fund Day, when the office served
as centre for Johannesburg activi-
ties only, such activity preventing
the accomplishment of anything
else---except, perhaps, addressing
of wrappers and envelopes.
Times were hard in more
senses than one. World. War I
was running its course and bring-
ing in its train tragedy, anxiety,
suspense both in the personal and
in the Jewish national spheres.
Many South African Zionists,
among them the Federation's
president and some members of
s executive,- were intimately
affected.
The fate of Zionism was hanging
in the balance and Zionists in South
Africa, as everywhere else, were
finding it very difficult to keep up
interest. Meetings of the executive
council were no longer regular and
(Continued on page 94)


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Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE EIGHTY-NINE


FIR ST rCOMMIEE OF YOUNG ISRAEL SOCIETY (1916): The youngsters in the picture have made their mark in public life in South Africa and elsewhere. Back row:
FebeRay Ashe, Bernard Gering (he became chairman of the S.A. Zionist Federation), I. Silove (a medical practitioner in Johannesburg). Sarah Kretzmer (wife of Leon
Feldberg, editor of the Jewish Times). Middle row: Mark Levin (now veteran teacher of English in Tel Aviv), Annie Goldstein, Norah Couzin (now in Cape Town), member
of well-known Zionist family), Bobby Spiro (now a prominent corn-
munal worker In Port Elizabeth). M. Witkin (medical practitioner
and Hebraist). Front row: Arthur Lourie (prominent Israel diplo-
mat), H. J. Schlosberg (legal practitioner and writer under pen
name "H. J. May"), Nancy Smith (now Nan Diamond, public rela-
tions officer of the Schlesinger Organisation), Nimy Metz (now
..,..active in Natal), Nathan Smith (prominent communal worker in
Durban), Polly Galgut (now 'Mrs. Jawitz, living in Johannesburg),
Hyman Schlosberg (business man in Johannesburg, of well-known
Zionis t family).


rK.W.'-SMK > ; S- asw mm Hi -M

EARLY JEWISH YOUTH MOVEMENTS
d eunfitniiO( trnmno pa e


three senior members were
appointed as commissioners to the
youth societies. They were Mr. S.
Lennox Loewe, Mr. Joseph Hey-
man and Mr. J. B. Shacknovis,.
whose duty it was to form new
juvenile societies and assist those
which were already in existence.
THE ZIONIST RECORD
November 1908 is a most signi-
ficant date in the history of our
community. On the 15th of that
month the Zionist Record first
appeared as an official organ of
the Zionist Federation. Until then,
reports on youth activities were
printed on rare occasions in the
London and the South African
Jewish Chronicles. By contrast in
virtually every number of the
Record space was devoted to
youth activities.
It was the Zionist Record
which realized that the future
of the community lies with its
youth, a fact that our com-
munity today is slowly re-
discovering.
The very first number men-
tioned that a new youth society,
the Daughters of Zion, had been
formed in Port Elizabeth. The
next few numbers tell us that the
most active juvenile society was
t he Pretoria Juvenile Zionist
Association which had over 200
members and had contributed
over 12 to Zionist Funds. The
Cape Town Junior Zionist Asso-
ciation managed to contribute
only Is. 8d. and Johannesburg
nothing at all.
The Zionist Record set aside a
page for the youth and carried
regular features on the progress of
the junior societies. The debt which
the youth owes to this journal
cannot be underestimated. It re-
garded the juvenile societies as full
and important members of the
Zionist Federation. It, more than
any other single factor, maintained
the -strong links binding these
societies to the Zionist idea.


