Zionist record

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Material Information

Title:
Zionist record the organ of South African Jewry
Distinctive title:
50th anniversary of the South African Zionist Federation, December 11, 1898-1948, and the fortieth anniversary of the Zionist Record, November 15, 1908-1948
Zionist Record Golden Jubilee, 1908-1958 : November 21, 1958 supplement
Physical Description:
v. : illus., ports. ; 38-44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Johannesburg
Frequency:
weekly[apr. 22, 1949-]
weekly[ former ]
semiweekly[ former -apr. 13, 1949]
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jews in Africa, South -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
South Africa

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33316494
lccn - sn 94094834
sobekcm - AA00000372_00001
Classification:
lcc - Microfilm 01616
System ID:
AA00000372:00001


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1WZ ion ist


The Organ
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10th, 1948


of South


Recor


African


Jewry
(Registered at the G.P.O. as a Ncispaper)


SPECIAL ARTICLES
AND FEATURES
DEVOTED TO THE:


OF THE


'5 SOUTH AFRICAN

ZIONIST FEDERATION


DECEMBER 11


1898


- 1948
AND


THE FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY
OF THE
ZIONIST RECORD


NOVEMBER 15
1908 1948


The arrival in Cape Town in
November, 1906, of Mr. David
Wollfsohn, successor of Dr. Herzl
as president of the World Zionist
Organisation. marked the begin-
ning of a series of visits by dis-
tinguished Zionist leaders to this
country. Photo shows members
of the combined Zionist Commit-
tees in the Cape (standing), left
to right: Mr. J. B. Shacksnovis,
Mr. J. Zuckerman, Mr. Advocate
Alexander (chairman), Mr. J.
Schwartz and Mr. B. Segal (hon.
secretary). Front: Mr. and Mrs.
D. Wolffsohn.




THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY,


*

Congratulat


to the SOUTH AFRICAN ZIONIST
FEDERATION and the
ZIONIST RECORD on
attaining their respective
ANNIVERSARIES

*1

HENDLER &
HENDLER

I SHEET METAL WORKERS AND
MAiNUFACTURERS OF ALL TYPES OF TINWARE


ions....


~NI


(Established 1920)
Office and Works:
Industrial Sites, Heidelberg Road, Johannesburg
P.O. Box 7025 Telegrams: "Metalware"
Phones: 22-3341 and 22-3273


DECEMBE


R 10, 1948





THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10,: 1948


PAGE ONE


PLANS TO SETTLE A MILLION JEWS


IN ISRAEL

J\ TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-Plans are being prepared to settle
,000 Jews in Israel within the next five years. Immigrants
1,0 ow coming into the country at the rate of 20,000 per month.
This was reported by Mr. Abraham Harzfeld, head of the Settle-
ment Department of the Histadruth, during the celebration of
the reopening of the wing of the Jewish Agency Building, hous-
ing the Jewish Foundation Fund, which was blown up last


spring.
Mr. Harzfeld stated that 35 new
Jewish settlements had been estab-
lished since- the termination of the
mandate in the middle of May. Fifty
more settlements are to be estab-
lished within the next six months.
Two settlements were established
to-day, but details are still unavail-
able.
The wing of the building has now
been completely repaired and only
minor scars of the original damage
caused- by the explosion are still
visible.


D.P. Camps

Empty!
ROME, Wednesday. With
the departure for Israel of 238
Jewish immigrants from Italian
D.P. camps the mass emigra-
tion to the Jewish State from
Italy has been completed, ac-
cording to a statement by one of
the officials in charge of the
camps.
In future there will only be
small batches of emigrants
leaving for Israel from the
camps in this country, which
have been emptying steadily
during the past few months.



Anti-Everything

Except Himself
Comment on Douglas Reed
MONTREAL, Wednesday. The
Chief Librarian of the Public Lib-
rary in Toronto has ordered slips to
be pasted into copies of the notori-
ous book "From Smoke to Smother"
by Douglas Reed. The slips state:
"Readers should be warned that this
book expresses the extreme and in-
dividualistic views of its writer. He
is not only anti-HitleriAt, anti-Fas-
a1ist, anti-Zionist, anti-British Labour
government; he is anti most things
and most people-but firmly pro-
himself."
"Library News," a Canadian mag-
azine, has withdrawn Reed's book
from the list of publications recom-
mended to its readers and states:
"In Reed's book the author's anti-
Semitic prejudices ) with which no
sane and fair pers'A could ever agree,
lead him into .tch fantastic flights
lof imagination as to discredit his
view on the particular subject."


AND NOW WE CONTROL
THE ATOM BOMB!
NEW YORK, Wednesday.-Jona-
than Ellswoith Perkins, one of the
leading anti-Semites in this country,
is presently distributing a six-page
pamphlet entitled "The Jews Have
Got the Atom Bomb" which alleges
that Jews in this country, led by Ber-
nard Baruch and David Lilienthal,
have obtained control of the secret
of the atom bomb in order to gain
power, it was reported here by the
"New York Post." The pamphlet,
mailed from Delavan, Wisconsin, of-
fers for sale a number of pieces of
anti-Semitic propaganda, including
copies of the forged "Protocols of the
Elders of Zion."


Renewed Fighting On

Egyptian Front
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-Fighting flared up on the Egyptian front
again this week, when Israeli patrols, 12 miles south-east of Gaza, in the
vicinity of the settlement of Nirim, encountered Egyptian sappers who
were mining the roads between Jewish settlements in the Negev and who
had damaged the Negev pipeline. The Egyptians withdrew hurriedly when
they were discovered by the Israeli troops.


Following these clashes during
which the Egyptians were forced to
abandon a strategic height, the
Egyptians on Tuesday used about 20
tanks in the area in support of their
sappers.
The Israeli forces engaged the
Egyptian tanks, destroying five of
them and. forcing the rest to re-
treat.
It is reported that the tanks are
British made and of a type never.
used previously by the Egyptians.
The position, at the time of
cabling, is still fluid.
Commenting on this incident, an
Israeli military spokesman stated -
that the Egyptian army had been
active in this, area since the third
week in November, indicating that
the intentions of the Egyptians were
not peaceful.


New Road To Jerusalem


Officially Opened
TEL AVIV, Tuesday.---Mr. David Ben Gurion, Prime Minis-
ter of Israel, on Tuesday afternoon officially opened a new road
to Jerusalem called "Kvish Hagvurah" ("Heroism Road"). This
road connects the coastal plain with Jerusalem and by-passes.
the Arab areas around Latrun. It was built within eight weeks
by the Israeli Army 'and recruited labour, including a large num-
ber of Arab villagers.


The new road is 27 miles long, has
a metal base and connects in the
vicinity of Rehovoth. It links up
with the Old Jerusalem Road near
Rehovoth. It is only five miles
longer than the main Jerusalem-Jaffa
Road of which the Arabs hold a small
but vital section.
When the corridor to Jerusalem
wvas widened during the military
operations in July, the Israeli army
decided to build road constructions
made of a special mixture. During
the first week in May Haganah re-
alised that the saving of Jerusalem
from starvation was only possible by
building a road through the hilly
country south of Latrun.
During May hundreds of Israeli
soldiers, working under shellfire,
built the 10 miles long Burma Road.
This primitive, so-called Burma
Road saved Jewish Jerusalem during
the city's most critical period.
It became obvious, however, that
the Burma Road was unsuitable for
heavy traffic in winter.
Addressing the gathering at the
official ceremony, Mr. Ben Gurion
said: "The battle for re-opening the
Jerusalem Road was a tragic and
heroic episode, and was the turning
point in the battle for liberation."
At the same time the foundation-
stone was laid, on a hill overlooking
the area through which the road
passes. The stone is in the form of
a memorial statue to the heroes who
died in the battle for the opening of
the road. The ceremony ended with
a parade of all those units which


participated in the fight to establish
the corridor and those forces which
built and maintained the road
against aggression.
While the road was being opened
two new settlements were estab-
lished in the area through which it
passes.
To protect the road permanently
the Israeli Government has already
prepared a plan for setting up a
string of settlements between Jeru-
salem and Tel Aviv.


Mysterious Disappearance
Of Communist
Secretary
TEL AVIV, Wednesday. A
special committee yesterday began
inquiries into the mysterious disap-
pearance of Sioma Mironianski,
secretary of the Communist Party,
who has not been seen since his
arrest in the summer of 1941.
A former ,C.I.D. official, Michael
Cohen, who was sentenced two
months ago to 15 years' imprison-
niefit for the murder of his wife,
told the inquiry committee that he
saw three Jewish police officers brut-
ally torturing Mironianski sevep
years ago in order to extract from
hi-i information concerning the mem-
Lcuihiip and activities of the Com-
munist Party.
The witness said that the torture
of prisoners by the Jaffa C.I.D. at
that time was a daily occurrence.
Cohen alleges that the Jewish
police inspectors, Shamai, Ben Eph-
raim and Steinberg were involved,
the latter having struck the fatal
blow on Mironanski's head.
Mironianski's body was later re-
moved while the officers warned the
witness not to disclose the incidents
he had witnessed. He feared to dis-
close this murder during the British
rule.
Originally when Mironianski dis-
appeared, the Communist Party, then
illegal, published illegal posters ac-
cusing the officers of the murder of
their secretary.
All the three po Iice officers
at present occupy prominent posi-
tions in the Israeli police. They are
continuing to hold their positions
while the inquiry is being cqjiducted.


AT THE UNO ASSEMBLY: Mr.
Moshe Shertok enjoys a joke
with Dr. Ralph Bunche, Acting
U.N. Mediator


Support the Israeli United Appeal






PAGE TWO


House of Commons Debates Recogni


Of Israel

LONDON, Tuesday.-The admission of Israel into UNO was
discussed by the British House of Commons this week. The
discussion ensued following questions put to the Under-Secretary
for Foreign Affairs about the Cyprus detainees.
Mr. Mayhew stated that the view of the British Government
was that Israel's application. at the present juncture was pre-
mature.


Replying to a question about Cy-
prus the Under-Secretary stated
.,that the May truce resolution of the
Security Council had called on all
governments not to introduce fight-
ing personnel in Palestine and into
the Arab states. The attitude of the
British Government was that the
entry into the Jewish area of Pales-
tine of a large number of men of
military age would create a situation
of military advantage' to one party,
thereby defeating the objects of the
truce.
Meanwhile women and children and
men of non-military age were free
to go to Palestine.
MR. IAN MIKARDO (Lab.) asked
how many British personnel were en-
gaged in guarding the detainees.
Mr. Mayhew was unable to reply.


SYDNE Y SILVERMAN
Since the people were ori-
detained under the manda-


tory power whose. jurisdiction has
now ended, what legal or constitu-
tional basis does there exist for de-
priving the liberty of these people?
MR. MAYHEW replied that he
must have notice on the question of
the legal point.
MR. W. McADAM (Lab.) asked
whether the Cyprus Government was
financially responsible for the main-
tenance of the refugees.
MR. MAYHEW replied that the
answer was in the negative.

Even Criminals Have the Right to
Know
DR. SEGAL (Lab.): Since the re-
fugees are now in despair, would it
.not be fair, in the name of humanity
and common decency, to let them
know how many months, or years,
they will have to suffer this enforced
detention. Even criminals have the
right to know that.


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P.O. Box 1157 JOHANNESBURG Phone 22-9711


MR. MAYHEW replied
people wehe held in accoi
the U.N. resolution.


SERVICE:
LUXURY:


THE0 ZIONIST RECOI FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10. 1948'
Ill lll llll llllIIIIIIIII IlllllIllllIllll I lllllllll lIllllllllll I lll

tion WE CAN BE

that these PROUD OF
dance with OUR CONTRIBUTION'


MR. SILVERMAN thereupon
asked that the House be informed
what resolution of UNO had asked
the Government to keep these men
unlawfully detained in Cyprus.
MR. MAYHIEW did not accept the
charge that the detention of the Cy-
prus detainees was unlawful.
Admission to UNO
MR. PLATTS MILLS (Lab.) asked
that the Foreign Office should in-
struct the British delegation at UNO
to support the application for the
admission of Israel into the United
Nations.
MR. MAYHEW: The Government
does not wish to exclude the possi-
bility of Jewish entry into UNO at
some stage, but the present appli-
cation is regarded as premature, as
the future of Palestine is still under
discussion in the General Assembly.
Met With Failure
MR. PLATTS MILLS said that
the. policy of the Secretary for War
and the Secretary for Foreign Af-
fairs, who set themselves up against
the Jews in Palestine, had met with
the failure it richly deserved.
"The State of Israel had em-
erged and established itself and
would not be altered by the For-
eign Secretary. Was it not high
time for the Foreign Secretary
to pocket his prestige?"
MR. MAYHEW resented manydof
the assumptions contained in the re-
marks of Mr. Platts Mills.
MR. NORMAN SMITH (Lab.) in-
tervened by saying that the State of
Israel was obnoxious and odious to
most British workmen.
LORD JOHN HOPE (Cons.) said
that the statement by Mr. Platts
Mills would give a wrong and mis-
chievous impression in the United
States.
MR. GALLACHER (Com.) said
that sooner or later Israel must be
recognized. Did not the Minister
agree with the decision of the Labour
Party Conference to keep the pledges
given and to make recognition
sooner.
MR. FANK BYERS (Lab.), while
dissociating himself with some of
the remarks of Mr. Platt Mills, asked
that the Government should recon-
sider the matter because many people
were anxious to see an equitable
solution. He believed that that could
only be done if Israel's application
for admission into UNO was sup-
ported.
MR. MAYHEW sa d that he was
aware of these views but the ques-
tion was how to obtain an equitable
solution. It .was not necessarily
helpful to take the action suggested.
MR. SILVERMAN said in view of
the long standing policy of the Lab-
our Party, the Minister should re-
pudiate the suggestion that the State
of Israel was "obnoxious to British
workmen,"
MR. MAYHEW replied that 'many
insinuations had been made which
ho entirely repudiated.
MR. IVOR THOMAS (Lab.) said
that it would be premature to admit
Israel into UNO when Eire, Portugal,
Italy, Transjordan and Ceylon were
still waiting.
MR. MAYHEW agreed that certain
states had much stronger claims than
Israel.


JACOB GITLIN,
Veteran Zionist

ONLY a year ago we were
able to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the World Zionist
Organisation, and now, on the
occasion of the jubilee of th
S.A. Zionist Federation it i
possible for us to look back and
estimate the great contribution
of South African Zionism to the
progress of our cause.
Few people can realise to-day how
difficult the struggle was in those
early days. Not many in our com-
munity understood what Zionism
would mean for the future of the
Jewish people, and the few workers
who had the cause at heart had to
fight against tremendous odds.'
However, they persevered and even.
tually they built up a strong and
healthy movement. They were for-
tunate in working amongst people
who were traditionally-minded and
with whom the love of Zion was part
of their upbringing.
Now that the Federation is fifty
years old it is right that we should
pay tribute to those stalwarts whi
have raised it to the high place i
now occupies in world Zionist affairs
It is impossible to mention the name
of all those pioneers but we shal
always be grateful to them for hav-
Ing shown the way. It is a matte
for deep regret that they did no
survive to see the establishment o
the State of Israel and the fruits o
their labours. In particular, I would(
like to recall three leaders who ar<
no longer with us, Samuel Goldreicj
and A. M. Abrahams, both past presi
dents of the Federation and m
dearest friend and collaborator, Be
zion Hersch. I shall never be abl
to forget all that Benzlon Hersc
undertook and achieved for Soutl
African Zionism. He devoted him
self, life and soul, to the creation o
a strong movement here, and his un
timely death was one of the greatest
blows we ever had to suffer.
Looking back at this jubilee, w
can be proud of our contribution t
Eretz Israel by our support of th
funds, by our investments, by on
political world and the activities o
those South Africans who haveTet
tied in the homeland. I hope tha
South African Zionists in the year
to come will be privileged to play a
even more distinguished part i
Israel's future.
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MR.
(Lab.):
ginally


Support the Israeli United Appeal






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Jerusalem Completes First


Quiet Week

From Moshe Brawer And Colin Legum

JERUSALEM, Sunday.-Jerusalem to-night completed its
first quiet week for many months. Since the new agreement for
a full truce came into force on the morning of December 1 not
a single shot has been fired across the front line, and it was only
during. the initial days of the agreement that a few isolated
sniping incidents occurred.
Your correspondent, on visiting the Jerusalem fronts during
the week-end, saw Israeli and Arab soldiers watching each other
across the narrow no-man's-land. Following the first storm of
the cold season, the soldiers from both sides stood outside their
fortifications and warmed themselves in the bright winter sun-
shine. '
Over the shell-ridden walls and to some extent, returning to normal,
rows of sandbags I could clearly see -- though this has been so for the last
Arab Legion men cleaning their rifles, three months and is not directly con-
while puzzled Arab civilians came to nected with last week's agreement.
the front to try and look into the On Friday morning a convoy
Jewish town. At certain sections of taking guards, maintenance, person-
the front, where showing oneself to nel and supplies to the demilitarised
the enemy a week ago meant death, zone of Mount Scopus, reached its
the Israeli soldiers who now hold the destination and returned without in-
advanced positions, stretch them- cident, nearly 60 guards having been
selves on exposed verandahs, read- relieved and brought back to Jeru-
ing newspapers and resting. salem.
The first three days after the sign- U.N. observers, accompanied by
ing of the agreement the troops Arab Legion officers, drove the con-
from both sides began fraternising voy consisting of two armoured
and exchanging greetings, cigarettes buses and three trucks through the
and chocolate. The officers from Arab lines. This was carried out in
both sides even raised their glasses accordance with an agreement signed
for a lasting peace. On Sunday, how- between the Jewish and Arab corn-
ever, the chatting across the front manders, providing for a fortnightly
,stopped, the Arab soldiers apparently convoy through the Arab-held area
having been instructed not to frater- to Mount Scopus.
noise. A cable from *Colin Legum describes
Why F gh-t? a visit to Jerusalem shortly after
git. the signing of the truce. He writes:
'-Shouting across the no-man's-land, A group of Israeli soldiers were
a -heavily moustached Arab Legion squatting near us playing a game of
sergeant told your correspondent: cards, while a few yards away two
**The Arabs and Jews are brothers. Arabs were being drilled without any
Why fight each other? We want arms in punishment of some minor
peace." misdemeanor. On one of the roof-
A Bedouin soldier, who was stand- tops some Arabs were dancing a
ing next to him, shouted: "King Ab- slow-debka, but without the tradi-
dullah will bring you peace. He is well tional swords.
disposed to the Jews." The sergeant Later we were taken through the
,then added: "Allah give wisdom to grandiose Cathedral of Notre Dame,
the Jews and the Arabs to end hos- which borders the old and new cities
utilities and which served as a citadel during
On the other sector of the front an the hostilities.
Arab Legion soldier told me: "We Although Notre Dame has not been
poor soldiers are only fulfilling orders, irreparably damaged, the signs of
We have nothing against you, while war are evident everywhere, the
you surely have nothing against us. severest damage having been done
We are both serving warmongers." to the beautiful mosaics in the under-
Several other of my attempts to ground chapel. This cathedral was
speak with the Arab soldiers by taken over by the Arab Legion when
shouting across the" lines failed. the British withdrew from the city
Some Arabs made signs that they and was later captured by Israeli
dared not speak, while others looked forces.
at us with contempt. Yet some The superb Madonna and child
Others spat towards us. -which stands 20 feet high on Notre
Near the Jaffa Gate I walked into Dame has been almost undamaged,
the no-man's-land and saw Arab and only a slight chip off the nose
Legionaires playing football on the serves as a reminder of the battle
road behind the gate. On Friday Is- which raged in the city.


raeli soldiers saw Arab troops coming
into no-man's-land dancing Arab
national and Bedouin dances.

Crowded Streets
Looking from the top of a roof of
a high building near the Jerusalem
wall at the usually deserted Old City,
I saw that the narrow lanes were
surging with people doing their mar-
keting for the day. From the build-
ng on Mount Zion I watched wor-
shippers going into the Dome of
Rock for Friday prayers. Soldiers
stationed at the same place told me
that this Friday more people had
ione into this mosque than at any
nime since the fighting started.
Though the tension along the front
,ine has disappeared, mutual suspi-
:ion is still noticeable. Soldiers from
)oth sides are becoming more daring
and trusting in the good faith of
;he other side from day to day. Life
n the Jewish part of Jerusalem is,


Notre Dame Cathedral
The streets of the Old City were
filled with Arab troops, some of them
wearing brilliant yellow headdress.
Israeli soldiers were guarding the
Notre Dame Cathedral, and nothing
whatever of the valuable manuscripts
and relics is being allowed out of
the building. The Jewish soldiers
who had defended the Cathedral were
stretched peacefully in the sun, or
going casually about their daily
tasks. They might even have been
mistaken for disinterested sight-
seers. It is only when they tell of
the incidents of the past few months
-of the friends who fell at that post
there, and how many were killed
forcing this particular entry, and how
many were wounded when that wall
was blown in, that one realises the
real tragedy of the battle that has
been waged so unnecessarily in this
holy place.


IRAQ HOPES TO OBTAIN

LOAN FROM BRITAIN,
LONDON, -Monday. Huzahim
Amin Pachachi, Prime" Minister of
Iraq, disclosed in a recent interview
that Iraq hoped to obtain a loan
from Britain, says a Reuter dispatch
from Baghdad. He declined, how-
ever, to say when the loan might be
obtained or whether negotiations had
yet started.
Reports circulating in Baghdad
earlier this month said that Iraq,
heavily burdened by the Palestine
war, might get a British loan
"shortly." Iraq also expects three
million Egyptian pounds in January.


PAGE THRBE
HISTADRUTH ORGANISES
ARAB WORKERS
TEL AVIV, Monday.-The task of
organising Arab workers in Israel is
Continuing and the Histadruth has
already had considerable success in
its efforts. After the capture of
Majdal a delegation of the llistad&
ruth visited the town and a branch
of the "Brit Poalei Erez Israel"-
the Arab section of the Histadruth-
was set up.
Representatives of the Histadruth
also visited the villages in recently
captured Central Galilee and laid the
foundations of the workers and pea-
sants trade union organisation there.
Every village elected a council in
which the various sections, such as
smallholders, young peasants with-
out land, and hired labourers are
represented.
The representatives of the Histad-
ruth were received with great friend-
ship everywhere, and their insistence
that the poorer sections of the vil-
lages and the workers must be given
adequate representation on the coun-
cil was received enthusiastically.


YAIR SALTZMAN KILLED


IN ACTION


The "Zionist Record" regrets to report that Yair Saltzman, only son
of Mr. and Mrs. Saltzman, of Tel Aviv, and brother of Pnina Saltzman,
the famous pianist, was killed in action in the Negev. Yair, who was
21 years of age, was studying in Paris when hostilities broke out in
Palestine. He did not wait to be called up and enlisted immediately.
Yair was a gifted and promising violinist and conductor. On several
occasions he appeared on concert platforms with his sister. The above
photograph of Yair and Pnina was taken shortly before he joined up.


Post Office


Accepts Parcels


To Israel

It is learnt that the Post Office
will accept for delivery to Israel par-
cels containing food and clothing,
provided that the maximum weight
does not exceed 4 lbs. 6 ozs.
These parcels are accepted as Let-
ter Post, the rate being 3d. for the
first ounce and 1l'd. for every ounce
thereafter. Therefore it would cost
8s. 10d. for a parcel weighing 4 lbs.
6 ozs. This charge does not include
customs duty which will have to be
paid at the other end.
The regulations covering the con-
tents are:
(1) The maximum value of either
food or clothing parcels cannot ex-
ceed 1.
(2) Butter, rice, cheese and con-
densed milk may not be included.
(3) Clothing is to be second-hand.
i


GOLDIE MYERSON IN ISRAEL
TEL AVIV, Wednesday. Mrs.
Goldie Myerson, Israeli envoy to
Moscow, has arrived in Israel for a
short holiday. She described the cor-
di-l welcome accorded to her in Mos-
coWr, and the puzzling impression the
establishment of the Israeli mission
in the city had made on the Russian
Jews who could not believe that the
Jc:.'s really had a state.



"DUET FOR TWO HANDS"
THERE is an air of unreality about
the play "Duet for Two Hinids"
shown by the Repertory Players at
the Library Theatre. Because of the
improbability of the plot the pro-
ducer might well have been advised
to dim the lights on the stage so
that the events assumed a fantastic
air.
Theo Sacks gives a memorable per-
formance o-f a difficult part. Donald
Wayne is .nost convincing. Terry
Parris and Doreen Mantle both man-
aged to convey the complicated
situations of the plot.





PAGE FOUR

ISRAELI MEMBERSHIP OF UNO


BE DELAYED
PARIS, Wednesday.-The acceptance of Israel as a member
of the United Nations this session has become extremely unlikely
and will not be finally considered by the Security Council before
the end of the week, when the General Assembly has taken a
decision on the resolution which is being submitted by the British
delegation.


It is improbable that the British
proposals, even though they have been
whittled down considerably, will re-
ceive the necessary two-thirds majo-
rity to make them effective. Gradu-
ally the realisation is becoming ap-
parent that, with the present align-
ment of forces at UNO, there is little
chance of the Assembly settling the
Palestine problem and that a solu-
tion will have to be sought else-
where.
Both the Soviet bloc and the Arab
States are opposed to the British re-
solution, although for widely different
reasons. Britain dare not sugg.,.st any
further concessions to the Arabs for
fear of losing the support of
America.
Despite the fact that Britain was
compelled to mitigate her demand
for the application of the major pre-
mises of the Count Bernadotte plan,
the resolution still provides that the
Conciliation Commission to be ap-
pointed should have the power to
make recommendations which are not
in conformity with the' original par-
tition decision of UNO.
The British delegation has been


for nearly fifty


busy these past few days endeavour-
ing to find a way out of the dead-
lock, and have been in almost con-
stant contact with the Foreign Office
in London. They are hoping to per-
suade the six nations who abstained
from voting on the resolution in the
Political Committee to support their
proposals. British efforts are also
being directed towards getting six of
the nations who voted against the
resolution to abstain from casting a
vote in the Assembly. Only thus
could the two-thirds majority --be
achieved.
According to some observers the
British are prepared to amend their


THE ZIONIST RECORD, -FRIDAY, DECEMBR 10. 1948


MAY


resolution even further, if it will
serve to achieve a definite decision.
Now that the British schemes to
have the Arab part of Palestine in-
corporated in TransJordan have
failed, the United Kingdom is an-
xious to find bases in the former
Italian colonies of North Africa and
is seeking to obtain a trusteeship
over these territories..
It appears that one of the main
objections to the British proposals is
that the composition of the Commis-
sion is to be left to the five great
powers.
There is much annoyance in British
quarters at the Arabs, who helped to
efeat the original resolution "and are
now in somewhat of a quandary with-
out any positive approach to the
whole matter. certain sections of the
Arab League are hoping to win sup-
port from Russia,. which is strongly
opposed to Abdullah being awarded
any part of Palestine. Besides- a
mutual desire to thwart the ambi-
tions of Abdullah, there is little else
in common between these two forces
and not much prospect of any defi-
nite stand.


Greetings From Eastern Province


(Message from Mr. N. E. Rosen-
berg, Chairman, Eastern Province
Council.)
The Golden Anniversary of the
South African Zionist Federation i's
indeed an occasion for celebration
and rejoicing, coinciding as it does,


years


South Africa 's


leading publishing house

and distributors of
newspapers
periodical s
ma g azin e s
and books
published in South Africa and overseas


offers its congratulations
to the

S.A. Zionist Federation


with the anniversary of the estab-
lishment of the State of Israel.
Who could have dreamt when a
handful of ardent Zionists gathered
on the 11th of December, 1898, that
fifty years later we would see the re-
birth of the Jewish nation; that the
prayers -and lamentations of genera-
tions through the centuries, from
every part of the world, would, in
our day, be answered.
We are indeed to be humbly
grateful that we are the privileged
generation to have lived to see this
great event. But nationhood brings
with it responsibilities. We Jews in
South Africa must realise that
whilst the State of Israel has been
established, there can be no slacken-
ing in our efforts. There is so much
to be done. There are so many prob-
lems to be overcome. Tens of thou-



















MR. N. E. ROSENBERG
- sands must be brought to Israel.
They need to come, just as Israel
needs them.
Let us therefore re-dedicate our-
selves; let us realise that we shall
go forward with determination, to
carry on our Zionist work in South
Africa.
Let every Jew realise his duty and
responsibility and if we do that, we
shall be worthy of having been the
privileged generation to see the re-
birth of Israel.


Greetings From

Belgian Conpo
In a message to the S.A. Zionist
Federation Mr. Abner Soriano, pre-
sident of "The Association Sionist
du Congo Belge," extends, on behalf
of his society, sincerest congratula-
tions and best wishes on the occasion
of the 50th Anniversary of the Fed-
eration.
"It is very fitting that this mile-
stone in Zionist history should be
marked with the establishment of
the State of Israel, which despite the
blood and tears it has already cost,
and the sacrifices that may yet have
to be made, is a glorious and wonder-
ful achievement, in which we have
been privileged to participate.
"We are sincerely -grateful for the
very small part that we have -been
.able to play in the foundation of Is-
,rael, and it is largely due- to .the lead
that the South African Zionist Fed-
eration has given us, and to her ini-
tiative that we have been able to


MR. ABNER SORIANO


play even this small part. Zionist
Societies in all parts of Southern Af-
rica have looked to the South African
Zioni.st Federation for guidance in
the past, and will continue to do so
in the future.
"May your endeavours grow from
strength to strength, and may they
be crowned in the very near future
with the establishment of peace inr
Israel, so that in the future all your
endeavours, and ours with yours may
be directed to the peaceful expan-
sion and consolidation of our State
of Israel."

Message to "Zionist Record"
"The Association Sionist du Conge
Belge" has also sent a message t(
the "Zionist Record" which reads aw
follows:
Your publication has been the
pioneer of Zionism in Southern Af
rica; and has always been foremost
in the defence of Jewish civil an(
political rights, in the launching o:
all campaigns which have been th(
life blood .of the young Jewish State
The "Zionist Record" is truly worth:
of the most heartfelt congratulation
for the part it has played in thi
creation of a strong healthy Zionis
Movement in Southern Africa. _
Despite the fact that your public
cation is written in a language whicl
.is not the one with which we arn
most familiar in the Belgian Congo
your paper is very widely read i1
this Colony. Members of our com
munity have always looked to thi
"Zionist Record" to bring them th
news of current events in ever;
sphere of Jewish life in the Yishu
and the Diaspora.


L II


Support the Israeli United Appeal






TRE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 0, 0. 1948
I Statement by M- :B. Gering C chairman S.A. Zionist Federation



WE ARE FACED WITH.


UNPRECEDENTED


RESPONSIBILITIES


PHE 50th Anniversary of the
establishment of the South
african Zionist Federation co-
ncides with the year in which
:he' actual ideal for which Zio-
iism was established became a
reality; and it is now possible
:o consider i n retrospect
whether Zionism has justified
itself.
i One of the minor incidents in the
!ge-old tragedy of the homeless Jew-
,h people, the Dreyfus trial pro-
iced a great historic event. Theo-
or Herzl was stirred by the
,reyfus trial, and it kindled
him the spark which led him
conceive the idea of a Jewish
tate as the only solution to the
problem of Jewish homelessness. The
'reyfus -tragedy fades into insignifi-
ince by comparison with the- suc-
.ssion of tragedies of increasing di-
mensions which have befallen *the
ewish people since that time.
!During the period the world has
witnessed the pogroms under Czar-
it Russia; the discriminatory laws
against Jews. in so many parts of
ie world; the barring of the doors
-other countries as the posi,tiion of
lie Jews in the country in which they
'ere living deteriorated; Jewry's
sses during the first World War
hen tens of thousands were driven
their homes, when families
:ere separated and indescribable
ardship.s were endured and when
indreds of thousands of lives were
st, only because they were Jewish
res.
'And then, there occurred the
greatest tragedy of all, when under
the Hitler regime, six million Jews
were massacred and hundreds of
thousands more were cast out from
their homes and debarred from
entering any other country.
Never Questioned
It is fortunate that bands of ideal-
;s throughout the world never
estioned Herzl's idea of Jewish
a,tehood. The early immigrants
)m Eastern Europe brought Herzl's
2al to South Africa, and spread it
roughout the villages and towns of
is country. Only a year after the
*rnption 'of the World Zionist Or-
nisation the decision was taken to
:ablish the South African Zionist
aeration. On the occasion of the'
aeration's 50th Anniversary, let
pay tribute to the men and women
o laid the foundations of the Fed-
ition as we know it to-day. The
;ceeding generations have guarded
Zionist heritage re should-
ng with fervour and& determination
great .responsibility arising from
establishment of the Jewish
te.
'rom the small beginnings of fifty
trs ago when the departments of
)paganda, Finance and the Hebrew
guage were established, the Fed-
tion has developed into a far-
ig vibrant organisation embrac-,
many departments and provin-
1 offices. The growing personal
itacts of the Jewish community of
ith Africa with the State of Is-
J1 has, in addition, necessitated the
ablishment of the Federation's of-
in Israel.

Tribute to General Smuts
'he achievements of the South Af-
in Zionist; Movement have been
atly stimulated by the tremendous
uence exerted during visits to


South Africa of our world Zionist
leaders, including David Wolffsohn,
Shmaryahu Levin, Nahum Sokolow,
Vladimir Jabotinsky and Chaim Weiz-
mann, first President of the State of
Israel.
We must record with appreciation
the support given by all successive
Governments of the Union of South
Africa to the Zionist cause. And we
must pay special tribute to General
Smuts, the only surviving architect
of the Balfour Declaration and the
champion of the Zionist cause.
The great achievements of the
South African Zionist Federation in
the course of the five decades of its


MR. BERNARD GERING


existence have been due in no small
measure to the fact that it succeed
in bringing about the full' co-opera-
tion of all Zionist groups, including
the women and youth; and to the
fact that it has worked in harmony
with other leading Jewish organisa-
tions. This unity of the Jewish com-
munity has been demonstrated by the
way it has responded to the emerg-
ency in Israel during the last year,
and by its contribution to the strug-
gle of the newly established S'tate
for its survival.
The State is an established fact.
Many battles have been won, but final
victory has not yet been achieved.
The Zionist Movement is now con-
fronted with immense tasks in the
fields of immigration, land redemp-
tion, colonisation, chalutziut and
Zionist education. The absorption of
ten to twenty thousand immigrants
every month places unprecedented
responsibilities upon World Jewry. I
trust that as in the past, the South
African Jewish community will play
its full part.
On the 50th Anniversary of the
establishment of the South African
Zionist- Federation let us pay tribute
to the leaders who have steered us
from Herzl's dream to the achieve-
ment of the Jewish State; and to
the builders and fighters of Israel;
let us assure them that we have re-
dedicated ourselves to Zionist service
and that we shall continue to bring
them our maximum support.


PAGE .1VSS

Prominent South Africans Who


Helped To Build Zionism

NO record of the history of South African Zionism would be
complete without reference, however brief, to the part
played by prominent statesmen and other public figures of the
Union in the furtherance of the Zionist cause. It is noteworthy
that support for Zionism came from all sections, irrespective of
party allegiance.


Of all the prominent non-Jews in
South Africa who have used their in-
fluence for the benefit of Zionism,
pride of place must undoubtedly go
to General Smuts, one of the prime
movers in bringing about the Balfour
Declaration. General Louis Botha, it
profound humanitarian, and an un-
compromising champion of justice for
the Jewish people, was another who
saw the merits and urgency of Zion-
ism when the movement was still in
its teens.
The powerful moral influence ex-
erted by General Botha on the Brit-
ish Government during the latter
part of the first World War helped
immeasurably to overcome the oppo-
sition from many influential persons
to the signing of the Balfour Declar-
ation.

General Botha
Botha was concerned with the Jew-
ish problem in all its aspects, and
was prepared to go to any length to
remedy the evils which were being
perpetrated against the Jews. Dur-
ing the deliberations of the Peace
Conference he became intimately ac-
quainted with conditions in-Europe.
At Versailles he insisted on the
drafting of a proclamation to ensure
the protection of national and relig-
ious minorities in Europe. That this
proclamation, eventually adopted by
the Peace Conference, failed to
achieve the effect envisaged by its
chief architect, reflects only on
those who recognized no law other
than their own ambition.
As early as 1910 General Botha
opened a J.N.F. Bazaar in Johannes-
burg and said that "the object of


ISRAELI ARMY OCCUPIES
112 LEBANESE VILLAGES
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-The Is-
raeli army is occupying 100 square
miles of Lebanese territory, includ-
ing 12 villages with 15,000 inhabi-
tants.
This fact was disclosed during a
press tour of the Israeli-Lebanese
border this week. Almost every day
notables from -villages inside Le-
banon cross the front and approach
the Israeli army with a request for
their protection.
Lebanese villagers told the corre-
spondents that they felt happy under
the Israeli rule, though they are. fac-
ing economic hardship, since they are
cut off from their sources of supply
and former markets.


WAR PRISONERS TO BE.
EXCHANGED
TEL AVIV, Wednesday. Red
Cross representatives are making
preparations for the exchange of
a second group of P.O.W's shortly.
Last week the clergy and notables
of Christian Arabs visited P.O.W.
camps in Israel to meet prisoners and
see conditions.
The prisoners held a special recep-
tion for the visitors, who later -ex-
pressed to the Israeli authorities
their full satisfaction at conditions
prevailing in P.O.W. camps. Recently
Arab broadcasting stations re-
peatedly issued false stories about
the mishandling of Arab prisoners
in Israel.


creating a great centre in Palestine
which will represent the home of
your people has my fullest support."

General Smuts
The constant and positive assist-
ance of General Smuts to Zionism
has always been a source of consid-
erable strength to the Zionist Move-
ment. His feelings for Zionism de-
rived from a real and vital respect
for the contribution of the Jewish
people to world civilisation, and from
a thorough understanding of the
wrongs they had suffered through the
ages.
In 1926 Nahum Sokolow visited
South Africa and in the course of an
extensive tour of the country was af-
forded every hospitality by the Gov-
ernment and the various Municipal
bodies. I-
It was shortly after his visit, and
as a result of the impression cre-
ated by him on members of the
Government, that the Union Cab-
inqt unanimously passed a resolu-
tion on September 4, 1926, express-
ing its determination to do what-
tever lay in its power to assist in
the establishment of a Jewish
National Home.
General Hertzog was Prime Min-
ister at the time and he, together
with Tielman Roos and Colonel Cress-
well, in a series of public statements
expressed their sympathy for Zion-
ism. In any appraisal of the achieve-
ments of the Zionist Federation every
recognition must be given to these
men who never permitted expedi-
ency or bigotry to intrude on their
sense of justice.
(Continued on page 46)


WE ARE "MECHUTONIM"!
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-In the
presence of the Israeli Minister
for Minorities the swearing-in
took place in Northern Israel on
Monday of several Druze units of
the Israeli Army.
Prominent Druze sheikhs parti-
cipated in the ceremony conducted'
by the Druze officer, who for many
years served with the Transjordan:
frontier force.
Greetings included messages
from well-known Druze leaders
outside Palestine.
Sheikh Suleiman Arif, speaking
at the conclusion of the ceremony,
praised the kinship between Is-
rael and the Druzes, stating that
their friendship dated back thou-
sands of years when Moses mar-
ried the daughter of the Druze
prophet Jethro.


Moshe Kleinman Evening
On the occasion of the death of
the veteran Hebrew writer "and editor
Moshe Kleinman, a special evening
has been arranged, to be held on
-Monday, December 13.- Among those
who will take part are Mr. C. Ger-
shater (editor, "Zionist Record"), Mr.
J. Batnitzky (editor, "African Jew-
ish Newspaper"), Mr. L. Feldberg
(editor, "Jewish Times"), Mr. J.
Bokalchuk (editor, "Dorem Afrika")
and Mr. Ben Moshe (editor, "Our
Future").






PAGE SIX

JEWISH AND ARAB COMMAND]


MEET IN JERUSALEM
JERUSALEM, Tuesday.-Colonel Moshe Dayan, the Com-
mander of the Israeli forces, and members of his staff met
Abdullah Tal, Commander of the Arab Legion in Jerusalem, on
Sunday, this being the third meeting within eight days. It was
the shortest they have had so far, lasting only for one hour.
The meeting was held in an Armenian school in the presence
of members of the Consular Truce Commission and U.N.
observers.


The commanders discussed an
extension of the agreement of a
full truce to certain areas north of
Jerusalem, and also the imposition
of a truce on Arab irregulars, who
had taken over a number of aban-
doned Egyptian positions in southern
Jerusalem.
The Israeli commander suggested
that the sewage in no-mans-land be
repaired for the benefit .of both sides.
Another matter discussed was the
renewal of the water supply to Jeru-
salem via the Arab-held Latrun
pumping station and the demilitari-
sation of the Latrun area ini order


to allow free passage to Jerusalem
through the main road.
Following the meeting with the
Israeli Jerusalem commander, Ab-
dullah Tal, the Arab Legion Jerusa-
lem commander, proceeded to the
Transjordan capital, Amman, to dis-
cuss matters with King Abdullah and
to obtain his approval for a number
of measures to ensure peace along
the entire -front, where the Arab Le-
gion faces the Israeli army.
Abdullah Tal also participated in
talks with the acting Mediator, Dr.
Bunche,, concerning the opening of
peace talks and a final settlement of
the Jerusalem problem.


A GREAT DEAL TO -BE DONE


T is gratifying to me to be able to
express my congratulations to the
S.A. Zionist Federation on the occa-
sion of their Golden Jubilee. My first
recollections of the Federation go
"back to 1908 when I participated, with
some other children, in the formation
of the First Juvenile Zionist Society
in Johannesburg, under the guidance
of the late Dr. Hertz, who subse-
quently became the Chief Rabbi of
the British Empire.
In those days I first came to know
men like Mr. Abrahams, who was
president for 25 years; Janower, Ben-
zion Hirsch, Gitlin, etc., and remem-
ber hearing the late Wolffsohn, as
president of the World Zionist Or-
ganisation, address a mass meeting
in the old Zionist Hall in Commis-
sioner Street.
What a tremendous change in Zio-
nist outlook has occurred since those
far-off days!
Forty years of striving and build-
ing has brought us the achievement
of the State of Israel, and the Fed-
eration has grown in. stature and
maturity and is to-day a vast organi-
sation with a voice in the councils of
the World Executive.
Our heartfelt thanks go out to
those men and women who have
work I so hard for the past half cen-
tury, and to whose wise planning and
dogged pluck in laying truly and well
the foundations of our present or-
ganisation in this country, we owe so
much.
There is still a great deal to be


MESSAGE FROM


-m

MR. M. PENCHARZ,
Chairman, O.F.S. Zionist Council
done in regard to immigration, col-
onisation and training for the hun-
dreds of thousands of our homeless
Jews and we must, each and every
one of us, dedicate ourselves anew to
this vital task so that Israel can take
its place amongst the nations of the
world with its message and contribu-
tion to the wellbeing of mankind.
M. PENCHARZ,
Chairman.