previously.
A little known fact is that the At this time there was a new
Juvenile Zionist Press is three force in youth affairs. In 1916 the
older than the senior Zionist Press. Johannesburg Young Israel Socl-
In 1905 The Jewish Youth was pub- ety was formed. The Zionist Re-
lished in Johannesburg by three cord commented inter alia: "The
enterprising youngsters. They had Young Israel Society has grown to
been pupils at the Jewish Govern- such enormous proportions and
ment School. The journal was pub- gives evidence of such tremendous
lished through their own initiative activities that a special corner of
and altogether five numbers were the Record is thought necessary
printed which were sold through to keep the members in touch with
the Central News Agency. Interest all the society's happenings."
was poor and the young editors From then on the Record car-
soon lost faith and the publication ried two columns for Young Israel
was discontinued. -one exclusively for the Johan-
In 1911 the Junior Zionist nesburg society and the other for
Society was established in Cape young Zionists generally.
Town with Philip Machanik as its The activities of the new society
first president. (Two, years later multiplied. It soon had its own
he was also the first president of clubhouse where its members could
the Student Jewish Association at meet daily. And during every
the South African College in Cape week socials, debates, fund col-
Town [now the University of Cape elections and festival celebrations
Town]. This society encouraged were held. The Johannesburg
its members to learn Hebrew, and society in 1924 had over 1,500
in 1915, it published its own quar- members, and the Zionist Record
terly magazine-the Judea. carried not merely a column but
In 1913 Mr. Machanik moved to a full supplement in which society
Johannesburg where he formed a affairs were publicised. Why the
similar society. And soon groups society should choose the Record
were being formed in other centres as its official organ becomes clear
as well. By 1916 over twenty youth from the following quotation: "A
societies were directly affiliated to common bonds links us and those
the Zionist Federation and at the who control the Zionist Record.
sixth Zionist conference in 1916 Their aims are ouc aims, and our
no fewer than 16 youth societies interests their interests."
were represented. Soon new societies were estab-
This was the first time that so listed in nearly all the centres
many youth delegates had come where Jews are settled. During
together. They refused to put up 1919-1922 no less than 50 junior
with the platitudes which were Zionist societies were formed from
echoed from conference to confer- Salisbury to Cape Town and from
ence. They demanded action and Durban to Mafeking. But al-
that the Federation initiates all though sharing common aims and
its pious resolutions relative to the being affiliated individually to the
youth. They demanded that a mem- Zionist Fedefration there was as
ber of a Junior Zionist Society be yet no Federation of young Israel
elected to the executive of the societies. In the Zionist Record
Zionist Federation, but this was ideas were expressed and unity
turned down. But youth had its of purpose, even without a unify-
impact and from thence onwards of puorganisation withoutas achieved.
the Federation paid more atten- ing organisation, was achieved.
tion to youth affairs than it had (To be continued in a future Issue)


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22/10/53________________________11


Isaac Abrahams
(Continued from page 12)
sioner Streets, above the old His
Majesty's buildings). There was
a wide wooden verandah in front
of this building. Cabs were
stationed outside and many of the
cab-drivers were Jews.
Shortly after the establishment
of the Record, telephones became
the latest innovation. I well re-
member the gentlemen of the
corpmittee shouting into the
mouthpiece as hard as they possi
bly\ could, fearing that the per-
son \to whom they wece talking,
being some distance away, would
not bear them. The same building
housed the offices of an Indian
solicitor who later achieved world
fame.' He was Mahatma Ghandi.
They knew each other well and
my father's niece, Miss Lilly
Glassburg (later Mrs. Isadore
Greenburg), was Ghandi's typist.
NOT FULL-TIME
The editorship of the Zionist
Record was not a full-time job for
Isaac Abrahams. He continued as
a teacher in the mornings and was
the actual finder of the Commer-
cial High School in Johannesburg.
This school was started as an
adjunct .to Troyeville Government
School and my father retired even-
tually with the status of vice-
principal. He also held an execu-
tive position in the Transvaal
Teachers' Association and took a
leading part in the affairs of the
teaching profession.
There are many hundreds of
people today, both Jew and Gen-
tile, who owe much tb this stal-
wart of the teaching profession.
In 1933. my father was among
the very first to beconiq associ-
ated with the newly established
Johannesburg Jewish form
congregation. He was theifirst
chairman of the School Board
of this congregation."
On his retirement from. the
Government service he devoted
his energies, together with his
brother, to the establishment of a
printing company. He died--in
Johannesbury at the end of June,
1944, in his 79th year, after having
lead a useful, successful and a full
life. Representatives of the
Federation and the present editor
of the Record were at the funeral.
* All will pay tribute to this man
of vast energy, who truly gave
of his best to help lay the founda-
tions of the Zionist Record. He
did a good job of work and I would
be lacking in my duty if I did not
say "May his memory ever live
with us, as one of the Jewish
pioneers."

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STOCKXITS OF
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COR. CORLETT DRIVE AND
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Teleph6ne 42-8216.


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opR'n RALEIGH TRAPFIETS

Hearty Jubilee Greetings from the
South African Distributors: L. K. HURWITZ & SONS, LTD.


With compliments from

JULIUS MEYER
Prop. Julmey Investments
(Pty.) Ltd.
701/2 Sanlam Buildings, Cor.
Commissioner & Saner Streets,
Johannesburg.
P.O. Box 2545
Phones 835-1221/2

CONGRATULATIONS FROM

Handy

Hardware

House
49 GRANT AVENUE,
NORWOOD,
JOHANNESBURG


ssesfso


PAGE NINETY







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


FIRST STEPS OF HEBREW


EDUCATION IN
ODAY Jewish education occu-
pies a place of major impor-
tance inthe community. Not only S AFRICA
is the need to turn our young
into well-informed and knowledge-
able Jews fully appreciated, but of the Law on April 17, 1858.
the Jewish day schools have even Who coached the boy and pre-
acquired a "snob appeal." pared him for his barmitzvah?
It is difficult to visualise that No one can tell, but there must
just over a half a century ago, have been some form of Jewish
Jewish education was considered education even though it may have
by the community .as a tiresome been confirmed merely to
necessity, and that it took almost mechanical reading of the pre-
50 years after the establishment scribed portion of the law.
in 1841 of the first congregation Some years later, in the early
in Cape Town before a Jewish 70's, it was read in a report by the
school was opened. Rev. Rabinowitz that "the child-
The early Jewish immigrants, ren come regularly to school and
who came from Western Europe are doing well." His was the first
and England, did not bring with school for religious training of
them the same urge for Jewish Jewish youth in Cape Town and
learning as did the immigration was opened on April 1, 1868.
from Eastern Europe in the latter
part of the 19th century. NEW ERA


FIRST BARMITZVAH
The first Hebrew Congregation
was established in Cape Town in
1841, but 17 years went by before
the first barmitzvah was celebra-
ted there.
The barmitzvah was that of
Michael Benjamin, son of the
President of the Congregation,
who was called up to the reading


A new era in Jewish education
in Cape Town began in 1895 with
the arrival of Rev. A. P. Bender
from England.
He was a cultured man and a
competent Hebrew teacher, though
not the type of minister to which
the Eastern European immigrant
was accustomed.
We can well Imagine the
amazement of the orthodox Jews


With Compliments, from




STENOR AFRICA

(PTY.) LIMITED
Director: D. L. I'ons


42 Wendell Street, OPHIRTON

P.O. Box 7855

JOHANNESBURG
TELEPHONE 835-1901 TELEGRAMS: "STENOR" Johannesburg



Distributors of:

LANDMASTER ROTARY

HOES




STENORIZER

VULCANIZERS




WANDESS MACHINE

TOOLS



A MEMBER OF THE FIRTH CLEVELAND GROUP


By R. MISHEIKER 1

from Poland and Lithuania of
the 19th century when Rev.
Bender introduced girls' confirm-
ation services in his synagogue.
These were the forerunners of
the batmitzvah service a com-
paratively recent innovation in our
orthodox synagogues. The girls
required instruction, but probably
not of. the same standard as the
batmitzvah candidates of today.
They were taught "Hebrew and
Religion" on Sunday mornings by
honorary lady teachers. The first
service took place ori November 8,
1896, and no fewer than 15 girls
took part-a record even for
present-day B'not Mitzvah in our
synagogues.
Two years before the batmitz-
vah service the first Jewish Day
School was established in Buiten-


I Ine late Air. Josepn ,eIen,
pioneer of Ivrit B'lvrit methods
In South African Hebrew
j schools.
. n...B... NM.. .. l.... . I IIi "il. .I
kant Street, Cape Town. The date
-January 22, 1894. The day-
school provided Jewish boys and
girls with a secular education in
accordance with 19th century
standards, as well as smattering of
Hebrew and Jewish religion. The
school was recognized' and even
received a grant of 60 from the
Government towards its establish-
ment and 30 towards the
teacher's salary.
But, even in 1894 the sum of
90 did not suffice to run a school
successfully and before long the
school experienced financial diffi-
culties. The quality of education
deteriorated and the Superinten-


The late Mr. Samuel Gering, a
member of the Maskilim-type of
Hebrew teacher. He was active
in Johannesburg.

dent-General of Education re-
quested the Cape Town Hebrew
Congregation to take over the
school. On July 15, 1895, the
"Jewish Public School" became the
"Hebrew Congregational Public
School."
Apparently the school was grow-
ing for, at the close of the century,
the management committee felt
that the school required a new
property. Headed by. Rev. J.