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Dr. Bunche met King A
a three-hour talk. He st
wards that "the discuss
encouraging."
Talks between the comn
Jerusalem are expected t
this week. They are e
discuss the question of Je
the Wailing Wall and per
Arab ambulances to pas
Jewish Jerusalem, Bethl
Hebron. Since the Ara
holding the road connect
and Bethlehem with A
north and east of Jerus:
are at present using an u
mitive road surrounding
from the east. The comm:
discussed the opening of
Jerusalem road and rail
sections of which are still
hands. In return the Jeru
will supply the Arab part
salem with electricity and
of essential telephone lir
the truce.
The Arabs apparently
bringing several thousand
fugees to the Old City of
and to house them in quar
were abandoned by their
cupants.


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10. 194I
mRS CZECHOSLOVAK-ISRAELI
FRIENDSHIP SOCIETY
ESTABLISHED
bdullah for PRAGUE, Monday.-The constitu
ated after- ent meeting of the Czechosluvak
ions were Israeli Friendship Society was helix
in Prague recently, and an executive
committee was elected.
wanders of The meeting was attended by th
;o continue Health Minister, the Minister o
expected to Technical Works, the Israeli Minis
ws visiting ter Mr. Ehud Avriel, and the Deput:
mission for Chairman of the National Assembly
s through Mr. Benda, Departmental Chief 6
ehem and the Ministry of Information, ex
bs are not tended greetings to the gathering ii
ng Hebron the name of Minister Kapecky anm
rab areas promised the Friendship Society a]
alem, they possible assistance. Mr. Ploihai
builtt pri- Minister of Health, said, "I welcome
Jerusalem the setting up of the society, as
anders also member of the generation which]
the main fought and suffered for the sam
way, small ideals-freedom and democracy-a
11 in Arab the State of Israel. This State ha
salem Jews taken its place in the family c
s of Jeru- people's Democratic States even if i
a number has still to fight a bloody battle
aes during against its enemies. We are bound
the State of Israel by firm frien
ship."
ly intend Mr. Ehud Avriel concluded th
Arab re- meeting and in the name of thl
Jerusalem people of Israel, thanked Presiden
ters which Klement Gottwald, the Cabinet ant
former oc- the Republic for the friendship to
wards his country.


Greetings From Natal Zionists


ANNIVERSARIES offer a welcome
opportunity to look back. At the
50th Jubilee of the S.A. Zionist Fed-
eration, the Zionists of this country
can do so with the deserved satisfac-
tion that they, at all times, have done
their share in the work for the up-
building of our National Home.
If figures show that, in proportion
to its numerical strength, our com-
munity has for many years contri-
buted to our Zionist cause in many
respects much more than any other
communities in the Golah, then let
us not only take pride in this fact,
but also remember that it was the
devoted w-ork of the leadership as
well as of the rank and file of the
S.A. Zionist Federation which made
S.A. Jewry realise earlier, or more
intensively, than others, that their
duty was to help to secure the future
of our people in freedom on its own
soil.

Natal Jews, or Natal Zionists-
these terms have become almost
identical here-have in all these
years taken their full share in the
work of the S.A. Zionist Federation.
They know that, even when the war
has been won in Israel, the still
greater task lies in front of us to
win the peace. Only then can we
devote ourselves entirely to the still
more honourable task of constructive
work: to make Medinat Israel a land
worthy of our Jewish tradition, a


FINE FURS


MR. E. SCHRAGENHEIM,
Chairman, Natal Zionist Council.
pride to world Jewry, a shining e
ample to humanity.
Expressing on behalf of Natal Zi
nists, our heartfelt congratulation
on the occasion of the 50th Jubilee
the S.A. Zionist Federation, I ha'
the right to do so only because I f9
assured that in the great task st
ahead of us, Natal Zionists w
never fail in their duty.
E. SCHRAGENHEIM,
Chairms


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMI


"Our Efforts


Have Borne


Fruit"


Greetings. From


Joseph Janower

(Tel Aviv)

M Y most hearty greetings to you
from Medinath Israel on the
occasion of the 50th anniversary of
Zionist work in South Africa.
It recalls memories of the first
Zionists who answered the call 'bof
Herzl and with faith and devotion
laid down the foundations which
later inspired others to carry on in
spite of disappointments and set-
backs.

South African Jewry can indeed be
proud of the role that they played
-from small beginnings to the mag-
nificent contributions of to-day in
the achievement of our aim. We can
all be happy that our efforts have
borne fruit and that we. are privileged
to see in our time the establishment
of the State of Israel. JOSEPH
JANOWER.


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BER 10, 1948 PAGE SBVEN

Commandant Of Ossewa Brandwag Cals


.-" T For Cmmon Action

M 1e II With Jews


"DTIE O.B." published the following
statement froffi its "Comman-
dant General,, Dr. Hans van Rens-
burg, in which he says:
"According to Transvaal news-
papers, Mi. Nossel, a Jewish mem-
ber of the Cape Town H.N.P., who
professes to be in close touch with
the HI.N.P. leadership, stated that
the Transvaal H;.NP. Congress (as
opposed to the. Cape). dismissed
the question of removing the dis-
crimination against Jews as. pros-
pective members) because if they, did
so, they would; also have, to liftt the
ban on the O.B:
"The reasoning- would appear to
have been that, since the Transvaal
H.N.P. cannot include Jews without
including: O.B's they would rather
exclude the Jews also. .
"I do not know how far Mr.
Nossel's alleged opinions reflect the
actual position; also we do not want
to interfere in the internal affairs of
the H.N.P-especially those of us
who. are members of the Afrikaner
Party, because the bond 'between the.
two parties must be taken into ac-"
count.
"But when we see the danger
which threatens white humanity, and
specifically white South Africa, then'
we feel that it is just as well to em-
phasise that in spite of racial and
religious differences there are cer-
tain common white interests which
are connected with the survival of
everyone of us who has found his
only fatherland here. There come
times when you can undertake com-
mon action, with your English-
speaking or Catholic (or Jewish)
neighbour in the interests of the
whites, -without affecting one iota or
tittle of your Afrikanerdom or Pro-
testantism.
"And as we notice the rising
waves which are approaching then
he must be a very phlegmatic on-
looker who says: 'That time has not
yet come.'
"It is for this reason, amongst
others, that the majority of the
O.B's so easily found the road into
the inclusive thoughts of the Afri-
kaner Party, which as a fundamental
test places the Hertzog demand of
'South Africa first.'
"On other questions, every one of
us can have his own opinions: but by
every one who is ready to faithfully
follow this principle, common South
African interests can be pursued,"
concludes Dr. van Rensb-$rg.


A Book
By A Jourmalis-
MR. BENJAMIN BENNET, the
news editor of the "Cape
Argus," is' one of South Africa's
best known Jewish journalists. .His
special interest has been criminology
and he was the crime reporter on
the "Star" for many years.
He has four books to his credit,
"Down Africa's Skyways," "Hitler
over Africa," "Up for Murder" and
"Famous. South African Murders."
His latest book is- entitled; "To6 late
for Teats," and' tells' the. story of 12
famous South African murder trials..
Tho two most interesting chapters
naturally cover our two most recent
murder trials, that of Mrs. Lee who
was hanged. recently, and- of James
Camb, who was found guilty of mur-
dering Gay Gibson aboard. the "Dur-
ban Castle."
*
Mr. Bennet has collected some in-
teresting material about Mrs. Lee.
During the trial one got the picture
of Mrs. Lee as being a cold-blooded
calculating murderess. This she may
well have been, but at the same time
Benjamin Bennet draws a 'picture of
a full-blooded person who enjoyed
life to the full. Some .of the stories
he, tells about her in the court are
most human. He tells that on one
occasion Mrs. Lee remarked on the
poor quality of the photographs that
appeared in the 'newspapers and
would willingly have sat for new
and more flattering photographs had
she been permitted to do so. She
certainly made a more attractive
show than the likenesses available to
the press.
During one short adjournment she
noticed a reporter place a pepper-
mint in his mouth. Inquiring sym-
pathetically whether he suffered from
indigestion, she advised him to be
careful as it might be a case of gas-
tritis. He should consult a doctor.
"I suppose I will before it is too
late-but it will have to wait till
this trial is over," he replied in jest.
"Of course it might not be- gas-
tritis at all," she added with a smile.
"Imagination plays a big part in
illness as you've probably realized
after listening to the evidence in
this case for a couple of weeks."


Mr. Bennet is not one of those
journalists interested in criminology
because of the morbidity of the sub-
ject. He has an attractive and a;
human approach which. makes his
book eminently' readable. This: book
deserves a wide circulation and can
be strongly recommended for those
who do not find this kind of study
too upsetting.
The book is published by Howard
Timmins, Cape Town, at 12s. 6d.


Cargoes, For Israef
UNDER the heading "Cargoes fbr
Israel," the "Cape Argus?" car-
ries the following report:
"The Cape route is becoming the
highway. of the blockade-runners, to
Israel from the East. Two ships
loaded with relief' cargoes at Union
ports have already passed' through
Table Bay, taking the roundabout
route up the west coast and through
the Straits of Gibraltar to avoid-inter-
ference- by the Egyptians; who' con-
trol the passage through the- Suez
Canal.
"During the next few. weeks seve-
ral more will pass- along the same
way. They include ships: that! loaded
in Australia and India. The' ships
from India are to- travel 13,000 miles
via the Cape and Gibraltar rather
than 4,000 via Suez.
"The first ship. from Australia, the
Norwegian motorship Heogh Trader,
will pick up 2,550 tons of cargo for
Israel here.
"The Danish motorship Benny Skou,
which has already penetrated the
blockade from the Union, will round
the Cape this week on her way to
begin her second loading at Durban.
She will complete it at Cape Town
early in December."



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PAGI UIGRT THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1940



ZIOnist Record At The UNO Assembly.In Paris
-The Organ of South African Jewry

"Zionism aims to establish a publicly-assured, legally
secured Home for the Jewish people in Palestine."
Basle Programme.


Permanent Buildings
Telegrams: "Kadimah"


Commissioner Street
Johannesburg


Telephone 34-1931
P.O. Box 150


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Golden Jubilee
THE Golden Jubilee of the S.A. Zionist Federation coincides with a happy
year in the annals of Zionist history. Yet, it is also a critical year.
In Israel our people are still at war and the Jewish State is still obliged
to keep the flower of its youth under arms. Until such time as Israel
dwells securely there is no room for rejoicing.
The Federation has, therefore, wisely decided not to convert the anni-
versary into a season of celebration, but to go on with the usual and urgent
daily work as befits a period of emergency.
Nevertheless, we make no apology for devoting considerable space in
this week's columns of the "Zionist Record" to the history of our move-
ment in this country and to its founders. It is right that we recall their
memory so that their faith, their enthusiasm and their devotion should
serve to stimulate us to further efforts.
This is a time for renewed dedication. Just as the Mandate was a
challenge to the Jewish. people to build their National Home, so is the
proclamation of the State of Israel a challenge to build the Jewish State.
To-day we have only the foundations and the beginning of the building;
the structure is yet to be completed.., Within the next couple of years the
population of Israel has to be doubled. To achieve that-and it is a task
which will incidentally rehabilitate hundreds of thousands of homeless
Jews-the Jewish people will have to mobilise every ounce of its energy
and strength.
Israel must become a viable State. Our experience in the past has
taught us that no one will help us to build our State; that we must depend
on our own resources. It has been one of the outstanding features of
South African Zionist history that at all times, in days of success and in
days of setback, we insisted that our contribution to the cause can best be
expressed through constructive 'effort.
Our pioneers and early Zionists were never deterred by the fact that
Palestine was smarting under the oppression of the Turkish Sultan. Later,
after the first World War, when immigration into Palestine was stifled by the
Mandatory Power, we were undeterred and helped to build new settlements
for the accommodation of more immigrants. When the purchase of land
was restricted we went on with the acquisition of land.
All along we were animated by faith in the future. In the earlier
days, when the waverers and the indifferent regarded the Zionist as a
dreamer and Zionism as a Utopia, there was indeed need for extraordinary
faith in the success of our efforts. To-day, the world is convinced of the
reality of Zionism. The Jew must equally become convinced that we are
now confronted with our greatest opportunity since the beginning of our
exile.
Far from being carried away by the gratitude and praise which the
Zionist leadership is extending to us on this solemn occasion, we must
recall with all humility the fact that Providence has spared our commu-
nity from the fate endured by our brethren in Europe and that we were
privileged to do what we could for a great cause.
The fifty years of effort were indeed worth while. To those of our
pioneers and builders who are no longer with us we now pay humble
tribute. We who had the "Zechiah" of witnessing the climax of Zionist
endeavour are animated by a feeling of thanksgiving: "Baruch Sheheheyanu
Vekiyemanu Lazman Hazeh."


The "Zionist Record"
IT is impossible to divorce the "Zionist Record" from the general scheme.
of the Federation's activities during the past forty years. The main
task of the journal was to maintain contact, firstly, between the outside
Jewish world and the local community and, secondly, between the communi-
ties in South Africa and the Federation.
In its broader sense the term "contact" demanded an organisation of
Jewish enlightenment-historically as well as geographically. In order to
be well informed the reader will seek in his paper the -necessary con-
tact with our historic past, with our present-day literary achievements and
with the ideals that inspire the Jewish people-and the cause of Zion. Geo-
graphically the reader has to be made familiar with the developments in
Eretz Israel and in other Jewish communities throughout the world.
The past few years have demanded an emphasis on political work.
The fight for the independence of Zion is as old as Herzl's first speech, but
the pitched battle was first launched in 1938, in the days of the White
Paper. Since then the Jewish press has been, of necessity, enlisted into
the great political fight.
At a time when inspired newspaper correspondents conducted a per-
sistent and regular campaign against us, it was the duty of the Zionist
newspaper to bring to the people in this remote land a full and authentic
account of events and a true version of our aims. The "Zionist Record"
endeavoured to supply the demand for enlightenment to the best of its
ability, and we are gratified to note that the journal has attained a repu-


Goldie Myerson, Israeli Envoy to the U.S.S.R, is conversing with Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt, member of the American delegation and widow of the
late President Roosevelt. Mrs. Myerson is now on a visit to Israel prior
to her return to Moscow.


station in the Anglo-Jewish world of which we have every reason to bi
proud.
As with every other department of Jewish activity, great response
abilities devolve upon the Jewish press during the coming years, both i
regard to the upbuilding of Israel and our communal life in South Africa
We have tried to meet the emergencies of the times and to keep pace witt
the progress of the movement through the introduction of an extensive
news service, the publication of the journal twice a week and the enlist
ment of competent correspondents and commentators.
As for our own community, the "Zionist Record" has at- all time
regarded itself as its "faithful servant." We have tried to stress th
constructive elements of our communal endeavour and to encourage unit
within our ranks as well as the establishment of religious, cultural an
social institutions.
We pray and hope that before long, when the Jewish State has attaine
peace, it will be possible to reduce the space'devoted to Zionist "politics
and to concentrate on educational material. A Jewish newspaper is basic
ally an educational institution. Its task is to propagate, in a non-Jewis
language, the values of Judaism and the knowledge of positive achieve
ments of the Jewish people.
It will be our resolve on this our 40th anniversary to be worthy o
the traditions of our founders and to continue to serve the cause of Zionisr
and the community of South Africa.

Educational Centre
THE consecration of the Linksfield Educational Centre marks y<
another important milestone in the progress of the S.A. Board
Jewish Education. During a comparatively short period of activity t
Board has acquired a "-number of imposing buildings and has establish
a network of institutions ranging from nursery schools to a Teacher.
Seminary. The S.A. Board of Jewish Education has indeed displayed vision
and imaginativeness. Undeterred by the Jeremiahs who keep on talking
of "apathy" and "indifference," they continued to build new institution
and to provide better facilities for the development of Jewish education
The community is indeed greatly indebted to them.
Johannesburg is to-day one of the leading educational centres in tl
Union. Apart from the large local Jewish school population, the cit
attracts annually Jewish students from all parts of the country. At th
same time the community itself has spread over a wide area and it
obvious that with the development of suburban congregations the preser
school accommodation will be totally inadequate. The Linksfield Educe
tional Centre is situated in an area with a large Jewish population an
will thus cater for them, but its main Value lies in the fact that it is th
first determined effort for many years to establish a Jewish day schoe
in Johannesburg.
The day school has met with initial success, but it is only a beginning
The community must now enable the Board to proceed with its magnify
cent undertaking and to establish the institution on a sound footing.
The Board of Education deserves well of South African Jewry.
is entitled to expect generous assistance. Some of its institutions should
be endowed by generous members of the community, so that they are fre
from the burden of mortgages and from the cost of upkeep. Johanner
burg Jewry can never have too many educational centres. Our very futu
is dependent on them.






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

"May This Anniversary.


Day Become A Starting


Point For New


Efforts"

Special Message From


,Dr. Claim


Weizmann,


President


Of Israel
THE 50th anniversary of the foundation of the South African
Zionist Federation is a major event in the history of the
World Zionist Movement.
The time has not yet come for the assessing of the out-
standing contribution made by the numerically small Jewish com-
munity of South Africa to the Jewish national revival and the
establishment of the Jewish commonwealth in Palestine. Only
those possessing intimate knowledge of the history of the last
30 years know of the yeoman service rendered by your Federa-
tion during the most critical phases of our movement.
Your Zionist enthusiasm and judgment has been a tower
of strength to leaders of the movement at every stage of our
struggle.
I feel that with the establishment of Israel, co-operation with
South African Zionism in upbuilding the Jewish commonwealth
will now be even more significant and creative. May this Anni-
versary Day become the starting point for new efforts, out-
shining even your past unique achievements. -


"Tell South

Zionists.


Special


PAGE NNE

African



From


David Ben Gurion, Prime Minister

-Of Israel


(Cable from Coblin Legum)
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-We
were sitting in Army Headquarters
with Israel's Premier, Mr. Ben
Gurion. It had taken me nearly a
week to get the interview, and
only through influential and high
Government contacts.
Outside, the waiting room and cor-
ridors were choked with deputations
representing almost every branch of
economic and military life in Israel.
Suddenly one of the doors in the
room opened and an unannounced
man of stocky build walked in
smiling. The Prime Minister looked
up and watched the man for a while
and then said: "Walk across the
room again." The man did so with
the air of one trying to show some-
thing off.
A few moments later Mr. Ben
Gurion walked across to him and
shook him warmly by the hand. We'
then learned that this young man had
lost a leg in the fighting in Galilee
a few months ago, and had just come
out of hospital with an artificial leg.
His first impulse on his discharge
from hospital was to come and show
his old Haganah commander, Ben
Gurion, how well he had been fitted
up. It was a mere informality for
him, while for most people it was
a difficult and elaborate procedure
to get an interview with the Prime
Minister.
This air of informality prevails in
most quarters in Israel to-day, and
there is much here reminiscent of
the early years of Government in
South Africa. Just as all old com-
rades of war came to call on Generals
Botha, Hertzog and Smuts to discuss
their daily problems, so men from
the kibbutzim and Haganah come
to see their -friends "at court."
During the interview Mr. Ben
Gurion gave me a message to South
Africa on the occasion of the fiftieth


anniversary of the S.A. Zionist
Federation. "Tell South African Zio-
nists," he said, "that we in Israel
are proud of the role it has played
in helping to make the Jewish State
a reality. It has played its part
well. South African Zionism need
not be ashamed of its 50 years .of
activity. Proportionately it has done
as much as any other country, Israel
always excepted.
"In fund-raising it has done more
than any other country, apart from
Israel. South Africa has always
played its part in sending chalutzim,
but not enough has been done in
this respect, and much more must
be achieved.
"If all the Jewish people were
of the same calibre as South Afri-
can Jewry, we would have little
to complain about.
"But as much as South African
Zionism has done in the past 50
years, it has not been sufficient. We
need more young people to help in
building Israel and securing the
future, and we also require more
money to be invested in the JewiSh
State.
"South African Zionism must im-
prove on its own high standards.
"We, of course, all hope for an
early end to this war, and there is
some justification for believing that
peace is not far off. But we must
nevertheless be ready to continue the
fight if the necessity arises.
"My personal regards and warmest
good wishes to all my friends .in
South Africa and to all South Afri-
can Zionists," concluded Mr. Ben
Gurion.
It was a moving experience for
me, Louis Pincus and Elli Kirschner
to hear this message personally de-
livered by the Prime Minister. Be-
hind it lies the warmth and integrity
of this greatest living Jewish genius
-a man who is widely recognized as
having been the key figure in the
establishment of the Jewish State.


Messa~,e





PAGE TEN

PIONEERS
in the
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ESTABLISHED 1902


SAUL
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ar
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We are now supplying Diamond rings to the
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Our Only Address:
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We extend our congratulations to the S.A. Zionist
Federation on its 50th Anniversary and wish it
continued success.


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


BUILDING


SOCIETY


UNITED BUILDINGS, Fox and Rissik Streets, Johannesburg.
ST. ANDREW'S BRANCH: Rissik and Commissioner Streets, Johannesburg.
PRETORIA: Cor. Pretorius Street and Bank Lane, Pretoria.
Branches and Agencies In all the principal towns throughout the Union.
I 1 8 II01:






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


They-


Were
'


B3ornl

FIFTY years old!
At that moment of his career,
the average human is in his prime,
at his peak; but he knows that, after
a further term of full-running life
and achievement, the current of his
days must flag and in due course
cease to flow.
A "movement" is-not'like that. It
is the expression of the group mind
or the incarnation of a group aspira-
tion. Its expectancy of life is
limited not by those mortal ills that
flesh is heir to, but by its own in-


A. M. ABRAHAMS
Compounded of devotion,'
integrity an d sweet
reasonableness.

trinsic worth and the vitality of the
group in which it lives and works.
Measured by this yardstick, South
African Zionism need fear neither
decline nor dissolution. For not only
does it stand for a great and noble
concept, but it is of *the very essence
.of the South African Jew. For him
it is no mere "cause" or "object"; it
is part of him, of his way of life as
a Jew; he does not merely believe
in it and work for it: he feels it, he
lives it.
I came to South Africa, 37 years
ago, already a convinced Zionist; but
I sobn found that the inferences I
had drawn from logic and history
were but a skeleton framework, and
ttat I must go to school to these
Jews from the towns of Kleinstettlach
of Lithuania, from the cities and vil-
lages, of South Africa, to learn what
living and feeling as a Zionist
meant, to clothe the dry bones of rea-
son with the warm pulsating sub-
stance of sentiment and hitlahavuth,
to find the secret of the golden chain
that binds Jew to Jew, running back
from generation to generation, from
the tohu-vavohu of to-day, through
the communities and ghettoes of the
Dispersion, to Zion and to. Sinai and
to our father Abraham. It was in-
deed a favouring wind of fortune
that brought me amongst men and
women who showed in every act and
thought that what they could do for
Zionism was far transcended by what
Zionism could and did do for them.


Mainspring Of Their Life
Some are born to Zionism; some
achieve it, by intellectual conviction
or by the awakening of latent senti-
ment; some have it thrust upon them
by persecution or the feeling of "not
'belonging." South African Jews are
for the most part in the first cate-
gory; their brand of Zionism is dyed
in the wool. And that is why, for
them, these fifty years are but a for-
mal division of time in their Zionist
life. There were Zionists in South
Africa before the Judeastaat was


. f


To


Zionism


written in 1895 or the First Zionist.
Congress held in 1897. Chibbath
Zion existed and functioned before
Herzl and the Dreyfus case; the very
name of one of our societies-the
Chovevi Zion of Bulawayo-takes us
back to those early days, and organ-
ised Zionist groups were to be found
up and down the country before the
official world movement came into
being.
And, by the same token, South Af-
rican Zionists will carry on in an
unflagging tempo in the years to
come. To them the argument that
the achievement of Jewish statehood
in Israel has 'taken some of the sig-
nificance and urgency out of Zionist
effort has just no meaning at all; not
because of the anus that obviously
rests upon world Jewry to consoli-
date and develop and bring to full
fruition the glorious" bcgnning which
this annus mirabilis haF w:tAessed,
but because Zionism and its expres-
sion in action will continue to be'the
mainspring and the motor of their
life as Jews.
From hand to, hand, from genera-
tion to generation, the torch is


M. I. COHEN
He won Rhodesia for
Zionism.

passed-a Ner Tamid, never to be
extinguished. South African Zionism
of to-day presents the picture of a
community standing in serried ranks,
disciplined, loyal, enthusiastic, re-
sponsive; from the oldest veteran to
the youngest recruit, ready and eager
for service. Like our vanguard in
the Yishuv, they have at all times
been steady and devoted; the ups and
downs of our national fortunes, the
so-called "crises," have not daunted
them; free from defeatism on the
one hand and extravagance on the
other, they have always pursued an
even course consistent, hopeful,
"practical."


The Old Guard
It is hard for me to refrain from
referring to some of those men and
women and youngsters who ex-
emplify these qualities: but it would
be a task not only invidious but im-
possible, for it would mean a
"Who's-Who" of hundreds, maybe
thousands, of names. But I will take
leave to recall a few typical figures
-out of many-no longer with us, of
whom I cannot think without rever-
ence and emotion.
I call to mind the picture of Idel
Schwartz of Cape Town, standing in
the van like a rock of rugged
granite; of Manuel Leo Genussow,
for whom the tiniest Zionist service
in the remotest hamlet was a holy
duty; of A. M. Abrahams, com-
pounded of devotion, integrity and


L


MORRIS MORRISON
Inspired a whole genera-
tion of Natal Jewry.

to demand more and more depart-
mentalisation. But all has grown
naturally and evenly, by living and
organic process; soundly, steadily,
progressively, the superstructure has
been built on a firm foundation. And
the same is true of the Funds.
The Blue Box of to-day, with its
frequent yields of ten, twenty or
thirty pounds at a clearance, is th"
lineal heir of the one which, thirty
years ago, was doing well at five
shillings a time. The great sums
given in our latter-day campaigns
are. in a natural progression from
the efforts of an older time, when a
contribution of one hundred pounds
was a rare simcha. No longer do we
need "distinguished visitors" to gear


PAGE ELEVE

Reflections on Tn1i

50th Anniversary

r y'i
'J~yI;


sweet reasonableness; of Jacob Wer-
ner, of Piet Retief, whose boyish en-
thusiasm never deserted him; of
Morris Alexander, the champion of
.every good cause; of Isaac Epstein,
who first in Rhodesia and later in
Pretoria played an unobtrusive but
decisive role; of M. I. Cohen, who'
carried Rhodesia for Zionism; of
Benzion Hersch, that restless soul
whose burning zeal literally con-
sumed him; of Meyer Melmed .,of
Queenstown, ex-soldier of Czarist
Russia, who from his deathbed
directed that he be buried in his
talith, and that Hatikvah' be sung,
and a collection for the Keren Kaye-
meth made, at his graveside; of
Louis Policansky and Bernard Gor-
don, dear and gracious souls, who
never made a speech and never
wearied in service; of Moses Morri-
son who, from the sick-room which
was his only home for twenty years,
inspired a whole generation of Natal
Jewry; of many another, to whom,
if only space allowed, I would wish
to pay tribute.
These were of the Zionist "Old
Guard"; they and such as they set
the indelible stamp of their person-
ality and their example upon the
character and development of the
movement. A host of their coevals
are still, happily, amongst us; still
greater numbers of the younger gen-
erations are following in their path.


From Strength To
Strength
Progress has been vast since those
earlier days. Societies have multi-
plied. Parties have emerged. Nat-
ional and Provincial Councils have
come into being. The women and
the youth have built up formidable
organizations of their own. Our
press and our propaganda have con-
stantly expanded. The-work has be-
come so widespread and so varied as


Jack Alexander
Secretary, S.A. Zionist Federations,
1917-1943

us to a special effort; in all essen.
tials the work 'is done ahead. 1"
long self-discipline we have learned,
and all but perfected, the "art o6
giving"; and nowhere is this art befr
ter known and practised than in thN
dorps and hamlets, whose responsive
ness-moral as well as material-4
is an object-lesson to many a largej4
community.
In the esteem of the Zionist world
no community stands higher thahi
ours; they recognize its unswerving
loyalty, its constructive and practi
cal quality, its good organisation, it
freedom from internal dissensim
and (within human limits) from
pettiness. Nor must it go unmei
tioned that no group enjoys great$
regard in the Yishuv than the Soulj
Africans who have made it thel
home. .
Ever stronger become our direct
ties with Israel. The South Africapi
aliyah, not insignificant even in earT
lier years, bids fair to become 'i
steady stream. The growing momeri-
tum of Chalutziuth is guiding th,
flower of our youth to Aretz. South,
African Companies, groups and il4
dividuals have brought their re-,
sources, experience ani iniative. Thle
stirring events of the past twelve,
months have evoke-! a standard both
of financial contribution and of p ;1
sonal service unprecedented a-d al
most undreamed of: and ever: ihis$i
one feels, is only an earnest of still
vaster efforts to come.


Spirit Of The Maccabees
For the Jewish Nation has still a
long and difficult road to tread. In
the last analysis, we stand alone; our,
own will and our own power-noth-i
ing but these will carry us through,,
as they carried our Maccabean anh
cestors, whose heroic and successful'
stand we are about to celebrate. And-'
just as these Maccabees joined to'
the achievement of national redemp,-
tion the re-dedication of the people-i
of Israel to its faith and its high!
mission, so our new State, won by!
our modern giborim, calls to the Jew-,
ish people, in and out of Israel, tW'
sustain and intensify its determina-
tion its enthusiasm and its ideals. -
Our National Council, in its Pro'
clamation of the State of Israel on:
the Fifth of lyar, declared that "the.
Jewish people remain faithful to thqe
land of Israel in all the countries of
their dispersion." South 'Africa has
assuredly been faithful these 50
years: it will assuredly be so in the.
years to come.




"-SBVMPAGE TWELVE

Important NEWS!!!
to

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FURNITURE MNFRS.
SHOPFITTERS
BUILDERS' MERCHANTS
Veneered Plywoods, S.A. (Pty.) Ltd. 'take
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Sales Enquiries to:
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22 BOK STREET, corner Twist Street
JOHANNESBURG Phone 44-7191


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


II


,"If f'r O "' 'I .vii '\ I I



PIcT RIAL


SERVICE
TO THE ADVERTISING
AND PRINTING TRADES
FOR ALL
PRINTING BLOCKS




PH ONEWS'S3-77/5 KCD* w 61


WE HELPED TO BUILD ZIONISM
L. R U B I N, Established 1S96

JOHANNESBURG'S PIONEER BOOKSELLERS

For 53 years the firm of L. RUBIN has contributed towardsthe growth of Zionism and the dissemination of Jewish know-
ledge by bringing Jewish books to the homes of South African Jewry. ,2


Jews scattered in all parts of the country, traders in outlying districts,
settlers in remote areas, from Cape Town to Nairobi, have turned to
RUBIN'S for their Hebrew, Yiddish and Anglo-Jewish books and
periodicals.
The firm of RUBIN'S was always glad to be of service to the' com-
munity. To its founder, the late Mr. Liebman Rubin, and to his successors,
it was a labour of love to bring the message of Judaism to practically
every Jewish home.
Most of our leading Zionists in this country have turned to our book-
shelves for inspiration.. We are proud of the fact that on this Golden
Jubilee of the S.A. Zionist Federation, we can humbly claim that we have
helped in the advancement of the great cause.
As in the past, we shall continue to bring the message of Judaism
to Jewish readers throughout the country.
L. RUBIN has distributed the "Zionist Record" and numerous other
Zionist publications from the very first day of the inception of the firm.


THE LATE MR. L. RUBIN
We recall with pride the pioneers of Zionism in South Africa who patronised our firm and we greet the present
Zion on this momentous occasion.


builders of




THE ZIONIST EECOEij, k~E1DAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948 PAGE FIFrEEN


INSCRIBE THE GOLDEN JUBILEE
OF THE S.A. ZIONIST MOVEMENT


THE


STATE


OF


ISRAEL


GOLDEN BOOK


SEFER HAMEDINAH


The proceeds


of these inscriptions will


redeem a tract of land in Israel for the


settlement of


ex-servicemen


THE ZIONIST RECORu, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


PAGE FIFTEEN




PAGE FOURTEEN


Helped


To Build The


Rand...


ESTABLISHED 1902


GRATUS


(PTY.) LTD.

BUILDING MATERIAL MERCHANTS


Manufacturers of the Famous
HERCULES STEEL WINDOWS,
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P.O. Box 4888 Telephone 33-6321 (5 lines)

We extend our best wishes to the S.A.
Zionist Federation on its 50th Anniversary
and for its continued success.





Serving


SOUTH AFRICA
We have a comprehensive service at all Union .ports
and also have a Branch Office in Johannesburg.
Our Activities include:
STEAMSHIP AGENCY, CHARTERING OF VESSELS,
SHIPPING (EXPORT OF FULL CARGOES, PARCELS
AND SMALL CONSIGNMENTS), CUSTOMS CLEARING
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MARINE AND FIRE INSURANCE, BAGGAGE AGENCY,
SHIPS' GUARDS, and any other General Agency business
required.
We have recently been privileged to load two vessels
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and Exporters of a service second to none.
Apply for full details of this service'to:

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Head Office: P.O. BOX 4, POINT, DURBAN
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Port Elizabeth Office: P.O. BOX 150
East London Office: P.O. BOX 48
Johannesburg Office: P.O. BOX 1558
Telegraphic Address at all Offices: "STEAD."


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


~II


ii~ --


PATLANSKY BROS.
AND

PATLEY (Pty.) LTD.


!FIRST


IN 1898 FOREMOST IN


1948


Who Have Been Advertisers In

'THE ZIONIST RECORD'

Since Its Inception .
extend best wishes to the S.A. Zionist
Federation on its 50th Anniversary
and to "The Zionist Record" on its 40th
birthday.
Readers of "The Zionist Record" have always
relied on UNIVERSAL OIL for Household Use.
132 JEPPE ST., P.O. BOX 378, JOHANNESBURG


GRATUS &


61 President


Street, Johannesburg


A' PILLAR
OF
SOUTH AFRICAN
PROGRESS

For 50 years we have been
ifl serving the people of South
.Africa.
Our motto has always been
m quality merchandise, honest
S-value and service.




Cor. Jeppe & Joubert Streets Johannesburg


Distributors of
UNIVERSAL
Salad and Cooking


Oil






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


WHAT


ZIONISM


HAS


DONE


PAGE FIFTEEN


FOR


THE ZIONIST


By

C. Gershater


FROM all parts of the world
%leading Zionists have show-
ered upon us greetings and
compliments on what we, the
Jews of South Africa, have done
for Zionism. On many previous
occasions we have. heard- of
these compliments and it is
about time that we started
thinking not of what we have
done for Zionism, but of what
Zionism has done for us.
In a broader sense, everyone to-
day acknowledges the debt which the
Jewish people owe to Zionism.
Everybody knows of the contribution
which Zionism is making to-day to-
wards a solution of the problem of
Jewish homelessness; of its general
answer to the question of Jewish re-
habilitation-in the polTtical, social or
economic fields. Let us,- however,
leave the broad issues and ask a more
restricted question: "What, if any-
thing, did South African Jews receive
in return for the fifty years of
labour in the cause of Zion?
The ifs" of history are always
fascinating. It has been suggested
that the best way of getting a proper
perspective of events of the past is
to reverse the process and to specu-
late on what would have been the
position to-day if this or that event
had not occurred. On the same lines
it might well be profitable to try
and imagine a state of things based
on the assumption of "South Afri-
can Jewry Without Zionism." We
could, firstly, build up an imaginary
picture of communal and social life
and, secondly, an analysis of the per-
sonal life of each and every Zionist,
from the leaders to the rank and file.
Neither of the two can be done here
in detail. The former-the commu-
nal picture- would require a book;-
the latter-the individual analysis-


I. ABRAHAMS
First Editor of the "Zionist Record"


is of a far too personal character.
In any case, self-analysis, which is
better expressed in Hebrew by the
term "cheshbon hanefesh," is at all
times a good thing and -on this occa-
sion each individual Zionist might
well be inclined to take stock of his
own spiritual life and to decide
whether or not-he had benefited from
the time which he devoted to Zionist
work.

Parents and Grandparents
For the younger members of the
movement it will be equally fascinat--
ing to give some thought to the ex-
tent of their benefits from the Zio-
nist activities of parents and' grand-
parents. Many of our leaders to-day
belong to second or third generation
active Zionists and in this connec-
tion one may be permitted to observe
that South African Zionism was, on
the whole, very fortunate in its chil-
dren.
It is to the credit of the move-
ment that so many of our founders
here have left behind them devoted
successors. Many of our pioneers
who are happily with us to-day may
well take pride in the fact that their
children and other members of their
families are active in the movement.
Furthermore, that a proportionately
large number of their children have
settled in Palestine and are render-
ing direct service to the building of
of the Yishuv.
This is a great blessing and is
illustrative of the. spiritual har- THE MODERN MAGIDIM.-
mony which Zionism introduced THE MODERN MAGIDIM.-
into our homes. The gulf between to South Africa have had a pi
father and son, between one gene- Photo shows Mr. Sokolow a
ration and another in Jewish life, picture was take
which elsewhere might have been
the cause of friction and conflict,
was here bridged by a movement
which appealed to every age group.
It made tradition live and assume opened South African Jewry to the
the air of reality in our social life; Jewish world.
it provided spiritual continuity in a Almost from the first day of their
Violently changing world, organised existence, South African
Zionists have been arranging visits
A Bundle of Sorrows of overseas delegates. The distin-
guished visitor came here for the
The Jewish settler who came to this purpose of assisting with campaign's
country was often still a young man. for funds. Yet, on watching the
He brought with him a bundle of audiences listening attentively and
sorrows, an aching heart at having eagerly to the speeches, one was re-
been uprooted' from a cosy environ- minded of the itinerant preacher, the
ment where life was static, poor, but "magid," who moved about the vil-
friendly. He came mainly from lages qf old Lithuania.
small villages where tradition dies The role of the "magid" in the past
hard. He knew everybody and few hundred years of Jewish history
everybody knew him. His way of has not yet been fully appreciated.
life was determined by a rigid set Unlike the "Ray," who was settled
of religious laws and social conven- in one place, busy with scholarly
tions. His migration was not merely books, which were accessible only to
from one continent to the other. It the select few: who frequently was
was a transportation from the primi- not even blessed with the gifts of ora-
tiveness of the village to the temp- tory and therefore maintained a cer-
tations of the city. tain detachment from the masses of
The first reaction was one of iso- the people, the "magid" was a wan-
lation. At a time when a letter took during preacher who created vital con-
.many weeks to reach these shores and tacts between one community and the
when the newspaper press had not other. He, too, collected funds and
yet assumed the dimensions .of to-day was a "meshulach" at the same time.
(how many of the early settlerrA Occasionally the "magid" came direct
could have received overseas period -Ifrom Jerusalem. Yiddish readers will
cals regularly?), it was not easy to recall Sholom. Aleichem's description
retain contact with the traditions of 'of the Jerusalem preacher who came
the old home. to the village and told an excited
Pent-up emotions had found their audience about people who speak
outlet in the building 6f congrega- only Hebrew, about graves of pro-
tions and synagogues wherever pos- phets and about goats that feed on
sible. The synagogue provided a re- ipe olives. He would also speak of
minder of a dim and warm past. Its his wanderings amongst other Jews,
atmosphere was a re-creation of a of their problems, their joys and their
recently abandoned environment. sorrows.
Within its walls the Jew was brought As we recavisited the great Ziwe aonnots
back to the old village, or (if he who visited these shores, we canngid.ot
were imaginative) to the very an- but be ire mnd e d of the ol d "magid
cient traditions of the Bible. Apart The naivete and amazement displayed
from the villationse nd apartBible. frt by the South African Jew at the re-
Biblical tradition, the big, wide world. Sokolow or Alexander Goldsteinahum
ain its Jewish connotation, remained were reminiscent of the Kasrilevke
Jews in Sholom Aleichem's stories.
Zionism has opened the world to Who can possibly estimate the bene-
the South African Jew and has fits and the blessings that the South


African Jew has derived from the
early Zionist Magidim; the inspira-
tion which he received from the
printed Zionist message?

A Long Way
We have travelled a long way since
1898. For the past ten years the
radio and the daily press bring news
from Palestine. The Jewish press has
a wide circulation. Thousands of Jew-
ish soldiers visited the country during
the war. People fly up to Palestine
with the ease of going to Muizenberg.
Many hundreds have close relatives,
sons and daughters, in Israel and are
in regular correspondence with the
country. But when Palestine had a
Yishuv of 50,000 at the end of World
War I, contact hardly existed. Few
of our early pioneers ever visited the
country of their dreams, a thing
which would appear improbable to-
day.
The big change has come about
during the last 10 or 20 years. In
the meantime, it was the Zionist mis-
sionary, the propagandist, who kept
the lines of contact going. He gave
the community much more than he
took from it. His importance be-
comes even greater when it. is rea-
lised that, unlike to-day, the Jews of
South Africa were at one $ime scat-
tered in numerous villages and ham-
lets. The Zionist preacher brought
the message to remote parts. He
talked to the rabbi or to the teacher
who was overjoyed by his stimulat-
ing company. He instilled new life
into the people. He gave them a
task to perform.
Changing Times
Times are changing. To-day
South African Jewry is well estab-
lished as a community, yet Zionism
has grown as a source of spiritual
strength together with the develop-
ment and growth of the community.
(Continued on page 16)







PAGE SIXTEEN

South African Link With


Pioneer Zionist


(Continued from page 33)

Dr. d"Arbella ever visited the Trans-
vaal. Should such, indeed, have
been the case then his document on
Jewry here in the days before the
Discovery of gold on the Rand in 1886
would certainly prove a most valu-
able source of historical information.
In all likelihood, he may have visi-
ted, besides Durban, other parts of
this quarter of Africa, of which no
record of his has yet come to light.
One finds it worthwhile to postulate
an assumption like this. The pres-
ent writer bases this contention on
a report .published in the first Afri-
kaans-paper ever to be issued in this
,country, "Die Patriot," of Septem-
ber 26, 1884-it was edited by the
pioneer of the Afrikaans tongue, the
Rev. S. J. du Toit-to the effect that
"Dr. Isaac Gregory d'Arbella be-
lieves that the Ophir of Solomon was
in Africa. While. at Chiloane, twenty
miles from Africa, he met natives
who were going to the mines in the
Transvaal. He was impressed by the
'Jewish types' of these natives."
Not always was he keen to remain
in Africa, and his thoughts, it seems,
were more often than not centred on
Palestine Jewish Palestine in
whose National resuscitation he
hoped to make his own specific con-
tribution. A fact it is, and, among,
others, who have confirmed this as-
sertion was none other than Elkan
Nathan Adler, who met him a year
after he had arrived in the land of
his fathers.
"Dr. d'Arbella is a man of means,".
opined the Anglo-Jewish scholar,
"and the primary object which
prompted him to settle in the Holy
Land was his desire to assist in the
upbuilding of the Yishuv, and to
give his charming little girl and
boy a Jewish education. His dark
bright-eyed little daughter is sweet-
ly pretty, and speaks English with
charming shyness. She is only seven,
but has already made a conquest. The
doctor takes much interest in the
agricultural colonies, and has a con-
siderable pecuniary stake in them.
He owns half-a-million vines in the
Rishon colony, and has a profound
belief in its future."