PAGE NINETY-ONE


With the compliments of

HARROW GARAGE &
FILLING STATION
(PTY.) LIMITED
HARROW ROAD, YEOVILLE Phone 43-1801
Mobilubrication Service


HAROLD'S POULTRY CENTRE
97 Claim Street, Hillbrow, Johannesburg
Phone 44-8879
KOSHER POULTRY, FRESH FISH DAILY
Delivery to all suburbs
THE CHEAPEST IN SOUTH AFRICA

CONGRATULATIONS FROM

H. LEWINBERG
(PTY.) LTD.
FRAMEMAKER FOR FIRESIDE CHAIRS
(in which is incorporated HI Art Woodcarving)
0
8 Bessemer Road, Heriotdale, Johannesburg
Phones 25-5334, 25-5213 Tel. Add.: "ACHELBERG"
Directors: H. Lcwinbcrg, S. Newstadt
P.O. Box 98, Cleveland (Tvl.)


With the compliments of

GREEN'S RADIATOR SERVICE
"The Radiator People"
13 Faraday Street, Wemmer, Johannesburg.
Phone 23-4549/50.


GRANADA GROCERS
II PRETORIA STREET, HILLBROW
Phono 44-36601
YOUR FAMILY GROCER
Stocklsts of the largent range of Delicatessen.
FRESH FISH Dally.
KOSHER POULTRY. Our delivery to your door In prompt. Our
PRICES are unbeatable. A TRIAL will convince you.


Jaco Wholesale Meat Supply
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Crosby Butchery
(PTY.) LTD.
Extend their best wishes to the Zionist
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59 MOIRA AVE., CROSBY, JOHANNESBURG. Tel. 33-5939.




RICHELIEU


PEARLS

(PTY.) LTD.


They're Beautiful

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING
STORES AND JEWELLERS
Extend their best wishes to the Zionist Record on its
Golden Jubilee







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


Congratulations from...

K.S.G. MANUFACTURING CO.
(PTY.) LTD.

Directors: E. N. Sharpies, R. Sharples


20 Bessemer Road, Heriofdale, Johannesburg
Telephone 25-6939. P.O. Box 3742, Johannesburg, Transvaal


Heartiest congratulations on your Golden Jubilee from

GUNN & VAN ES (Pty.) Lfd.
FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS
13 CRUCIBLE ROAD, HERIOTDALE, JOHANNESBURG



GOLLACH & GOMPERTS
(PTY.) LTD.
GRAIN MERCHANTS
23 PIM STREET, NEWTOWN
SPECIALISTS TO THE BAKERY & CONFECTIONERY
TRADE
18 PIM STREET, NEWTOWN
Extend their best wishes to the Zionist Record
on its 50th Anniversary


We congratulate the Zionist Record on its 50th anniversary

Kenfil Furniture Manufacturers
(PTY.) LTD.
Manufacturers of Quality Occasional Furniture

23-25 GUS STREET, JEPPE, JOHANNESBURG
P.O. Box 139, Jeppestown.



With compliments from

HOUGHTON GARAGE
82 Louis Botha Avenue, Yeoville,
Johannesburg
Telephone 43-5151

"FOR PERSONAL SERVICE"
W. G. WICKINS Proprietors A. E. COOKE


Best wishes to the Zionist Record from

SWISS ICE-CREAM
63 De Korte Street, BRAAMFONTEIN
Tel.: 44-5072


With best wishes to the Zionist Record on its Golden Jubilee
from

I. STEIN
Mining Material Merchants, 398 Main Reef Road, DENVER


WITH COMPLIMENTS TO THE ZIONIST RECORD ON ITS
GOLDEN JUBILEE FROM
PROGRESS WHOLESALERS
Specialising in Glassware, Hardware and Fancy Goods
17 KERK ST., JOHANNESBURG. Phones 835-1601, 835-5379



WHOLESALE WATCH & JEWELLERY
CO.
(H. Smith & Son)
21 Quebec House, Cor. Small & President Streets,
JOHANNESBURG. Phone 22-2082, 22-2768.