Went To Eretz Israel
Such, indeed, was the object he had
in view when he left our shores for
good some time in 1885 or 1886. By
mid-1887 he was already to be found
in the country of his ancestors. He
certainly did not find it easy to en-
ter there, for he came at a moment
when the Turkish authorities of the
time were doing their utmost to re-
strict the" movement of Jews in that
quarter of the earth. He was adam-
ant in his particular quest, however,
and it was only on account of his
profession as a medical man that the
then Turkish Governor eventually
permitted him to enter the Land of
Israel.
Within a little while Dr. d'Arbella
made his mark in the Palestine of his
age, and it was immediately after
his arrival there that he, in 1887, was
engaged as medical officer of the col-
ony of Rishon le-Zion-a settlement,
it will be remembered, which was
founded in 1882 by seventeen fami-
lies who were all members of the
Russian Chovevei Zion Society.
He was not there for long, however,
and late in 1888 he was asked to act
'as physician to the Rothschild Hospi-
tal in Jerusalem-a position he held
for years.
He always appeared to take a seri-
ous view of his vocation as such,
and wherever possible endeavoured


to succour. ailing man. For instance,
on one occasion, in 1891, after wit-
nessing the sad plight of Persian
Jewry in Palestine following an out-
break of cholera in Syria he ap-
pealed to folks outside the country
to help them as much as possible. "I
am the only person who speaks Per-
sian," he then declared, "and I know
their terrible conditions."
Not only was he concerned about
the physical conditions of these
Persian Jews-most of them were
Marrahoes who fled their natal land
-but he himself, as befits a -man, of
knowledge, was interested :in their
cultural life as well. Possessor of a
facile-and ready pen, he wrote essays
on them as well as on other topics
for the London "Jewish Chronicle" of
his generation. He was, also, in com-
pany with some of the most renowned
Jewish intellectuals of the day like
Moritz Steinschneider, David Kauf-
mann, Lector- M. Friedman, Joseph
Halevy and Alexander Harkavy, a
contributor to the "Jerusalem Jahr-
buch" for 1889 which was edited and
published by Abraham Moses Luncz
(1854-1918), the famous Kovna-
born blind scholar and pioneer Heb-
rew printer in the Land of Israel.
Dr. d'Arbella spent much ot his
time. in Palestine in advancing the
Hebrew language within the bound-
aries of the ancient Land. Such was
the interest he displayed in espous-
ing this cause thit, in 1890, he was
elected President of the Jerusalem
"Safa Berura," which was founded
in 1889. It was an organisation which
had for its aim "the substitution of
pure Hebrew for the diverse mongrel
jargons, as the home language of
our co-religionists in the Holy Land."
A year later, in 1891, he, on their
behalf, issued an appeal for finan-
cial assistance. "Considerable pro-
gress has been made already," he
wrote, "but funds are needed to sup-
ply teachers for the girls, to purchase
books, and for the publication of use-
ful conversational guides, the want
of ithe latter being much felt." And
it is, mainly, for an activity such as
this on his part that one can well
claim him, in company with his bet-
ter known contemporaries Eliezer
Ben-Yehudah the lexicographer and
Jechiel Michael Pines the writer, as
among ,the pioneers of the Hebrew
tongue in the land of his fathers.
At the same time he was, also,
equally devoted to the cause of Jew-
ish education in the Holy City. He
was often, for example, present P't
the examination of pupils of the
Evelina de Rothschild Girls' School
in Jerusalem.


Held, In High Esteem
That he was a man generally held
in high esteem in the Holy City of
his era is a fact that cannot be gain-
said. To such a degree was this the
case that early in the 1890's, for
instance, he was appointed by the
Government of the Netherlands as
their Consul in Jerusalem.
What was the personal impression
that he made on his contemporaries?
"Dr. d'Abrella," observed one of
them, Elkan Nathan Adler, "may
not be scrupulously observant, ac-
cording to Jerusalem notions, but he
never eats 'trifa' or smokes on 'sab-
bath.' He is a handsome, active man,
and though he mourns for the wife
he lost, he is too much of an ideal-
ist or an enthusiast to be anything
but the most agreeable and refresh-
ing of companions."


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

What Zionism Has Done For The Zionist
(Continued from page 15)


We have experienced a number of
great upheavals. The physical de-
struction of European Jewry might
have brought spiritual destruction
elsewhere. The rise of Hitler in the
30's could have brought about moral
decay amongst a small and helpless
people faced with so ferocious an
enemy. At the time when Hitler was
sprawling across Europe, reaching out
for the entire civilised world, we
held on to our Zionism. It offered
not merely fruitless consolation, but
bright rays of hope and an outlet for
constructive work. The grim feeling
of helplessness was relieved .by the
thought that "despite everything"
we have a goal in -front of us -and
are moving towards it. To use a
crude and cruel analogy, Hitler had
taken from the Jewish people in the
course of five years much more than
Zionism can take from them in the
next thousand years. Yet, the com-
pensation received by the Jews (de-
spite their significant contribution to
the war effort) from the Allied
Nations, was nil, while the reward
which Zionism has given, us has .ex-


pressed itself in a thousand ways and
reached its climax during the last
glorious year of 1948. How can we
adequately describe this reward?
How can it be measured? The sta-
ture of every Jew, wherever he may
be, has been raised. Young Jewry
is fighting its enemies and heroic-
ally defending its soil! The very
thought has electrified not only those
who had worked for Zion, but thou-
sands who stood outside our ranks.

A Mission
Zionism has indeed done for the
Zionist .much more than the Zionist
has done for Zionism. It gave him
a mission-the type of mission of
which the fruit can be gathered in
our own time. It provided a link,
firstly, with the .great past, and,
secondly, with the expanse of Jewry
in other parts of the world. It gave
content to the Jewish home and
created a harmony which on the final
analysis is an inestimable contribu-
tion towards the development of local
communal life, in face of many social
and political handicaps.


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10. 1948

Understanding,


Zeal


And


Devotion


MESSAGE FROM DR. A. GIAANOVSKY, CHAIRVIAN, BOARD
OF DIRECTORS, KEREN KAYEMETH
I EXTEND my warmest greetings to all South African Zionists
on this historic occasion. The Golden Jubilee of South Afri-
can Zionism coincides with the close of an epoch in Jewish his-
tory. It has been an imperishable epoch, stupefying in its dis-
asters, but sublime in its ultiniate. achievement of the State of


Israel.
South African Jewry has been
privileged to know every stage along
this tremendous course, and from the
very beginning has played its part
in the struggle. Although remote
from the centres of Jewish life, the
founders of South African Zionisnm
brought with them from their "old
home" in Europe the seeds of the
Zionist ideal, and when Herzl sounded
the call they were quick to respond.
I recall reading, during my youth-
ful years, parts of "Die Welt," by
Herzl, which included reports of en-
thusiastic and loyal work by the pio-
neers of South African Zionism.
What Zionism owes to these pioneers
is only too well known.
South African Zionism has grown
considerably in its deeds and in its
conception since those days, when
South African Jewry was small in
size and poor in pocket.
.In every sphere of Zionist activity
the Zionists of South Africa have
done their share. Indeed, proportion-
ately they have participated in a
greater measure than the people of
most other countries of the world in
support of National- Funds and semi-
public and private enterprises in Is-
rael; the part that South African
Jewry is playing has made its r.amne
ring throughout the world. It has
also won a distinguished place for
itself for its fine work in the field
of Political Zionism.

Magnificent Strides
But I feel it incumbent on this oc-
casion to recall the particularly
splendid work it has done for lhe re-
demption of the land of Israel through
the J.N.F. This started during the
earliest days of this century, when
the tireless efforts of my friend,
Joseph 'Janower, and others led to
the creation of a special J.N.F. de-
partment of the Zionist Federation,
which is to-day making magnificent
strides in its work. The love, under-
standing and devotion cf South Afri-
can Zionists, from the first dark
days, has been one of the distinguish-
ing factors which have enabled the
J.N.F. to provide the land upon
which the Homeland has been
steadily built and upon which the
State of Israel came into being.
I know that the Zionists of South
Africa realise that the birth of the-
State is but the fulfilment of the at-


DR. A. GRANOVSKY
tributes of Jewish n:-tionalism. This
in itself is not our ultimate vision, but
is the means to an end. It is the
means whereby our nation will be en-
abled to build a life of freedom and
justice and to implement the ideal it
once proclaimed to mankind.
We are at the beginning of a new
epoch in our national destiny and are
realising the age-old yearnings of our
people. Our responsibilities are
greater than any we have borne until
now.

Increased Task
The J.N.F. belongs to the Jewish
people throughout the world, and is
the instrument for providing land for
the masses of immigrants flocking to
Israel. The J.N.F. is confident that
it will measure up to its increased
tasks in this great year of triumph.
I regard it as an honour to add my
tribute on this occasion to South
African Zionism and to the men and
women who brought it to its present
stature. I know* that in the years
ahead the name of South African
Zionism will continue to echo in Is-
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understanding, zeal and devotion to
the ideals of Zionism.


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PAGE 4SEVENTEBN

THE FEDERATION HAS

BECOME ROOTED IN


THE. LIFE OF
FIFTY years ago the few
scattered Zionist- societies
joined together and formed the
South African Zionist Federa-
tion, thereby declaring that the
Jewish State as conceived by
Herzl had become the aim and
ideal towards the fulfilment of
which the Jews in South Africa
as a whole pledged themselves.
The leaders who fifty years
ago accepted the common re-
sponsibility stem from and are
the inheritors of the tradition
that to forget Jerusalem is to
let the right hand wither.
The vicissitudes of the mass
of Jewry in Europe bound the
,South African Jewish commu-
nity closer and closer to the
fate of their brethren and
forged ties which grew stronger
and stronger as the tragedy
grew greater and the need for
a Jewish land became more and
more a question of life or death
for the Jewish people.
The State of Israel stands
to-day, gallantly fought for and
nobly won by those who came
and were driven there from the
four corners of the world.
Through the fifty years' work
of the South African Zionist
Federation, the old and the new
generation of South African
Jewry has a part in what has
been done and has yet a great
task before it in all that is to


S.A, JEWRY


eMessa~,e


From


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Mr. N.


Kirschner


ikjone there. The Federation
become rooted in" the life
o\0-- '- h African Jewry. It is
sti in the strength that
Jew y gives it, and I know that
it will grow stronger yet in
measure to help to bring Israel
to full stature amongst the
nations of the world and to the
full hope that it has for all
Jews.


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~I Take this opportunity of extending congratula-
tions to the S.A. Zionist Federation on its 50th
birthday and wish it continued success.










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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, -1)436EMBER 10. 1949-


PAGE .EIGHTEEN






THE ZIO ST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


THE BARMITZVAH YEAR



Of The Zionist Federation


I WAS not fortunate enough to b
clever in the sense of the sage
who said: "Eigehu chacham Haroei
et Hanolad." I did not stand at th.
cradle of the S.A. Zionist Federatio
-but I managed to come to the Bar
mitzvah. I came to South Africa ii
1911, when the Federation was ex
actly 13 years old. This information
was given to me on the eve of my de
parture from Germany by the lati
President of the World Zionist Or
, ganisation, David Wolffsohn-thi
successor of the great Herzl.
Wolffsohn had been to South Afri
ca in 1906 and knew the history o:
local Zionism and of our local Zionists
He summed up the position in his owi
style: "There are no great figure
heads, but the masses are great an
wise-hearted. The love and affec
tion shown to me during my sta
gave me hope and strength. I wa
the harbinger of the message of th<
Geulah. I soon- realized that I v'a
not in Darkest Africa but in Sunnl
South Africa. The old proverb "Ha
rotze lehachkim Yadrim" (if on
wants to get wise let him go to thi
South) still holds true. The South
African Jews are like a box o01
candles. They are all pitch dark
but one match is sufficient to give
them all'bright light. Go, mein liebe.i
Junge, and be a match unto them
Give them all my love and regards
and may the God of Israel and Zion
help you."
He further told me: "I am no
philosopher, no writer, ich bein a po-


--- V~


MORRIS ALEXANDER


shelter Yid, ich bin nor ein Kauf-
mann." (His opponents used to call
his Zionism: Kaufmannischer Zion-
ism).
I was deeply moved.
That was thirty-eight years ago
and, believe it or not, I was thirty-
eight years younger, and Herzl's
heir, David Wolffsohn, looked to me
as a descendant of King David.
Wolffsohn was a modest man, but it
was his eyes-the windows of his
soul-which made a deep impression.
I replied that I would give his re-
gards, but his love I would keep for
myself. He embraced and kissed me.
His colleagues of the Action Com-
mittee, who were with him in the
Hotel Adlon, looked on in astonish-
ment and smiled, but he left them
to lead me to the door saying:
"Gluckliche Reise. Come to-morrow
and my secretary will give you a few
letters of introduction both to our
Zionist friends and to the mining
magnate "
A few days before Purimn 5671
(1911) I had my first meeting with
a South African Zionist. Wolffsohn
had given me a letter of introduc-
tion to Morris Alexander in Cape


e
5
e


n1

e


e


n
d

'7


Town. I- found him to be most charm-
ing. It was impossible to have a dis-
cussion in his office which was a
beehive of activity. I was unable to
accept his invitation to come to his
home as our ship, the Carnarvon
Castle, was soon due to leave for
Durban, so we went to a cafe.
Morris Alexander expressed sur-
prise that I, a Russian Jew, should


I. '


CHIEF RABBI HERTZ


be an admirer of Wolffsohn. In his
view the Russian Zionist leaders
"had killed Herzl" and desired to
break up the Zionist organisation-
"yet Wolffsohn speaks so highly of
you."
He Vw anted to know hov. long I
had been in Germany and which doc-
tor cured me of Wolffsohnphobia. I
told him that I was cured by the 9th
Zionist Congress in Hamburg where
I had had long discussions with Wolff-
sohn, who had assured me that
Herzl was never a territorialist and
that it was only "ein politischer
Schachzug." JIerzl had said to
Wolffsohn: "Alber mein lieber David,
Uganda ist dock eine Chimera." It
was merely a manoeuvre to show the
Sultan that other powers were pre-
pared to deal with us. 'Herzl knew
very well that the English- satraps
would be opposed to their "beautiful
Uganda being turned .into Jew-
ganda." These words (turned into
Jewganda) were actually used in a
cable addressed to the British Gov-
ernment immediately after the 6th
Congress by Johnson, Governor of
Nairobi, and sent in the name of the
white settlers of Nairobi.
Herzl was able to deal with the
Zionist "Neinsagers," but the real
"Neinsagers" were the British offi-
cials. Alexander admitted this to be
correct, and asked my indulgence for
speaking so harshly of the Russian
Zionists. He said that many great
Russian Zionists such as Dr. Chas-
anowitz, Rabbi Reines and Yitzchak
Leib Goldberg, had been faithful to
Herzl and understood him, nay, felt
with him. He added: "I am an East-
ern Jew born near 'Posen am Rhein'
and came to South Africa as a kid.
My father-in-law is a double East-
ern Jew, a Russo-Rumanian Jew."
I enquired whether he meant Pro-
fessor Schechter.
"Yes. How do you know it?"
"Wolffsohn had told me and, let me
tell you, that he fears that as a
friend of Achad Haam and a pupil
of Isaac Hirsch Weiss, Schechter
will put political Zionism into the
Genizah."
"But," replied Alexander smiling-
ly, "he will discover it again."
He drew out a letter-head and
wrote a few lines which he asked me


to give to his cousin Bernard Alex-
ander, who "in his spare time" is
also a Zionist.
He wished me luck and promised to
contact me when he visited Johan-
nesburg. He urged me to do Zion-
ist work. All must do it. "There are
many good Zionists here," he said,
"but they do not know much of Zi-
onism. Wolffsohn tells me that you
are a doctor of Zionism-I am only
a Zionist student. Raising his cup
he said: Let us conclude with a He-
brew saying "Lechayim."
On Pesach I met "Morris the Sec-
ond," Morris Kantorowitz (later
Kentridge). He had come to his par-
ents in Harrismith, O.R.C.. He was
a young Zionist soldier. His father,
Rev. Kantorowitz, was not a politi-
cal Zionist. He was a Chovev Zion
and looked at me with bewilder-
ment when I told him about my Zi-
onist inclinations. He gave me a
piece of advice: "You are a far-
brenter. Zionist-farfalen- every-
body is meshiiga in his. own way. But
if you go to Johannesburg you will
see how your Zionist friends torture
Dr. Landau, the greatest Jew in
South Africa. A few years ago he
dared criticise local Zionists and say
they did not live according to the
Jewish Law and were not Zionists,
but Hellenists. Since then the Doc-
tor had been unable to participate in
the movement-he is excluded from
the camp."
Rev. Kantorowitz then said:
"Here is a Jargonische Blettel. Der
Yiddisher Hohn where a Yungatz
who deserted his family in Russia
attacks Dr. Landau in a most dis-
graceful way, because he had said
that not all the Chassidim were
saints. This treifener .bew took up


PAGE NINETB!I


Reminiscences '

TBy


$4,



j. ^v ,
'w .S~~k fl ? '.^* -


-II

J. S. Judelowitz


the cudgels on behalf of the Chassi-
dim and a Zionist paper published
it. How can any eidelcr ,,ensot
have anything to do with them?"
He stood up pulling with both
hands at his long beard and paced up!
and down the room. I looked at hio.
At his full height, with his pierce
ing eyes and pulling at his koshr
beard which had never been touch'
by a barber, he'had the appearance
of a fine Talmid Chochom of old a2i0
(Continued on page 20)


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S= We extend our congratulations to the S.A. Zionist i i
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respective anniversaries. i





PAGE TWENTY

THE BARMITZVAH YEAR


(Continued from page 19)
he resembled Wolffsohn slightly.
Tall, upright and straight-forward,
his mind was directed to his great
master, Moshe Leib Lilienblum: "He
was the greatest Zionist in my young
days. A great Lamdan, a great
Apikoires, a great. Zionist and above
all a greisser Yid un a greisser
monsh, dos is geoven der emes allein.
Did you read his books?
"I have them all here."
"Really, come let us go, I would
like to see them."
The old lady, a pious woman of
the traditional type with a sheitel, a
real Zaddekes, laughed at his excite-
ment and stopped him: "Wait, let us
have tea. You have been talking all
the time. Moshe .Leib can wait."
Tea was served and old Kantoro-
witz, brightening up considerably,
told us this story.
When in the course of his efforts
to prevent a ban on Shechita in
Europe the famous Dr. Dembo
visited Switzerland he went up to
Basle, to the first Zionist Congress.
Ussishkin was pleasantly surprised
to. see him.
"Glad to meet you Herr Doctor, as
a Zionist," he said to Dr. Dembo.
"I am not a Zionist."
"Then why are you here?"
"Well, I heard that you Zionists
are assembled here to establish a
Jewish State in Palestine so I came
to see to it that you don't prohibit
the Shechita there."
We all laughed and Morris heard
all these stories and did not say a
word. A homo novus in local Zion-
ism, he kept silence but followed the
talk intently.
Earlier, in England, at the age of
14, Morris used to write reports of
Jewish gatherings for the "Jewish
Chronicle." In Durban he and Mr.
Joseph Rabinowitz were the hon.
secretaries of the Zionist Society.
They were called Die Umsiste
Schreibers.
Incidentally, Mr. Kentridge told
me that in the early days he once


called a Zionist meeting in Durban.
He gave his speech in advance to the
"Natal Mercury." The next day the
speech was published verbatim, but
the meeting was never held! The
"Natal Mercury" described it as a
"packed house."
The mantle of Morris Alexander
subsequently fell on Morris Kent-
ridge, who is now the doyen of Jew-
ish M.P.'s in the Union. Whenever' I
see him I recall the conversation at
his father's home in Harrismith
which took -place on Pesach 5671.
I came to Johannesburg in May,
1911. I presented my credentials to
the Zionist Federation where I saw
the acting chairman, Mr. A. M.
Abrahams, his brother Isaac, who
was the secretary of the Zionist Fed-
eration, and Mr. Isaac Caplan, who
was the honorary treasurer.
I gave them this message: "Your
President sends his best wishes and
mazeltov on your Barmi.tzvah." They
looked at me with surprise.
"Isn't it the Barmitzvah-year of
your Federation?"
"Oh, yes," Caplan smiled, placed
his hat on his head and rattled off
the Haftorah of his own Barmitz-
vah.
A. M. Abrahams claimed that he
could do the same, but was inter-
rupted by his brother, who told him
not to bother since he would not re-
ceive any presents. He then asked
after the Chief.
Mv message was not too cheerful.
T related that Wolffsohn was suffer-
ing from the Zionist sickness-heart-
disease. He had inherited it from
Herzl. The wags said that his con-
dition had become worse since he
had started to learn English. The
editor of the "Razsviet," Idelsohn,
had advised Wolffsohn not to attempt
the study of English, saying to him:
"Herr President, the English people
are fortunate in having acquired
English as their mother-tongue. If
they had to master the English
language they would not have had
time to conquer the world."


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 194S


I told the people at the Federation
that we must assist Wolffsohn and
that I was at their disposal. I would I
be a good Zionist missionary.
This made the "Barmitzvah boys"
very happy. I then addressed the Ab-
rahams brothers: "Sokolow told me
to ask whether you knew anything
of your great Landsman, Jules
Verne. Sokolow had told me that
both of you and Mr. Goldreich orig-
inate from Plotsk, in Poland. In that
town there was an old Jewish
teacher. His name was Olszewicz. He
had a son who went to France, be-
came baptised and changed his-name
to Verne.
This piece of information was met
with the biggest astonishment, so I
asked them if "Die Welt" of 1905
was available. The volume produced
was from Sam Goldreich's library
and I pointed out an article bv M.
Berkowitz: "Jules Verne-ein Jude"
("Die Welt," 1905, No. 35.)
They all felt that we should write
to Sam Goldreich about it. While
looking at "Die Welt" an envelope
fell out of .the -volume. On the back
-of the envelope was printed the in-
scription: "Nicht reich aber doch
Goldreich." This was the motto on his
letter-heads.
During my conversation with the
Zionist leaders I discovered that A.
M. Abrahams was an old friend of
Zangwill and that he was not "ex-
territorial." He had Territorialist
inclinations. His knowledge of Zion-
ism was very poor at the time-the
others knew even less.
I afterwards met Benzion S.
Hersch, the editor of "Die Judische
Pahm." I started to speak to him in
Hebrew. He answered in Polish. He
was a son of a Talmid Chacham,
Meyer David Hersch, a Gemora Lam-
dan. I was also introduced to S. Len-
nox Loewe, a son of Dr. Ludwig
Loewe, the secretary of Sir Moses
Montefiore.
Dr. Ludwig Loewe mastered 38
languages. His son was, however, a
taciturn man and could keep silent
in all the 38 languages. B. S. Hersch,
who was full of temperament and
most talkative, was the first politi-
cal Zionist in South Africa; he was
the first in South Africa to corres-
pond with "Herzl about Zionism.
When I asked him if he had read
Hess and Salvador he looked at me
and answered: "I am a "gemeiner"
in the army of Allgemeine Zionosten.
I am a plain soldier, a hard-working
man. I have no time to read. Work
for Zionism-that is the main thing.
I can assure you that if Herzl were
to have read all these writers he
would never have had time to write
his immortal book 'Der Judenstaat.'
The greatest Zionist of Anglo-Jewry
was Sir Moses Montefiore, whom I
remember well from my infancy. He
did a lot of work for Palestine, but
never read. My father once said of
him, 'he was the greatest Jew of
his time and the greatest Am-
Haaretz'."
S. Lennox Loewe had a small
circle of friends, he used to call them
"Maccabeans." (Hersch called them
Mcbeans).
My next call was on Dr. Landau. I
had a letter to him from S. I. Hur-
witz, who stirred up a controversy in
the Jewish world with his Hebrew
year book "Heatid." In 1909 he orgi-
nised the first conference for the
.Hebrew language and culture and he
requested Dr. Landau to establish a
branch of this organisation in South
Africa. Dr. Landau made a deep im-
pression on me. He was a great
scholar and well versed in Hebrew
and world literature. He reminded
me of a sage of the golden epoch of
the Jews in Spain.
I asked Dr. Landau about the ac-
tivities of the Hebrew movement in
Johannesburg and he replied that
they had a Hebrew circle "Ivriyah,"
but no Hebrew scholars apart from a
few of the old type melamdim. He
said: "I hope you will give us a He-
brew lecture soon. My house is open
to you and I will always be glad to
see you. I avoided discussion on Zion-
ism because of the information I had
had from Rev. Kantorowitz. How-
ever, during the tea served by Mrs.


Landau I glanced through thn pape:'.
-on a little table and amongst them I
came across an issue of the "Judishe
Fohn" dated May 4, 1911, which con-
tained a little feuilleton by Devorah-
sohn entitled "garei At-in the He-
brew High School." This epistle sub-
sequently led to a court case involv-
ing Dr. Landau and the Hebrew High
School. This was a scandal and a
Chilul Hashem.
I also managed to visit Dr. J. H.
Hertz,'- who was about to depart for
New York. Dr. Hertz was somewhat
embittered, though he did not express
it, but his efforts to assist in the es-
tablishment of Transvaal Jewish
Board of Deputies had placed him in
disfavour -with the Zionists. Sam
Goldreich refused to attend the in-
augural mass meeting of the Board
which was held at the Wanderers in
1903. Lord Milner noticed his ab-
sence and asked "where is the little
man?"
The Zionists were opposed- to the
establishment of the Board of Depi-
ties, and Isaac Caplan publicly said:
"You will come to your Board over
our dead bodies." (In his youth Cap-
lan was an Anarchist and a Socialist,
who had no love for the Peverenrls).
In 1911 Zionism was- dull and lifp-
less despite the fact that the 10th
Zionist Congress and the 4th S.A.
Zionist Conference were held in that
year.
Glancing through the May issue of
the "Zionist Record" of 1911 I re-
called Bismark's description of Ber-
lin: "A desert of bricks." That issue
could be described as the scribbling
of freaks. The editorial containing
this gem: "It is not rather a fact
that the Jew has never suffered from
a dislike of learning The prayer
book and his literature stand as liv-
ine and eloquent memorials to these."
(That was an argument against Cul-
tural Zionism). Here you have the
Siddur Yid-the ideal of Chief Rabbi
Adler of London: We do not need
the Gemora Yid or Misha Yid or even
the Tanach Yid-we must have the
Siddur Yid.
In the desert of Reports and Cor-
respondence there was only one
article by S. Lennox Loewe, F.A.A.
on Political Zionism. It commences:
"When Adam had been created, the
first work he undertook was to give
names to all animals and inanimates
around him." The author then pro-
ceeds to give an analysis of practical,
cultural and political Zionism. Prac-
tical Zionism he described as "the
burial ground" which "amongst Jews
in termed the House of Life."
The only good work of the Johan-
nesburg Zionists was the Zionist
Hall. Every evening the hall was
packed by the Jewish masses for the
purpose of reading periodicals and
books in Hebrew, Yiddish, English,
Russian and German.
The 4th Conference of S.A. Zion-
ists was a failure. There were fewer
delegates than at any other previous
conference. There was only one ju-
venile delegate present and neither
the Mizrachi nor the Poalei Zion
were represented. The "Zionist Rec-
ord" boasted that in South Africa
there was no room for them. In all it
was a catastrophic year, "a schwa z
vor." The 10th Congress was the
last to be attended by Max Nordau
who could not bear the ruination of
Herzlian Zionism.
That was my first year in South
Africa.. Thirty-eight years have
passed and like the Phoenix Zionism
rose from. the ashes. During these
years the movement had its up and
downs, but to-day it is the only guid-
ing star in the Jewish firmament.
On the occasion of the "Golden
Jubilee" of the S.A. Zionist Feder-
ation I offer my heartiest congratula-
tions.
In conclusion I also congratulate
the "Zionist Record" on its 40th
birthday, and I heartily congratulate
my old friend Levi Chaim Gershater
under whose able editorship the
journal has beaten all the
"Records." My wish for him is that
he will celebrate the Diamond Jubilee
of the organ of South African Jew-
ry in Israel.


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We extend
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Federation on its 50th Anniversary and
wish it continued success.





ISHE ZIONIST RECftD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

Chalutziut-keakest Link In


S.A. Zionist


Visit


To


South


African


Chalutzim


In Israel


'By Colin Le um

TEL AVIV, Tuesday. Chalutziut has been the weakest
link in the 50 years of South African Zionist history. Never-
theless, Israel to-day has hundreds of South African settlers.
Although only two kibbutzim are predominantly South African
-Maayan Baruch and Timurim-there are South Africans in
dozens of kibbutzim throughout the country, as I found during
an extensive tour from beyond Dan to beyond Beersheba.
As Ben Gurion told me: "What we have seen of your South
Africans on the land and in the towns makes us anxious to see
many more." This is the greatest challenge to South African
Zionism in the new epoch which opens before us now. Chalut-
ziut must become the dominant keynote of Zionist activity-
nothing can be more important in the years ahead.


Erecting prefabricated houses at Mayan Baruch.


The first kibbutz I visited was
Eilat, which adjoins the trim little
town of Natanya-the home of Is-
rael's diamond industry. Most of the
South African settlers had already
left Eilat to settle in their own kib-
butz, deep in the Negev. Eilat
serves as a base for Shuval where,
the settlement is being constructed
in the heart of the field of military
operations.
Their Little Base
Ruth Rosenberg and "Meish Reeb
showed us around their little base,
taking pride in Meish's cows and"
fowls and Ruth's laundry, which has
overrun into the library. Workshops
are hard put coping with the needs
of Operation Negev, while Shula-
mith Gutalovsky-as pretty a shoe-
maker as ever soled a shoe-has not
time to leave her last. Her fame as
a shoemaker has spread far beyond
Eilat.
One day a proud daughter will
say: "My mother was the 'shoester'
at Eilat and Shuval."
The great dream of the settlers at
Ramat Yochanaan is that they'll be


At the entrance to Ramat Yochan-
aan, the Kibbutz named after Gen.
Smuts.


The late Mr. Bernard Gordon. Mayan
Baruch was named after him.


honoured in the near future with a
visit by the man after whom it has
been named-General Jan Smuts.
Smuts would be proud of this glori-
ous kibbutz, .overlooking Emek Zvu-
lun, high above Haifa and Acre. It
was at Ramat Yochanaan that I made
my first contact with "Botz" (Mud).
In all the years of talking about
Zionism, I had never come across
a "Botz," yet it was a thing that I
was in up to my neck throughout my
visit to Galil.
The early winter rains bring back
swamps to their previous glory, but
without the death sting of malarial.
fangs. Botz, Botz, Botz, as heavy
as lead became the song of this trip.
Chalutzim should know that in addi-
tion to milk and honey, this life
flows with botz and other conditions
that.are hard and difficult, but satis-
fying.
There are only three South Afri-
can Chalutzim at Ramat Yochanaan,
the most famous being the grand-
father of' South African Chalutzim
-Bennie Joffe, who was one of the
first four chalutzim to settle here
and is the only one of that pioneer
group who is still on the land. Bennie
is a baker without peer. He accom-
panied us for the rest of our tour
and we saw for ourselves how every
baker in Galil turned to him for ad-
vice. Bennie the Baker is a charac-


ter as lovable as he is valuable and
he would not change his life here
for all the dough at Crystal's Con-
tionery.
Until Palmach Moved In
Ramat Yochanaan was heavily at-
tacked for three days-it wqs here
that warlike Druzes came charging"
down the hills with knives in their
mouths. Bennie was in that en-
counter-high up in the outposts.
Ramat Yochanaan defended itself
with only ten rifles and 80 rounds of
ammunition, until Palmach moved in.
The defenders allowed themselves
a shot only if absolutely certain that
it would be effective. A terrific bar-
rage had been laid down; but had the
Arabs only known, they could have
walked in with little effective oppo-
sition.
A Veritable Arsenal
To-day, the position is entirely
different. Ramat Yochanaan like
every other settlement, is a veritable
arsenal. That is the most amazing
thing in the kibbutzim we visited.
Everywhere are heavy entrench-
ments and strongholds-each one a
powerful fort with underground
shelters, stores and munition dumps.
The transformation has been little
short of miraculous. 370 members
of the kibbutz and 85 Americans Will
shortly settle on their own kibbutz
near Rama. Ramat Yochafiaan has
a dream-school which is the envy of
every kibbutz in the country.
A Syrian Princess
Among the defenders of Ramat
Yochanan was Syria's Princess
Natasya, a Moslem who fell in love
with the kibbutz four years ago
and has stayed there ever since.
Kfa' Blum-set in surroundings
reminiscent of Ranschoek in the Cape
-is one of the string of settlements
that stretches along the Upper
Huleh Valley in the midst of the
towering peaks of two mountain
ranges that form the boundaries of
Syria and Lebanon.
It has grown by leaps and bounds
and now it has nearly 600 inhabi-
tants of whom a dozen are South
Africans. Here are Americans from
the North and deep South; English
Jews from London, Manchester and
Glasgow; Canadians, Australians
and from every country where Eng-
lish is spoken.
We came through the Botz at dusk
and were greeted with a rich deep
South American accent, whose owner
guided us to the tent of Valerie and
Les Shandel. Mrs. Shandel, senior,


a sister of Mr. Moss Morris of Dur-
ban, is the latest settler here. She"
is as happy as a lark. We were soon
joined by Rhona Moss Morris and her
husband Freddie, who is the Mazkir
(secretary). It was quite a family
affair.
Kfar Blum is emerging out of its
economic difficulties and is becoming
one of the most vital settlements in
the Huleh.
Mayan Baruch
At dawn we left our car that had
become "botzed" down on the road
from Kfar Giladi to Dan and botzed
our own way heavily up the hill to
Mayan Baruch, which lies under the
towering peak of Hermon.
The mist swirled down from the
mountains and the winter rains beat
down, but nothing could spoil the
beauty of this glorious valley.
Maayan Baruch's population of 160
members includes fifty South Afri-
cans and many ex-servicemen. It is
the happiest kibbutz we visited, even
though the Beit .Yeladim had not yet
received its children back-but they
were expected the 'next day. We
climbed the watch tower with Harry
Drew and saw where the Syrian base
lay-less than three miles away.
These boys are right up on the battle
front, but there is less oia,$sinse of
war here than in Tel Aviv. Some of
the boys are in the army, but most
are on the land and in. the local de-
fence. The settlement is developing
rapidly and lands are beginning to
bring in the first crops.
Maayan Baruch is the biggest
South African settlement in Is-
rael, but it needs hundreds more
to make it a really effective unit.
"Tell them back home that we
must have more chalutzim to cope
with the grave labour shortage here.
We should be counted in hundreds,
not in tens," is the message of the
boys and girls here.
I saw them in the refet (stable),
in workshops, in the fields, in the
kitchen and at their defence posts-
most of them I had known in South
Africa, but here they have ldst
v1-_ght, toughened up eid argued
,tli tractors, guns and obstinate
cows, instead of with obstinate poli-
tical opponents-and they are hap-
pier than they have ever been.
Of course, there are those (as
there will always be) who have fal-
len out, but the majority are here
to conquer land and enjoy the
struggle of the pioneer's life.
Mayan Baruch has a long way 'to
go to catch up with its distinguished
(Continued on page 22)


A


History


PAGE TWENTY-ONE





PAGE TWENTY-TWO


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Greetings from the

Executive of the



Jewish Agency

and the


World Zionist Organisation
W RMEST greetings from the Jewish Agency and the World
t Zionist Organisation on the occasion of the South African
Federation's jubilee, symbolising 50 years of unceasing activity
and sacrifice to the Zionist ideal.
South African Jewry was always among the first to respond
to the great needs of the hour, and to help restore the Jewish
people to their land and to establish the Jewish State.
We are confident that you, our brothers in South Africa,
will mark this occasion by re-dedicating yourselves anew to
Israel's present-day struggle, when for the first time in history
20,000 of our people, men, women and children, reached in one
month the shores of their homeland, thus consolidating the
Jewish State.-EXECUTIVE, JEWISH AGENCY AND WORLD
ZIONIST ORGANISATION.


SOUTH AFRICAN CHALUTZIM
(Continued from page 21)


neighbours, Kfar Giladi-to-day a
massive modern farm village; defiant
Mettula, up on the Lebanese boun-
dary; Dan, Daphne, Kfar Szold,
whose fields are in the Syrian's
frontlines. But this lusty infant of
the Huleh is full of rich promise.
We visited Phyllis and Yoel Palgi
and the youthful Palgi. Yoel is re-
covering from a motor accident in
which he fractured his leg.
Classic Defence
At Degania Aleph we .talked to
Betty Horvitz, wife of Gideon
Baratz. She talked of this pioneer
settlement's classic defence against
the mechanised power of the Arab
Legion as if she were talking of a
Muizenberg summer season.
We could not reach Ain Hanatziv,
where several of our Mizrachi youth
-including some evacuated from
Kfar Etzion-are settled. The botz
made it impossible to get through.
From all reports our settlers down
there include some of the best
material that has come from South
Africa.
The fighting prowess of Miz-
rachi youth is deservedly famous
throughout Israel.
Cut Off for Months
Timorim is perched in the hills of
Nazareth, which nestles comfortably
less than a mile away. It was not
very comfortable living up in these
parts until a month ago when Nazar-
eth was taken from the Arabs. The
settlers at Timorim were cut off for
months, lived in the rocky shelters
hewn out of the hill and had a ring-
side view of the fighting in the hills
around them-except those who were
involved in the operations. They
now sit and watch Yoel Palgi's para-
troop division do its operations on
the plains of Esdraelon below them.
The settlement is less than six
months old, has sixty-five members
of whom 30 are South Africans.
Another fourteen are expected soon.
Electricity is being installed, a trac-
tor has arrived, a flock of sheep is


due next, and they expect the first
arrival for the Beit Yeladim soon.
In the meanwhile there has been
much discussion as to whether a
Special Beit Yeladim (children's
home) should be built, or whether
the first child should have a room
beside its parents.
From Timorim, one looks over the
circular Nahalal, the airfield of
Ramat David, the forests of King
George, Balfour and Masaryk. No
wonder Maisie Zagganoff said: "Poli-
tics seem so remote to us here. We
are far more interested in Zionist
politics in South Africa than we are
here."
Maisie's husband, Isaac, and Karl
Zilberman hid gone to Haifa on kib-
butz business. Karl holds the ele-
vated positions of both Secretary and
Treasurer of Timorim-he is the "big
shot" around the place and is tre-
mendously admired. The Zionists of
Mayfair should have a special in-
terest in Timorim, the majority of
whom come from Johannesburg's
western suburb. But the Yeoville and
Berea chaverim are determined to
end Mayfair's stranglehold soon if
they can, Maisie and Solly Myers as-
sured me.
A few Cape Town chevra aim to
eliminate the entire domination of
Johannesburg. But all agree that
while they want their suburban lands-
leit to be in the majority, they don't
care much where they come from, so
long as they come-because the
beautiful fields below Nazareth are
crying out for labour to work them.*
Nearby at Beit Kesher, 10 South
Africans have moved in and formed
the garin (nucleus) of a useful unit
which needs to be developed as soon
as possible.
This is the period of South.African
aliyah. One has that feeling -wer-fe-
ever one goes-but the question is
whether this aliyah that has been
started with much promise will be
fulfilled soon. I know that the
chalutzic spirit is strong among the
youth of our country. Zionist leader-
ship must be directed towards canali-
sing it with vigour and enthusiasm.






- iHE Z S GED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


"WE MUST HAVE LAND FOR


THE NEW SETTLERS"


THE fact that South African Jewry
is now celebrating the 50th
anniversary of the S.A. Zionist Fede-
ration shows that the tiny, scattered
community here must have been
deeply imbued with Zionist sentiment
in order to establish the Federation
so shortly after the organisation of
the World Zionist Movement. Its
history, therefore, is the history of
modern Zionism, and there are many
chapters in it which prove that South
Africa has made a great contribu-
tion to the realisation of our ideal.
Our rejoicing is the greater by the
- fact that our Golden Jubilee coincides
with the establishment of the Jew-
ish State..
The Keren Kayemeth has played a
predominant part in that great
achievement. It has not only been
the biggest fund of the Zionist
movement; it has supplied to Zionism
the specific and indispensable ideo-
logy of the return to the land. It
has stirred the imagination oT gene-
rations of Jews with its aim of a
Jewish nation rooted in the soil,
creative of new social reforms, pav-
ing the way to justice and freedom
not only for our people, but for all
the nations of the world. -
The workers and supporters of the
Jewish National Fund in South Africa
can take pride in the message which
President Weizmann sent to the
Keren Kayemeth at the time of the
proclamation of the Jewish State:
"Your work has helped in the con-,
summation of our great dream."
The time of rejoicing is, however,
also a time for serious reflection.
Much has been accomplished, much
remains to be done; land acquisition
is still-the vital need of the Jewish
people; we must have land for the
tens of thousands of immigrants from
the camps; we must have land for
settlers from other parts of the


Message from


MRS. KATIE GLUCKMANN
Chairman of the J.N.F. in South
Africa.
Galuth; we must found new colonies;
new industries must be established on
the land; afforestation, irrigation-
these are all the tasks of the Keren
Kayemeth. Our task is to provide
the means for the implementation of
these projects.
Constructive work has been our
policy in the past; that has led to
our success; constructive work must
be our policy for the future. The
infant Jewish State was born in tra-
vail; let us hope it will now develop
in peace and in harmony to serve as
an example of justice and tolerance
to humanity.,, It is in this spirit
that the Keren Kayemeth celebrates
this Golden Jubilee.


Commemorate Golden Jubilee


Through Sefer, Hamedinah


THE fiftieth anniversary of the South African Zionist Federation is a
red-letter day for every Jew in this, country. One's mind goes back
to the beginning of the movement, the handful of people who gathered
in Johannesburg to make the first formal declaration of allegiance to
Zionism.


The day of the Golden Jubilee of
our organisation is a day worthy to
be celebrated and to be commemor-
ated. In true Zionist tradition, this
celebration will take the form of con-
structive endeavour. Societies affi-
liated to the Federation will inscribe
the South African Zionist Movement
in the new Golden Book, Sefer Hame-
dinah. This privilege is also ex-
tended to individuals, and groups
of four individuals, who wish to place
on. record their appreciation of the
achievements of half-a-century. This
is the way Zionists celebrate and re-
member: by making their contribu-
tions to the Keren Kayemeth Leis-
rael to redeem more land, to settle
more Jews, and to establish more
settlements on our land.
For fifty years the Jewish com-
munity of South Africa has given
its full support to the Zionist Move-
ment, and has made a fine contribu-
tion to the upbuilding of Eretz Is-
rael. We can take pride in the de-


velopment of our Homeland: there
has been no phase of the work done
in which South Africans have not
played their worthy part. Not only
have we contributed to the industrial
development of Palestine and to its
housing' schemes, but the youth from'
this country have gone over as
chalutzim to build up the land, and
some of them have entered the ranks
,of those that have built the State and
its many institutions. Among those
who have sacrificed their lives in the
struggle for freedom can be found
South African boys and girls.
This special effort of South Afri-
can Jewry has been inaugurated to
set aside land for Israeli ex-service-
men and women. Thus, while we
pray-Shehechianu vekimanu vehi-
gianu laz-man hase-we will make
provision for the future to ensure
that generations shall be able to
celebrate their achievements in a
virile Jewish State.


PAGE TWENTY-THREE


Keren Kayemeth And


South African Zionism


T HE Jewish National Fund was
established in London in 1901,
with the object of -collecting funds
throughout the world for the redemp-
tion of land in Palestine. Its activi-
ties developed from very small be-
ginnings to the large fund-raising
and educational activities of to-day.
In South Africa, early attempts
were made to sell JNF Stamps, and
after Herzl's death in 1904, to sell
"trees" in memory of the founder of
the Zionist Movement. While the im-
agination of many young South Afri-
cans was stirred by the ideology of
the Jewish Land Fund, JNF work
was not then part of.the S.A. Zionist
Federation's activities.
For this reason the Johannesburg
Jewish National Fund club was
founded in 1904, with the late Ben-
zion S. Hersch as its chairman. In
1906, Joseph Janower, now a direc-
tor of the Keren Kayemeth in Jeru-
salem, was treasurer of the JNF
Club, and, in this capacity, was ap-
pointed its representative on the Fed-
eration's newly established JNF
Bureau. A few years later Mr. Jan-
ower became a member of the
Federation's Executive and served as
its honorary treasurer for 16 years.
In 1928 a special Jewish National
Fund Department of the Federation
was established under Mr. Janower's
chairmanship, anid all JNF work was
greatly intensified.
Fund-raising efforts were launched
on a much bigger scale, and new
methods for increasing the revenue
were evolved. Previously there had
been small efforts at campaigning
under the title of "Dunam Drives."
Now biennial campaigns for the JNF
became the established routine of the

*^fcMeA.U L.
/: ', ^


THE LATE BRIG. F. H. KISCH
who visited South Africa on behalf
of the J.N.F.

Department. Under the aegis of the
JNF, well-known personalities came
to South Africa in its interests.
Rabbi Zlotnik,, Dr. Benzion Shein,
Harzfeld, Baratz, Rabbi Meir Berlin,
Rabbi Solomon Goldman, the late
Brigadier Kisch, Dr. Alexander Gold-
stein, Dr. Yehuda Kaufman, Werner
Bloch and A. Baumgarten, Harry
Levin and, last year,, Dr. A. Gran-
ovsky, the chairman of the World
Board of Directors of the Keren
Kayemeth Leisrael, and Mrs. Gran-
ovsky-all these people not only


raised the standard of contributions
to unprecedented heights, but also
helped to engender a deep apprecia-
tion of the meaning of Keren Kaye-
meth work amongst the large num-
ber of workers and the thousands of
supporters of the Fund.
Headed by Rabbi Schwartz, a
group of South African workers have
rendered great service to the work of
the National Fund in South Africa.
With the appreciation of the Keren
Kayemeth's ever-increasing status
as the central organisation for crea-
tive Zionist work, several other in-
come-raising methods were evolved,
the most important -being that of
Bequests.


DR. ALEXANDER GOLDSTEIN
brilliant orator, who led South
Africa's effort for the Keren Kaye-
meth.

A comparatively large number of
Jews, some wealthy, some of more
moderate means, perpetuated their
memory by creating -living monu-
ments to themselves in our Home-
land, and at the same time enabled
the fund to acquire large tracts of
land and to -establish a number of
settlements.
The best-known of these indivi-
duals are the late Mr. I. Ochberg of
Cape Town and the late Mr. B. Gor-
don of Johannesburg. Mrs. Rosie
Lewis of Johannesburg, Mr. Epstein
of Kingwilliamstown, Mr. L. Landau
of Bulawayo, B. Linden and -J. Ep-
stein of Pretoria, deserve mention for
the outstanding contributions they
made to the JNF in their Wills.
Income from the "traditional"
sources-from boxes, inscriptions and
through the Tree Fund, began to
rise. When Mr. J. Janower relin-
quished his position and Mrs. K,
Gluckmann, the present chairman,
assumed the leadership of the JNF
in 1936, she saw unprecedented in-
creases in the fund-raising efforts of
the Department under her charge.
Her chairmanship has provided the
inspiration which comes from her
single-minded devotion to her task.
She has addressed meetings in prac-
tically every town and village in the
Union of South Africa, and has es-
tablished close contacts with the Zio-
nist Women's Soc;eties, amongst
whom one finds the most devoted
workers of the Keren Kayemeth. She
has witnessed, more particularly in
the present decade, an expansion of
JNF work which could have been a
dream only to the early founders of
the JNF in this country, yet she and
her committee continue to strive for
ever-greater returns for the Fund
upon which so much of the future of
the State of Israel will depend.





PAGE TWENTY-FOUR



[Tlhe South




Loyalty

rHE South African Zionist Fed-
eration rose to its present
stature against a background of
unity, loyalty and discipline dis-
played by local Zionists for half
a century. Despite the handicaps
of the great distance from the
main currents of Jewish life in nussow, were his pe
-Europe, and the isolation of the by the South Af
amttered Jewish communities in Board of Deputies
South Africa during the early part time dealt with by t
oat the century, our Zionist Move- Yet pre-occupation
agnt has been effective and vital fairs did not, preclu
Atm the day of its inception. In tion from concernii
irength of sentiment and in pro- the World Zionist.:.
portionate material contributions, early as 1902, it beg
it won for itself a leading place an influence in the
in the countries of the Galuth, a ternational Zionist
position which it has maintained to Theodor Herzl calle
the present time. Zionists to welcome
Although many Zionist societies berlin to South Afr
were functioning throughout the There were close
country before 1898, there had Herzl -and South A
been a growing feeling, that their Samuel Goldreich, I
work should be co-ordinated and Benzion Aaron, Ma
guided by a central body which
would be in direct communication
with the World Zionist Organisa-
tion. And so it was arranged
that representatives of 13 Trans-
vaal Zionist societies should meet
in Johannesburg on December 11,
1898. The result of this meet-
ing was the formation. of the
South African Zionist Federation.
Mr. S. Bebro was the first Pres-
ident of the Federation; but the
dominating figure was Samuel
Goldreich. He succeeded Mr.
Bebro as president, and shortly
afterwards became Hon. Life
President. His influence was tre-
mendous, both among local Zion-
ists and the World leadership. It
was perhaps through his encour-


SAMUEL GOLDREICH
. dominating figure


agement of the young Zionists,
"The Pfefferlach," as he called
them, that he made his greatest
contribution to Zionism. Among
the young "hot-heads" of that time
were Jacob Gitlin, Joseph Jano-
wer and the late Benzion S.
Hersch. Goldreich acted as their
mentor. He was to no inconsider-
able extent responsible for the po-
sitions they have attained in the
Movement over the last 50 years.
The Anglo-Boer War necessi-
tated the temporary transfer of
Zionist Headquarters to Cape
Town, and during that period Zi-
onists devoted themselves mainly
to local matters. The Federation
received authority to issue permits
to refugees enabling them to re-
turn to their 'homes in the Trans-
vaal; and many other duties which
in these days would be undertaken


And


y Gertrude Kar


personal friends
frican Jewish
were at that
he Federation.
n with. local af-
de the Federa-
ig itself with
Movement. As
*an to exercise
realm -of iii-
politics when
-d upon S.A.
Joseph Cham-
ica.
ties between
kfrican Jewry.
Lennox Loewe,
nuel Leo Ge-


the Federation'
in 1909 with t
lish a month:
Zionist Record
Under the g
B. S. Hersch,
veloped and ex
when it became
tion and the o:
Federation.
One of the o
uals in the- M
Africa was
President of th
1911 to 1931,
President.
The Federati
international Zio


BENZION S. HERSCH


and devout followers. Bernard
Weinronk, a founder of the first
Zionist club in Johannesburg, and
leader of the Zionist Movement in
Port Elizabeth from 1912 to 1936,
corresponded with Herzl on Zioin-
ist matters.
An early event in the story of
the Federation was the first S.A.
Zionist Conference held in Johan-
nesburg in July 1905. The burn-
ing question of the moment was
that of Jewish settlement in
Uganda; the decision was in fav-
our of Palestine, and Conference
adopted the Basle Programme.
In this connection it should be
noted that the late Rev. M. I.
Cohen came down from Bulawayo
to organise the conference. At
that time he had already laid the
foundations of Rhodesian Zion-
ism which has played so import-
ant a part in the history of the
Federation.
A large number of distinguished
Zionist leaders have visited South
Africa over the years, and have
left their mark on the develop-
ment of Zionist work here.
The first of these was David
Wolffsohn who had succeeded
Herzl in the leadership ot the
World Zionist Movement. Before
his arrival, it was rumoured that
he had come to raise 5,000-a
rumour which caused as much
amusement as if he had set a
target of 10,000,000.
A landmark in the expansion of


to increase part
ginning of Wor
ference in 1915
for safeguardii
and the recogni
claim to Palest
post-war peace
Until 1921,
delegation to V
gresses was in
overseas nom'in
South Africans'
gress from tim
Messrs. Bernar
Janower, Leop
Rev. Isaacs co
direct delegation
dent for direct
South Africa
The late Chi
Landau was a
in South AfricE
member of th
1916, he was ap
dent in 1922 an
dent in 1931. I
arship, brilliant
unified personal
great importai
addresses, and I
ber of deputati
authorities.
Dr. Shmarya
the greatest p(
Zionist Movem
first Keren Ha
South Africa i
sonal magnetism
an indelible mz
ment in this co


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIIAY, DECEMBER 10, 19T8


Devotion

Since that time, several dis-
tinguished leaders have. visited the
1. country, in connection with the bi-
ennial Campaigns. Each has made
his own contribution to the fur-
therance of the cause. Mr. Nahum
Sokolow in 1926 and when he re-
s work was reached visited this country in 1934, as
the decision to bub- President of the World Zionist Or-
hly bulletin-"The ganisation, exerted almost as
." great an influence on the non-Jew-
guidance of the late ish public and South African Gov-
the "Record" de- ernment circles as on his fellow-
xpanded until 1926, Jews.
e a weekly publica- Enthusiasm on an unprece-
fficial organ of the dented scale was aroused by the
visit of Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
outstanding individ- Pfiesident of the World Zionist Or-
lovement in South ganisation, and Mrs. Weizmann, in
A. M. Abrahams 1932. Dr. Weizmann has always
he Federation from been an inspired leader, and
and then Hon. Life during his visit he fired the im-
agination of South African Jew-
on's interest in in- ry who were enthralled by his lu-
nist politics began cid analyses of the Zionist
Movement, and his visions of the
development of the Jewish Na-
tional Home.
During their visit, Mrs. Vera
Weizmann initiated plans for the
establishment of the Women's
Zionist Executive Council, which
came into being in-that year, un-
der the Presidency of Mrs. Hed-
wig Reinhold. Mrs. Reinhold was
succeeded by the late Mrs. Jenny
Greenberg, who- led the Council
for eight years.
The Women's Zionist Council
has developed into one of the larg-
est and most important depart-
ments of the Federation. With its
affiliated societies, it constitutes a
vast organisation and makes a
tremendous contribution towards
all aspects of Zionist endeavour.
In addition to the strong support
which the women give to the
W.I.Z.O., their unceasing work for
the J.N.F., their support for
Youth Aliyah, their intensive edu-
cational work and their present
participation in the Israeli
United Appeal, make a story in
themselves.
ticularly at the be- In 1928, the 11th South African
rld War I. A con- Zionist Conference conceded the
Drafted demands principle that the Zionist women
ng Jewish rights, of South Africa should have di-
tion of the Jewish rect representation on the Feder-
ine as part of the action. Mrs. Kate Gluckmann was
settlement, elected to the Executive in this
the South African capacity and she has been a mem-
World Zionist Con- ber until the present time. Since
fact composed of 1936, Mrs. Gluckmann has held
ees, although a few the position of National Chairman
had attended Con- of the Jewish National Fund in
e to time. In 1921, South Africa. She has played an
rd Gordon, Joseph important role in the development
pold Kessler and and expansion of the work of the
nstitutecd the first Federation, and has exercised
n, and set a prece- considerable influence in the
t representation of Movement. A number of other
at Congress. women have served on the Feder-
ation. They include Mrs. Ethel
ief Rabbi Dr. J. L. Hayman, Dr. Deborah Katzen,
dominating figueA Mrs. Jeanette Davidoff and Mrs.
a n Zionist life. A Anna Franks.
pointe Executive since To-day, the Jewish National
pointed Vice-Presi- Fund is one of the most import-
d Hon. Life Presi- ant departments of the Federa-
t oratoryDr. Landau's schodig tion, yet it was only in 1928 that
t oratory and dig- this department was established.
ty were factors of In the "early days" supporters of
nce in his public the National Fund made their
his work as a mem- contribution by selling National
ons to Government Fund stamps, greetings, messages
and trees under the aegis of a
hu Levin, one of National Fund Club. In 1906, the
personalities in the Club's treasurer, Joseph Janower,
sent, launched the was appointed its representative
yesod Campaign in on the Federation's J.N.F. Bureau.
n 1922. His per- A few years later, he became a
m and influence left member of the Executive and
ark on the Move- served as its Hon. Treasurer for
untry. 16 years. It was under his chair-


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


A


Record


Of


PAGE TWENTY-FIVW



Unity


First

S.A. Zionist

Conference

July, 1905


The Late Chief Fabbi Dr. Landau
manship that th, iNational Fund
Department wa, established in
1928. Since 194;, Joseph Jano-
wer has hcen a member .of the
World Board of Directors of the
Keren Kayeneth in Israel.
The biggest in lividual monetary
contribution to the Jewish Na-
tional Fund in tl world was made
by Isaac Ochbeil one-time Pres-
ident of the Do:shei Zion Society
of Cape Town. I[is bequest to the
Fund enabled it to redeem the
"Isaac Ochberg Tract" in Sa-
maria.
Another Sout] African Zionist
leader, whose n mory is perpetu-
ated through th i establishment on
National Fund nfid, is the late
Bernard Gordoi member of the
Executive and ts Vice-President
for many yearF The first "South
African Settle mpt" in Eretz Is-
rael at Maya.a Baruch is a
worthy tribute t) him.
Many well-kr own workers for
the Zionist Mov ment have visited
South Africa in order to assist the
National Fund Department, the
last of whom, )r. A. Granovsky,
chairman of tht, World Board of
Directors, cam< to South Africa
with Mrs. Grai ovsky in 1947 to
launch the bi- nnial Campaign.
Their vitnu prov ded a fresh stim-
ulus to worker., for the Fund-a
stimulus which has enabled the'
to carry out th work of the Na-
tional Fund wiih increased devo-
tion.
There has be rn a tendency to
assume that thi fund-raising de-
partments of th, Federation have
constituted 'its entire nroe7anmme


of work, yet no picture could be
complete without reference to the
less publicised departments.
In 1932, a Youth department of
the Federation, which has de-
veloped and assumed great im-
portance was established. Prior
to that time, Zionist Youth So-
cieties were fostered and encour-
aged; but their planned develop-
ment really started with the es-
tablishment of the S.A. Zionist
Youth' Council in 1932. This
Council now controls the entire Zi-
onist Youth Movement throughout
South Africa and the Rhodesias. It
has made every effort to encour-
age and foster chalutziut and its
Hachsharah centres in South Af-
rica have trained many chalutzim
who have taken their place in the
life of the Yishuv. Mention may
also be made here of the founding
of the Habonim Movement in
South Africa by Mr. Norman
Lourie in 1932. This Movement
has made a great contribution to-
'wards Youth work.
In 1934, the Propaganda and
Information Department, -under
the chairmanship of the late A. I.
Miller, intensified its activities by
engaging the services of Maurice
Samuel to give a series of lectures
in South Africa. In the years that
have followed, a number of guest
lecturers have toured the country,
and the department has expanded
in other directions. It now Iakes
available films, educational pro-
grammes and publications of an
informative nature which provide
the basis of Zionist education in
this country.
Closely linked with this depart-
ment are the Federation's Libra-ry
and Book Department. The Pales-
tine Office, which was active prior
to World War II, was re-consti-
tuted in 1943.
A comparatively new depart-
ment of the Federation, but one
which has assumed great import-.
ance in recent years, is the Politi-
cal Department." Its -work in-
cludes the distribution of publica-
tions and information to all sec-
tions of the local community, and
contacts with prominent non-Jew-
ish personalities on Zionist mat-
ters. Its work assumed new im-
portance at the outbreak of World
War II.
The youngest of the Federa-
tion's departments is that of
Youth Aliyah which was estab-
lished only in 1947. Prior to that,
Youth Aliyahl campaigns under
the National Chairmanship of Dr.
Deborah Katzen, were undertaken
by leading Zionist workers and
the Women's Zionist Executive
Council in an unofficial capacity.
Reference to the Federation's
departments would be incomplete
without mention of the Treasury.


The first South African Zionist
Conference, held at the Free-
mason's Hall, Jeppe Street, Jo-
hannesburg, on Sunday, July 9,
1905. The following centres were
represented:
Bulawayo, Rev. M. I. Cohen.
Bloemfontein, Rev. Z Lawrence
and H. Goldberg.
Beaufort West, E. Guilaroff.
Boksburg, B. Mendelson.
Brandfort, L. Hoffman.
Cape Town, Dorshei Zion, M. L.
Genussow, S. Goldreich and M.
Solomon.
Capo Town, Y.M.ZA., J. B. Shaks-
novis, Dr. Landau and Dr. Abel-
heinm.
Cape Town, Juveniles, Mrs. Dr.
Hertz.
Cape Town, Bnoth. Zion, Mrs. To-
das and J. Turbovitz.
Calvinia, J. H. Goldreich.
Ceres, R. Goldseller.
Durban, Rev. M. A. Levy.
Durban, Ladies, Mrs. Dr. Landau.
East London, H. M. Cohen.


The least vociferous of all depart-
ments, its directors have usually
been "silent" workers. Sam Gor-
don, member of the Executive
since 1924 and its Hon. Treasurer
from 1933-1947, seldom appears
on public platforms. Yet he exer-
cises a great influence in the Fed-
eration.
The departments of the Feder-
ation have received invaluable as-
sistance in the implementation of
their programmes of work, from
the provincial Zionist councils, the
first of which was established in
the Eastern Province in 1939. Al-
though the Western Province
Council was not established until
1943, the Dorshei Zion Society in
Cape Town led by the Zionist
veteran, Jacob Gitlin, virtually
served as a Council for many
years.
Jacob Gitlin, the acknowledged
doyen of the Zionist Movement in
South Africa, who celebrates his
70th birthday simultaneously with
that of the Golden Jubilee of the
Federation, has probably exer-
cised a greater influence on the
Movement than any other single
individual.
The Late Moses Morrison, of
Natal, was another distinguished
figure over many years. With the
indefatigable assistance of his
wife, he exerted considerable in-
fluence on Zionist activities
throughout the country-
Although the Federation has
never made a general call for sup-
port of the Hebrew University, it
has always co-operated in the
work of the Friends of the He-
brew University.
The late Mr. I. Schwartz en-
dowed a Chair of Modern Hebrew


Grahamstown, D. Starfield.
Grdaff-Reinet, A. Sprinz.
Gwelo, E. J. Edelstein.
Heidelberg, J. Reichenberg.
Harrismith, Dr. D. Horwich.
Jeppestouwn, W. Rabinson and J.
Bloch. "
Jeppestown, Juveniles, Miss Rab-
inson.
Johannesburg, B. Danziger, H.
Graumann, H. Solomon and L.
M. Patlansky.
Johannesburg, Ladies, Mesdames
Lurie, Glasser, Greenberg and
Miss Micalitski.
Johannesburg, Herzl Society, A.
M. Abrahams.
Kimberlcy, A. Hern.
Kingwilliamstown, H. M. Cohen.
Kroonstad, Rev. East.
Krugersdorp, S. Canter.
Krugersdorp, Juveniles, Miss
Ethel Judes.
Klerksdorp, A. Kirson.
Koffyfontein, Rev. Woolf.
Middleburg, C.C., M. Cohen.
Maf eking, S. Levisohn.
Maraisburg, E. Lewy.


Literature at the University as
early as 1922. In 1925, when the
University was opened by Lord
Balfour, Mr. Schwartz was one of
those who represented the Federa-
tion at the ceremony.


DR. SHMARYAHU LEVIN
launched first Keren Hayesod
Campaign

Despite the magnitude of the
Federation's programme of work,
it still does not possess its own of-
fices. Yet a centre for Zionist ac-
tivities was established in 1936
when the Federation acquired Cor-
onation Hall in Johannesburg,
mainly as the result of the gener-
osity and far-sightedness of Woolf


Oudtshoorn, I. Abrahams.
Paarl, Rev. D. W. Hirschowitz.
Port Elizabeth, Louis Woolfe.
Potohefstroom, B. Levy.
Pretoria, B. Goldberg.
Pretoria, Ladies, Juveniles, Miss
G. Friedmann.
Queenstown, S. Shapiro.
Randfontein, L. Pessen.
Riversdale, ManTred Nathan.
Roodepoort, J. Levy.
Simonstown, -. Woolf.
Springs, J. H. Alexander.
Standerton, Rev. Lipkin.
Somerset West, E. L. Mosley.
,ftellenbosch, Rev. S. Maonne.
Uniondale, Dr. Hertz.
Veoreeniging, M. Patlansky.
Vryheid, Woolf Davis.
Volksrust, Rev. Hillcowitz.
Willowmore, B. J. Chaimowitz.
Witbank, I. Caplan.
Worcester, Sam Metz.
Wynberg, C.C., R. Hirsch and H.
Lurie.
Mizrachi, C. J. Kark, J. M. Traub,
A. Rabinowitz and A. Abrq
hams.


Senior, a member of the Executive
for many years.
The decision to establish a Zion-
ist Council was taken at the 17th
Conference in 1939. The Council
meets between conferences and
also whenever any matter or
great urgency arises.
Since the outbreak of World'
War II and particularly as a re-
sult of the development of air
communications, the ties between
South African Jewry, the World
Zionist Organisation and the Yi-
shuv have become closer and
closer. One of the most active and
influential personalities during
this period, has been N. Kirsch-
ner, who held the position of
Chairman of the Federation from
1935-1947. No platform, no depu-
tation or delegation has been com-
plete without his leadership. Dur-
ing these years he has visited
Eretz Israel and Europe on many
occasions to participate in discus-
sions, to express the opinion of the
Federation, and to consult with
our leaders as to the most effec-
tive measures to be .taken by,
South African Jewry in the cause
of Zion. Other members of the
Executive have travelled between
Palestine and South Africa on
many occasions. South African
servicemen, both Jewish and non-
Jewish, who visited Palestine dur-
ing the war, strengthened the per-
sonal ties between local Jewish
families and the Yishuv.
An increasing number of South
Africans have settled in Eretz Is-
rael in this period, following in
the footsteps of Lazar Brr:do,
member of the Executive Federa-
(Continued on page 34)


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PAGE TWENTY-SIX


DAMELIN





THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

A Veteran Recalls


Early


Of S.A.
W HEN Abraham Kirson, an ardent
young member of the Chovevei
Zion in Radvitski near Shavel came
to Johannesburg in 1892, he found
that there was no Zionist activity or
even awareness of the Zionist Move-
ment here.
In 1894 he made his home in
Klerksdorp, where his only contact
with Zionist affairs came through
such reports as were published inthe
local paper, the "Mining Record." It
was in the "Mining Record" that he.
read brief reports of the first Zion-
ist Congress held in Basle in 1897.
His enthusiasm was rekindled and
he determined to initiate Zionist
work in Klerksdorp. His knowledge
of English was at that time very
slight; but with whatever assistance
he could gather he framed a letter
for publication in the "Miping
Record" in order to stimulate the
Jewish population in the Klerksdorp
area.
By pre-arrangement, the late Bar-
ney Starfield replied to his letter.
They followed this up by calling a
meeting of the Jewish community at
which the Klerksdorp Zionist Society
was formed early in 1898.

Worked Unobstrusively
As he worked unobtrusively behind
the scenes to establish and consoli-
date his first little society, so has he
worked throughout the ensuing years.
A Mr. Hanson was Klerksdorp's first
chairman; neither then nor sabse-
quently has the name of Kirson ap-
peared in any executive position. Yet
it was Kirson who planned the work
of the society, work which consisted
of selling shares in the Jewish Colon-
ial Trust Bank, and later, after the
establishment of the J.N.F. in ar-
ranging for the transfer of the in-
terest accruing from shares to the
J.N.F.
He recalls with grave amusement
the "figureheads" whose names were
important to the Movement; but who
were disinterested, ignorant, and al-
most unwilling to be coached for their
parts.
In 1898, Kirson represented
Klerksdorp at the meeting which was
held in Johannesburg and at which
the S.A. Zionist Federation wag
formed. It was an adventure to travel
from Klerksdorp to Johannesburg in
those days-a journey which lasted
for a day and a half and was cov-
ered partly by coach and partly by
train. Yet he found the adventure
worth while, for despite the desire of
so many people to make their voices
heard at the meeting, whether they
had any contribution_ to make or not
-or whether they were able to speak
or not-their great enthusiasm pro-
vided fresh stimulus for those who
were working almost alone.

One Of The Crowd,
A much greater stimulus came
from David Wolffsohn's address
1906. Kirson was one of the tremend-
ous crowd which gathered at Germis-
ton Station to welcome the great Zi-
onist leader, and he was one of those
who accompanied Wolffsohn to Jo-
hannesburg. He recalls the unprece-
dented enthusiasm with which local
Jewry received Wolffsohn's address


Days


Zionism


Interview


With


Abraham Kirson



at His Majesty's Theatre. On this
occasion, Kirson was busy once again
behind the scenes, when he was
among those responsible for arrang-
ing the platform and seating accom-
modation.
In 1907 -Iirson returned to his
home in Russia where he remained
until 1912. There Zionist' work Was
continuing despite the vigilance of the
police who succeeded in disbanding
every meeting that was called. On
his return to Johannesburg in 1912,
he found that big strides had been
made in local Zionist work.


Zionist Hall
He visited the Zionist Hall in Com-
missioner Street, presided over by
the late B. J. Chaimowitz, and the
focal point of all local Zionist work,
discussions and functions. He soon
fitted -into this atmosphere and re-
sumed his silent but penetrating work
for the furtherance of the Zionist
ideal. Until the visit of Dr. Shmar-
ayhu Levin in 1922, Kirson's work,
like that of most other Zionists, was
mainly in the interests of the J.N.F.
Dr. Shmaryahu Levin's visit initiated
work for the Keren Hayesod and
raised the whole tempo of Zionist ac-
tivity to a much higher level.
In the succeeding years, Kirson has
played his full part in all aspects of
Zionist endeavour; but his main de-
votion is still to the J.N.F., on whose
National Gommittee in South Africa
he has served for many years. The
example which Abraham Kirson has
set has been closely followed by his
children. His daughter, Jane Katz,
and his daughter-in-law Celia Kir-
son, are very active members of the
Johannesburg Women's Zionist
SLeague; his son, Maurice, works in-
defatigably to further the cause
which is so dear to his father.


PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN


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PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT
ANNIVERSARY EVENING AT
DURBAN
THE Zionist Council of Natal has
planned an interesting function
for Sunday, 12th inst. Associating
with the Council for the occasion are
the Durban Zionist Association, the
Durban Women's Zionist League, the
Durban Young Israel Society, and
the ITabonim.
Recognition will be made of two
anniversaries, the first of the UNO
partition decision and the fiftieth of
the establishment of the Zionist Fed-
eration.
Mr. S. N. Herman, the brilliant
young South Africaiy, who has re-
cently returned from the U.S.A., and
who is well known here, is to be the
guest speaker.
Miss Jocelyn Kahn, who is a gifted
young Durban singer, and who has
recently had training in New York,
will sing a group of Hebrew songs.
Mr. Harold Freed, who is one of the
best known stage and radio person-
alities, will read excerpts from mod-
ern Hebrew poems, and the Habonim
are staging a camp fire finale.
It is also hoped during the evening
to present Golden Book and tree cer-
tificates to those workers whom
various organizations have decided to
honoeir during the 'year.
A warm invitation is extended to
visitors to Durban to attend this
function.

Contributions at Pidyon Haben
A SUM of 25 was raised at the
Pidyen Haben of the infant son
of Mr. and Mrs. Joselowsky of 152
St. Amant Street, Malvern, Johan-
nesburg. k20 was donated to the Ha-
bonim Hachsharah, and 5 to the
United Minsk Society.


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, D


Q-v~
>,,J*
-' -% 7


News And Names

Of Survivors

In Europe
Will anyone able to furnish any itoz.
Inatlon concerning the following people
kindly communicate with the S.A. Tew
lah Board of Deputies, P.O. Box 11280
Johannesburg. or call at 2nd Floor, Coat
mercial House 124 Fox treet, Johanw

EIDELMAN, Abraham, originally
from Ligemian, sought by Betty
Wiseman, niece of Gite Pesse, also
from Ligemian.
EHRLICH, Walter and Jacob
Frankenberg, sought by G. Baygel,
man. l
GOLDWASSER, Berel, born in
Give, lived in Kovno for many years,
now believed to be in Cape Town
sought by Fanny Gal, now in Israel;
GOTZ or GOCS family, originally.
from Schaulen, Lithuania, sought by
Alexander Goes, son of Leib from
Schaulen.
MACHT, Oscar and brother, orig-
inally from Hamburg, sons of Sara
and Jack, sought by cousin Edith
Comaroff.
NIEDERMEIER, Franz from Des-
sau, now believed to be in Johannes,
burg..
STERN, Ida, married name un-
known, originally from Mannheim,
sought by Edith Maria Neuwahl.
SILBERSTEIN, Jacob and Sara
(nee Schoenberg), and uncle Max
Schoenberg, originally from War-
saw, sought by Michael Silberstein,
now in Israel.
SAPOSNIK, Chaim Vigdor, sought
by his neice Sheve Shapiro.
WEINMAN, Otto, originally from
Vienna, Neubaugasse 2, sought by
Max Jamie.
YANES, Abraham, originally from
Vienna, Neubaugasse 2, sought by
his nieceS. Blosht (nee Brostein).


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Jewish Musical Institute

Establishes School Of Music

TO OPEN IN JANUARY
ANUARY 17, 1949, will be a notable date in the musical history of
Johannesburg, for it will mark the opening of the new School of Music
established by the Jewish Musical Institute at the Ginsberg Hall. The
School, which is non-sectarian in character, offers tuition in all the various
branches of music. Experienced teachers will guide each of the different
sections of the string instruments, the brass, woodwind and singing. A
ballet school, which is already in existence, will continue its activities


in association with the school.
Tuition- is available for beginners
and advanced students, whether chil-
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function of the school, which awards
its own certificates as well.
To bring musical benefits within
the reach of everybody the fees have
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nominal figure-15s. per month for
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The first director of the School
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Meal
Quotations on application






THE ZIONIST REC0R~ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948 PAGE TWENTY-NINE


David Dainow



N the dim atmosphere of the badly
ventilated and poorly lighted
rooms in the Old Stock Exchange
Buildings in Fox Street, Johannes-
burg, I was welcomed one-morning
in 1923 by Jack Alexander, the then
chief of the "Zionist works"-as it
were. e
It was an historic moment for me.
I had entered the service of the Fed-
eration for a year. I did not, how-
ever, leave that service until twenty
years afterwards.
Originally my arrival in South Af-
rica a year earlier had been due to
an invitation by the late Isaac Och-
berg to help him to place in institu-
tions and homes the orphans from
pogromen areas of the Ukraine,
whom, he had brought to this coun-
try. -
That work being over in a few
months, I was about to retuiln to
England. A call, however, reached
me from the S.A. 'Zionist Federation
to take up tentatively the secretary-
ship of the newly formed Keren
Hayesod; so I reported for duty.
The First Campaign
The great Nahum Sokolow was to
have come to inaugurate the cam-
paign. He would be assisted by a
person who then was an unknown in
South Africa. Then came the news
that Sokolow was prevented from
coming at the last moment. The
opening of the campaign was well
upon us. It was too late to send for4
another "star." The duty then de-
volved upon me to "boost" Sokolow's
lieutenant, Alexander Goldstein.
I set about the task with deter-
mination. Gold-ein was to be the
leading figure a the campaign-ban-
quet in Johannesburg. He became a
great force in the work of the cam-
paign, which proved highly success-
ful. '
A New Appointment
In the quiet period after the cam-
paign, I had been making my plans
to return "home." Suddenly, how-
ever, I was called upon to attend an
informal meeting of a few leading
Zionist workers and informed that I
was to become the editor of the "Zio-
nist Record"-the organ of the South
African Zionist Federation.
The journal was then a small
monthly magazine. It was edited in
the midst of his many duties as
secretary of the Federation, by Jack
Alexander. In order to effect a
break-away, an office separate from
the Federation headquarters was
hired. I found myself in a small
room with a junior typist, a type-
writer, a couple of chairs, a table
and a desk.
My first duty was to publish the
monthly journal each month. There


AN EX-EDITOR IN



REMINISCENT MOOD


had been an occasion or two when
that obvious "regularity" had been
lacking! At that time the advertising
revenue per issue approximated 35.
My task was to increase revenue and
I remember going to many firms
securing advertising contracts on
forms I had typed at the office.

A Fortnightly
After some little time it was de-
cided to turn the monthly magazine
into a fortnightly newspaper. This
was looked upon as a momentous
decision. The proposal was opposed
by many members of -the Executive
Council of the Fedeieation, who did
not wish to be burdened with the re-
sponsibility of a widened publication.
It was the late Benzion S. Hersch,
who put up "an heroic fight" for the
fortnightly edition.
By that time, when the project was
being discussed, a company had been
formed, with the Federation as chief
shareholder.
The basic idea of establishing
the Kadimah Press, Ltd., was to
avoid a "chillul hashem" in case
the publishers at any time were
sued for libel!

Success of New Venture
Hersch had become chairman of the
editorial board of the "Zionist Re-
cord" and a member of the- board of
directors o0 fihe Kadimah Press. His
power of persuasion and enthusiasm
led finally to a favourable decision.
The "Zionist Record" began to ap-
pear as a fortnightly newspaper. Sub-
scription rates were increased, but
instead of circulation falling off, it
became larger. Advertising support
came along easier. It did not take
very long before Mr. Hersch could
declare with just pride to his pre-
viously wavering colleagues on the
board of the Kadimah Press: "I told
you so."
The phrase "a tower of strength"
might well describe the contribution
made by Benzion Hersch in the
gradual development of what had now
become recognized as the leading
Jewish journal on the sub-continent
of Africa. He would come into my
office as often as ten times a day and
would be overjoyed at every evidence
of growth. The publication became
a favourite child of his. As it
matured into newspaper manhood he
grew in stature. Hersch was talented
and his advice and co-operation
were of immense value.
.. As I was also Advertising and Cir-
culation Manager, beside being the
editor, it was impossible for me to
write all the editorials, so Hersch
wrote some, which he signed with the
initial H. Jack Alexander wrote some
of his distinguished editorials, which
he signed with the initial A. My edi-
torials were signed with D. At that
time a quip -went around that the
readers of the journal were being
editorially "HAD."

Advertising Support
Some years passed. The staff had
increased and the services of an ad-
vertising canvasser secured. -
I well remember when a handsome
contract arrived dealing with the
marvellous properties possessed by a
certain famous brand of pills and
how eagerly the Board of Director,,
"stomached" it.
Meanwhile the "Zionist Record" in-
creased in size and in literary and
news importance. It was whilst still
a fortnightly that the famous series
of "Letters to my Son" by Ben Elie-
zer (D. Merowsky) appeared in serial


form. They were later published as
a popular volume of essays. At that
time, too, "Hamabit" began his series
of "Current Communal Comments"
which went on for fifteen years.
Hersch, who was very serious
minded, did not approve of the light
pen and the mild criticism of "Hama-
bit." Seeing, however, that the
editor insisted on having some light
relief in an otherwise heavy journal,
he did not press the matter.

A Discovery
Finding himself one day in Bula-
wayo, he was spoken to by a leading
Zionist worker. The latter said he
was not so keen/ on perusing the
"Zionist Record."
"One thing, however, I do like in
it, Mr. Hersch" went on the Zionist
worker, "and I turn to it always
with alacrity-that is your own con-
tribution under the pen-name of
Hamabit."
Hersch was comradely enough to
tell the story. After that he began
reading "Current Communal Com-
ments" and enjoyed it to the day of
his lamented passing.
The big task which confrorted Ben-
zion Hersch came when he decided
that the time had arrived to turn the


MR. JOSEPH DALESKI
A photograph taken during his chair-
manship of the Editorial Board

fortnightly "Zionist Record" into a
weekly newspaper. The idea seemed
then veritably preposterous. There
was much heat shown in the pro-
nounced opposition to the project. It
seemed it was claimed that Hersch
was out on a' ruinous campaign of
expenditure. Benzion Hersch, how-
ever worked like a tiger. He gained
by his enthusiasm the support of
leading men like Joseph Janower and
Lazar Braudo. Finally, the day of
victory arrived when a resolution
was carried giving the Kadimah
Press, Ltd., permission to issue the
"Zionist Record" as a weekly pub-
lication. Hersch gave a party at his
house' to celebrate the event.

The Weekly Publication
The journal entered its new career
under good auspices. The writer of
this article had hoped the Federation
would have taken the opportunity at
that stage to change the name to
"The Jewish Record." One of the
bitterest opponents to such change
was Hersch, who felt that a sacred
tradition hung to the old name.


Again the rates of subscription
were increased to meet the added ex-
penditure upon weekly printing, and
again the circulation, instead of de-
creasing; began to increase. The
paper, by the addition of new fea-
tures, did indeed become a lively
journal of general Jewish, besides
specifically Zionist, interest. It be-
gan to arrange a cable service, to
pay. more generously for literary
contributions and to encourage local
Sriters.
.It was during the early period of
its entry as a weekly publication that
the "Zionist Record" began to pub-
lish articles from the pen of a writer
who, many years later, became my
successor in office and who now so
capably edits the newspaper. I had
met Chaim Gershater on his arrival
from Vilna. He was a young, man
who had a good knowledge of Yiddish
and spoke a flawless Hebrew. He
knew German ,and other languages,
but had only a slight knowledge of
English. His cultural make-up and
his keen Jewish enthusiasm attracted
me. When he went to Bulawayo to
occupy ap educational post I kept 4.
touch with him.
The Future Editor
On his first re-visit to Johannes-
burg I noticed he had made enor-
mous progress in English. He wrote"
for me impressions of his visit to
Doornfontein, which was at that time
a live centre of Jewish life and ac-
tivity. The contribution was pub-
lished in the "Zionist Record" and
was much .admired.
During my regime there wrs in-
troduced the enlarged issues of the
journal on each Rosh Hashonah.
These increased special numbers
offered an opportunity for the publi-
cation of special feature articles from
the pen of some of the greatest
writers in the Jewish world. When
the years of depression came we
went through a difficult time, but
finally weathered the storm.
The twenty years I spent in pro-
ducing the "Zionist Record" were
happy ones. The work was heavy,
but never tedious. Each number as
it came from the press filled those
associated with it with pride. Not
only was 'the paper performing a
service to the community and the or-
ganisation which created it, but we
felt it was helping in the resuscita-
tion of Israel as a nation.
Gaining a Reputation
The paper gradually gained for it-
staff. The "Zionist Record" ex-
pressing an ideal permeated an
idealism which was strange to the
ample of the highest form of Jewisth
journalism. Its columns and editor-
ial op'nic'n were greatly respected,
not only in Johannesburg, Pretoria
and Cape Town, but in Jerusalem,
New York and Montreal.

The Printers
-There was. always a fine spirit of
comradeship among members of the
staff. The "Zionist Record" expres-
sing an ideal permeated an idealism
which was s t r a n g e to the
goyim-the printers. Thee latter
colleagues throughout the years col-
laborated loyally and became deeply
concerned as one Jewish "crisis" fol-
lowed upon the other. The printers
most of whom are of non-Jewish
faith have much to be thanked for
their daily devotion to the "job" of
bringing out on good time the red6p-
nised organ of South African Jewry.
(Continued overleaf)


THE ZIONIST RECORDI. FRIDAY, PECEMBER 10, 1948


PAGE TWENTY-NINE


(BvT






THE ZIONIST' RECORD, RmIDAY, 'rECEfel 10, i4S'

Ex-Editor In Reminiscent jMood

(Continued from previous page)


FURNITURE
AND GARDEN REQUISITES
SUPPLIERS AND ERECTORS OF ALL TYPES OF FENCING

African Gate & Fence Works
LIMITED
188 BREE STREET, JOHANNESBURG
Phone.: 33-2010 and 34-1581 P.O. Box 7544


"'Some Memories"
May I relate a few lighter inci-
dents ?
A fond father came to me on one
occasion with his young son. He
wanted the boy to be taken onto the
staff of the paper. It did not matter
even if he started as a messenger
boy. The father, however, was keen
to know what were the prospects for
the boy in the future.
"He could, if he worked hard for
a ,number of years, and showed pro-
mise, become the editor," I said en-
couragingly. The father looked at
the boy, then at me.
"That's hardly good enough," he
remarked. He got up and took the
- boy with him.
Good Enough
It will be recollected that when
Jack Alexander wiote many of the
editorials in the "Zionist Record"
there was often a generous distribu-
tion of Latin and Greek quotations
in them. The writings were often
specimens of classical English.
A certain veteran Zionist of those
days wvho had never conquered the
intricacies of the, English language,
although he had been thirty-five
years in South Africa, said to me on
oniie occasion:
"What I like about the "Record"
is Jack -Alexander's writing."
"Why," I asked, "do you under-
stand it?"
"Hardly a word," was the reply,
"but I feel it is good Oxford Eng-
lish."
"In Spite"
.I remember some fifteen years
ago, at an interval during the pro-
ceedings at a bi-annual Zionist con-
ference, an elderly loyal Zionist
worker of the old school was annoyed
with the "Zionist Record." He com-
plained to me over a cup of tea.
"But," I replied, "the journal was
merely expressing the official opinion
of the Zionist Federation."
The old gentleman continued to sip
his tea in disgruntled fashion.
Finally he stood up and said in a
voice full of righteous indignation:
"I tell you, Dainow, Zionism will
succeed in this country in spite of
the Zionist Federation."