extend their best wishes to
the Zionist Record on its 50th Anniversary 3
J lIIIIUIIIMlllllf llllllinilllll ll li IliIIII ll lllHI ml l lllllll llllllllllllllillll llll l l l


DAVID

DAINOW
(Continued from page 9)
Zionism in South Africa.
The monthly bulletin was, how-
ever, growing too big for him to
handle with his other duties, and
the decision was taken to appoint
a separate editor. David Dainow
was invited to assume this posi-
tion; as well as to take the Zionist
Record in hand from a business
point of view. The arrangement
worked well. Alexander continued
to embellish the journal with bril-
liant editorial articles, and
Dainow, in collaboration with an
editorial and business committee
headed by the late Benzion S.
Hersch set about the task of build-
ing up the paper. He did this
with such effect that when I
joined the staff ten years later, it
was already a weekly.
As he looks back today at those
formative years of the Zionist
Record's development, Mr. Dainow
pays warm tribute to the part
which its editorial and manage-
ment boards played in the pro-
gress of the paper. In addition
to Benzion Hersch, he recalls with
affection the names of stalwarts
who rendered service on these
boards: Men like Woolf Senior,
BHerman Karnovsky, Harry Lourie,
L. H. Bagg, Joseph Daleski, Ber-
nard Gering, "Simie" (now Judge)
Kuper; and men no longer with
us, like the late Joseph Janower,
A. I. Miller, B. Reinhold, S. M.
Gordon and A. Levy.
Over the years, David Dainow
attracted to the editorial staff of
the Zionist Record a number of
young people who subsequently
won distinction in fields outside
journalism-S. A. Rochlln, now
archivist to the S.A. Jewish Board
of Deputies; "Chummie" Hirsch-
mann, now a leading figure in the
insurance world; Percy. Baneshik.
now one of South Africa's best-
known radio personalities; Miriam
Liknaltzky, now'practising law in
Johannesburg; Marcia Gitlin, now
on the Public Relations staff of
the Hebrew University. It is no
exaggeration to say that David
Dalnow, '- through his unfailing
friendliness, helped them take
their first steps on the road that
has led them so far.
Distinguished Cape Town photo-
grapher, Harry Goldstone, also did
a spell of work on the Zionist
Record; and as I think of persons
who assisted on the business side
in those now distant days, the
names of Ethel Lyons, Fanny
Yates and her sister Ada, Tilly
Pencharz, Sonia Kaplan, A.
Cousin, Joseph Woolf, Morris
Segal and Ray Jacobson (theirs
was a Zionist Record romance:
they met and married while work-
ing on the paper!) and Barney
Amdur come to mind.
When, in 1943, Mr. Dainow re-
tired from the Zionist Record, it
was in order to fulfil a life-long
ambition to settle in Palestine
(as Israel then was). It was not
easy to go to Palestine in the
middle of war; Dainow made his
way there in a soldiers' convoy.
He settled in Jerusalem, and there,
for several years, he devoted much
of his time, entirely in an hono-
rary capacity, to welcoming South
African visitors and helping to
show them the Holy City.
A former Israel Minister to the
Union, Mr. Cecil H y man
(currently re-visiting South Afri-
ca for the I.U.A.) said of him:
"We look upon Mr. Dainow as the
honorary ambassador for South
Africa," and that graceful tribute
well exemplifies the service he
rendered. At the same time, he
contributed a regular feature, "A
Jerusalem Diary," to the paper
he had edited for so long.
Health troubles, and the need
for a major operation, finally
brought him back to South Africa,
where he now lives in retirement.
It has been an active retirement.
in which he has found time to
carry on his writing, has published
a book of South African Jewish
humour, "Our Shadchan," and has
lectured to many organizations on
Israel and other aspects of Jewish
life and culture. Now in his
seventies, he can look back upon
a devoted record of service to
Zionism.


Wilh the Compliments of
OLLETTE LADIES' HAIR SPECIALISTS
8 Edinburgh Court, Second Floor, Telephone 22-6267

Cor. Jeppe and Von Brandis Streets, JOHANNESBURG.