A Curious Visitpr
On another occasion, a Yiddish-
speaking farmer-storekeeper in a
back-veld area, came to see me. He
appeared a good soul with plenty of
time on his hands. His mission was
an unusual one. It appeared that
his children used to read and trans-
late to him every Sabbath the ar-
ticle by "Hamabit." This he enjoyed
intensely, especially the anecdote at
the end of each contribution. I
thanked him and promised to convey
his congratulations to the writer.
"But I want to meet hinT," he
exclaimed. "I would like to see how
and where he writes."
At that time the secret of "Hama-
bit's" personality was well kept. Only
a few knew that the writer of this
article was the culprit. I could not
permit myself the pleasure of telling
my visitor that he was now gazing
upon the writer of the weekly fea-
ture he so much liked. So I white
lied and told him that "Hamabit"
was unknown even to myself as edi-
tor. I declared that he just sends
his contributions from outside and
they are then published. *
"If so," asked niy visiting Jewish
farmer, "how do you send him your
cheque in payment?"
I had to answer that no payment
was sent, which happened to be liter-
ally true.
"He writes without payment?"
asked my persistent visitor.
"Yes," I replied.
"Nu," he commented, "iz er nit nor
gut, er iz auch meshugga!"


PAGE THIRTY


Old Colleagues
Finally, to be serious again, -I
would like to pay tribute to some old
colleagues. Edgar Bernstein, the
well-known journalist, got his first
real journalistic job with the "Zio-
nist Record."
Another person whom I drew into
the orbit of the "Zionist Record" was
S. A. Rochlin. He then lived in Cape
Town and appeared not to wish to
know new people. I landed on hidt
during a visit to Johannesburg. Ha
rebuffed me nicely, but I persisted.
I felt here was great talent, the born
archivist and historian. It was for
me a personal victory when his first
contribution appeared in the coluinis
of the "Record."
Besides the journalistic association,
a great personal friendship sprang
up between the journalist and the
archivist, a friendship which is likely
to last .out our lives. It is a pleasure
for me to know that the great talents
of S.A. Rochlin are beginning to be
appreciated by South African Jewry.
May I, too, join in congratulating
the Federation on the celebration of
its fifty years of effort. I am grate-
ful that the privilege was mine dur-
ing two decades to help in the great
work for Zion. They were for me
happy and unforgettable, years. May
they prove equally so for ,my suc-
cessor in the editorialship of the
Federation's official organ!
,I must here pay a tribute, too, to
one who took over the burden when
Benzion Hersch fell by the way and
was later lost to us. I refer to
Joseph Daleski, who was chairman
of the Editorial Board. He did
valiant work for six years and left
an indent on the journal's history.
After him came S. M. Kuper, who
carried on the work for a few fur4
their years and showed great devotion
to his responsibilities.

ORT-OZE MEETING IN BENONI
At the second annual general
meeting of the S.A. Ort-Oze Wo-
men's Section sub-committee of the
Union of Jewish Women, Benoni,
held at the residence of Mrs. D.
Schneider recently, it was reported
that over 20 children had been
"adopted" under the Foster-parent
scheme and that numerous functions
had been held during the year, in
aid of Ort-Oze funds.
Mrs. M. Furman and Miss R. Corin
attended the annual meeting on be-
half of'the Ort-Oze Women's Central
Executive and addressed the meet-
ing. The following 'committee was
Selected:
Chairman, Mrs. A. R. Serebro;i
vice-chairman, Mrs. R. Druian; hon.
treasurer, Mrs. Y. Baker; hon. sec-
retary, Mrs. L. Schneider. Commit.-
tee: Mesdames E. Alter, L. Anolik,
D. Bernstein, M. Danin, F. Frankel,
H. Gewer, J. Joffe, Kelmowitz, Kah-
anowitz, F. Koseff, H. B. Lieberman,
P. Mandelstam, S. Nakan, F. Nakan,
R. Perkes,. D. Schneider, M. Schwartz,
Mrs. Druian presided and Mrs. P.
Mandelstam proposed a vote of
thanks.

S.A. Betar Holds Kinus
The Kinus Artsi of the Berit Trum-
pledor of Southern Africa held in Jo-
hannesburg recently passed a number
of resolutions, including one urging
that the movement in future place the
greatest emphasis on Aliyah and
Hachsharah.
The Kinus was opened by Quatsin
Kaplan, who dealt extensively with
the fundamental problems facing
Betar in this country.
The Kinus concluded with greet-
ings to Madame Jabotinsky, Mena-
chem Beigin, Tenuat Hacherut, and
the World Revisionist Movement.
Greetings were also extended to all
Betarim and soldiers of the army of
Israel.













THE South African Zionist Federa-
tion as one of the territorial or-
ganisations of the World Zionist
Movement is faced to-day with im-
mense tasks and problems. The mili-
tary and political victories resulting,
in the proclamation of the State of
Israel have opened a new chapter in
the history of the Zionist Movement
and cleared the way to a constructive
effort of unprecedented intensity and
magnitude. Thus the South African
Zionist Federation celebrates its
Golden Jubilee at a time when great
changes 'are taking place in the Zion-
ist Movement.
The Jewish State is not an end in
itself. It is an indispensable" means
to the establishment of a National
Home for the. Jewish people. The
sovereign state removes all political
restrictions on immigration-and col-
onisation, and places Aliyah ana the
economic development of the country
under the control of the Jewish
people-the State of Israel and the
World Zionist Organisation. '
There are now four main tasks
tasks confronting the Zionist Move-
ment:
1. Organisation of immigration.
2. Comprehensive scheme of col-
onisation for the absorption of
large scale immigration.
3. Youth training in the spirit of
Chalutziut.
4. General Zionist Education.

Great Responsibilities
In the light of recent events in the
Jewish world, the first two tasks are
self-evident and need no elaboration.
The simple fact that the Zionist Or-
ganisation plans to establish in the
course of the next year 150 new set-
tlements, while in the course of the
whole Zionist history only 350 settle-
ments have been established, gives a
clear indication of the immense in-
crease of our responsibilities in the
field of colonisation.
The establishment of these 150
settlements is vital for the absorp-
tion of the immigrants and the
safeguarding of the frontiers of
the infant State.
The third task, too, assumes to-day
a much greater importance than ever


MR. ISRAEL DUNSKY
Treasurer, S.A. Zionist Federation


' ,z.


Infeld


Secretary, S.A. Zionist Federation



before. Chalutziut, the pioneering
spirit of youth, is indispensable for
the implementation of the new
scheme of settlement. The i'icreased
rate of colonisation necessitates an
increased tempo of chalutzic- educa-
tion.
Who will drain the svwamps of H:--
leh and transform them into flourish-
ing settlements; who will render the
-sands of the Negev habitable and
who will go to the frontiers of Syria
and Lebanon, Egypt and Transjor-
dan to erect fortress-like kibbutzim?
Without the unconquerable devotion
and the youthful vigour which have
always characterized our Chalutzim,
this- plan is impossible of achieye-
ment. And the responsibility of pro-
viding Chalutzim for the up-building
of the State of Israel rests with the
South African Jewish youth as much
as with the Jewish youth of any
other country.
The fourth task-the Zionist Edu-
cation and Propaganda-is of no less
importance. It is true that the Jew-
ish people as a whole with very few
exceptions, has rallied behind the Yi-
shuv in its struggle for survival, and
that the old conflicts between Zionist
and anti-Zionist have almost disap-
peared. But there is still a difference
of approach. To many the State of


...MR. M. KENTRIDGE, M.P.
tion.
Israel is nothing but a refuge for
Jewish displaced persons, and it is
the philanthropic sentiment and a
certain sense of national solidarity
aroused by the calamity of European
Jewry that have prompted them to
support it.

Relief Organisations
The Joint Distribution Committee
or our Jewish War Appeal have
made vital contributions to the Zion-
ist cause, but they are not Zionist
bodies. They are relief organizations
and do not represent a national move-
ment, although many of their leaders
and supporters may be staunch and
convinced Zionists. These organisa-
tions have directed -their activities
more and more towards Israel be-
cause this country happens to be al-
most the only part of the globe cap-


PAGE THIRTY-ONE


rTHN ZINfTT -P.EfORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948



Tle Future


MR. S. M. KUPER, K.C.
Vice-Chairman, S.A. Zionist Federa-
tion.
Jewish State, the propagation of the
Zionist ideology and the promotion of
Hebrew as a living national language
have become more urgent than ever
before..Hebrew is essential, not only
for those who want to settle in Israel,.
but for those who, while in the Dias-
pora, desire to be in communion with
the new cultural life in Israel.

The increased responsibilities of
the Zionist Movement require read-
justment of its organisational media.
It is true that the achievements of
the South African Zionist Federation
in all spheres of Zionist activity have
received general recognition, and
aroused the admiration of our lead-
ership in Israel as well as of Zion-
ists throughout the world. It is also
true that the organisational frame-
work of the Federation is regarded
to be the best in the Zionist world.
Nowhere else do you find a Zion-
ist Federation that embraces not only
Zionist parties but all Zionist or-
ganisations and institutions.
Consider, for instance, the be-
wildering organisational conditions
prevailing amongst Zionists of the
.S.A. The Zionist Organisation of
America (Z.O.A.) represents General
Zionists only, while other Zionist
parties, viz., Mizrachi, Poale Zion
and the Revisionists are separate
and independent organisational enti-
ties. The same applies to the Zionist
women and youth. There are several
women's and youth organizations in
America without any contact with
each other. Moreover Zionist fund-
raising activities are conducted there
by independent organizations, whether
it be the Jewish National Fund. or
the United Palestine Appeal.


Tasks


able -of solving the problem of Jew-
ish refugees.
To us Zionists the Jewish State
signifies the radical solution of the
Jewish 1--. oblemn in its totality. The
Zionist Movem; nt aims not at solving
the problem of Jewish refugees,, but
rather at removing its causes The
normalisation of our national life in
all its aspects, whether political o:
economic, social or cultural, is the
main object of the World Zionist
Organisation. It is natural thaL the
State of Israel should solve the prob-
lem of Jewish refugees, but Zionists
do not work for "them," but for all
of us-fo-' the Jewish p-onle az a
whole. For the Jewish problem is in-
divisible and is not confined to any
particular geographic area.

Personal Interest
Zionists are expected to have a
personal as well as national interest
in the upbuilding of the State of Is-
rael. With the emergence of the


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MR. S. M. GORDON
Vice-President, S.A. Zionist Federa-
tion.
Here in South Africa all these ac-
tivities are controlled by the South
African Zionist Federation through
its various departments, and all
Zionist bodies, including ,women and
youth are affiliated to it. This con-
centration of Zionist work in all its
aspects has made for greater effi-
ciency and raised the prestige and
authority of the South African '-ion-
ist Movement in the eyes of the Jew-
ish community and the general pub-
lic as a whole. And yet even the
frame-work of the Federation will
have to be subject to serious rec6n-
sideration in order to achieve a pro-
per adjustment of our organisational
media to the increased tasks facing
us, whether in the field of Hachsha-
rah and Aliyah or fund-raising pro-
paganda and Zionist education.
In the course of the first fifty
years the South African Zionist Fed-
eration has grown from a small be-
ginning into a strong vibrant or-
ganisation. We have no doubt that
also in the future the Federation
will measure up to its increased re-
sponsibilities and play its full part
in the upbuilding of the State of
Israel and the redemption of the Jew-
ish people.


=Z=5z - - - - -






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIO.Y, DECEMBER 10, 1945


PAGE THIRTY-TWO


GOLDEN


ANTHONY JOEL LEADER. In-
scribed on the occasion of his birth,
14th May, 1948, by his grandparents
Mr. and Mrs.-H. Kremer.
MR. JACOB GITLIN. Inscribed on
the completion of his term of office
as Chairman of the Palestine Mari-
time League by the Palestine Mari-
time League of Cape Town, South
Africa, in appreciation of his wise
and effective leadership and as a tri-
bute to an admired senior colleague.
AARON AND EDITH ROSE
SHANDLING. Inscribed on the oc-
casion of their marriage, 26th' Au-
gust, 1948, by their father Louis
Freedman. Cape Town.
MR. ERICH SCHRAGENHEIM.
Inscribed by the First Natal Zionist
Conference, held at the Durban Jew-
ish Club, Sunday, 6th June, 1948, in
recognition of his valuable services
rendered to our National Cause.
MRS. MILLICENT BROOMBERG.
,inscribed by the Durban Women's
Zionist League for 15 years unbroken
and devoted service to the cause of
Zionism. Durban.
MISS GERTIE FISHER and MR.
H. BROWN. Inscribed on the occa-
sion of their marriage, 27th August,
1948, by the Union of Jewish Wo-
men, Grahamstown Branch.
ERIKA STEINLAUF and
ERNEST KAHN. Inscribed on the
occasion of their marriage, 27th
June, 1948, by their parents. Johan-
nesburg.


BOOK




MRS. ANNIE GERTRUDE KARK.
Inscribed by the Hillbrow Branch of
the Johannesburg Women's Zionist
League, in recognition of services
rendered.
ANITA RUBIN (Nee NOWOSEN-
ITZ). Inscribed in commemoration
of her Aliyah to Israel, by the Jew-
ish Community of Randfontein.
PHILIP NOWOSENITZ. Inscribed
in commemoration of his Aliyah to
Israel by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
DAN GOLDBLATT. Inscribed in
commemoration of his Aliyah to Is-
rael, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
HARRY GOLDSTEIN. Inscribed
in commemoration of his Aliyah to
Israel, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein .
MICHAEL KRUSS. Inscribed in
commemoration of his Aliyah to Is-
rael, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
MAX KANGISSER. Inscribed in
commemoration of his Aliyah to Is-
rael, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
GORDON MANDELZWEIG. In-
scribed in commemoration of his Ali-
yah to Israel, by the Jewish Com-
munity of Randfontein.
JULIE PEARL. Inscribed in com-
memoration of her Aliyah to Israel,
by the Jewish Community of Rand-
fontein.


efer M



BAR MITZVAH
gg^^ ^g~gg-g~gg=ga==g^.=~gss^^g~gg=^gg^ggg==ggI


BASIL SELWYN BORTZ. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 20th November, 1948, by his
parents Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Bortz.
Benoni.
SAMUEL GROLMAN. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 27th
November, 1948, by his parents Mr.
and Mrs. M. Grolman. Benoni.
NEVILLE NORDAUX RUBIN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 4th December, 1948, by the
JExecutive of the Bnoth Zion Associa-
tion. Cape Town.
DAVID BERTIL FRIEDMAN. In-
scribed on -the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 23rd October, 1948, by his
parents Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Friedman.
Durban.
MICHAEL GEORGE MOSHAL.
Inscribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 30th October, 1948, by his
parents Mr. and Mrs. B. Moshal.
Durban.
FREDERICK KAHN. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 6th
November, 1948, by his parents Mr.'
and Mrs. S. Kahn. Durban.
MICHAEL RONALD BEARE. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 27th November, 1948, by
his parents Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
,,Peare. Durban.
ANTHONY BRIAN KAPLAN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-


mitzvah, 9th October, 1948, by his
uncle and aunt Mr. and Mrs. A. Kap-
lan. Durban.
/
KEITH MAISELS. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 30th
October, 1948, by .the Observatory
Branch of the Johannesburg Wo-
men's Zionist League.
ALAN MICHAEL LEVY. Inscribed
on the occasion of his barmitzvah,
26th June, 1948, by his parents Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Levy. Johannesburg.
LESLIE BEREL CLEMANS. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 13th November, 1948, by
the Port Elizabeth Women's Zionist
League,
SAMUEL TROCKI. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 6th
November, 1948, by his parents.
Queenstown.
BERNARD WOHLMAN. Inscribed
on the occasion of his barmitzvah,
13th November, 1948, by his parents
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney WQhlman.
Springs.
RICHARD JONATHAN EPSTEIN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 13th November, 1948, by
his grandmother Mrs. Sarah Epstein.
Springs.
NORMAN PANOVKA. Inscribed
on the occasion of his barmitzvah,
4th December, 1948, by Mr. and Mrs.
David Panovka. Springs.


DESMOND KAHN. Inscribed on
the occasion of his birth, 27th Sep-
tember, 1948, by Mrs. Judelman, Mrs.
Syfrin, Mrs. Meyers and Mrs.
Cohen. Benoni.
LEON SHER. Inscribed on the oc-
casion of his birth, 7th October, 1948,
by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Max
Sher. Benoni.
MICHAEL LEON SCHMULIAN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
16th October, 1948, by Mrs. Kahan-
owitz, Mrs. Kelmowitz, Mrs. Philips
and Mrs. Friedstein. Benoni.
PATRICIA VERITY SACKS. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
30th May, 1948, by Mr. and Mrs. B.
Sacks. Bloemfontein.
HAROLD GOLDBERG. Inscribed
on the occasion of his birth, 2nd
June, 1947, by Mr. and Mrs. G.
Goldberg. Bloemfontein.
IVOR HAARBURGER. Inscribed
on the occasion of his birth, 20th
July, 1948, by Mr. and Mrs. H. Haar-
burger. Bloemfontein.
NOLA LANDSMAN. Inscribed on
the occasion of her birth, 17th May,
1947, by her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
M. Landsman. Bloemfontein.
SEON HYMAN. Inscribed on the
occasion of his birth, 28th October,
1946., by his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. B. Chein. Boksburg.
HYLTON ROY RABINOWITZ.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
22nd October, 1948, by his grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Rabino-
witz. Bulawayo.
ANN SIMONE LUBINGER. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
31st August, 1948, by her grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Salber,
Claremont. Cape.
JONATHON ANTHONY FREED-
BERG. Inscribed on the occasion of
his birth, 11th August, 1948, by his
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Freedberg,
Parow. Cape.
JOYCE MERLE WINNETT. In-
scribed on the occasion of her 1st
birthday, 12th November, 1948, by
her parents. Cape Town.
DESIREE ANN GORDON. In-
scribed on her birth, 28th May, 1948,
by her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. I.
M. Gordon, Wynberg. Cape.
MERVYN GANS. Inscribed on the
occasion of his birth, 3rd July,.-1948,
by friends and relations. Durban. ,
BRIAN ERIC LIEBESMAN. In-t
scribed on the occasion of his birth
4th August, 1948, by his parents. Jo-
hannesburg.
BRIAN DENNIS SUSMAN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 10th October, 1948, by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Susman.
Johannesburg.
RAYMOND JEFFRY STEIN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 14th October, 1948, grand-
father, Nathan Abelman. Johainnes-
burg.
PHILIP MORRIS FEINSTEIN.
nscribed on the occasion of his birth,
'25th June, 1948, by his grandmother,
Fanny Fainstein. Johannesburg.
NORMAN NATUS. Inscribed on
the occasion of his birth, Johannes-
burg, 2nd November, 1948, by his
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Wil-
kov. Randfontein.
'MICHAEL JOHN NATHANSON.
Inscribed 'on the occasion of.,his Bris


l]4ilah, 3rd October, 1948, by his
friends. Johannesburg.
CARMEL ARONOWITZ. Inscribed
on the occasion of her birth, 20th
August, 1948, by her grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. H. Aronowitz. Johan-
nesburg.
GEOFFRY MENDELSOHN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 25th November, 1948, by Mr.
and Mrs. .Mendelsohn. Johannesburg.
JEFFREY RONALD FEHLER.
Inscribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 31st October, 1948, by his
grandmother, Mrs. S. Fehler. Johan4
nesburg.
TESSA LYNN TEEGER. Ins-
cribed on the occasion of her birth,
3rd November, 1948, by the Chair-
man and Committee of the Highlands
North Branch of the Johannesburg
Women's ZiZonist League.
OSHER SAMUEL AND EDA
PESSA COHEN. Inscribed on the oc-
casion of their birth, 28th October,
1948, by Mrs. Flora Ben-Dror. Jo-
hannesburg.
RODGER DAVID. Inscribed by his
grandfather, Mr. N. Lincow. Kim-
berley.
ROSALINE HOTZ. Inscribed by
her grandfather, Mr. N. Lincow.
Kimberley.
DAVID DAVIDSON. Inscribed on
the occasion of his birtli, 22nd Oc-
tober, 1948, by Chaya and Israel
Adelson, Krugersdorp.
BEULAH AVRILLE BONER.
Inscribed on the occasion of her birth,
16th January, 1948, by her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. L. Boner. Roode-
poort.
SANDRA SEGALL. Inscribed on
the occasion of her birth, Sea Point,
17th October, 1948, by her great-
grandmother, Mrs. Annie Bernstein,
Port Elizabeth.
LESLEY ANNE BENNUN. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
13th August, 1948, by her grand
parents, Mr.- and Mrs. S. Bennun.
Port Elizabeth.
GRAHAM MARTIN SHULMAN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
23rd September, 1948, by his par-
ents. Pretoria.
JONATHAN HERBERT BRAUDE.
Inscribed on the occasion of his 2nd
birthday, 2nd March, 1948, by his
grandmother, Mrs. Miriam Ziman,
Pretoria. -
JEANOT CECIL BUISANSKY.
Inscribed on the occasion of his Pid-
yan Haben, September, 1948, by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Buisansky.
Pretoria.
CHERRY RICHMOR. Inscribed by
Mr. S. Chazen for coming first in
her class at the Randfontein Hebrew
School.
HILTON IRVIN SKUY. Inscribed
on the occasion of his birth, 19th Sep-
tember, 1948, by his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. I. Skuy. Springs.
ADEL HELEN STRAUSS. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
13th October, 1948, by her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. S. Strauss. Springs.
- RAYMOND EDWARD CHALOM.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
13th October, 1948, by his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Chalom. Springs.
DAPHNE MARION DAVIDS. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
16th August, 1948, by her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. P. Davids. Springs.







Friend of the Grand Khedive and Physician to the Zanzibar Sultan


South


African


Link


With


Pioneer Zionist


Dr. D'Arbella Scholar, Traveller

and Humanitarian


ON the occasion of the present-cele-
bration of the foundation of the
South African Zionist Federation
some fifty years ago the present
writer considers it a privilege to res-
cue from oblivion, one of the most
remarkable Jews ever to have visited
South Africa. He was one who seems
to have received as yet scant atten-
tion from the Jewish historian, of
either to-day or of. yesteryear. He
certainly deserves, to be remembered
not only as a pioneer Zionist but,
also, as one of the most outstanding
personalities of the Palestinian Jew-
ish scene of the last quarter of the
nineteenth century.
The man I refer to is Dr. Isaac-
some know him, too, as Israel-Greg-
ory d'Arbella respecting whom little
information as yet can be gleaned
from Jewish reference sources in this
country.
An ardent Jew who was interested
in the welfare of his people wherever
he sojourned, Dr. d'Arbella--his real
surname is unknown to the writer
at the moment-has an association
with this sub-continent which was of
an unusual kind. His was, indeed, a
most varied career, details of which
I have been able to obtain as a con-
sequence of perusing some of the
Jewish periodical literature of his
age, notably the London "Jewish
Chronicle."
Served In
Russo-Turkish War
A Russian Jew, he was first a stu-
dent of the Imperial Medical School
of St. Petersburg, following which
he attended the University of Rome
where he graduated as an M.D.
He returned, subsequently, to his
native land where, in the course of
his seven years' military service, he
fought in the Russo-Turkish War of
1877. He was wounded on the bat-
tlefield, and such was the personal
gallantry he displayed in the latter
sphere that he was decorated by the
Czar-a distinction which very few
of his co-religionists in Eastern
Europe then gained. Incidentally, a
brother of his, also, at the time
served as an artillery officer in the
Russian army. All told, he received
six or seven medals from a number
of European sovereigns.
Elkan Nathan Adler, one of Anglo-
Jewry's foremost bibliophiles, who, as
a young man met him in Jerusalem in
October, 1888, said, "his inlaid guns
and diamond-hilted sword are a
sight to see."
He was not in Europe for long, and
before the 1870's closed he was to
be found in Africa. I am as yet un-
acquainted with --the -reasons that
ultimately prompted him to come
here. At any rate, at the turn of
the 1880's, he lived in Cairo, where,
by the way, he became a friend of
the Khedive.
Not long afterwards he made his
way to Zanzibar where he lived for
some years not only as a private
physician to the local Sultan but
also as surgeon major-general of the
later's army. "In that capacity,"
notes a contemporary, "he was able
to do much for the advancement of
civilization, and rendered good ser-


vice to British interests, as Sir John
Kirk has testified. He vaccinated ail
the dusky members of Stanley's fol-
lowing, when that adventurous trav-
eller started on his last journey into
the interior of Africa, and was the
last European to bid him farewell.
The great explorer confided to him
that he had other objects in view,
besides that of relieving Emir Bey.
To such a degree had the Sultan
of Zanzibar become attached to him
that on one occasion, late in the year
1887, he was charged by the latter
to deliver, on his behalf, a certain
communication to the Khedive at
Alexandria. Following his ac-
knowledgment of the document con-
cerned, the Khedive gave a cordial re-
ception to Dr. d'Arbella on whom he
conferred the title of Bey.
Congregation
In Zanzibar
In spite of all this, he was not the
one to forsake his Faith even at a
place like Zanzibar, where, incident-
ally,-he helped to organise the first
Jewish congregation. States the Lon-
don "Jewish Chronicle" of May 15,
1885-the source is quoted by an In-
dian Jewish historian, Kehimkar,
whose work on the Bene-Israel was
re-published some years ago by Dr.
I. Olsvanger, a well-known figure in
South African Zionist circles of some
two decades ago-"the small Jewish
colony at Zanzibar, owing to the ex-
tension of commerce with that Afri-
can country, has within recent
months received a slight accretion to
its numbers. Dr. Gregory d'Abrella
mentions that that colony now con-
sists of seven Europeans, more than
a dozen of the Bene-Israel from In-
dia, and two or three Arab Jews
from Aden. The Jewish residents
are sufficiently numerous to form a
congregation, but this is as yet im-.
possible owing to the difference, be-
tween the rites of the Ashkenazim
and the Sephardim, which are still
very marked in the East, and partly
also owing to the unfriendly attitude
observed by Arab Jews of the pure
type towards the Bene-Israel, whom
they -regard as half-caste."
Zanzibar, .however, was not the
only place of African interest he
knew; he was as well acquainted with
the Durban of 1884 respecting whose
Jewry he penned this account which
was reprinted by the "Cape Times"
.of September 10, 1884, from the
London "Jewish Chronicle."
"The second day after my arrival
at Durban I rambled over the neat
little town to find some trace of a
synagogue,, but all my migrations had
been without avail," he wrote. "A
letter of introduction to a Durban-
ite merchant, who also happened to
be an Israelite, put me on the right
track. Following his directions, I
found in Grey Street a neat little
building, very simple but very decent,
which periodically served the Metho-
dists as a chapel. At the back of this
synagogue is a cottage for the mar-
riage officer, as a chazan, shochet
and mohel is styled here.
"The next Sabbath I went to the
Synagogue to' hear the service. There
was not more than a minyan, and all


STANDARD


the congregation consisted of Russian
and Polish Jews. The poor fellows
arc all artisans, getting, a. living by
their several handicrafts; they have
collected some money amongst them-
selves and bought the present build-
ing, and are supporting the minister.
There are a great many German
Jews, who do not take any.part in'
this laudable undertaking, and have
completely left Judaism, having in-
ter-married with Christians, and who
try to hide their Jewish origin; but
they are despised by both Christians
and Jews..
"The greatest speaker in the Leg-
islative Council, and the best bar-
rister in Durban," added Dr. d'Arbel-
la, "is Mr. Escombe, of Jewish ori-
gin, and I heard many colonists say,
'he is clever because he is a Jew.' If
Natal receives Responsible Govern-
ment he is pointed to as the future
Premier.
"A great many English and for-
eign Jews are in trade, the names dis-
played on their shops and stores in-
dicating who the owners are to a
man who knows something of Jew-
ish names: Emanuel, Samuels, Sha-
pira, Weinstock, Adler, Woolf, Pin-
cus, Gumpelsohn, Isaacs, etc. There
are many jewellers in Durban and
Pietermaritzburg who have the clas-
sical names of Levi and Cohen. Many
have their wives with them and


BANK


A


PERSONAL

AND

BUSINESS

BANKING SERVICES


The safety and convenience of a banking

account is an indispensable need of persons of

affairs whose financial transactions require efficient

and expeditious handling.

Our Branch Managers will readily assist in

indicating the extent to which our services are

available for the ready dispatch of all personal and

business monetary requirements.


THE


OF SOUTH AFRICA, LIMITED
Registered as a Commercial Bank
ESTABLISHED 1862


THE ZIONIST RECORiD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


PAGE THIRTY-THREE


By

S. A. ROCHLIN

their children attend a Hebrew class
held at the house of ehe minister.
"Next week," he concluded. "I am
going up-country, and shall certainly
write to you about the Jews in the
Transvaal gold fields, where they are
said to be found in very large num,-
bers."

Described Durban Jewry
Not only was he content to describe
Durban Jewry in the columns of the
London "Jewish Chronicle" of 1884
but he also gave practical expression
of his interest in the local commun-,
ity by donating, in Septembef, 1884,,
the sum of twelve guineas to its
funds. It is only lately I have dis-
covered this fact whilst perusing
the earliest membership book of the
Durban Hebrew Congregation which
I then found to be in the possession
of Mr. Philip Wartski, who passed
away earlier this year.
So far I have not been able to
corroborate the statement whether
(Continued on page 16)






PAGE THIRTY-FOUR
.. -~


LET YOUR SAVINGS

GROW WITH J.B.S.
Only 5/- is required to open a J.B.S.
SAVINGS ACCOUNT. Interest on Daily
Balance 2%

RATES FOR

FIXED PERIODS

J.B.S. Fixed Deposits give 310% per annum
on amounts of 25 and over, deposited for
periods of 12 months or more.

SHARE

AN ORGANISATION'S

PROSPERITY
J.B.S. FULLY PAID SHARES, yielding half-
yearly dividends, are issued in terms of the
Building Societies Act, and yield 4% per
annum.
Full particulars of J.B.S. Savings Plans will
be given by any branch.


+4.+


JOHANNESBURG

BUILDING

SOCIETY
Established 1888.
Registered under the Building Soelety Act 62 of 1934.



@


P.O. Box 87, 106 Fox Street, Johannesburg.
P.O. Box 1099, 224 Pretorius St., Pretoria.
Agents all along the Reef and throughout the Union.
35/15

'I- =


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, JPECEMBER 10, 1948

HOW MIZRACHI GROUP WAS

FORMED IN 1905
A VERY interesting document has been received by the Mizrachi office
in Johannesburg from the late Mr. A. Rom, of Yeoville. The docu-
ment is an extract from an old minutes book of the Mizrachi Organisa-
tion dated 1905 and deals with the establishment of the Mizrachi group
in South Africa-the first Zionist party in South Africa.


Mr. Rom recounted that in Ellul,
1905, Rabbi Arieh Rabinowitz, who
was born in Shavel, published an an-
nouncement in the journal "Hako-
chav," which was edited by Mr. Y. -N.
Traub, in which he said that Rabbi
Reines, the renouned founder of Miz-
rachi, had turned to him with the
request that he establish a Mizrachi
organisation in Johannesburg.
Well over one hundred people at-
tended its first meeting at which
were present the leading Rabbis and
Zionists of the town. An executive
was elected which .included Rabbi
Arieh Rabinowitz, 'chairman; Mr.
Chaim Cooper, treasurer; Mr. A.
Rom, secretary; and Rabbi S. Res-
nick, Mr. E. Shliezs, Siegmund
Shapiro, Chaim Peretz Goodman,
Jacob Traubowitz and Shalom Tovia
Braude.
The organisation numbered 126
active members who conducted Miz-
rachi work and who each paid a
membership subscription of Is. 6d.
per month. The organisation was
.active for three years until Rabbi
Rabinowitz left for America, where
ho becam"3 Rabbi of Baltimore.
Because of the great interest
which those early Zionist pioneers in
South Africa will have for present-
day readers, we" print the names of
all the original members. They were:
Abraham Abrahams, Aron Balta,
Arieh Liev Batvanik, Einhorin,
Yaakov Blieden, Yosef Menachem
Blumberg, Moshe Lave Bloch, Mena-
chem Bush, Moshe Brazer, Sholom
Tovia Braude, Sholom Abrahams,
Sholom Yosef Berkman, Sholom
Blosberg, Leib Osrin, David David-
owitz, Chaim Dubnov, Moshe Jacobs,
Moshe Gershom Diamond, Moshe
Sonnenburg Peretz Dryzentok,; Elie-
zer Pobritz, Asher Falkov, Chaim
Zvi Etzman, Isiah Fineberg, Leib
Epstein, Harav Moshe Freedman,
Meyer Finger, Moshe Edelson.
Saadye Freiman, Edelstein, Yaakov
Friedgut, Shumeil Etzman, Avigdor
Freed, Chatzkelson, Benyamin Galis,
Chaim Peretz Goodman, Chaimowitz,
Moshe Helfand, Moshe Simcha Hor-
witz, Shumeil Godrich, Michael Gold-
berg, Dov Hotz, Abraham Moshe
Cohen, Isaac Kaletz, Benjamin Cap-
lan, Zalman Joffe, Zundel Cohen,
Zeev Cohen, Chaim Yaakov Kark,
Chaim Kes, Chaim Cooper, Moshe
Cooper, Israel Cooper, Mordecai
Joffe, Moshe Cohan, Getschel Cohen,
Itzchak Cohen, Dov Katzev, Yud Get-
schel Cohen, Elchanan Sheinson,
Itzchak Shlom, Israel Shewitz, Moshe
Aron Steinbach, Menachem Shapiro,
Shaul David Sacks, Shumeil Stein,
Moshe Zaied, Zvi Itzchak Stark,
Moshe Yehuda Weinberg, Abraham
Balta.
Itzchak Cohen, Dov. Katzev, Isiah
Yehudah Cohen, Moshe Kaplan
Eliahu Zalman Kaplan, Abraham
Moshe Luntz, Eliezer Lazerson,
Moshe Alexander, Asher Meltzer,
Herschel Levy, Itzchak Levitan,
Yaakov Lurie, Yosef Mureinik,
Yosef Levy, Maisel, Zvi Yaakov
Merimow, Isiah Zvi Moll, JAiathan
Papet, Israel Michael Traub, Joshua
Zdlik Shapiro, Yitzchak Shein, Mena-
chem Tucker, Nachman Shewitz,
Shalom Treisman, Shneier Solomon,
Zaviel, Salman Weitzman, Shalom
Arenson.
Moshe Polentzski. Eizriel Ofsh-
owitz, Shlomo Yaakov Kromnick,
Rabbi Arieh Rabinowitz, Gershon
Resnickowitz, Yaakov Eliezer Rieb-
nick, Isiah Reiss, Michael Reifman,
Ezriel Ehuda Rom, Rabbi Shabtai
Resnick, Shlomo Rosenberg, Yaakov
Ringel, Chaim Yoel Rinder, Eliahu
Shliezs, Aharon Zarankin, Abraham
Shapiro, Benjamin Zeev Traub, Sus-
man Stein, Itzchak Yaakov Zaaran,


Israel Schumlian, Yaakov Trubowitz,
Menachim Stern, Zvi Troim, Simcha
Tucker, Simson Swartzberg, Yaakov
Yehuda Zeidel, Chaim Gershon
Wooli, Abraham Abrahams.
In 1943 Rabbi Arieh Rabinowitz,
who was then living in Tel Aviv,
wrote to "Our Future" as follows:
"Thirty-eight years ago we founded
the Mizrachi Organisation of South
Africa. But even before that on my
arrival in Johannesburg, I was ac-
tive in enlarging and strengthening
Zionism generally, which was then
very weak and quite small. It was
on my becoming Rabbi and Dayan of
Park Station Shul that I began work-
ing for the establishment of the Miz-
rachi Organisation.

(Continued from page 25)
tion for many years, and its one-
time President.
Another South African leader,
Jack Alexander, the Federation's
Secretary from 1917-1943, who
was largely responsible for the or-
ganisational development of the
Federation, has made his home in .
Israel.
In 1947, there was a fundamen-
tal change in the constitution" of
the Federation, when the election
of members of the Executive took
place for the first time on the
basis of Party representation. Un-
til that tme, the "best man" basis
of electid8 had operated, although,
from 1931; provision was made
for individual representatives of
parties to be members of the Ex-
ecutive. There are still many Zi-
onists who have refused to join
any political party and their fu-
ture status within the Federation
is as yet undetermined.
L. A. Pincus, member of the Ex-
ecutive for a number of years, and
one of its vicechairmen until his
departure for Israel early this
year, was largely responsible for
the development of the Zionist
Party system in South Africa.
Without doubt, the period since
the United Nations resolution of
November 29, 1947, has been the
most arduous which the Federa-
tion has had to face. The crisis in
Palestine following the UNO .reso-
lution; the outbreak of hostilities
there; the withdrawal of Britain
from the Mandate; the procla-
mation of the State of Israel, and
the war into which the new State
was plunged-all these develop-
ments called for a great increase
of the Federation's work, as well
as the assumption of new and un-
foreseen responsibilities. The im-
mediate response of South Afri-
can Jewry, under the leadership of
Bernard Gering, chairman df the
Executive, his colleagues and key
workers throughout the country,
was to forget all party and per-
sonal differences and to unite in
loyalty and discipline to bring aid
to the Yishuv.
This unity, coupled with the de-
voted service which has been of-
fered by the staff of the Federa-
tion, under the guidance of the
Secretary, Zwi Infeld, has at-
tained results of great propor-
tions. The Palestine Special
Emergency Fund and the I.U.A.
have yielded unprecedented cam-
paign results, yet these are but
two -of the commitments which
have been undertaken by the Fed-
eration during the present year.
South African Jewry is taking
part in the making of history, and
is too close to that history to beJ4
able to evaluate or appreciate its
contribution.





THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Women Shared In The Responsibilities


O-DAY when the S.A. Zionist
Federation is celebrating its
Golden Jubilee, our thoughts go back
to the beginning of women's partici-
pation in Zionist activities in this
country, and one contemplates with
a certain degree of satisfaction, the
advance made since that time.
Until 1932, the women for the
most part, played their role only
through general Zionist Societies and
there were few separate women's
societies in existence the Bnoth
Zion of Johannesburg (later the Jo-
hannesburg Women's Zionist Lea-
gue), the Bnoth Zion of Cape Town'
and small groups in Pretoria, Port
Elizabeth and Oudtshoorn. These
societies, however, were in no way
linked together and had no specific
women's tasks to perform. They
were content to assist in certain
J.N.F. activities. The one exception
to this occurred in 1924, when the
first women's Keren Hayesod cam-
paign in the world was inaugurated
in some of the larger centres by Dr.
Alexander Goldstein, during his visit
to South Africa.
Unification
It was only in 1929, that the first
suggestions came for a unification of
women's work, and when in 1931 the
S.A. Zionist Conference was called,
the women decided to hold a semi-
official conference of their- own to
discuss their work.
It was in 1932, through the efforts
of Mrs. Kate Gluckmann (the first
woman to sit en the S.A. Zionist
Federation Executive, representing
women's work) supported at first
only by Mrs. Ethel Hayman and Mr.
Janower (both members of that Ek-
ecutive) that the Federation agreed
to the formation of the S.A. Wo-
men's Zionist Counc'l. Some mem-
bers of the Executive at that time
felt that this would bring about the
downfall of Zionism in this country,
but to-day we can afford to smile at
that viewpoint.
The Women's Council was anxious
to arouse more fully the national con-
sciousners of Jewish women through-
out South Africa and the Rhodesias,
and to organise them as an effective
force within the .Z'onist organisa--
tion. The aim of the Council was
also to co-ordinate the work of exist-
ing societies and to establish new
ones throughout the country. It is
a Department of the Federation by
which it is guided on all major mat-
ters of policy.
The first president was Dr. Hedwig
Reinhold, -,nd the first vice-president
the late Mrs. Clara Patley. Mrs.


DR. DEBORAH KATZEN
President of the Council (1941-47)
and National Chairman of Youth
Aliyah.


JENNY GREENBERG
Who was President of the Council
for eight years.

Thousands of Garments
Apart from these activities for
WIZO women, as far back as 1934,
formed themselves into sewing and
knitting groups, and thousands of
garments for infants and older chil-
dren have been sent to the various
WIZO institutions. During the
second world war and during the
present war in Israel, very large
numbers of soldier's comforts have
been made by these groups.
The President and the two vice-
Presidents of the Women'3 Council
sit on the WIZO Galuth Executive;
and in 1935 for the first time South
Africa sent delegates to the WIZO
World Conference; this was con-
tinued until the war in 1939. In
1946 South Africa had a country-
wide election and seven elected dele-
gats attended the first past-war
WIZO Conference held in Basle, at
the same time as the 1946 Zionist
Congress. As one of the largest con-
tributors to WIZO, South Africa is
entitled to a strong delegation at
these conferences, in order to be able
to direct the future policy of that
organisation.
All these efforts for WIZO have,
however, in no way interfered with
other important Zionist activities,
and there is no dOubt that to the
women goes the credit for putting
the day to day J.N.F. work in this
country on a firm basis. Since the
day that women undertook the re-
sponsibility of placing and clearing
regularly all J.N.F. Blue Boxes, the
insignificant proceeds of the Blue
Box have attained globular 'figures.
Every women's society undertakes a
quota for the J.N.F. in addition to
this work, and under the Council's
constitution the J.N.F. has the right
to all monies raised through fune-


Reinhold was followed as president,
after a year of office, by the late
Mrs. Jenny Greenberg, who remained
president for eight years. It was
under her regime that the Council
grew to become a large and impor-
tant body; her untimely death was
a severe loss to Zionism in this
country. It was when Mrs. Greenberg
took office that Mr. Kate Gluckmann
became the vice-chairman of the
Council and she has served the Coun-
cil in that capacity ever since. From
1941 until last year Dr. Deborah
Katzen held the reins of this fast
growing organisation.
Affiliated to WIZO
It was in 1932 too, through the
efforts of the present First Lady in
Israel, Mrs. Vera Weizmann( then
President of W.I.Z.O.) that the S.A.
Women's Zionist Council became
affiliated to the Women's Inter-
national Zionist Organisation; but
with its constituent bodies, it al-
ways retained its broader Zionist
character, as a general Zionist or-
ganisation, because it wished to be
associated with 'every aspect of the
upbuilding of Israel.


ETHEL HAYMAN
Former member of the Zionist Fede-
ration and Chairman of the Keren
Hayesod.

It was in that year that the women
requested the Federation to allocate
to W.I.Z.O. fifty per cent. from all
women's Keren Hayesod campaigns.
This request was granted, and since
that time the women's campaigns in
this country have been known as
WIZO Keren Hayesed campaigns
(with the exception of the 1948 bi-
ennial campaign, which was known
as the Wizo Emergency Campaign.)
The Council has brought out many
outstanding personalities as dele-
gates for their campaigns. They
have included amongst many distin-
guished names Mrs. Vera Weiz-
mann, Mrs. Rebecca Sieff, chairman
of World WIZO, Mrs. Hadassah
Samuel, chairman of WIZO in Is-
rael, and Mrs. Rosa Ginzberg, trea-
surer of WIZO in Israel.

Growing Programme
Until 1942 the Council's constitu-
tion did not permit any other finan-
cial contributions to WIZO; but by
that time its role in Israel-or Pal-
estine, as it then was-had become
such -an important one, due to its
growing programme of work (which
embodied vocational and other train-
ing;' infant and child welfare work;
care of the immigrant women and
children, and other activities in the
field of social services, often ren-
dered by a state) that it was decided
that additional financial support
from South Africa was essential. It
was therefore agreed, with the con-
sent of the Federation to increase


W.40's allocation from women's
campaigns to seventy-five per cent.
Moreover it was agreed upon that an
annual WIZO Month be in -ugurated.
Thn monies from this WIZO
Month for the first few years were
to be earmarked for the building of
a new Mothercraft Train ng Centre
in Tel Aviv and its equipment; since
the existing building was far too
small to house the many under-
nourished, weak and prematurely
born infants who required' to be
nursed back to health; and because
South African women were anxious,
too, to see that such an essential in-
stitution should have the -necessary
accommodation for the nurses who
were receiving their training there,
under excellent supervision.


Anna Franks
President, S.A. Women's Zionist
Executive Council.

tions, with certain exceptions de-
cided by conference.
Although the Youth Aliyah was
until 1946 P. separate organisation,
the Council and its constituent
Societ es have played an important
part in all Youth Aliyah campaigns
in this country. The National Chair-
man of that organisation since its
inception has been Dr. Deborah Kat-
zen, and its national vice-chairman
is also a woman. Now that Youth
Aliyah-is a department of the Fed-
eration, it has become a regular fea-
ture of our work.
But in addition-to all these activi-
ties, the Council has always stressed
the extreme importance of edu-
cational work. At first this aspect of
our work was not altogether satis-
factory, but through perseverance
we have won through, and many So-
cieties throughout the country now
fully appreciate the fact that with-
out a full knowledge of our cultural
heritage and present-day work in
Israel, practical achievement must of
necessity be limited.
The Council issues reading
material for sewing group's and for
societies. Various titled News Di-
gests have been published from time
to time: it is the Council which has
since 1947 been responsible --
through its educational sub-commit-
(Continued on page 36)


DR. HEDWIG REINHOLD
First President of the S.A. Women's
Zionist Executive Council


PAGE THIRTY-FIVE

TBy


Of Zionist Progress





PAGE THIRTY-SIX

Women Shared In Responsibilities

Of Zionist Progress

(Continued from page 35)


tee-for the collation of material in
an Educational Folder, which it
sefids throughout the country. Days
and weeks of work go into the pre-
paration of each of these folders,
and it is heartening to know That
to-day it is eagerly awaited and
widely used.
Since the beginning of this year,
the Council has established its ownp
Women's Paper, presently called
"News and Views. Much time,
energy and work is put into this
publication .which has within a year
grown from a four paged leaflet to
a full-blown magazine. This paper
is sent to every member of our Zio-
nist Societies through the Council
offices.
In addition to the written word,
mapy prominent Zionist women visit
large and small centres and take the'
message of Zionism to our affiliated
societies; but with the growth of our
organisation it became -impossible to
carry on through honorary workers
alone, and in an attempt to improve
the organisational side of our acti-
vities, and to spread our work still
further afield, we invited in 1943 Dr.
Anni Samuelsdorff, an important
member of WIZO in Israel, to pay
an organisational visit to this coun-
try, which proved a very successful
inipvation.
Later in 1945 when Miss Marcia
Gitlin returned from a visit to Is-
rael, she joined our Council and un-
dertook a similar mission on our be-
half for a period of twelve months.


In 1948 at our special request Miss
Tonie Hauser, general secretary of
WIZO, visited this country, and in
addition to the very fine work which
she did for the WIZO Emergency
Campaign (for. which she was our
chief .delegate) she assisted us very
considerably in the organisational
side of our work. To-day we have
two organizers, Miss Sally Burstein
and Miss Doreen Guinsberg as mem-,
bers of our staff.
We have 112 societies and 44 cor-
respondents in South Africa and the
Rhodesias with whom we keep con-
tact, a far cry from the handful
of societies with which we started
in 1932. Membership has, during
this period, increased to approxi-
mately 16,000.
- The Council's president automati-
cally sits on the Federation's Ex-
ecutive, but without a vote on poli-
tical matters.
The Council was also a party to
bringing about the present merger-
of most major women's organi'sa-
tions in the interest of the Israeli
United Appeal (Women's Section).
It is no exaggeration to say, that.
in the hand of the women lies a
large part of the responsibility. for
the progress- of the Zionist move-
ment in this country; for through
our mothers we have brought Zion-
ism into .our homes. Every emer-
gency has found the women ready
to respond to the demands of the
critical days in which we are living.


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, -94"

ANNIVERSARY COINCIDES


WITH FIRST, UNITED


EFFORT


FOR


ISRAEL


AND JEWRY


eMessa~,e


From


L. Tager
National Chairman, Israeli United
Appeal.
THE 50th anniversary of the South
African Zionist Federation,
which coincided with the first anni-


versary of UNO's decision in favour
of a Jewish State, takes place within
a few months of the proclamation
of the State of Israel.
It also coincided with the first
united, and biggest, effort the South
African Jewish community has ever
made for the needs of Jewry in Is-
rael and Europe.
There is no doubt whatsoever that
during the past 50 years the South
African Zionist- Federation has suc-
ceeded in instilling in the South
African Jewish community an appre-
ciation and understanding for the
Zionist cause which resulted in a sub-
stantial contribution towards the up-
building of the Homeland, and ensured
the solid support of the whole com-
muiity .behind the State of Israel
front the time of its establishment.
Even those members of the comic
m-anity who did nof share the poli-
tical aspirations of Zionism realized
.the .tremendous achievement and
significance of the establishment of
the State of Israel.
The South African Zionist Fede-
ration still has- important tasks to
perform within the community for
the sake of the State of Israel,
as well as for the sake of that sec-
tion of world Jewry which is depen-
dent upon the State of Israel for the
satisfaction of its fundamental needs.
There is no solution of the problem
facing these people'outside of immi-
gration to Israel.
On behalf of the National Execu-
tive and the workers of the Israeli
United Appeal, I 'wish to extend my
warmest congratulations to the
South African Zionist Federation on
its jubilee.
I express my sincere belief that
the South African Zionist Federation
will continue to discharge success-
fully its important functions to the
advantage of the South African Jew-
ish community, world Jewry and the
State of Israel.


Rhodesia Has Shared The Work

From The Beginning
N sending a message of greetings on
the occasion of the Fiftieth Anni-
versary of organised Zionism In eFr
South Africa, I am constrained to M eSSage From
mention that Rhodesia has shared
in the work from the very beginning..
of Zionist efforts in Southern Africa.
This work has not always been easy.
It was necessary to convince the
sceptics and win them over to the
conception of Zionism as the solu-
tion to the problem of Jewish Home-
lessness.
Only a fanatical belief and faith
could sustain the effort on the part
-of the few amongst the considerable
large number who required persuad-
ing and convincing.
- If we are now reaching a stage in
the practical realisation of the Jew-
ish National ideal it is essential to
pay tribute to South African and
Rhodesian pioneers in Zionism. The
"Zionist Record has played a distin-
guished part in the task.
In the Rhodesias we are conscious
of the ever-increasing responsibili-
ties that devolve upon every Jew in
the final consummation and estao- a. muel Rabinovitz
lishment of the J'wish State. Now
is the time to combine in a big heave
in the present struggle confronting Chairman, Rhodesian Zionist
the Jewish people. Council.


.t 152 Market Street


Johannesburg




THE ZIONIST RECO D,- FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


The


Two


Small


Rooms


In


PAGE



Portland


THE two small rooms in Portland
House with their ob:~urufe and
modest furnishings, the files and
stacks of papers, and pictures cover-
ing the walls, .was for me a place of
pure and wonderful romance. To
my youthful imagination it was an
alchemist's wonderland. There men
and women came together, and sat,.
talked, paced about, telephoned and
wrote. And as a result of all this
a new land was being built in a place
far on the other side of the earth-
the land of the Jews. These
memories of my childhood stand out
clearly from the mist of the years
that have passed away.
I can have known little of what
history meant. Palestine was no
more than the wonderous name of
a phantom land that belonged to the
heroes like Moses and Joshua, the
Maccabees and Bar Kochba and to
me. My knowledge of the Jews in
our time was confined to those in
Doornfontein, and the un-named vic-
tims of oppression in Europe. My
first experiences in Portland House
were moments of great illumination
for me. There the idea of the Jew-
ish people began to crystallise. It
was there that I received a sense of
a conscious Jewish past, and its bond
with a conscious Jewish future, and
my own association with them. It
gave me a sense of history, too, in
a wider sense, and made me realize
what men were prepared to do for
an idea.
A Strange Business
It was a strange and wonderful
business. With deep awe I watched
the makers of history hurrying in
and out: Benzion Hersch, Joseph
Janower, A. M. Abrahams, J. L. Lan-
dau, Loewe, and it was a source of
perpetual pride to me that my big
sister was then secretary of the S.A.
Zionist Federation, and was on
familiar terms with these men. I
watched and listened, and stuck
stamps on envelopes. I was not
present officially, so to speak. But
I was nevertheless a witness to all
that was going on. I was even a
particle on the surface of this
strange and wonderful world. There
was something about sticking
stamps on envelopes in that office,
that was different from all other-
stamps and envelopes.
From the enchanted piles some of
the letters certainly winged their
way ultimately to the golden land
where the Jews would come together
from all over the world-men like
Moses and Joshua, the Maccabees andl
Bar Kochba and I, too, and thel
names of Jews would ring .gloriously
throughout the world. For one little.
boy the stature of the figures of
those days, and the dreams they
inspired were to persist long after
the intrusion of a greater knowledge
and harsher realities.
Soon the boyhood life became a


CBy Harry


Levin


serious matter; there were new and
fascinating ideas, and many new pro-
vinces to be explored, and stern am-
bition asserting itself to extend be-
yond the achievement of stamp lick-
ing. But the image of the golden
land did not waver in its strength or
recede at all.
And in due course the personal
part of that dream was fulfilled. In
1926 Palestine became my home. It
was not golden, unless the sunlight
shining on the endless mud was seen
a transmuted gold. But it had other
riches. There, I realized, existed
many "brands" of Zionism, each with
its own accents, differently toned and
not insignificant, and South African
Zionism was one of them. It was a
proud "brand." If .it did not open
new paths, it certainly won warm re-
spect.
Sometimes, with some embarrass-
ment, one became a symbol rather
than a person. Here, too, I realized
clearly that there was a Zionist his-
tory and also a history of South Af-
rican Zionism which was contri-
buting all its force to the first, but
still enjoying its own life and dis-
tinctions.
The Alchemists
I am sitting in my studio in Jeru-
salem now, my mind wandering back
to the years of South African Zion-
ism, with which I have remained as-
sociated even since Eretz Israel be-
came my home. Outside my window
a group of Israeli soldiers are walk-
ing down the street, lustily singing
a song of the Negev. "Kol Israel"
brought me news over the air from
Tel Aviv only a few minutes ago.
And around me were a score of
visible reminders-were such things
necessary ?-of the Jews of South
Africa who helped to make the dream
of Israel come true. A long row of
alchemists hurrying in and out of
Portland House, and an even longer
road from the first years of the
Golden Jubilee of South African
Zionism. The multitude of mem-
ories that lie along this road, the
large things and little things, but
mostly the little things-for that is
history. It is only in retrospect, in
later years, do world shaking pat-
terns stand out as series of
tumults and brilliant pageants. But
the herrt of history is motive, and
constant little things, and a few
large things, and then the thread
which binds them all together. And
by that definition-or by any other
for that matter-South African
Zionism made history.
These fifty years may have ended,
and the State of Israel has now been
established. There will have to be
redefinitions of Zionist terms. But
one thing is clear, Zionism is a time-
less ideal, because the ideals of
Judaism are timeless. It will go on
but the stresses will be changed. Now
it will not be the consequences of
lack of complete nationalism that
will come to the fore, but the conse-
quences of what we make of it now
that we have it.
In tho immediate and ultimate
'new tasks i Israel, South African
Zionism will continue to have its
part to play. There will be changes
and new habits of thought, and new
meanings to old forms. But it will
continue to be a great and creative
part, worthy of those first fifty years.


Complete The Prophetic



-Vision


O reetin~,s


From


Lazar cBraudo

(TEL-AVIV)

FIFTY years of Zionism has
brought us our Medinath Israel.
The work is far from having been
completed, and I am sure that the
South African Zionist Federation
will continue to work with even
greater force to help complete the
prophetic vision.-LAZAR BRAUDO,
Tel Aviv.


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PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDA,'Y, DECEMBER 10, 1948


CONSECRATION OF LINKSFIELD EDUCATIONAL CENTRE


Large Gathering oAt Open-Alir ..

Ceremony "

ABOUT 1,000 people attended the official opening and conse-
cration of the Linksfield Educational Centre, held in the- .
grounds of the institution, last Sunday afternoon. The cere-
mony marked yet another important milestone in the develop-
ment of Jewish education in South Africa, and all present Were
deeply impressed by the -achievements of the S.A. Board of
Jewish Education.


The ceremony took. place in a
huge marquee, where refreshments
were served to the visitors.
A feature of the proceedings was
the impressive consecration 'service
conducted by Chief Rabbi Dr. L.
Rabinowitz, hon. vice-president of
the Board, assisted by Cantor S.
Mandel, by courtesy of the Berea.
Hebrew Congregation, and the Great
Synagogue choir, under the direction
of 'Mr. G. Grosberg, by courtesy of
the United Hebrew Congregation.
Mr. J. A. Grosberg was at the organ.,
At the conclusion of the speeches
groups of people inspected the
school, and had nothing but praise
for the' achievements of the Board.
Opening the proceedings Mr. Her-
ber welcomed all present, especially
'Mr. I. J. Hersch, the senior vice-pre-
sident of the Board of Education,
who had .now recovered from his re-
,cent indisposition.
Referring to the work of the Board*
'since it took over the control of Jew-
ish education five years ago, Mr.
Herber said that despite tremendous
opposition and difficulties and the
lack of public support, they had
!every reason to be satisfied with the
progress that had been made during
this short. period. The Board had
been compelled to borrow money for



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its building schemes and the sooner
the loans were repaid the less it
would cost the community in the long
run.
"We cannot make a proper contri-
bution to the State of Israel without
providing our children with a sound
Jewish education. We are faced
with tremendous tasks, but with the
wholehearted support of the com-
munity we shall be able to build an
educational structure which will be
a credit not ofily to South African
Jewry, but to Jews everywhere," he
concluded.
Mr.. C. ISAACSON conveyed
greetings on behalf of the S.A. Jew-
ish Board of Deputies, "one of the
parents" of the Board of Education.
Mr. Isaacson emphasised the need
for bringing the message of educa-
tion to every Jewish home. Unless
this was done, he said, many of our
co-religionists would be lost to Juda-
ism. The Board of Deputies would
do everything in its power to assist
in this task.
MR. B. GERI.G, chairman of the
S.A. Zionist Federation, paid tribute
to Mr. Herber and his associates for
all they had done in the cause of
education, and especially congratu-
lated them on their latest achieve-
ment. He said it was the duty of
those who believed in the cause of
Jewish education to show their -in-
terest by rendering service to the
Board.
"We are to-day engaged in the
tremendous task of building a State,
but we also have to rebuild the Jew-
ish nation itself. The latter task
calls for the same enthusiasm, and
energy as have been displayed in
support of the State. Without edu-
cation there is no future for Jewry
in the Diaspora, and for Jewry as a
nation," he declared.
In calling upon the community to
give the Board its wholehearted sup-
port Mr. Gering also pledged the
continued co-operation of the S.A.
Zionist Federation in the tasks still
facing -the Board.


-- T .

71


Mr. H. Herber addresses the gather ing.


MR. B. I. JOFFE, president of the He paid warm tribute to Rabbi
United Hebrew Schools, said that the Zlotnik, whom he described as "the
differences which had existed be- mind and the power behind every-
tween the Board and the institution thing that has been achieved." He
he represented, had been amicably also expressed the thanks of the
resolved, and they were working in Board to the Assistant Director, Mr.
complete harmony for the common Goss, the Principal of the Linksfield
cause. The high standard of Jewish Junior School, Mrs. R. Sykes, and
education in this country was due Mrs. R. Osrin, who was in charge of
largely to the untiring efforts of Mr. the Nursery School, and all the
H. Herber and his assistants, members .of the staff.
Chief Rabbi Rabinowitz based his RABBI J. L. ZLOTNIK expressed
sermon on the "Sedra" of this week, his admiration for what the Board
and said that as in the case of Jacob had accomplished during the past 12.
of old, it was the courage and vision years. In the short space of five
of Rabbi J. L. Zlotnik which led t) years the Board had acquired six
the creation of the fine educational magnificent buildings, including its
structure we have to-day. This task latest acquision near the Herber
was achieved in the faca of opposi- House for the establishment of a
tion, apathy and disbelief on the part Seminary.
of the public. "This magnificent achievement was
It was regrettable to think that due to \vision and daring and to a
the cause of Jewish education should spirit for expansion and consolida-
have to be .fostered not because of tion. What has been created are
the inner convictions of the heart, strongholds of Judaism which can
but because of external pressure. never be destroyed," he declared. "
Dr. Rabinowitz warned the corn- Continuing Rabbi Zlotnik said that
munity to heed the times in which the Board had created a demand for
we are living and to follow the ex- Jewish education and now would
ample of .other denominations by He to conern itself wthe growth of
providing its own educational insti- He referred to the growth of
providing its own educational ist pupils in the pre-School, as well as
tutions. the nursery schools and to the
MR. P. FROMAN, chairman of the "proud record" of the Seminary. He
Institutions Committee of the Board, mentioned that 19 students who had
described the establishment of a attended the Seminary were at pre-
Jewish day school as the "Board's sent in Israel, while six were to-day
greatest enterprise." occupying positions as teachers. Two
In giving a survey of the Board's students would "shortly proceed over-
activities he pointed out that 66 seas for further studies.
schools, with a total of over 1,500 In conclusion he stressed the need
pupils, were affiliated to the Board. for the establishment of a students'
In addition the United Hebrew home and for the further develop-
Schools, with a total of 18 schools, meant of those institutions already in
and 900 children, now .formed part of existence.
the Board. There were also 21 nur- Mr. L. Rubik, president of the He-
sery schools, comprising 865 children, rew Teachers' Association, con-
under the Board's supervision. eyed a message in Hebrew, and
other speakers were Dr. Mendelow,
*.. chairman of the Parents-Teachers'
K WAssociation of the Linksfield Junior
School, and Mrs. Jeanette Cohen,
K W V Tchairman of the Nursery School.
E de Co lo On behalf of the school Mrs. Cohen
Eau de Cologne presented the Board with a menorah
& Lavender Water in appreciation of its services.


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THE ZIONIST RECORIk, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948
The* Challenge Before Us Is How To Build


FRUITFUL RECIPROCAL RELATIONS

BETWEEN OUR COMMUNITY


AND ISRAEL
IT gives me very great pleasure
to express my warm congra-
tulations both to the S.A. Zio-
nist Federation and to the
"Zionist Record" on the occa-
sion of these notable anniver-
saries.
It was a happy thought to
make a joint celebration of the
50th anniversary of the Zionist
Federation and the 40th of the
"Zionist Record." For although
each has functioned separately,
they have been the two major
pillars of the Zionist structure
in South Africa, playing a role
that cannot be over-estimated
in promoting the Zionist ideal
and strengthening the Zionist
movement in this country.
We may take justifiable pride in
the fact that the jubilee celebration
of the S.A. Zionist Federation fol-
lows so close upon the jubilee of
modern political Zionism itself, show-
ing how deep are the Zionist roots
in this country.
We are particularly fortunate that
we celebrate this anniversary in the
auspicious circumstances of to-day,
when the State of Israel is an ac-
complished fact and when, as we hope
and believe, complete international
recognition and the restoration of an
abiding peace are not far off. South
African Jewry has the deep satisfac-
tion of knowing that it has itself
made no insignificant contribution to
this historic achievement.
Now that we have moved from the
period of striving and aspiration into
the era of' accomplishment so far as.
political Zionism is concerned, we
must naturally expect that the Zio-
nist movement in the Diaspora will
undergo important changes. The em-
phasis in Zionist work is likely to be
altered.


Message from


MR. B. A. ETTLINGER, K.C.
President, S.A. Jewish Board of
Deputies.


The challenge before us in South
Africa is how to build the most fruit-
ful reciprocal relations between our
own community and the people of Is-
rael. As citizens of this great coun-
try we do not recognize any political
allegiance outside of South Africa
itself, but I believe it will be to our
advantage, both as Jews and South
Africans, that we should continue to
take a lively interest in the fortunes
of the Jewish State and to draw
cultural and spiritual inspiration
from the new life in Israel. We
shall thereby not only enrich our
own communal life but also enhance
the contribution which we make as
citizens to the well-being of South
Africa as a whole.


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PAGE THIRTY-NINE


Forge Firm Links

Between Israel and Galut


AM delighted to send you
greetings and best wishes on
the 50th anniversary of the
Zionist Federation and the 40th
anniversary of the "Zionist
Record."
You can happily look back on
years of great achievement
when your contribution to the
upbuilding of the Jewish State
was noteworthy. The tasks of
Zionism are not yet ended, and
you must now undertake new
duties in fulfilment of this his-
toric hour.
The establishment of Israel is
the "culmination of the first
phase of our endeavour, and
now the urgent duty of Zionist
Federations all over the world
is to forge firm links between
Israel and the Galut, which will
fructify the Jewish future.


Message from


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of London


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PAGE FORTY








WOMEN'S SECTION


USUALLY at this time of the year there is a slackening of
activity as workers prepare for the annual recess. The
urgent necessity for increased support for the I.U.A. has, how-
ever, encouraged all committees to further efforts, and from
communities scattered over Southern Africa come reports of
successful functions and novel fund-raising efforts.


LU.A. COLLECTION TINS
From reports' received of the first
clearance of these Tins it is appar-
ent that both guests and hostesses
have taken the Voluntary Entertain-
ment Tax seriously. The splendid.
financial results prove that the I.U.A.
is being remembered at simchas and
private gatherings. It is confidently
anticipated that as the Tin and the
Voluntary Tax become integral parts
of all entertaining this source of re-
venue will add further substantial
sums to the fund.




1949 DIARIES
There are still supplies of the 1949
Diary available at the J.W.Z.L.,
'phone 33-7704, or the I.U.A., 'phone'
22-4403. I.U.A. receives the total
revenue from these Diaries.




JOHANNESBURG
Without a respite from the bril-
liantly successful Donor Dinner, Jo-
hannesburg I.U.A. workers are plaii-
ning other large-scale functions.
On December 13 and 15, at the
Coronation Hall, will be shown pub-
licly for the first time in South Af-
rica the moving dramatic film "In
My Father's House," written and
produced by the eminent American
journalist Meyer Levin. Tickets are
4s. 10d. (inclusive of tax), and book-
ing is at the door.
Entertainment of another c'har-
acter will be offered to the public at
the Library Theatre on February 1,
2, 3, and 5, 1949, by the Parktown
and Melrose branches. Frederic
Lonsdale's scintillating comedy "On
Approval" produced by Anna Romain
Hoffman is bound to be a great at-
traction to the theatre going public.
The show will be dressed by Louis
Jacobson and the cast will include the
well-known South African actor
Johann Nell. Tickets may be ob-
tained from Mrs. H. Herber, 'phone
42-3181 Melrose, Mrs. B. Gordon,
'phone 44-1617, and Mrs. S. Gavron-
sky, 'phone 44-4713 Parktown. Book-
ing at Greatermans will open on
January 17, 1949.



PRETORIA
The Pretoria women -have in
recent weeks been extremely active
on behalf of the I.U.A. A Grand
Fete has been planned for the 8th
and 9th March next, and conveners
of the various stalls are exceedingly
busy arranging subsidiary functions.
Morning Markets are being held
practically every Friday in different
homes, and women are asked, in view
,of the organising entailed, to put
aside this morning to take their
friends to tea and do their shopping
amidst pleasant surroundings.


In addition several novel func-
tions have taken, place, such as a
Fashionable Race Meeting- at the
Memorial Hall, and a Braaivleis and
Dance at Wingate Club, which event
was unfortunately dampened (in
more ways than one) by the
weather. Record crowds turned up
at this function, -the catering ar-
rangements were excellent, and had
the weather been kinder, it would,
undoubtedly, have been an outstand-
ing success.
The Flower Stall also has some
novel ways of raising money' and
has been very active. "The Israeli
Girls," as they style themselves, un-
dertake floral decorations for par-
ties, Barmitzvahs, weddings, etc.
This also entails a great deal of
hard work, but the results, both from
an artistic point of view as well as
monetary, are well justified.
Many of the other stalls have
planned functions to take place early
next year and, with all the activity
and enthusiasm prevailing, it is
hoped the I.U.A. will benefit by a.
considerable amount from the Fete
next year.




VEREENIGING
The Women's Section of the Ver-
eeniging Israeli United Appeal, un-
der the chairmanship of Mrs. L.
Friedman, held a most successful
Fete and Children's Fancy Dress
Parade at the Isaac Lewis Hall on
Wednesday, November 17.
The Mayoress, Mrs. T. O. War-
wick, in opening the Fete paid tri-
bute to the women of Vereeniging.
for their efforts on behalf of local
charities, and hoped that -the com-
munity would show its appreciation
by supporting this function. She
said that the cause was a most
worthy one, one of the aims being
the care and mental rehabilitation of
children who had suffered terrible
ordeals in the concentration camps
in Europe. She hoped that the
efforts of the women would be
crowned with success.
Mr. Max Shapiro, chairman of the
Vereeniging I.U.A. Executive Com-
mittee, thanked the Mayoress for
opening the Fete and the women
members for all their hard work.
Judges for the Children's Fancy
Dress were Mrs. T. -0. Warwick,
Mrs. Rose Falcke and Mrs. F. Jacobs.
The music was-provided by Mrs. J.
Benjamin and 'Mr. Louis Sacks.
There were many stalls catering
for a variety of tastes and a Braai-
vleis organised by the youth contri-
buted towards a happy atmosphere.

aa

THEUNISSEN
Theunissen has formed an I.U.A.
committee as fo,' pws: Co-chairmen,
Mrs. Motavsk nd Mrs. Ogince;
secretary, Mrs.7Kotzen.


THE ZIONIST


HENNEMAN
Henneman has formed an I.U.A.
committee as follows: Chairman,
Mrs. Sam Hersch, and hon. sec-
retary, Mrs. Mitchell Hersch.


GERMISTON
The Germiston Branch of the
I.U.A. held a very successful "mock
wedding" at 'the Germiston Town
Hall ,on Saturday, November 20.
This function was an outstanding
success both socially and financially.
The net financial result was a re-
cord in Germniston.
The Berea Zionist Youth Society
brought out their .cast for the "mock
wedding," which was a most taining and enjoyable presentation.




POTCHEFSTROM
The following I.U.A. Committee
has been formed in Potchefstroom:
Chairman, Mrs. I. F. Waks; vice-
chairmen, Mrs. B. Shapiro and Mrs.
D. Kirsch; hon. treasurer, Mrs. I.
Glaser; hon. secretary, Mrs. B. -Law-
rie. Committee: Mesdames D. Bortz,
I. Gamsu, M. Gamsu, S. Diamond,
W. Herr, L. M. Lewin, B. Metz, S.
Miller, A. Sandier, H. Sandier, M.
Singer, M. Wes. and J. Waks.
Potchefstroom 'has arranged a
series of novel and successful func-
tions during the past few weeks, in-
cluding successful evening gather-
ings, Jumble Sales, Bring and Buy
Sales, a Children's Concert and the
notable Israeli Ball.
On December 19, at the Cheder
Hall, at 8.30 p.m., a Tape Derby will
be run. The Potchefstroom public
Swill spend a diverting evening while
supporting the I.U.A. F


SRUSTENBURG
Recently an open air cinema per-
formance was given at the farm of
Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Fram, which re-
sulted in raising a substantial sum
for the I.U.A. Films of Jewish in-
terest and an excellent feature film
"Until the Clouds Roll By" made a
pleasant evening. Mrs. Fram was
responsible for the lovely refresh-
ments.
On November 21- a Children's
Fancy Dress Party was held at Mr.
and Mrs. H. Ritchken's farm. This
was probably one of Rustenburg's
most successful functions judging by
the numbers present and the in-
genuity and beauty of. the -childrpn's
costumes. Judging of the cdsf-uiim&
and the Grand Parade wasg followed
by swimming in fhe lovely pool.




DURBAN.
The Circle Bowling Section of the
Durban Jewish Club, for the first



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Been, S. Wolpe, B. Been. Seated:
Mrs. M. Ritchken, Dr. N. Hurwitz,
Mrs. E. Wulfsohn.

time in its history, arranged a mixed
Bowling Tournament last week-end.
They wished to give expression to
their enjoymment in a worthwhile
manner, and they, therefore, raised a
sum of money which they had handed
to the Women's Section of the Dur-
ban Israeli United Appeal. The com-
mittee is appreciative of the Bow-
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THE ZIONM RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948 PAGE FORTY-ONE

GIGANTIC TASK STILL FACES S.A. JEWISH APPEAL


Emphasis On Emigration And


Reconstruction

HAVE no desire to perpetuate the life of the S.A. Jewish
Appeal, but no one' can say to-day that its work is com-
pleted," stated Mr. Max J. Spitz, national chairman, in an ad-
dress to the special meeting of the Council of the S.A. Jewish
Appeal at the Carlton Hotel on Sunday last.
"The S.A. Jewish Appeal was the instrument forged by the
conscience of this community to implement a solemn promise
made at the beginning of the war that the Jews of South Africa
would work tirelessly to rehabilitate the survivors of the Nazi
tyranny. There is at least another two to three years' work
ahead. We had done everything possible to rescue Jews. Was
it not now our job to give these Jews the opportunity to go on
living as normal people? We still have a great job to do, which
is linked up with and integral to the birth of Israel. Jewry
is one and indivisible, and we must not slacken our efforts to
rehabilitate and reconstruct the Jews of Europe and North
Africa.

Call For Co-ordination Of

Fund-Raising


"The time has also come for the
stabilisation of the set-up in South
African Jewish campaigning for
funds," continued Mr. Spitz. In his
opinion it was eminently desirable to
have a continued combined effort,
and this was the demand of the ma-
jority of the Jews in South Africa.
Jewish leaders here must get to-
gether and work out a permanent
and satisfactory basis to the whole
problem of raising funds for over-
seas needs and for providing for
South Arican requirements. Such a
set-up would decide on allocations
according to their urgency-he was
not concerned with percentages, but
only that the South African Jewish
Appeal would have an adequate
budget to do a proper job. Such
united campaigns could take place
biennially, and in the intervening
years there could be drives for local
needs.

.< Emigration Is Priority No. 1
The chairman dealt with the many
topics discussed at the Paris Relief
Conference. He said that it was
unanimously accepted that priority
number one in the future work of
the JDC in Europe, and the vari-
ous organisdtions associated with it,
would be emigration.
In 1945, at the time of liberation,
there were in the D.P. camps of Ger-
many, Austria and Italy about
100,000 D.P.'s had emigrated to Is-
proximately 145,000. Last year about
100,000 DdP's. had emigrated to Is-
rael from Europe. It was hoped
during the coming year a further
135,000 will be enabled to enter Is-
rael, including about 20,000 from
Bulgaria and some from other East
European countries. He expected
that emigration to countries outside
of Israel would number perhaps
30,000, and would include the U.S.,
Canada and Australia. Under this
heading the*general situation was ein-
couraging, but would require very
large sums of money. It was esti-
mated that one and a half million
dollars would be required monthly
during 1949.
The delegation had been asked to
press for an immediate merger of
JDC-HIAS activity and had put a
very strong case before the Conter-
ence. The merger had not yet been
effected, bu.t some measure of success
had been achieved as regards migra-
tion from the D.P. countries to the
U.S. under the American Emigration
Act recently promulgated.


Reconstruction
Recalling that at the end of hos-
tilities in Europe, 95 per cent. of the
surviving Jews were homeless, pro-
pertyless, and without means of earn-
ing a livelihood, it was amazing how
much progress had been made in the
sphere of their reconstruction. Pro-
ducers' co-operatives, credit co-
operatives, loan funds, work projects
and Hachsharoth had been estab-
lished. This was in addition to the
vocational training schools and
special courses which were conducted
by ,lhe ORT.
South African Jewry should be
gratified that they had been able to
play some part in this dramatic re-
vival.
It had to be remembered that in
the Eagtern European countries
there was now a new economic ap-
proach making the task of rehabili-
tation even more difficult. The Paris
Conference had confirmed the JDC's
decision that it was not for a relief
agency to dictate to the Jews re-
ceiving aid as to how they should
live, or think; or, whether or not
they should try to adjust themselves
to the economies of -the countries in
which they found themselves, but that
its task was merely to heln Jews in
need in such cases where they them-
selves had worked out their future.
Rehabilitation implied two main con-
cepts-integration into the economy
of the country in which those-in need
were, and wished to remain, and
emigrrion and integration into the
economy of the country of destina-
tion.
Unquestionably, training-and re-
training-was the first and most im-
portant means of rehabilitation.
Qther methods were by the establish-
ment of the various co-operatives al-
ready mentioned.

Union OSE
The delegates had been requested
to attend a conference of the Union
Oze, said Mr. Spitz. This was a most
outstanding gr,4.hering of workers in
the medical sphere who were men of
high calibre and selfless devotion.
The debates had been of a high stan-
dard and our delegation found it
necessary, in the belief that the Oze
was to become the central Jewish or-
ganisation for health purposes, to
introduce a motion for a more prac-
tical businesslike element being in-
cluded in the Oze set up, and two
businessmen were elected to the Ex-
ecutive.


Anc ~her great achievement of our
delegation was the bringing together
at the top level of the JDC medical
workers and the Oze, and he hoped
that a permanent understanding
would come about whereby 9ver-lap-
ping would be avoided and the Oze
would ultimately take over the medi-
cal work of the JDC.

Amazing Absence of Disease
A most encouraging fact reported
was, despite the sufferings of the
D.P's. and their plight after t.he war,
there had been an amazing absence
of epidemics and diseases, due
largely to the wholesale preventive
inoculations, and probably to the fact
that only the toughest individuals
had survived.
The chairman dealt with the health
work of both the OZE and JDC. In
Germany, after the liberation and
before the Polish influx in 1946,
nearly all the survivors were be-
tween the ages of eighteen and forty-
five, almost all of the aged and child-
ren having perished.
He then gave statistics of the vari-
ous sanatoria, hospitals, clinics and
child care institutions in Europe.

Welfare and Child Care
It was estimated that there were
160,000 Jewish children still to be
found in Europe of whom we have
given assistance, in one way or an-
other, to some 130,000.
The chairman went into consider-
able detail of the various activities,-
in *respect of schools and children's
homes which were being supported
and maintained by the JDC.
In 1945, there had been a terrific
amount of overlapping and lack of
co-ordination. This fact had been
frankly admitted at Conference, but
the position has since considerably
improved. There had also been criti-
cism in the past as to the composi-
tion of the JDC staff. The position
in this respect to-day is that there
were only 200 Americans employed
by the JDC in Europe, 150 from
other countries including Sopth Af-
rica and Canada, and tihe number of
indigenous employees was 2,000.

Educational and Cultural Activities
The JDC had been criticised both
for doing too much and for doing too
little, but the line it had adopted was
confirmed by the Conference.
Dr. Schwartz had'said that in Po-
land the JDC, through the Central
Committee, distributed large sums of
money on the understanding that the
Central Committee used its dis--
cretion on the basis of non-discrimi-
nation. This resulted in vigorous
Yiddish and Hebrew activities. The
Conference felt that Jewish values
must be stressed, and also accepted
that it would be wrong to lay down
a line of approach from which no
one was to deviate.

Cyprus
Referring to-. Cyprus, Mr. Spitz
said that the plight of the, D.P's.
still there was deplorablA. He paid a
tribute to a South African, Dr. Mary
Gordon, for the outstanding work she
had been doing for a long time in
this territory. Dr. Gordon had re-
ported that the clothing sent by the
SAJA Women's Section had been
particularly appreciated.

Jews in Islamic Areas
Mr. Spitz then dealt with the
plight of the Jews in Arab countries,
where it had been estimated there
are between 800,000 and one million
Jews.
Centuries of neglect and low stan-
dard of living, not only for the Jew-


ish populations, had resulted in con-
ditions which defy description.
There was no housing and people
lived in holes in the ground. There
was no medical care and the inci-
dence of certain diseases was very
high. Trachoma affected the popula-
tion, resulting in a high percentage
of blindness. The figure for tubercu-
losis was estimated at between 30 per
cent. and 50 per cent., and the infant
mortality was the appalling figure
of 250 per thousand from birth o
the age of one year.
There was an enormous task ahead
of us here and the Paris Conference
had accepted the need to divert large
funds for these areas.
In addition to the problem of
funds, however, there was also tie
problem of personnel because there
were no trained indigenous per-
sonnel to assist in any relief or re-
habilitation programme. In the im-
mediate future, the work of the Ort,
Oze and of the Alliance Israelile
Universelle, would be of increasing
significance.

Delegation's Mandate
The chairman then indicated how
the delegation had dealt with the
"mandate entrusted to it. They had
not succeeded in bringing about the
consultative body. The attitude of
Dr. Schwartz and his colleagues was
that it was not desirable to set up
such machinery with a diminishing
programme; there would be tre-
mendous difficulties in bringing to-
gether representatives from the vari-
ous countries should an emergency
arise; but his primary objection was
that in the absence of a firm and
stable budget, such a consultative
body would not be able to function.

JDC Acclaimed
The -delegation criticised the lack
of warmth in the JDC's attitude to-
wards Vhe D.P's., but he was bound
to say that although the South Afri-
can delegation levelled strong criti-
cisms, the representatives from the
"receiving" countries, together with
the delegates of the other countries,
were unanimous in their acclamation
of the splendid job of work accom-
plished by the JDC.

Housing in Israel
In regard to the housing scheme
in Israel, the delegation, could not
bring this before Conference because
.the JDC had taken the line in New
York that its activities were confined
to the European scene. Though as far
as the SAJA is concerned, the Coun-
cil has already confirmed the prin-
ciple of a housing scheme in Israel.
If American Jewry desired that
the JDC extend their activities to Is.
rael, they would have to provide the
additional funds when the JDC would
undertake the work. For this 'rea-
son, too, the JDC was nc9 prepared
at present to give the Ort and Oze
additional grants for their work in
Israel.

Tributes to Schwartz and Warburg
Summing up, the chairman was
convinced that the Conference had
served a very good purpose. Its suc-
cess was in a great measure due to
the splendid manner in which Dr.
Schwartz. presided and handled tfhe
proceedings; he won the admiration
of all the 250 delegates. Mr. Spitz
also paid a tribute to the tone and
high standard of the debate set' by
Mr. Eddie Warburg, whose example
was followed by many of the dele-
gates.
He was very proud to have led
such a splendid delegation as his col-
leagues, Dr. Sonnabend and Mr.
Greenstein, to whom he. paid tribute.





PiRk ROBeS-TWO


"Givers"


Jewish partisans' and othi
vivors.
Of the relief work don
1945 this. dramatic fact sh
remembered, that never bi
history had private


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DfEGMB~ '10, 1 8'


And


Reipi


On The Same Lev



At Relief Conferen


Dr. Sbnnabend's Repo rt To S.AJ

Council
ADDRESSING the special meeting of the Council 6f the
Jewish Appeal on Sunday, Dr. H. Sonnabend referred t
report given by the chairman (published on page 41) and
that as an expert on the compilation of statistics he wa
r'erwhelmed by the figures given by the chairman, for fi,
could be made to tell whatever was required. He would
About two things: the background of the Paris Conferen
Relief and what the South- Afrieam delegation had achier


S Background of Conference
excellent spirit had..permeated
"'-C erence, a spirit similar toa. that
Ofe ish soldiers defeating German
fo*,es in 1944. and meeting, the ffirst


fio


and, 8tlrikting' printecb 8tyle&
Brand ed~ 'Tebilized',


it resists creasing, much
as woob db.es.








/


This is the era of
"something new" ..
new shapes, new styles,
new- lengths,. new- contours.
It's a relief to, find some-
thing which always reauiw
constant-the quality and
serviceability ofTootalse
famous washing fabrics-"
their reliable good taste
in colour and-design.


GU. T A A~kNTED FABRICS


el


ents Met

achieved anything on so gigantic
a scale, having spent at. least
250000;000 dollars voluntarily col-.
lected, from Jews all over the
" world.


It had been a Conference of both
e^A gives and recipients who met on the
n. same level, there being no hostility
or even embarrassment.. The 250,
delegates represented vastly dif-
. A ferent ideologies, outlooks and coun-
r. tries, but all' were united in the view
of there being a' Jewish nation. (pre-
viously only Zionists,, Bmndists- and-
anti-Semites had been convinced that
there was such. a nation). The
S.A. efforts in the spheres, of relief' and
o the rehabilitation had had-a. deeper sig-
nifihance than the mere rendering, of
I said aid' for the survivors: it had united
Snot .
gures Delegates" Acleivemenft
speak The delegate( had be ashed to.
ce on take up the following three things:
(:) 'Ths setting-up of an overall
plhn and to see to its implementa-
er sur- tion by a permanent consultative
body;
e since (b) Ttte-eliminationa of overlap,
iould be ping and for activity- in each sphere
before in to be carried out by one specialist
agencies organisation;
(c) That reconstruction and re-
habilitation be regarded, as of para-
mount importance.