South African Mutual Fire

and General Insurance Company Limited


FIRE ACCIDENT MARINE


Head Offiice: Mutual House, Harrison Street,
JOHANNESBURG
Phone 33-9926

Extend Cqmpliments to the
Zionist Record on its Golden Jubilee


i1


Congratulations



on your



Golden


Jubilee


Anniversary


from


the makers of


6- A-





EXPORT- QUALITY



bottled and


canned foods


PAGE NINETY-TWO







Supplement to THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958


PAGE NINETY-THREE


NA THAN
The late Dr. Manfred Nathan,
K.C., M.A., LID., who was acting
judge of the Supreme Court Natal,
and a famous authority on South
African law, was among the first
pioneers of the Zionist Record.
When the journal was established
in 1908, Mr. Abrahams was ap-
pointed editor, while under a spe-
cial arrangement Dr. Nathan
exercised "editorial control" of the
journal. He contributed many
articles to the early issues.

BEST WISHES TO THE ZIONIST RECORD
FROM

WASSYNG BROS.
3 Elby House, 62 Wolhuter Street,
NEWTOWN, JOHANNESBURG

With best wishes to the Zionist Record on its Golden Jubilee
from
DENVER METAL WORKS
(PTY.) LTD.
18-22 Crystal St., Denver. Phone 25-7521/2. P.O. Box 84 Denver


The management of Holdains
extend congratulations
to the

ZIONIST RECORD
on the occasion of its
Golden Jubilee
//






HOLDAIN BOXES

LIMITED
CORRUGATED CASE & PAPER PRODUCTS

Factories:


TRANSVAAL
P.O. BOX 221
GERMISTON


NATAL CAPE PROVINCE


P.O. BOX 2324


P.O. BOX 18


DURBAN PAARDEN ElAND


ABBA EBAN'S
I FATHER


ON March 15, 1916, the Zionist
Record published an apprecia-
tion by Benzion S. Hersch of Mr.
Abraham Myer Solomon, who
died in London. Mr. Solomon was
the father of Abba Eban.
Mr. Hersch wrote: "When Mr.
Solomon was taken to London
some months ago by his wife,
accompanied by their little daugh-
ter and son, his condition was
such as to give anxiety. S.A.
Jewry can ill afford to lose the
services of a young man of our
late colleague's ability and Jewish-
ness.
"The late Mr. Solomon was a
brilliant young man and devoted
most of his energy and ability to
the Jewish cause. He represented
Cape Town Zionists at almost
every Zionist conference and was
president, of the Dorshel Zion
Association for many years."
A memorial meeting was held
at the Cape Town Zionist Hall.
Mr. S. Shapiro recalled that he
had an unquenchable thirst for
knowledge, but he did not drink
at the fountain of foreign know-
ledge only Hebrew knowledge
played a great part in his life.

EDITOR IN 1912
















In 1912 Mr. Isaac Goodman
was approached by the late Mr.
Leopold Kessler in London to
:act as secretary of the S.A.
Zionist Federation and editor
of the Zionist Record. As a re-
sult Mr. Goodman left for South:
: Africa and settled in Johannes-
:burg where he acted as editor:
:and secretary for nine months.:
:He then turned to dally Jour-:
:nalism and was a member of:
the staff of the Rand Dally Mail
until his retirement.

With the compliments of the
Victoria Hotel
PLEIN STREET,
JOHANNESBURG

The Zionist Record acknow-
ledges receipt of the sum of
ten guineas (10 10s.) from
Messrs.
Keatings Pharmaceuticals,
105 Quartz Street, Hillbrow,
for the LU.A. to mark the occa-
sion of our Golden Jubilee.
The cheque has been handed
over to the LU.A.


____________________________________________________________ 11 'II.


CONGRATULATIONS
FROM
CHESLER'S CAP AND
CLOTHING MNFRS.
56 VON WIELLIGH STREET,
JOHANNESBURG.


BEST WISHES
to the Zionist Record
on its 50th anniversary
from
LESLIES
RADIATORS
(PTY.) LTD.
18 Troye Street,
Johannesburg.

With the compliments of
LESVOS GROCERS
Incorporating
WAVE CREST FISHERIES
FOR ALL YOUR FAMILY
REQUIREMENTS
Telephone 42-4125, 42-1249
Fisheries Phone 42-1344
COR. FOURTH AVENUE
AND SIXTH STREET,
PAIRKiIURST.


Telephone 51-8531


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0


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1111 u u m IIII II II m