A Plan
While we had not quite achieved
our wish for a comprehensive .blue-
print, we had not entirely failed.
Dr. Schwartz had declared emphati-
cally at Conference that it was
necessary to work out a three-year
plan. At an interview given shortly
after the Conference,. Dr. Schwartz
and Mr. Warburg had stated, that
the JDC had decided to embark on
such a plan, and that they intended
in this period to liquidate the prob-
lem of the 145,000 D.P's.
They also intended helping to train
or retrain vocationally 75,000 people,
even more than the most optimistic
ORT target. They also planned- to
render medical aid to a large num-
ber, and- altogether planned to spend
75,000,000 dollars in 1949.
On the negative side, our hope
S that .something would actually be
worked out at Conference was not
achieved. A permanent co-ordina-
ting body would be a. very impor-
tant part of such a plan, but the
JDC considered that the setting
up of a "miniature" conference
was undesirable.
It. must .be .faced that an' organi-
sation- of the magnitude-of the JDC
would, not want others to have a say
'in their budgeting. He felt, how-
-. ever, that the fact that the JDC'had
stated they wished to work on a plan
was no mean achievement.
Specialisation!
In this field 'something had been
achieved. A beginning had been
made in the work of co-ordinating
the efforts of JDC and HIAS in the
emigration field. Tremendous vested-
interests had to be 'considered in
both organizations. The bringing of
this problem before a 'world forum
would force something to be done.
Here the S.A. Jewish Appeal
was fortunate, because in spite of
being a giving country, we had no
vested interests. As far as 'ORT
was concerned, much had been
achieved. JDC realized that it could
not do ORT's job for technical rea-
sons; ORT had specialised in its field
for many years. Much of the work
of vocational training was already
in the hands of ORT and soon it
would be doing the work of voca-
tional training entirely by itself. As
far as the ORT was concerned, here
again there were vested interests


and there were considerable dif-
ferences between thle OSE' and the
JDC, but the chairman by his tact
and diplomacy, had brought these
two organizations much closer to:-
gether, and it was hoped that ulti-
mately all medical work and prob-
lems in the sphere of health activi-
ties would be left. to the ORT. A'
start had already been made in Cze-
choslovakia and Italy, and also in
North Africa, where the work would
be done by the OSE, but they would
be subsidized by the JDC.
Reconstruction
The Jews of South Africa felt
that reconstruction should be prior-
ity No. 1. This, however, did not-
mean that it did not realise there
were tremendous other needs. Basi-
callyi reconstruction meant the
fitting of people into the economic
structure of the country in which
they lived. This could be achieved
mainly by vocational training; and
much had. already been done. There
were two symbols which proved that
the ORT viewed. the problem both
practically and with vision. It was
proved, practically by the Mountreuil
School in Paris, and' by the estab-
lishment. of the seminary in Geneva
where teachers and leaders-would be
instructed.
-Regarding. North- Africa, it -was
-felt, that these Jews must be helped,
even though they had lived in great
distressed. -or many centuries. Jews
liid'dheveloped the consciousness of
being a nation and they felt that the
North African Jews were part, of
that nation and therefore must be
helped, particularly as their positibn-
was being worsened. because of the
conflict between Israel and the Is-
lamic world; they were, by their ii-'
creased suffering, paying the price
for the building-up of Israel.
Many languages had been spoken
at the Conference- and Yiddish was
the basic tongue, but the common
spiritual link was the realisation by
-the Jews that they were members' of
one nation responsible to and for
each other.
Dr. Sonnabend concluded his ad-
dress' stating that South Africa's
contribution to the Paris Conference
had' been a very considerable one,
and he felt that we would ultimately
-achieve our objectives if we "stuck
to our gauis."
Budget
The chairman then submitted the
Question of the budget; to the Coun-f
cil meeting, and suggested- that the"
S.A.J.A. should make its budget
year the calendar year January to
December, to conform with the prac-
tice of the J.D.C. and. other overseas
bodies. He also suggested that
henceforth the budget- should cover
the- total' estimated income for the
year and should' not provide for any
reserves. The emergency was far
too great. His colleagues- on the
'delegation gave the matter very. full
thought and he submitted their sug.-
gestions*that the budget should deal
with the following priorities:
S1: EMIGRATION, and that our.
vote. under this head should provide
a certain grant for the merger acti.'
vities of the JDC and HIAS.
2. RECONSTRUCTION A N0D
HEALTH: with the proviso that for
vocational training activities we
should, make our remittances direct
to the ORT JJnion, and for the health
- programme we should "deal directly
with the Union OZE. In this way,
we would be expressing the wish of
the South African community and
* underlining where we felt the em-
phasis of further work should be.
3. A GRANT should be made for
general welfare work covering chil-
dren's homes; homes for the aged-;
the establishment of further co-oper-
atives; for cultural, educational and
religious work, and for direct relief
essential until the final clearance-of
the camps, and also for our admin-
istrative expenses.
(Continued- on page 46) _. _


L stawi thusroct'rayom. 0,~
r1 suommer frooI&--cffpJ2& 8 this
8&LasO, sin superb' new colo'ars





THE ZIONIST -RPCORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948
Israeli United Appeal


Crowded Kensington Meeting

Addressed by Mr. Tager


On Sunday, November 21, approxi-
mately 400 people crowded Kensing-
ton Communal Hall to listen to an
impressive address by Mr. L. Tager,
National Chairman of the Israeli
United Appeal, on the latest de-
velopments in Israel. Mr. Getz pre-
sided in the absence of Mr. Jack
Bloch, the chairman of the Kensing-
ton Committee. He introduced the


Mr. J. Bloch, chairman Kensington
I.U.A. committee, who organised the
meeting

speaker and made a warm appeal
for support of the I.U.A. A well
deserved vote of thanks to the
speaker was proposed by Rabbi B.
Rabinowitz in which he also appealed
to the community not to relax for
one moment in the tasks that lie
ahead and to assist that small band


of workers in Kensington who have
done such fine work. In conclusion
some of the latest films from Israel
were shown which brought the even-
ing to a fitting end.
.. And at Southern Suburbs


Mr. H. Rubinstein, chairman I.U.A.
committee for Southern Suburbs
On Wednesday, November 24, a
representative gathering of the Jew-
ish community of Southern Suburbs
listened to an interesting address
given by Mr. Leo Tager,. National
Chairman of the Israeli United Ap-
peal, who spoke on the position in
Israel to-day. Mr. H. Rubinstein,
the chairman of the I.U.A. Commit-
tee in Southern Suburbs, presided
and introduced the speaker. The
evening was brought to a close with
the showing of a few Israeli films.


IUA CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED
IN WARMBATHS
The Israeli United Appeal in Warm-
baths was launched at a meeting held
at the Jewish Communal Hall on
Sunday, November 28. Mr. I. Isakov
presided. Rabbi Dr. M. C. Weiler
gave an illuminated address on his
experiences overseas. He was ably
supported by Mr. L. Franks.
During the evening a very forceful
address was delivered by Rabbi Haz-
dan, the newly-appointed minister to
the the Warmbaths Jewish commu-
nity. The appeals of the speakers
met with a good response.
After the meeting tea was served
at the Residency .Hotel. Special
thanks are due to Mr. and Mrs. Perl
for arranging this function at their
hotel.
The delegation was accompanied by
. Messrs. L. Sachs and L. Coleman.
Special thanks are due to the newly
appointed committee consisting of
Mr. I. Isakov, Mr. M. Cohen, Mr. E.
Taffelstein and Mr. C. A. Perl.
Ise


PAGE FORTY-THREE
MEETING AT ALBERTON
An Israeli United Appeal meeting
was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
A. Lisoos, Alberton. The meeting
was addressed by Rabbi DIr M. C.
Weiler, Mr. S. Shewitz and Mr., M.
Ettinger. Mr. J. Abraham presided.
There was a satisfactory response to
the appeal.

SABIE, PILGRIM'S REST,
GRASKOP NELSPRUIT
An Israeli United Appeal meeting
for Sabie, Pilgrims Rest, Graskop
and Nelspruit Jewry was held re-
cently at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
J. Kibel, Sabie, and was presided over
by Mr. A. W. Greenstein. Mr. Y.
Marshak delivered an illuminated ad-
dress and Mr. J. B. Miller proposed
the vote of thanks. Mr. Marshak
was ably supported by Mr. N. Schultz
and Mr. M. Ettinger. The response
to the appeal was satisfactory.


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PAGE -FORTY -FOUR


COLOSSEUM
IAfrican Consolidated Theatres, Limited)
Phone 22-1744
SATURDAY at 10.15 a.m., 2.15, 6
9 p.m.

ANOTHER OUTSTANDING
COLOSSEUM ATTRACTION
R.K.O.-RADIO PRESENTS

INGRID BERGMAN

CARY GRANT

CLAUDE RAINS
in -
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
Powerful Suspense Drama


NOTORIOUS


NOTORIOUS

(Released by 20th-Century-Fox
Book at Theatre or Publix (Carlton)

S.A. Jewish Ex-Servicemen's
League, Pretoria Branch
To the Memory of Pretorians
who fell in World War II
A PLAQUE
will be unveiled on
Sunday, December 12th
at 3.30 p.m.
in the
Jewish Memorial Hall
Beatrix Street, Pretoria
THE PUBLIC ARE INVITED
TO ATTEND


Teachers'


Summer


Vacation Oourse
CAPE BOARD OF JEWISH
EDUCATION
and
HEBREW TEACHERS'
ASSOCIATION
A 'series of educational lectures of
particular interest to all Hebrew
Teachers will be held in Cape Town
under the auspices of the above
during the period 2nd January to
o* 8th January, 1949.

For particulars apply:
THE SECRETARY
P.O. Box 2578, Cape Town


THE ZIONIST -RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, IMs


EMPIRE
(African Consolidated Theatres, Ltd.)
Phone 22-2281
DAILY at 2.15 and 8 p.m.
SATURDAY at 10.15 a.m., 2.15, 6
9 p.m.
IT'S A GREAT CAST-
ROBERT MONTGOMERY
SUSAN HAYWARD
JOHN PAYNiE
AUDREY TOTTER
IT'S A GREAT MOTION
PICTURE -


"THE SAXON

CHARM"

tJniversal-International's
Screen Adaptation of the
Best-Selling Novel by
FREDERIC WAKEMAN
"It's Scintillating! A Fine
Adult Motion Picture." -
"New York Herald Tribune"
30th September, 1948.
Book at Theatre or Publix (Carlton)

CARMEL RES. HOTEL
THE MODERN
KOSHER HOME
High-Class Menu
22 MULLER STREET, YEOVILLE
JOHANNESBURG
(Phones :
43-2250 Office 43-3003 Residence


Important Announcement

THE JEWISH MUSICAL
INSTITUTE OF S.A.
announces the opening of. the

SCHOOL of MUSIC
(Director: SOLLY ARONOWSKY)
on
JANUARY .17, 1949
at the
GINSBERG HALL
All Instruments and Singing
Taught by Experienced Teachers
Nominal Fees
Those interested please contact:
The Director
Phone 44-4896
3 7 p.m.
or-
The Secretary
Phone 24-4132
10 a.m. -1 -p.m.


METRO
Bree & Phone
Hoek Sts. 22-4411
Daily at 2 and 7.15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m., 2.15 and 7.45 p.m.
(Feature commences daily at
2.10 and 7.25 p.m., Saturdays at
9.10 a.m., .2.25 and 7.55 p.m.)
M.G.M. Proudly Re-presents
David 0. Selznick's
TECHNICOLOUR PRODUCTION

"GONE. WITH

THE WIND"
featuring -
CLARK GABLE
VIVIEN LEIGH
LESLIE HOWARD
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND
and a cast of thousands
Full. Length, Unchanged !
No Increase in Prices!


A CONCERT
of the
JEWISH MUSICAL INSTITUTE.
will take place on
SUNDAY, 12th DECEMBER
at 8.30 p.m.
at the
GINSBERG HALL
GORDON TERRACE, BERTRAMS
-On the Programme-
Yiddish and Hebrew Music and Songs
The Youth Symphony Orchestra
The Artists :
Fanny Sugarman (Popular Soprano),
Cantor -Dov Propis (Celebrated Pales-
tinian Tenor), Hannah Seinick, Sheila
Smith, Sarah Zundelewitz, Mary
Davidov, Helen Ichilchik, Gertie
Santop, Sonnie Barnet and Hylton
Smith
All proceeds in aid of the
YIDDISH FOLKSCHOOL


MAARIV SERVICE
Cantor J. Eidelson will
conduct Maariv Service at
the Witwatersrand Jewish
Aged Home, 10 Louisa
Street, Doornfontein, on
Monday, 13th Inst., at 7
p.m.

PRIZE MONOGRAPH
COMPETITION
THE S.A. JEWISH SOCIOLOGICAL
AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY
wish to announce that the closing
date of the above Competition is:
DECEMBER 31st, 1948
All enquiries and manuscripts to
be addressed to: The Secretary,
P.O. Box 1180, Johannesburg.

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR
Removed Permanently
As many as 150-160 in half an
hour by the latest radiomatic
machines.
MADAME RITA
(New York Diploma)
35 Downing Mansions
Cor. Eloff and Plein Streets
Phone 22-4551
Consultations Free


Social




ISRAEL UNITED APPEAL
WOMEN'S SECTION
present a
MOVING AND DRAMATIC FILM-

SIn My Father's House"

By MAYER LEVIN
at the

CORONATION HALL
Son

MONDAY, 13th DECEMBER
and

WEDESDAY, 15th DECEMBER
at 8.15 p.m.
Tickets: 4/10 (including tax)
obtainable at door


MALATER & DISTRICT SOCIETY
RAKISHKER SICK BENEFIT &
LOAN SOCIETY
AN
Open Air Dance & Braaivleis
in aid of
PARCELS FOR REFUGEES
IN ISRAEL AND EUROPE
at
K. BACHER'S FARM
on
WEDNESDAY EVENING
15th DECEMBER, 1948
MAX ADLER'S ORCHESTRA
Double Ticket, 10/6
Enquiries re transport: 22-7730 and
22-8296 43-4938 (after hours)
In the event of rain dance will be
held indoors
Directions to Farm:
Proceed along New Main Reef Road
to Randfontein until Circle, then
straight along Randfontein Road to
Signpost "Bacher's Farm" on left-
hand side coming from Johannesburg.
Watch for Native with lantern.
Grills, Refreshments, Amusements,
Entertainment



MOSAIC WOOD FLOORS
(PTY.), LTD.
68 MARLBOROUGH ROAD
SPRINGFIELD
JOHANNESBURG
Parquet Floors supplied, laid &
sanded from 15/- per sq. yd.
Phone 32-4509, After Hours 33-6270
P.O. Box 2570

ACCOMMODATION OFFERED
IN MUIZENBERG
Newly Furnished Private Home, Excellent
Cuisine (strictly Kosher), under the personal
supervision of Mrs. Melamed.
For reservations please apply to Mrs. A.
Melamed, "Mavista," Cromer Road, Muizen-
berg. Phone 8-5021.


MAGEN DAVID ADOM
VOLUNTARY FIRST-AID ASSOCIATION
DAY AND NIGHT MAGEN DAVID ADOM STANDS
READY IN PALESTINE TO RENDER MEDICAL
SERVICES TO THE SICK AND WOUNDED
Enrol NOW as a Member of
MAGEN DAVID ADOM IN SOUTH AFRICA
P.O. Box 9228 Johannesburg Phone 33-2782
(This space is sponsored by RADIOLEK (ETKIND BROS.)
| | s







--W.IIE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Sabbath begins Friday, December 10, 1948,
at 6.34 p.m.
Sabbath ends Saturday, December 11, 1948,
at 7.14 p.m. .

BIRTH
GIER.-To Percy and Ray (nee Gecelter)
af daughter at the Moedersbond Nurs-
ing Home, Pretoria, on December 5.
Both Well.

BARMITZVAH
LADEN.-Mervyn Baron, only son of
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Laden, Sea View
Hotel, East London, will read a
portionn of the Law and Maftir at the East
ndon Synagogue on Saturday, December
18, 1948.
SHEAR.-Brian, younger son of Mr. and
S Mrs., t_ Shear, will read a portion
of the law at the Western Road
Synagogue, Port Elizabeth, on Saturday,
December 11, 1948. Brocha at 6 Trinder
Mansions, Whitlock Street, after morning
service. No cards.

MARRIAGES
LOOM -- SACHS.-The marriage of
Marion, younger daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. II. Sachs, of Bulawayo, to
Myer, elder son of Mr. and Mrs E.
Bloom, of Kimberley, will take place at
the Bulawayo Synagogue on Tuesday, De-
cember 14, 1948, at 11.30 a.m. No cards.
Address: 24 Fort Street, Bulawayo.
M ANN WOOLF.-The marriage of
Rahlyn, only daughter 'of Mr. and
Mrs. N. Woolf, of Bloemfontein, and
David K, Mann, of Johannesburg, young-
est son of the late Mr. and Mrs. I. H.
Manaschewitz, formerly of Oudtshoorn,
will take place at the Bloemfontein Syna-
gogue on December 12, at 12 noon.
RASKIN -- MOWSZOWSKI.-The mar-
riage- will take place at the Bula-
wayo Synagogue at 10.30 a.m. on
Sunday, December 12, between Gertrude
Guta), eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
L. Mowszowski, 4 Walter Howard Road,
Bulawayo, formerly of Bialystok, Poland,
to Harry Louis, only son of Mr. I. Ras-
kin, of Cores, C.P., and the late Mrs. B.
Raskin. Reception, Guild Hall. Relatives
and friends cordially invited
OSENBERG NOTELOVITZ. -- The
marriage of Alex; son of Mr. and
Mrs. Myer Rosenberg, of Johannes-
burg, to Ray, only daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. A. Notelovitz, of Pietersburg, will be
solemnised on Sunday, December 12, at
2.30 p.m. at the Great Synagogue, Wol-
marans Street.
RINK-BLOCH.-The marriage ot Min-
nie, eldest daughter of Rabbi I. Bloch
and the late Mrs. Bloch, of Port
Elizabeth, to Harry, younger son of Mrs.
A. Katz and the late Mr. B. Trink, of
Luderitz, South-West Africa, will take
place at the Raleigh Street Synagogue,
Port Elizabeth, on Sunday, December 12,
at 11.30 a.m. Congratulations, 21 Glen
Street, Port Elizabeth.
ENRY TREISMAN advises you to per-
petuate this momentous occasion In
your life by photographing yourselves.
Wbhe natural, therefore the most beautiful,
results will be a lovely reminder of your
happiest day. Make your appointment:
Phone 22-7314.
SPECIALISTS in liquor catering for wed-
dings, engagements, and all festive
occasions. Largest range of whisky,
champagne imported and best South Afri-
can wines, liqueurs, brandies, etc. P. J.
Joubert, (Jhb.) (Pty.). Ltd., Main & Kruis.
Streets. Phone 22-1575, Johannesburg. Also
at Darban. Port Elizabeth. Pretoria, Ver-
aeniging. Randfontein and Brakpan.

CONSECRATION
H U RWlTZ.-The consecration of the
tombstone erected in memory of, the
late Harry Hurwitz, of East Lon-
don, will take place at the West Park
Cemetery on Sunday, December 12, 1948,
at 11.15 a.m.

IN MEMORIAL
BEROLD.--Barney Isaac. In fondest
memory of my beloved husband and
our dear Dad who passed away on
December 13, 1936. Thoughts drift back on
bygone days. Life moves on. But sweet
memory stays. We who l'-, d l iim will
never forget. Fanny and children.
LASS. Lieut. David Emanuel
(S.A.M.C.) died of wounds In
Libya, on the 1st December, 1941
corresponding to the 11th Kislev.) Ever
remembered by his loving mother and
father, sisters Alice. Hilda, Sylvia,
brothers-in-law Sam. Hymie and Jack,
nieces Sheila, Joyce, Reena and Desire6,
and uncle Moses Klass.
SEINKER.-Eigo. In loving memory of
our dearly beloved mother and grand-
mothlir who passed away on the
51l (lay of Kisliv 5199, corresponding to
December 3, 1938. Always remembered. by
her Inving children and grandchildren.


-- ...


SITUATIONS VACANT
INTELLIGENT youth required for our
wholesale warehouse. Apply Koseff
and Co., 119 President Street, Johan-
nesburg.
GOVERNESS required for girl 13 years
old. Apply in first instance to P.O.
Box 37, Villiers, O.F.S.

TUITION OFFERED
STANDARD I to X. All subjects, at
pupil's home. By full-time tutor, six
years' training (Wits.). Phone
43-4486.

ACCOMMODATION OFFERED
ACCOMMODATION AGENTS (P-TY.),
LTD., London House, 21 Loveday
Street, Johannesburg. Holiday or
permanent accommodation everywhere.
Unlimited selections. Tel address "Well-
suited."
OOM to share (lady), in Berea board-
ing house, any time from December
14 to January 18. Reply: Miss M.
Cohen, 137 Berg Street, Potchefstroom.
BOARD and lodging available in private
Kosher home for High School boy.
Vicinity Kensington, Johannesburg.
For particulars please phone 25-1887, or
write "P.Z.," c/o "Zionist Record," P.O.
Box '150, Johannesburg.

CAPE TOWN
REMISES to let as Kosher high class
cafe and .restaurant at 22 Commer-
cial Street, Cape Town, reasonable
rental. Phone 2-1200 or write P.O. Box
2402, Cape Town.

FLAT TO LET
TWO-ROOMED flat, 17 10s. African
Ace, 705 Alris Building, 3 Rissik
Street, Johannesburg.

WHERE TO STAY
O N arrival in Johannesburg, stay at tt,-
Mirkin-Seeff Kosher Hotel, 2B
O'Reilly Road, Berea. Modern and
strictly Kosher. Excellent cuisine. Phonee
44-8815. manager's office; 44-4517. visitors.

MUIZENBERG
HILE on holiday get your copy of the
"Zionist Record" at the C.N.A.
branch, Muizenberg.

MUIZENBERG
A pleasant Holiday for you at
PIED A TERRE "
Alexander Road Phone 8-4483
Some vacancies available for School Holidays
A Home from Home
Continental Cuisine and Service
Mr. and Mr& E. Hirschfeldt
(Formerly Cafe De Luxe)

NIGEL HEBREW CONGREGATION
Applications are invited for the
position of

SPIRITUAL LEADER, HEBREW
TEACHER AND CHAZAN
for the Nigel Hebrew Congrega-
tion. Please apply, giving full
details of qualifications together
with copies of recent testi-
monials.
David Wolff, Honorary Secretary
P.O. Box 8, Nigel


SITUATION WANTED
TEMlPORARY or part-time job wanted
as attendant in milkbar, hotel, etc.
Middle-aged man competent ener-
getic. trustworthy, also to act as man-
ager. Write: Advertiser, P.O. Box 4216,
Johannesburg.
A BLE, willing, Jewish married man
seeks position in outfitting and tail-
oring or clothing factory in Johan-
nesburg or on the Reef. Experienced cut-
ter/designer men's, juvenile clothing;
knowledge of salesmanship, supervising,
etc. Able to assist generally in firm with
prospects. Please help. Write M.R., c/o
"Zionist Rtecord," P.O. Box 150, Johan-
nesburg.
GROCERIES and Provisions Dept.
Thoroughly experienced gentleman
requires position. Capable of hand-
ling receiving and despatch departments,
maklung-up and checking of order as well
as supervising. Please reply: "F.B.," c/o
P.O. Box 150. Johannesburg.
CUTTER, designer, with exceptional
qualifications in ladies' slacks,
ladies' and men's overalls, dressing
gowns, and ladies' blouses, seeks position.
lease write to "Advertiser," P.O. Box
3395, Johannesburg.'


FARMING
The S.A. Ort-Oze Vocational
Guidance Bureau has a vacancy
for a young man who wishes to
learn farming. Apply immedi-
ately to: 10 Unity House, 100
Fox Street, Johannesburg.


PROFESSIONAL APPOINTMENTS
Chartered Accountants have vacan-
cies for matriculated youths to be
trained as Articled Clerks. Duties to
commence 2nd January, 1949. Appli-
cants who are writing their Matricu-
lation examination or awaiting re-
stilts will be favourably considered.
Apply P.O. Box 3428, Johannesburg.


UNITED HEBREW INSTITU-
TIONS, GERMISTON
Applications are invited for the
post of:
1.-Hebrew Kindergarten
Teacher
2.-Trained Nursery School-
Teacher
Applications must be addressed
to:
"Gan," P.O. Box 31, Geimiston
to reach the office not later
than 15th January, 1949.


CYRILDENE OBSERVATORY
HEBREW CONGREGATION
A FULLY QUALIFIED

HEBREW TEACHER

required as and from 1st January,
1949, -for four days weekly, com-
mencing Mondays to Thursday.

Apply:
THE SECRETARY
P.O. Box 5506, Johannesburg



-SITUATION

VACANT

Wanted competent Night
SSister to reside on pre-
mises. Apply Secretary,
Jewish Aged Home, 10
Louisa Street, Doornfon-
tein.


ATTENTION UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS!
There is a good opportunity for you
to earn during the University Holi-
days by canvassing for progressive
Jewish Organisation. Apply in per-
son at 703, Permanent Buildings, cor.
Simmonds and Commissioner Streets,
Johannesburg.




Situation Vacant




SMART

AIND


LIVELY CANVASSERS
wanted by progressive Jjwish -
Organisation. Apply:
"A.S." C/o "Zionist Record,"

P.O. Box 150, Johannesburg


PAGE FORTY-FIVE

Office & Works: Phone 33-8614
Res. 43-2846 P.O. Box 3028

ANTWERP

DIAMOND CUTTING WORKS
(E. SCHAMROTH)

Licensed Diamond Cutter
Office & Showroom:
79 Rissik Street, Johannesburg

Engagement Rings at Factory Prices
--



ELGIN HOTEL
Cor. PLEIN & KLEIN STREETS
(Facing Union Ground)
JOHANNESBURG

O When Visiting Johannesburg
call at the ELGIN HOTEL

ROOM ONLY SYSTEM
MEALS OPTIONAL
FIRST-CLASS CUISINE MODERATE
PRICES BEST ATTENDANCE




GERRARD'S

LADIES' HAIRDRESSERS

101 Mansfield House
103 President Street

SPECIALISTS IN HOT AND
COLD PERMANENT WAVES

Phones 22-6202, 22-3293



BLANKETS, BOOTS and SHOES

THE EAST RAND LEATHER CO.
Proprietor: A. MOSS

WHOLESALE LEATHER AND
SOFT GOODS MERCHANTS
18, Henry Street,
BLOEMFONTEIN
P.O. Box 170 Tel. 1229
HARNESS LEATHER A
SPECIALITY



NAVIAS BROS.

& PINCUS
5/7, HANGER STREET,
BLOEMPONT EIN.

WHOLESALE MERCHANTS
General Groceries, Soft Goods, Fancy
Goods, Cigarettes, Tobacco, Stationery ,
Cycle Accessories, etc.
Phone 738 P.O. Box 807
Tel. Add.: "NAVIPINK"





K. J. REINHEIMER


Woollen & Soft Goods

Merchant


153B President St.,

JOHANNESBURG
v _





PAGE FORTY-SIX

Maccabi

Conference
THE next conference of the Mac-
cabi World Union will be held
"in Tel Aviv on December 26. The
traditional custom of a flaming torch
-being carried by relay runners from
SModin, the burial place of the Mac-
cabees, to the Tel Aviv Town Hall,
will again be observed.
At the beginning of the Arab-Jew-
.ish war it seemed that this feature of
Sthe TMaccabiad would have to be
dropped, as Modin is situated in the
.Arab territory of Judea. However,
.the Israeli victory along the Jerusa-
lem corridor has secured a free road
:between Modin and Tel Aviv.-J.T.A.

SIt Happened In

Vienna
VIENNA, Monday. Several
`clashes occurred at a soccer game in
Vienna last week between the Hakoah
"and Vienna Sparto teams when
spectators shouted anti-Semitic in-
sults at the Jewish team and Jewish
members of the audience. The mem-
bers of the team protested to the
city's police headquarters because
policemen assigned to keep order at
the game failed to intervene and
made no effort to apprehend the anti-
Semitic rioters.


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1bT, 19if

Mr. M. ,estadt M.P.C.

with

M.C.C. Stars


This photograph, taken during the recent visit of the M.C.C. team to Benoni, shows Councillor Morrie Nestadt,
M.P.C., shaking hands with F. G. Mann, the captain of the visitors. Others in the picture are: S. C. Griffith,
the M.C.C. vice-captain (extreme left) and D. Compton (extreme right), who scored a brilliant 300 in the match
against North-Eastern Transvaal. Mr. Nestadt, who takes a prominent part in Jewish affairs, is the president
of the North-Eastern Cricket Association, the East Rand Cricket Association, as well as chairman of the Willow-
moore Park Club.


DR. SONNABEND'S
REPORT
(Continued from page 42)
4. Finally, a substantial grant
should be made for housing in Is-
rael, in conformity with the principle
that had already been accepted by
+this Council to participate in a large
project of housing in Israel. In this
scheme the chairman envisaged the
participation of the local Landsmann-
schaften.
Mr. Segal hoped that before the
final figures were adopted, the Pro-
vinces would be given an opportunity
to express their views.
The meeting unanimously accepted
the chairman's suggestions. In view
of the importance of this question,
it was resolved to adjourn the meet-
ing until Sunday, December 12, so
that there could be a further dis-
cussion by the Council on' the re-
ports of the budget proposals.




Premier Paper Mills
Limited
south Africa's Pioneer Paper Mills
Manufacturers of:
Pure Kraft Wrapping Paper
Supplied In Reams and Rolls.
Weights: 40 lbs and upwards.
,i,.Our Prices Defy Comrpetition
Send your enquiries to :
P.O. Box 1359, Johannesburg.
Head Office:
1st Floor, Northern Trust
Building, 28, Harrison Street,
JOHANNESBURG.
Mills : Kllpriver, Transvaal.
Telephones- -- 33-7693/7.


Prominent South Africans


Helped To Build Zionism
(Continued from page 5)


Tielman Roos represented the
Union Government at the opening of
the Tenth Conference of- the S.A.
Zionist Federation in Cape Town in
1926. In the course of a sincere and
moving address he conveyed the good
wishes of the State, and said: "I
am here not only to' represent the
Government of the Union-of South
Africa, but also to assure you of my
personal goodwill. It could not, in-
deed, in my case, be otherwise, as I
have a wide circle of valued friends
belonging to your community who
have been tested by the passing
years."
Governors-General
The S.A. Zionist Federation has
been fortunate in finding so many,
friends among the non-Jewish ele-
ments of the population. Prince
Arthur- of Connauglit, the Earl .of
Athlone and Sir Patrick Duncan,
during their respective terms of of-
fice as Governor-General of the
Union all placed on record their hope
for the realisation of a Jewish
National Home in. Palestine.
While it is evident that the funda-
mental tasks in the establishment of
the Jewish Stiate were performed by
the people in Israel, the importance
of the support rendered to Zionism
by responsible public personages in
far away South Africa- should not be
underestimated.
Public Declaration
In 1928 Tielfnan Roos, Colonel
Cresswell, General Smuts, Patrick
Duncan, as well as the administra-
tors of the- four provinces of the
Union, and many other prominent


figures, signed a declaration signify-
ing sympathy with the "aspirations
of those who seek to re-create in
Palestine a" National Home for the
Jewish people." This document im-
pressed a large section of the South
African population who saw it as an
avowal of high-minded idealism,
free of any political intent.
Mr. Hofmeyr
One of the most ardent exponents
of the cause of Zionism among the
non-Jews of South' Africa has al-
ways been Mr. J. H. Homeyr, whose
splendid dignity and courageous, af-
firmation of the-rights of all peoples
earned him the absolute devotion of
the Jewish people. Mr. Hofmeyr, de-,
spite the almost overwhelming de-
mands on his time wa4 always
pleased tb attend a Zionist function,
or-prepared to deliver one of his
scholarly and scathing addresses
directed against the forces endeav-
ouring to cripple, in advance, the
prospects of a Jewish State. While
Minister of Finance he was associ-
ated with the South African Parlia-
mentary Pro-Palestine Committee
which was set up in 1944.
The chairman, of this committee
was Senator Edgar Brookes, 'a man
with a similar outlook in many re-
spects to Mr. Hofmeyr, and fearless
in his logical denunciations of anti-
Semitism. The Pro-Palestine Commit-
tee was extremely active and was in-
strumental, through public meetings
and various other measures, in bring-
ing about a greater awareness of the
issue involved in the Palestine ques-
tion.
Dr. Colin Steyn, tile Minister of
Justice in the last Government, and
a long standing friend of Zionism,
was also associated with' the Com-
mittee, which consisted of the fol-
lowing: Mr. Morris Kentridge, Dr.


L. Bosnian, Mr. Morris Alexander,
Senator F. C. Hollander, Dr. L.
Steenkamp, Senator G. Hartog, .the
Rt. Hon. J. Stratford, and Senators
D. D.,C. Murray and G. J. Hugo.
Senator Conroy and Piet Grobler,
. who was a member of General
Hertzog's. Cabinet in 1926, Professor
Dingemans, of Rhodes University,
and George Barrel, for many years a
member of the Cape Provincial Coun-
cil, did much to assist the Federa-
fion by their willingness to appear
on Zionist platforms. This they did
with remarkable regularity.
A number of prominent South Af-
rican judges have, on various occa-
sions, associated themselves with the
Zionis' movement. Incidentally,
Mr. Justice Greenberg and Mr. Jus-
tice Millin, both members of the Jew-
ish community, have played an im-
portant part in ,the Zionist move-
ment. Justice Greenberg in particu-
lar was closely associated with the
movement. He was honorary presi-
dent of a number of Zionist cam-
paigns, presided at numerous Zionist
functions, and was responsible for
-some brilliant Zionist orations which
left a deep impression on audiences
in this country.
These public figures, together with
a number of others who have unfor-
tunately had to be omitted from
. mention in this review, have made a
-worthy contribution to Zionism, and
helped to strengthen the rightful
.claims of the Jewish people for a
State. J.B.


ANNETTES
442b Louis Botha Avenue

Ladies' and Children's
Outfitters.



FOR SOMETHING EXCLUSIVE
CALL AT ANNETTES


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THE BULLBRAND FERTILISERS, LTD.
SARNIA NATAL





-TH- .^tS_'I' RECORD. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


"Pixy Pix"
3ir,-In your recent "Fac
(issue dated Friday, Nove
there are two statements
fact, are rather pixy.
The given Hebrew name
ring can in all probability
to the family 'of "mad herr
correct name of a normal
"Dag-maluah."
More pixy is the other
that "The Rose is never me:
the Bible." It is enough to
while to that Garden o:
naturally: The Song of S
one can easily pick more th
dozen of lovely-lively fresh
So-why mix pix with f


P,O. Box 14
Lusaka, N.R


Yours, etc.,
A. BORN
1,
.


Neglected
Communities
Sir,-I see that, according
port of a Board of Deputies
Conference, which appeared
"Zionist Record" last week,
plaint is made that the sma
communities are neglected
the course of fund-raising.
As one who, after living
years in a small country to


newcomer to Johannesburg, I can
sympathise with that complaint.
Separated from the large Jewish
communities, in many instances, by
hundreds of miles, these Jews thirst
in vain for a "Yiddishen wort" but
the only time they are honoured is
when there is a campaign, when the
speakers and lecturers are there, like
bees around a honey pot.
Yet it is these Jews who are the
backbone of all fund-raising efforts,
giving, in proportion, far more than
their city brethren. In the towns
there are thousands who are never
even approached, whilst in the small
centres there is hardly anyone who
does not contribute.
Surely our national organizations
should pay far more heed to the
needs and desires of these small cen-
tres and see that speakers should
visit these centres not only during
campaign' periods but at frequent
intervals right through the year.
Frankly, I think the remedy lies
with these country centres them-
selves. If only they would decide on
concerted action and declare that
they will refuse to contribute to any
funds unless speakers are sent to
them at frequent intervals, and not
only for campaign purposes, they
would soon bring our national or-
ganisations to heel.
I realise, of course, the practical
difficulties and the costs involved, and
I would therefore suggest that the
main national organizations, such as


1RE ED I 0
EDITOR

the S.A. Zionist Federation, the S.A.
Jewish Board of Deputies and the
;ts in Pix" S.A. Board of Jewish Education
mber 26), should establish a special lectureship
which, in fund, to be maintained by these or-
ganisations- for the sole purpose of
for a her- sending lecturers to the smaller cen-
refer only tres at frequent intervals.
ings"; the At present, with each organisation
herring is working independently, overlapping
in some centres and sheer neglect of
statement other centres often take place. -
ntioned in You have the spectacle of the Zio-
turn for a nist Federation sending a speaker to
f Scent- a centre and two weeks later the.
ongs-and Board of Deputies sending one of its
an half a lecturers to the very same centre.
roses. Then months pass before a visiting
facts? speaker is heard in that town again.
You also have cases where one
STEIN, centre is visited by two, three, four
and more speakers from various or-
ganisations, whilst another centre,
for some reason or another, does not
get even one speaker. "
By having a common panel of,
speakers to serve all the national or-
ganisations and by drawing up a
proper timetable ensuring that every
centre be visited, the present state of
affairs would be done away with.
The panel of speakers should be of
g to a re- so diverse a nature that it should
Regional contain speakers able to serve the
ed in the needs of all the organizations and
the corn- the timetable should be drawn up in
caller rural such a manner that every cehtre
except in should be visited at least once a year
by someone able to expound the view
for many of each organisation represented on
wn and a the scheme.


Yours, etc.,
G. KRAMER.
130 Becker Street,
Bellevue.

Public Spirited,

Families
Sir,-I wonder how many of your
readers were struck by the fact that
no less than three Gerings figured
prominently in your news columns
last week. And was it mere co-inci-
dence or was it intentional that the
three "stories" dealing with the three
Gerings followed each other in
three successive pages?
On page 17 was the report of the
opening of the Israeli United Appeal
Campaign in Durban at which Mr. B.
Gering, chairman of the S.A. Zionist
Federation, was one of the principle
speakers.
On page 18 you had details about
the Transvaal Automobile Club Din-
ner for the Israeli United Appeal in
the capable and energetic hands of
Mr. I. Gering, the vice-president of
the Automobile Club.
On the very next page there was
the report of the Witwatersrand He-
brew Benevolent Association, of
which Mr. D. Gering was elected
president.
There is yet another Gering, Mr.
Jack Gering, who plays a prominent
role in the life of Israel.
This is indeed a family record of
national and communal service of


which any family can justly be
proud.
I can. think of only one other Jew-
ish family in South Africa that can
compete with the Gering family in
public service and that is the Dunsky
family, which can boast of having
two members on the S.A. Zionist
Federation, a third member who is a
leader of the Zionist Youth in this
country, and yet a fourth who seems
to be following in the footsteps of
the other three brothers, not to men-
tion the other members of the family
who all play active parts in the Zio-
nist movement in Germiston.
It would be interesting to hear if
any of your readers can give details
of any other Jewish families in this'
country with similar records.
Yours, etc.,
J. MEYEROWITZ.
142, Jan Smuts Avenue.


EXCELLENT YIDDISH REVUE
AT HIS MAJESTY'S
JUDGED by pure musical-hall
standards the latesT Yiddish
revenue at His Majesty's ("Broadway
Star") is altogether excellent Un-
like some of the previous perfor-
mances there is no over-abundance of
hackneyed dialogue and forced
humour.
Every one of the actors has a
chance, to display his talents and
perhaps for the first time, Aron
Alexandroff was able to show what
he can do. His rendering of a ghetto
poem was a masterpiece of acting
and the manner in which the audi-
ence responded to him showed that
when it comes to serious acting
"Johannesburg can take it" and need
not always be fed on "Ga-ga." He
got the biggest applause of the even-
ing and well deserved it.
Not that we decrv light-hearted
comedy, but if it be Amusic-hall stuff
we want it good and solid, without
too much melodramatic sob-stuff and
pseudo-tragic nonsense.
That is why "Broadway Star" is
most pleasing. Every one of the
actors has something to do and does
it well. Anga Rappel, for example,
held the audience spell-bound with
her character sketch of a teen-ager:
excellent mimicry, good sfiging and'
good dancing. Samuel Silberberg
was not lost on the stage as on
earlier occasions. He let himself go
and produced a delightful Litvak,
whose every movement evoked
laughter and merriment.
Of the local artists Zygielbaum
and Farber were funny, while Eng-
lander and Angorin moved with ease
in minor roles. Our South African
actors well deserved the tribute paid
to them by Perlman. The latter
again attrajed much attention. "Five
Cents" waswdelightful and the "Ben-
zine-song" caught on.
G.


OVERALL & LINEN
MANUFACTURERS (PTY.) LTD.
Associated with:
H. HORN (PTY.), LTD.
THE LINEN SPECIALISTS
Manufacturers of:
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Also All Types of Sheets, Pillow-
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JOHANNESBURG
Phone 22-9194


Esplanade Private Hotel
MUIZENBERG
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Alexander Road, Muizenberg.
Phone 85461


PAGE FORTY-SEVEN


20TH CENTURY
Phone 22-9561.

Daily at 2.15 and 8 p.m.
Saturday at 10 a.m., 2.15, 6 and 9 p.m.
Public Holidays at 10 a.m., 2.15,
6 and 9 p.m.
TYRONE POWER/
ANNE BAXTE
in 20th Century x's
Delightful Comedy Hit

THE LUCK OF
THE IRISH
with -
CECIL KELLAWAY
LEE J. COBB



Commercial Clothing
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Makers of all types of
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TRADE ENQUIRIES:
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Telegrams: "TIGCLOMA." 'Phone 22.2913/4






PAGE FORTY-EIGHT
COMPANY MEETING.


ACKERMAN'9


LIMIT

CHAIRMAN
The second annual general meet-
ing of the shareholders of Acker-
man's Holdings, .Ltd., was held on
Friday, November 19, 1948, at 11
o'clock in the forenoon, at the offices
of the company, 164 Market Street,
Johannesburg. Mr. H. Herber, the
chairman, who presided, said:-
Ladies and Gentlemen,-The direc-
tors' report,' balance ,sheet and ac-
counts for your company for the year
ended June 26, 1948, have been cir-
culated to members, and I propose
they be taken as read. The compara-
tive figures for the previous year are
shown in the margin of the accounts
to enable you to compare the results
with those of the previous financial
.year. I now propose dealing with a
few items shown in the accounts.

BALANCE SHEET,
The balance of 45,195 standing to
the credit of share premium account
at June 26, 1947, has been trans-
ferred-to general reserve and, in ad-
dition, a further 15,000 was trans-
ferred from profits, thereby increas-
ing the general reserve to 75,195
at the end of the year under review.
,-jVith regard to the item "royalty
agreement at cost 200,000," the roy-
alties received from subsidiary com-
panies during the year amounted to
68,341, which added to the amount
received last year makes a total re-
ceived over the two years of 139,320.

NET PROFIT
During the year under review, in-
terest has been' charged on all inter-
company balances. This is reflected
in the increased amount received by
your company as interest, and the
corresponding decrease in dividends
received from subsidiary companies.
The total net profit for the year,
before providing for taxation,
amounts to 255,104, to which must
be added the balance brought forward
from last year of 103,123, making
a total of 358,227.
The following allocations have been
made:-


Final dividend of 6Q per
cent. in respect of the
year ended June 26, 1947
Interim dividend of 6 per
cent. in respect of this
year ......... .....
Dividends on preference
shares for the year to
April 30, 1948 .. .. ...
Provision for taxation .. ...
General reserve .. .. ...


71,500

66,000

18,000
50,855
15,000


221,355
leaving a balance available
for distribution of .. .. 136,872
358,227
Your directors have recommended
the payment of a final dividend of
6h per cent. (3.9d. per share), mak-
ing a total of 12A per cent. (7_d. per
share) for the year. This will absorb
71,500, leaving a balance to be car-
ried forward to next year oif 65,372
compared with 31,623 last year.

CONSOLIDATED ACCOUNTS
The consolidated accounts which
show the position of your company
and its subsidiary companies as a
whole, are self explanatory. The in-
crease in freehold properties com-
pared with last year is 61,706. This
is due to the acquisition of the
premises occupied by branches at
V*eniging and Mossel Bay, and a
standd adjoining our Woodstock


RBE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECErMBR" 10, i 'S


3 HOLDINGS


[TED


'S REVIEW
branch. The Vereeniging branch
premises were acquired by purchas-
ing the shares of a private company.
The consideration payable for the
shares was based on the value of the
property which was 14,159 in ex-
cess of the book value. This resulted
in the increase in the item "excess
cost -of shares over book value
234,666" compared with 220,507
last year. Your directors are satis-
fied that the whole of this item
amounting to 234,666 is covered by
excess values of properties over their
book figures.
The net profit of the group for the
year under review amounted to
266,864. After providing for divi-
dends, taxation and transfers to re-
serves, the balance on profit and loss
account carried forward to next year
is 151,092, which is 36,287 higher
than the balance brought in from
last year.
DIRECTORATE
I wish to take this opportunity of
welcoming Messrs. V. Roumanoff
and M. Cassell as members of the
board. Mr. Roumanoff is a director
of Greatermans Stores, Ltd., and
Mr. Cassell is a director of all our
subsidiary companies and general
manager of Ackerman's Ltd. The
business experiences of these two
gentlemen will be of great value to
the board.
In conclusion, I wish to congratu-
late Messrs. G. Ackerman and L.
Segal, the managing directors of the
subsidiary companies, on the results
achieved during the past year, and
to express to my colleagues on 'the
various boards, the managers, execu-
tives and staffs, my appreciation and
thanks "for their loyal co-operation
and support during the past year.
The balance sheet and accounts for
the year ended June 26, 1948, were
adopted, and a final dividend of 6.;
per cent. (3.9d. per share), making a
total of 121 per cent. (76d. per
share) for the year ended June 26,
1948, was declared payable on De-
cember 15, 1948, to holders of ordin-
ary shares.
The appointment of Messrs. V.
Roumanoff and M. Cassell as direc-
tors was confirmed, and Messrs. H.
Herber, S. Herber and W. G. F. Still
were re-elected directors of the com-
pany. After fixing the remuneration
of the auditors, Messrs. Price,
Waterhouse, Peat and Co., the chair-
man declared the meeting closed.


Y.M.C.A. Quiz Team at

Jewish Centre
On Tuesday evening, November 30,
a large audience attended a Quiz
Contest, which took place between,
the Jewish Centre and the Y.M.C.A.
at the Jewish Centre.,
Rabbi Dr. I. J. Harris, the Cen-
"tre's Director, welcomed Mr. Ian
Balfour of Broadcast House, and the
two teams.
Messrs. D. Shaw, J. Wright, T. V.
Peter and Misses W. Swann and M.
Page comprised the Y.M.C.A. team,
and Joe Katz,. Z. L. Sacks, R. L. Nar-
uisky and Misses M. Lutrin and Y.
Touys represented the Jewish Cen-
tre.
Mr. H. Moore of the Y.M.C.A. ren-
dered a vote of thanks on behalf of
his organisation, and Messrs. M.
Salovy, chairman, and M. Itzikowitz,
vice chairman of the Jewish Cen-
tre's Debating Club (Kadimah), un-
der whose auspices the Quiz took
place, expressed their appreciation
of -the close co-operation of the
Y.M.C.A. in arranging this contest.
Miss Badana Chertkow, a young
pianist, played a number of light
works during the interval and was
accorded an- extremely fine reception.
Mr. Simon Friedman, Instructor
in Dramatic Art at the Jewish Cen-
tre, proposed a vote of thanks.


UNION OF JEWISH WOMEN
GENERAL MEETING
The annual general meeting of the
Johannesburg branch of the Union of
Jewish Women was held at the Sky-
line Hotel, Johannesburg, last week
and was addressed by Rabbi Dr. E.
Neufeld, who gave an informative re-
view of the political position of the
Jews in the world to-day. He dis-
cussed developments in Israel and ap-
pealed for the maximum support to
assist in bringing about a speedy
settlement in Palestine.
Mrs. Adler, the retiring chairman,
spoke of the work of the Union dur-
ing the past year and of its inten-
tion to subscribe the funds necessary
for the completion of a hostel at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
The following committee was
elected for the ensuing year:
Chairman, Mrs. B. Susman; vice-
chairmen, Mesdames G. Hayden and
J. Pinchuk; hon. vice-chairman, Mrs.
M. Adler; hon. treasurer, Mrs. R.
Jacobson; hon. secretary, Mrs. S.
Silverman; chairman, Public Rela-
tions and Publicity Sub-Committee,
Mrs. A. Franks; executive, Mesdames
-. Abt, B. Alexander, J. Davis, P.
Duchen, M. Ettlinger, D. Gavronsky,
B. Gordon, I. Jacobson, L. Joffe, H.
Khhr, M. Miller, M. Million, I. Oshry,
D. Palmer.


MDA Function
The Branch Rishon of the Magen
David Adom is holding a "Hagi-
gah" at the Ginsberg Hall on Wed-
nesday, December 15, at 8 p.m. The
Chevrayah Jazz Band will be in at-
tendance, and refreshments will be
served.
Dr. Lionel Melzer, who has recently
returned from Israel, will deliver a
message of greetings from MDA
headquarters in Tel Aviv.
Tickets are 10s. 6d. per double, and
all enquiries should be made to
'Phone 33-2782.

Two New Mi)A Branches
Established
Two new branches of the Magen
David Adorn have been formed in
Johannesburg during the past fort-
night. The one branch which is to
be known as the Levontin Branch,
was formed after an inaugural meet-
ing at the residence of Mrs. L.
Wunsh.
Mrs. J. Kaplan, chairman of the
Women's Section, addressed the
gathering.
The following office-bearers were
elected: Chairman, Mrs. L. Wlinsh;
vice chairman, Mrs. Finkelstein;
hon. joint secretaries, Mrs. Levitan
and Mrs. Peskin; hon. treasurer, K.
Heitner.
Will all those interested in joining
the branch please communicate with
Mrs. Heitner, 'phones 41-3203 or
33-2782 on week-days.
At a meeting convened by Mr. L.
Oppenheim, Council member of the
MDA, the following committee for
the Doornfontein branch was formed:
Chairman, Dr. J. S. Zidel; vice-chair-
man, Councillor H. Miller; hon. sec-
retary, Miss E. Joffe; hon. treasurer,
Miss M. Levin.
Those wishing any further infor-
mation please 'phone Miss Joffe,
44-5925, or 33-2782.

ACTIVITIES OF WOMEN
ZIONISTS
VICTORIA WEST
The Women's Zionist Society in
this town is perhaps the smallest in
the country, but what it lacks in
numbers is made up in enthusiasm.
The five members meet regularly
under the guidance of their chairman,
Mrs. S. Musikanth, and devote much
of their time to sewing and knitting
for Israel. There is also consider-
able cultural activity in this small
centre.
UPINGTON
Upington Women's Zionist Society
recently held its annual general
meeting at which the following wo-
men were elected office-bearers for
the ensuing year: Chairman, Mrs. B.
Jacobsohn; vice-chairman, Mrs. L.
Hirschfield; secretary-treasurer, Mrs.
Nat Davis. The outgoing chairman,
Mrs. J. Kowen, submitted a report
which showed great enthusiasm and
excellent results in every field of Zio-
nist effort.
PORT ELIZABETH YOUNG
\ WIZO
This active group of youthful Zio-
nist workers meets regularly and de-
votes considerable effort to the cul-
tural aspect of Zionism. One of its
most successful recent ventures was
a "Living Newspaper." Freda Red-
house, as editor, recalled the inau-
guration of the group some five years
previously and demonstrated the
many and various methods of assis-
tance which it had given to other
-movements in Port Elizabeth.
NORTHERN O.F..S. GOLDFIELDS
Recently Miss Doreen Guinsberg,
organiser to the Women's Zionist
Council, visited this society, which
comprises the women of Hennenman,
Whites, Virginia, Ventersburg, Kalk-
blakke and Odendaalrus. Although
somewhat scattered, the society is
very active in fund raising and has
also sent substantial parcels of gar-
1 ments to Israel.


DUGSON HOLDINGS LIMITED
(Incorporated in the Union of South Africa)

Notice of Preference Dividend No. 4.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Dividend No. 4 on the 6%
Cumulative Preference Shares has been declared in respect of the six
months ended 31st December, 1948, at the rate of six per cent. (6%)
per annum and will be payable to all Preference Shareholders regis-
tered in the Books of this Company at the close of business on the
28th December, 1948.
The Preference Share Registers_ will accordingly be closed from
the 29th December, 1948, to the 31st December, 1948, both days in-
clusive, and Dividend Warrants will be posted on or about 29th
January, 1949.
By Order of the Board,
ARTHUR M. GOLDSTEIN, Secretary.
Transfer Office:
Messrs. Security Registrars (Pty.), Ltd.,
7th Floor, Transvaal House,
80, Commissioner Street,
Telephone 33-1851, Johannesburg.
6th December, 1948.




THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


1Ae
" P---------


IT is nearly three in the morning and pouring
with rain. The signal along the line pierces the
darkness, and the Patrolman knows that in a few
minutes the night mail will be passing through.
To him falls the task of keeping this stretch of
line safe and clear. Yet he knows that when the
night mail goes by, and his .lamp blinks its greeting,
the only answer will be a cheery wave from the
train crew. They will know that all is well.


passengers

sleepingg. .


The passengers are sleeping. None of them
even knows of this Patrolman, and few are aware
of the many like him who keep vigil day and
night who work while we sleep constantly
and carefully checking and testing equipment along
the 14,000 miles of our Railways so that rail
travel throughout our land will be maintained
at the highest standards of safety, comfort and
reliability.


SOUTH


AFRICAN


RAILWAYS






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


J. H. ISAACS & CO., LTD.
Established 1902.


A progressive establishment keeps


.1wJ


pace with the growth of a great city


REAL ESTATE
INSURANCE
FINANCE


104, COMMISSIONER ST., JOHANNESBURG
Box 5575. Telephone 33-7641


ISSUED CAPITAL
RESERVES -


- 403,333
- 52,000


Directors :
DR. EPHRAIM BENJAMIN WOOLF, J.P., M.E.C. (Chairman)
HENRY CARO ISAACS Joint Managing .. Alternate: WILFRED ISAACS
AARON JACOB ISRAEL r Directors .. Alternate: LOUIS IRAEL
ALFRED ERNEST TROLLIP, M.P. .. .. .. Alternate: ERNEST JOSEPH TROLLIP
MAJOR EDGAR BADEN ISAACS
DAVID D. AITCHISON
ISRAEL GESHEN
Bankers :
Barclays Bank (Dominion, Colonial and Overseas), Commissioner Street, Central,
Johannesburg.
Secretaries and Registered office :
J. H. ISAACS & CO., LTD..
104, Commissioner Street. Johannesbur,.
Transfer Secrotaries :
J. Lavine & Company,
35/36 National Mutual Buildings,
Rissik Street,
P.O. Box 5589. Johannesburg.


Apex Consolidated


Investment Corporation


Limited


Authorised and Issued Capital


Reserves -


- 518,750


- 84,000


Directors :
DR. EPHRAIM BENJAMIN WOOLF, J.P., M.E.C. (Chairman)
ROBERT SHAPIRO (Deputy Chairman) Alternate: HENRY SHAPIRO
HENRY CARO ISAACS 1 Joint Managing .. .. Alternate: WILFRED ISAACS
DAVID D. AITCHISON Directors .. .. Alternate: WILLIAM D. FIELD
FELIX CHARLES HOLLANDER, J4P.
MONTAGU SIMPSON

Bankers :
Barclays Bank (Dominion, Colonial and Overseas), Commissioner Street, Central,
Johannesburg.


Secretaries and Registered office :
J. H. ISAACS & CO., LTD.,
104, Commissioner Street, Johannesburg.

Transfer Secretaries:
Century Trust Co., Ltd.,
5th Floor, Century Buildings,
94 Commissioner Street, Johannesburg.


SA VINGS

ARE YOUR SAFEGUARD

in good times and bad nothing is of more value
to the individual than a safe investment

0

Permanent Shares -410


Redeemable Shares
Contributing Shares
Fixed Deposits -
Current Account .


- 4%
- 4o%
- 3%
- 2%


PROVINCIAL

BUILDING SOCIETY OF S.A.


104 Commissioner Street,


P.O. Box 5575,


JOHANNESBURG

Secretaries:
J. H. ISAACS & CO.


Printed for the Proprietors by Magazine Press (Proprietary), Limited, 2a IH irrison Street, Johannesburg, and published by the Kadimah Press, Limited,
SPermanent Bldgs.. Corner Commissioner and Simmonds Streets, 'Johannesburg.




Full Text

PAGE TEN

PIONEERS
in the
JEWELLERY TRADE
ESTABLISHED 1902


SAUL
Wholesale
ar
cDiamond


PINCUS
Jewellers
Ld
VMerchants


Sole Agents and Distributors for:


" VULCAIN"


ard STUDIO"


WATCHES


We are now supplying Diamond rings to the
THIRD generation


Our Only Address:
95 MARKET St., cor.


Kruis St.,


Johannesburg
We extend our congratulations to the S.A. Zionist
Federation on its 50th Anniversary and wish it
continued success.


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


BUILDING


SOCIETY


UNITED BUILDINGS, Fox and Rissik Streets, Johannesburg.
ST. ANDREW'S BRANCH: Rissik and Commissioner Streets, Johannesburg.
PRETORIA: Cor. Pretorius Street and Bank Lane, Pretoria.
Branches and Agencies In all the principal towns throughout the Union.
I 1 8 II01:






PAGE TWINTY-FOUR THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 19 s


[Tihe


South


African


Zionist Fed


Loyalty


And


Devotion


THeE South African Zionist Fed-
eration rose to its present
stature against a background of
Imity, loyalty and discipline dis-
played by local Zionists for half
a century. Despite the handicaps
of the great distance from the
main currents of Jewish life in
Europe, and the isolation of the
mattered Jewish communities in
South Africa during the early part
of the century, our Zionist Move-
imnt has been effective and vital
Amim the day of its inception. In
obrength of sentiment and in pro-
portionate material contributions,
i won for itself a leading place
in the countries of the Galuth, a
position which it has maintained to
the present time.
Although many Zionist societies
were functioning throughout the
country before 1898, there had
been -a growing feeling that their
work should be co-ordinated and
guided by a central body which
would be in direct communication
with the World Zionist Organisa-
tion. And so it was arranged
that representatives of 13 Trans-
vaal Zionist societies should meet
in Johannesburg on December 11,
1898. The result of this meet-
ing was the formation. of the
South African Zionist Federation.
Mr. S. Bebro was the first Pres-
ident of the Federation; but the
dominating figure was Samuel
Goldreich. He succeeded Mr.
Bebro as president, and shortly
afterwards became -Hon. Life
President. His influence was tre-
mendous, both among local Zion-
ists and the World leadership. It
was perhaps through his encour-


SAMUEL GOLDREICH
. dominating figure


agement of the young Zionists,
"The Pfefferlach," as he called
them, that he made his greatest
contribution to Zionism. Among
the young "hot-heads" of that time
were Jacob Gitlin, Joseph Jano-
wer and the late Benzion S.
Hersch. Goldreich acted as their
mentor. He was to no inconsider-
able extent responsible for the po-
sitions they have attained in the
Movement over the last 50 years.
The Anglo-Boer War necessi-
tated the temporary transfer of
Zionist Headquarters to Cape
Town, and during that period Zi-
onists devoted themselves mainly
to local matters. The Federation
received authority to issue permits
to refugees enabling them to re-
turn to their "homes in the Trans-
vaal; and many other duties which
in these days would be undertaken


nussow, were his personal friends
by the South African Jewish
Board of Deputies were at that
time dealt with by the Federation.
Yet pre-occupation with.local af-
fairs did not- preclude the Federa-
tion from concerning itself with"
the World Zionist, Movement. As
early as 1902, it began to exercise
an influence in the realm of iin-
ternational Zionist politics when
Theodor Herzl called upon S.A.
Zionists to welcome Joseph Cham-
berlain to South Africa.
There were close ties between
Herzl and South African Jewry.
Samuel Goldreich, Lennox Loewe,
Benzion Aaron, Manuel Leo Ge-


the Federation's work was reached
in 1909 with the decision to pub-
lish a monthly bulletin-"The
Zionist Record."
Under the guidance of the late
B. S. Hersch, the "Record" de-
veloped and expanded until 1926,
when it became a weekly publica-
tion and the official organ of the
Federation.
One of the outstanding individ-
uals in the Movement in South
Africa was A. M. Abrahams,
President of the Federation from
1911 to 1931, and then Hon. Life
President.
The Federation's interest in in-
ternational Zionist politics began


BENZION S. HERSCH


and devout followers. Bernard
Weinronk, a founder of the first
Zionist club in Johannesburg, and
leader of the Zionist Movement in
Port Elizabeth from 1912 to 1936,
corresponded with Herzl on Zioi,-
ist matters.
An early event in the story of
the Federation was the first S.A.
Zionist Conference held in Johan-
nesburg in July 1905. The burn-
ing question of the moment was
that of Jewish settlement in
Uganda; the decision was in fav-
our of Palestine, and Conference
adopted the Basle Programme.
In this connection it should be
noted that the late Rev. M. I.
Cohen came down from Bulawayo
to organise the conference. At
that time he had already laid the
foundations of Rhodesian Zion-
ism which has played so import-
ant a part in the history of the
Federation.
A large number of distinguished
Zionist leaders have visited South
Africa over the years, and have
left their mark on the develop-
ment of Zionist work here.
The first of these was David
Wolffsohn who had succeeded
Herzl in the leadership ot the
World Zionist Movement. Before
his arrival, it was rumoured that
he had come to raise 5,000-a
rumour which caused as much
amusement as if he had set a
target of 10,000.000.
A landmark in the expansion of


to increase particularly at the be-
ginning of World War I. A con-
ference in 1915 drafted demands
for safeguarding Jewish rights,
and the recognition of the Jewish
claim to Palestine as part of the
post-war peace settlement.
Until 1921, the South African
delegation to World Zionist Con-
gresses was in fact -composed of
overseas nominees, although a few
South Africans had attended Con-
gress from time to time. In 1921,
Messrs. Bernard Gordon, Joseph
Janower, Leopold Kessler and
Rev. Isaacs constituted the first
direct delegation, and set a prece-
dent for direct representation of
South Africa at Congress.
The late Chief Rabbi Dr. J. L.
Landau was a dominating figure
in South African Zionist life. A
member of the Executive since
1916, he was appointed Vice-Presi-
dent in 1922 and Hon. Life Presi-
dent in 1931. Dr. Landau's schol-
arship, brilliant oratory and dig-
nified personality were factors of
great importance in his public
addresses, and his work as a mem-
ber of deputations to Government
authorities.
Dr. Shmaryahu Levin, one of
the greatest personalities in the
Zionist Movement, launched the
first Keren Hayesod Campaign in
South Africa in 1922. His per-
sonal magnetism and influence left
an indelible mark on the Move-
ment in this country.


CBy Gertrude Kark
---------- ..^^ ^^ gg^^ ^^ ^^ ^=s


First

S.A. Zionist

Conference

July, 1905


Since that time, several dis-
tinguished leaders have. visited the
country, in connection with the bi-
ennial Campaigns. Each has made
his own contribution to the fur-
therance of the cause. Mr. Nahum
Sokolow in 1926 and when he re-
visited this country in 1934, as
President of the World Zionist Or-
ganisation, exerted almost as
great an influence on the non-Jew-
ish public and South African Gov-
ernment circles as on his fellow-
Jews.
Enthusiasm on an unprece-
dented scale was aroused by the
visit of Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
Pilesident of the World Zionist Or-
ganisation, and Mrs. Weizmann, in
1932. Dr. Weizmann has always
been an inspired leader, and
during his visit he fired the im-
agination of South African Jew-
ry who were enthralled by his lu-
cid analyses of the Zionist
Movement, and his visions of the
development of the Jewish Na-
tional Home.
During their visit, Mrs. Vera
Weizmann initiated plans for the
establishment of the Women's
Zionist Executive Council, which
came into being in-that year, un-
der the Presidency of Mrs. Hed-
wig Reinhold. Mrs. Reinhold was
succeeded by the late Mrs. Jenny
Greenberg, who- led the Council
for eight years.
The Women's Zionist Council
has developed into one of the larg-
est and most important depart-
ments of the Federation. With its
affiliated societies, it -constitutes a
vast organisation and makes a
tremendous contribution towards
all aspects of Zionist endeavour.
In addition to the strong support
which the women give to the
W.I.Z.O., their unceasing work for
the J.N.F., their support for
Youth Aliyah, their intensive edu-
cational work and their present
participation in the Israeli
United Appeal, make a story in
themselves.
In 1928, the 11th South African
Zionist Conference conceded the
principle that the Zionist women
of South Africa should have di-
rect representation on the Feder-
ation. Mrs. Kate Gluckmann was
elected to the Executive in this
capacity and she has been a mem-
ber until the present time. Since
1936, Mrs. Gluckmann has held
the, position of National Chairman
-of the Jewish National Fund in
South Africa. She has played an
important role in the development
and expansion of the work of the
Federation, and has exercised
considerable influence in the
Movement. A number of other
women have served on the Feder-
ation. They include Mrs. Ethel
Hayman, Dr. Deborah Katzen,
Mrs. Jeanette Davidoff and Mrs.
Anna Franks.
To-day, the Jewish National
Fund is one of the most import-
ant departments of the Federa-
tion, yet it was only in 1928 that
this department was established.
In the "early days" supporters of
the National Fund made their
contribution by selling National
Fund stamps, greetings, messages
and trees under the aegis -of a
National Fund Club. In 1906, the
Club's treasurer, Joseph Janower,
was appointed its representative
on the Federation's J.N.F. Bureau.
A few years later, he became a
member of the Executive and
served as its Hon. Treasurer for
16 years. It was under his chair-


The Late Chief F
manship that th,
Department waE
1928. Since 194
wer has be)en a
World Board of
Keren Kayemeth
The biggest in
contribution to
tional Fund in tF
by Isaac Ochbei
ident of the Do:
of Cape Town. I
Fund enabled it
"Isaac Ochberg
maria.
Another SouMt
leader, whose n
ated through th
National Fund
Bernard Gordoi
Executive and
for many year'
African Settle,
rael at Maya;
worthy tribute t
Many well-kr
the Zionist Mov
South Africa in
National Fund
last of whom,
chairman of thi
Directors, camt
with Mrs. Grai
launch the bi-
Their vign prov
ulus to workers
stimulus which
to carry out th
tional Fund wii
tion.
There has be
assume that thi
apartments of th
constituted *its






THE ZIO ST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


THE BARMITZVAH YEAR



Of The Zionist Federation


I WAS not fortunate enough to b
clever in the sense of the sage
who said: "Eigehu chacham Haroei
et Hanolad." I did not stand at th.
cradle of the S.A. Zionist Federatio
-but I managed to come to the Bar
mitzvah. I came to South Africa ii
1911, when the Federation was ex
actly 13 years old. This information
was given to me on the eve of my de
parture from Germany by the lati
President of the World Zionist Or
, ganisation, David Wolffsohn-thi
successor of the great Herzl.
Wolffsohn had been to South Afri
ca in 1906 and knew the history o:
local Zionism and of our local Zionists
He summed up the position in his owi
style: "There are no great figure
heads, but the masses are great an
wise-hearted. The love and affec
tion shown to me during my sta
gave me hope and strength. I wa
the harbinger of the message of th<
Geulah. I soon- realized that I v'a
not in Darkest Africa but in Sunnl
South Africa. The old proverb "Ha
rotze lehachkim Yadrim" (if on
wants to get wise let him go to thi
South) still holds true. The South
African Jews are like a box o01
candles. They are all pitch dark
but one match is sufficient to give
them all'bright light. Go, mein liebe.i
Junge, and be a match unto them
Give them all my love and regards
and may the God of Israel and Zion
help you."
He further told me: "I am no
philosopher, no writer, ich bein a po-


--- V~


MORRIS ALEXANDER


shelter Yid, ich bin nor ein Kauf-
mann." (His opponents used to call
his Zionism: Kaufmannischer Zion-
ism).
I was deeply moved.
That was thirty-eight years ago
and, believe it or not, I was thirty-
eight years younger, and Herzl's
heir, David Wolffsohn, looked to me
as a descendant of King David.
Wolffsohn was a modest man, but it
was his eyes-the windows of his
soul-which made a deep impression.
I replied that I would give his re-
gards, but his love I would keep for
myself. He embraced and kissed me.
His colleagues of the Action Com-
mittee, who were with him in the
Hotel Adlon, looked on in astonish-
ment and smiled, but he left them
to lead me to the door saying:
"Gluckliche Reise. Come to-morrow
and my secretary will give you a few
letters of introduction both to our
Zionist friends and to the mining
magnate . "
A few days before Purimn 5671
(1911) I had my first meeting with
a South African Zionist. Wolffsohn
had given me a letter of introduc-
tion to Morris Alexander in Cape


e
5
e


n1

e


e


n
d

'7


Town. I- found him to be most charm-
ing. It was impossible to have a dis-
cussion in his office which was a
beehive of activity. I was unable to
accept his invitation to come to his
home as our ship, the Carnarvon
Castle, was soon due to leave for
Durban, so we went to a cafe.
Morris Alexander expressed sur-
prise that I, a Russian Jew, should


I. '


CHIEF RABBI HERTZ


be an admirer of Wolffsohn. In his
view the Russian Zionist leaders
"had killed Herzl" and desired to
break up the Zionist organisation-
"yet Wolffsohn speaks so highly of
you."
He Vw anted to know hov. long I
had been in Germany and which doc-
tor cured me of Wolffsohnphobia. I
told him that I was cured by the 9th
Zionist Congress in Hamburg where
I had had long discussions with Wolff-
sohn, who had assured me that
Herzl was never a territorialist and
that it was only "ein politischer
Schachzug." JIerzl had said to
Wolffsohn: "Alber mein lieber David,
Uganda ist dock eine Chimera." It
was merely a manoeuvre to show the
Sultan that other powers were pre-
pared to deal with us. 'Herzl knew
very well that the English- satraps
would be opposed to their "beautiful
Uganda being turned .into Jew-
ganda." These words (turned into
Jewganda) were actually used in a
cable addressed to the British Gov-
ernment immediately after the 6th
Congress by Johnson, Governor of
Nairobi, and sent in the name of the
white settlers of Nairobi.
Herzl was able to deal with the
Zionist "Neinsagers," but the real
"Neinsagers" were the British offi-
cials. Alexander admitted this to be
correct, and asked my indulgence for
speaking so harshly of the Russian
Zionists. He said that many great
Russian Zionists such as Dr. Chas-
anowitz, Rabbi Reines and Yitzchak
Leib Goldberg, had been faithful to
Herzl and understood him, nay, felt
with him. He added: "I am an East-
ern Jew born near 'Posen am Rhein'
and came to South Africa as a kid.
My father-in-law is a double East-
ern Jew, a Russo-Rumanian Jew."
I enquired whether he meant Pro-
fessor Schechter.
"Yes. How do you know it?"
"Wolffsohn had told me and, let me
tell you, that he fears that as a
friend of Achad Haam and a pupil
of Isaac Hirsch Weiss, Schechter
will put political Zionism into the
Genizah."
"But," replied Alexander smiling-
ly, "he will discover it again."
He drew out a letter-head and
wrote a few lines which he asked me


to give to his cousin Bernard Alex-
ander, who "in his spare time" is
also a Zionist.
He wished me luck and promised to
contact me when he visited Johan-
nesburg. He urged me to do Zion-
ist work. All must do it. "There are
many good Zionists here," he said,
"but they do not know much of Zi-
onism. Wolffsohn tells me that you
are a doctor of Zionism-I am only
a Zionist student. Raising his cup
he said: Let us conclude with a He-
brew saying "Lechayim."
On Pesach I met "Morris the Sec-
ond," Morris Kantorowitz (later
Kentridge). He had come to his par-
ents in Harrismith, O.R.C.. He was
a young Zionist soldier. His father,
Rev. Kantorowitz, was not a politi-
cal Zionist. He was a Chovev Zion
and looked at me with bewilder-
ment when I told him about my Zi-
onist inclinations. He gave me a
piece of advice: "You are a far-
brenter. Zionist-farfalen- every-
body is meshiiga in his. own way. But
if you go to Johannesburg you will
see how your Zionist friends torture
Dr. Landau, the greatest Jew in
South Africa. A few years ago he
dared criticise local Zionists and say
they did not live according to the
Jewish Law and were not Zionists,
but Hellenists. Since then the Doc-
tor had been unable to participate in
the movement-he is excluded from
the camp."
Rev. Kantorowitz then said:
"Here is a Jargonische Blettel. Der
Yiddisher Hohn where a Yungatz
who deserted his family in Russia
attacks Dr. Landau in a most dis-
graceful way, because he had said
that not all the Chassidim were
saints. This treifener .bew took up


PAGE NINETB!I


Reminiscences '

TBy


$4,



j. ^v ,
'w .S~~k fl ? '.^* -


-II

J. S. Judelowitz


the cudgels on behalf of the Chassi-
dim and a Zionist paper published
it. How can any eidelcr ,,ensot
have anything to do with them?"
He stood up pulling with both
hands at his long beard and paced up!
and down the room. I looked at hio.
At his full height, with his pierce
ing eyes and pulling at his koshr
beard which had never been touch'
by a barber, he'had the appearance
of a fine Talmid Chochom of old a2i0
(Continued on page 20)


The Rendezvous Of The Community
- -- With A Tradition Of 20 Years


THE NAME OF



Crystal Confectionery



(Co.), Ltd.

STANDS FOR


QUALITY SERVICE COURTESY
(100 Per Cent. Kosher Products -
Under the supervision of the Beth Din)

35 Beit Street, Doornfontein, Johannesburg

P.O. Box 1376. Phones 44-3701/2, 44-4341i




SEND YOUR FOOD PARCELS

TO ISRAEL THROUGH US!!

S= We extend our congratulations to the S.A. Zionist i i
Federation and the "Zionist Record" on their
respective anniversaries. i















A
prj i~'


L'Al


1 Nj
KAkl-I


K


%It


Vol. XLV (50) No. 17S90.


'4


p


Supplement to the Zionist Record of
9dat, eosembepe ZI 19SS





ISHE ZIONIST RECftD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

Chalutziut-keakest Link In


S.A. Zionist


Visit


To


South


African


Chalutzim


In Israel


'By Colin Le um

TEL AVIV, Tuesday. Chalutziut has been the weakest
link in the 50 years of South African Zionist history. Never-
theless, Israel to-day has hundreds of South African settlers.
Although only two kibbutzim are predominantly South African
-Maayan Baruch and Timurim-there are South Africans in
dozens of kibbutzim throughout the country, as I found during
an extensive tour from beyond Dan to beyond Beersheba.
As Ben Gurion told me: "What we have seen of your South
Africans on the land and in the towns makes us anxious to see
many more." This is the greatest challenge to South African
Zionism in the new epoch which opens before us now. Chalut-
ziut must become the dominant keynote of Zionist activity-
nothing can be more important in the years ahead.


Erecting prefabricated houses at Mayan Baruch.


The first kibbutz I visited was
Eilat, which adjoins the trim little
town of Natanya-the home of Is-
rael's diamond industry. Most of the
South African settlers had already
left Eilat to settle in their own kib-
butz, deep in the Negev. Eilat
serves as a base for Shuval where,
the settlement is being constructed
in the heart of the field of military
operations.
Their Little Base
Ruth Rosenberg and "Meish Reeb
showed us around their little base,
taking pride in Meish's cows and"
fowls and Ruth's laundry, which has
overrun into the library. Workshops
are hard put coping with the needs
of Operation Negev, while Shula-
mith Gutalovsky-as pretty a shoe-
maker as ever soled a shoe-has not
time to leave her last. Her fame as
a shoemaker has spread far beyond
Eilat.
One day a proud daughter will
say: "My mother was the 'shoester'
at Eilat and Shuval."
The great dream of the settlers at
Ramat Yochanaan is that they'll be


At the entrance to Ramat Yochan-
aan, the Kibbutz named after Gen.
Smuts.


The late Mr. Bernard Gordon. Mayan
Baruch was named after him.


honoured in the near future with a
visit by the man after whom it has
been named-General Jan Smuts.
Smuts would be proud of this glori-
ous kibbutz, .overlooking Emek Zvu-
lun, high above Haifa and Acre. It
was at Ramat Yochanaan that I made
my first contact with "Botz" (Mud).
In all the years of talking about
Zionism, I had never come across
a "Botz," yet it was a thing that I
was in up to my neck throughout my
visit to Galil.
The early winter rains bring back
swamps to their previous glory, but
without the death sting of malarial.
fangs. Botz, Botz, Botz, as heavy
as lead became the song of this trip.
Chalutzim should know that in addi-
tion to milk and honey, this life
flows with botz and other conditions
that.are hard and difficult, but satis-
fying.
There are only three South Afri-
can Chalutzim at Ramat Yochanaan,
the most famous being the grand-
father of' South African Chalutzim
-Bennie Joffe, who was one of the
first four chalutzim to settle here
and is the only one of that pioneer
group who is still on the land. Bennie
is a baker without peer. He accom-
panied us for the rest of our tour
and we saw for ourselves how every
baker in Galil turned to him for ad-
vice. Bennie the Baker is a charac-


ter as lovable as he is valuable and
he would not change his life here
for all the dough at Crystal's Con-
tionery.
Until Palmach Moved In
Ramat Yochanaan was heavily at-
tacked for three days-it wqs here
that warlike Druzes came charging"
down the hills with knives in their
mouths. Bennie was in that en-
counter-high up in the outposts.
Ramat Yochanaan defended itself
with only ten rifles and 80 rounds of
ammunition, until Palmach moved in.
The defenders allowed themselves
a shot only if absolutely certain that
it would be effective. A terrific bar-
rage had been laid down; but had the
Arabs only known, they could have
walked in with little effective oppo-
sition.
A Veritable Arsenal
To-day, the position is entirely
different. Ramat Yochanaan like
every other settlement, is a veritable
arsenal. That is the most amazing
thing in the kibbutzim we visited.
Everywhere are heavy entrench-
ments and strongholds-each one a
powerful fort with underground
shelters, stores and munition dumps.
The transformation has been little
short of miraculous. 370 members
of the kibbutz and 85 Americans Will
shortly settle on their own kibbutz
near Rama. Ramat Yochafiaan has
a dream-school which is the envy of
every kibbutz in the country.
A Syrian Princess
Among the defenders of Ramat
Yochanan was Syria's Princess
Natasya, a Moslem who fell in love
with the kibbutz four years ago
and has stayed there ever since.
Kfa' Blum-set in surroundings
reminiscent of Ranschoek in the Cape
-is one of the string of settlements
that stretches along the Upper
Huleh Valley in the midst of the
towering peaks of two mountain
ranges that form the boundaries of
Syria and Lebanon.
It has grown by leaps and bounds
and now it has nearly 600 inhabi-
tants of whom a dozen are South
Africans. Here are Americans from
the North and deep South; English
Jews from London, Manchester and
Glasgow; Canadians, Australians
and from every country where Eng-
lish is spoken.
We came through the Botz at dusk
and were greeted with a rich deep
South American accent, whose owner
guided us to the tent of Valerie and
Les Shandel. Mrs. Shandel, senior,


a sister of Mr. Moss Morris of Dur-
ban, is the latest settler here. She"
is as happy as a lark. We were soon
joined by Rhona Moss Morris and her
husband Freddie, who is the Mazkir
(secretary). It was quite a family
affair.
Kfar Blum is emerging out of its
economic difficulties and is becoming
one of the most vital settlements in
the Huleh.
Mayan Baruch
At dawn we left our car that had
become "botzed" down on the road
from Kfar Giladi to Dan and botzed
our own way heavily up the hill to
Mayan Baruch, which lies under the
towering peak of Hermon.
The mist swirled down from the
mountains and the winter rains beat
down, but nothing could spoil the
beauty of this glorious valley.
Maayan Baruch's population of 160
members includes fifty South Afri-
cans and many ex-servicemen. It is
the happiest kibbutz we visited, even
though the Beit .Yeladim had not yet
received its children back-but they
were expected the 'next day. We
climbed the watch tower with Harry
Drew and saw where the Syrian base
lay-less than three miles away.
These boys are right up on the battle
front, but there is less oia,$sinse of
war here than in Tel Aviv. Some of
the boys are in the army, but most
are on the land and in. the local de-
fence. The settlement is developing
rapidly and lands are beginning to
bring in the first crops.
Maayan Baruch is the biggest
South African settlement in Is-
rael, but it needs hundreds more
to make it a really effective unit.
"Tell them back home that we
must have more chalutzim to cope
with the grave labour shortage here.
We should be counted in hundreds,
not in tens," is the message of the
boys and girls here.
I saw them in the refet (stable),
in workshops, in the fields, in the
kitchen and at their defence posts-
most of them I had known in South
Africa, but here they have ldst
v1-_ght, toughened up eid argued
,tli tractors, guns and obstinate
cows, instead of with obstinate poli-
tical opponents-and they are hap-
pier than they have ever been.
Of course, there are those (as
there will always be) who have fal-
len out, but the majority are here
to conquer land and enjoy the
struggle of the pioneer's life.
Mayan Baruch has a long way 'to
go to catch up with its distinguished
(Continued on page 22)


A


History


PAGE TWENTY-ONE






THE ZIONM RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948 PAGE FORTY-ONE

GIGANTIC TASK STILL FACES S.A. JEWISH APPEAL


Emphasis On Emigration And


Reconstruction

HAVE no desire to perpetuate the life of the S.A. Jewish
Appeal, but no one' can say to-day that its work is com-
pleted," stated Mr. Max J. Spitz, national chairman, in an ad-
dress to the special meeting of the Council of the S.A. Jewish
Appeal at the Carlton Hotel on Sunday last.
"The S.A. Jewish Appeal was the instrument forged by the
conscience of this community to implement a solemn promise
made at the beginning of the war that the Jews of South Africa
would work tirelessly to rehabilitate the survivors of the Nazi
tyranny. There is at least another two to three years' work
ahead. We had done everything possible to rescue Jews. Was
it not now our job to give these Jews the opportunity to go on
living as normal people? We still have a great job to do, which
is linked up with and integral to the birth of Israel. Jewry
is one and indivisible, and we must not slacken our efforts to
rehabilitate and reconstruct the Jews of Europe and North
Africa.

Call For Co-ordination Of

Fund-Raising


"The time has also come for the
stabilisation of the set-up in South
African Jewish campaigning for
funds," continued Mr. Spitz. In his
opinion it was eminently desirable to
have a continued combined effort,
and this was the demand of the ma-
jority of the Jews in South Africa.
Jewish leaders here must get to-
gether and work out a permanent
and satisfactory basis to the whole
problem of raising funds for over-
seas needs and for providing for
South Arican requirements. Such a
set-up would decide on allocations
according to their urgency-he was
not concerned with percentages, but
only that the South African Jewish
Appeal would have an adequate
budget to do a proper job. Such
united campaigns could take place
biennially, and in the intervening
years there could be drives for local
needs.

.< Emigration Is Priority No. 1
The chairman dealt with the many
topics discussed at the Paris Relief
Conference. He said that it was
unanimously accepted that priority
number one in the future work of
the JDC in Europe, and the vari-
ous organisdtions associated with it,
would be emigration.
In 1945, at the time of liberation,
there were in the D.P. camps of Ger-
many, Austria and Italy about
100,000 D.P.'s had emigrated to Is-
proximately 145,000. Last year about
100,000 DdP's. had emigrated to Is-
rael from Europe. It was hoped
during the coming year a further
135,000 will be enabled to enter Is-
rael, including about 20,000 from
Bulgaria and some from other East
European countries. He expected
that emigration to countries outside
of Israel would number perhaps
30,000, and would include the U.S.,
Canada and Australia. Under this
heading the*general situation was ein-
couraging, but would require very
large sums of money. It was esti-
mated that one and a half million
dollars would be required monthly
during 1949.
The delegation had been asked to
press for an immediate merger of
JDC-HIAS activity and had put a
very strong case before the Conter-
ence. The merger had not yet been
effected, bu.t some measure of success
had been achieved as regards migra-
tion from the D.P. countries to the
U.S. under the American Emigration
Act recently promulgated.


Reconstruction
Recalling that at the end of hos-
tilities in Europe, 95 per cent. of the
surviving Jews were homeless, pro-
pertyless, and without means of earn-
ing a livelihood, it was amazing how
much progress had been made in the
sphere of their reconstruction. Pro-
ducers' co-operatives, credit co-
operatives, loan funds, work projects
and Hachsharoth had been estab-
lished. This was in addition to the
vocational training schools and
special courses which were conducted
by ,lhe ORT.
South African Jewry should be
gratified that they had been able to
play some part in this dramatic re-
vival.
It had to be remembered that in
the Eagtern European countries
there was now a new economic ap-
proach making the task of rehabili-
tation even more difficult. The Paris
Conference had confirmed the JDC's
decision that it was not for a relief
agency to dictate to the Jews re-
ceiving aid as to how they should
live, or think; or, whether or not
they should try to adjust themselves
to the economies of -the countries in
which they found themselves, but that
its task was merely to heln Jews in
need in such cases where they them-
selves had worked out their future.
Rehabilitation implied two main con-
cepts-integration into the economy
of the country in which those-in need
were, and wished to remain, and
emigrrion and integration into the
economy of the country of destina-
tion.
Unquestionably, training-and re-
training-was the first and most im-
portant means of rehabilitation.
Qther methods were by the establish-
ment of the various co-operatives al-
ready mentioned.

Union OSE
The delegates had been requested
to attend a conference of the Union
Oze, said Mr. Spitz. This was a most
outstanding gr,4.hering of workers in
the medical sphere who were men of
high calibre and selfless devotion.
The debates had been of a high stan-
dard and our delegation found it
necessary, in the belief that the Oze
was to become the central Jewish or-
ganisation for health purposes, to
introduce a motion for a more prac-
tical businesslike element being in-
cluded in the Oze set up, and two
businessmen were elected to the Ex-
ecutive.


Anc ~her great achievement of our
delegation was the bringing together
at the top level of the JDC medical
workers and the Oze, and he hoped
that a permanent understanding
would come about whereby 9ver-lap-
ping would be avoided and the Oze
would ultimately take over the medi-
cal work of the JDC.

Amazing Absence of Disease
A most encouraging fact reported
was, despite the sufferings of the
D.P's. and their plight after t.he war,
there had been an amazing absence
of epidemics and diseases, due
largely to the wholesale preventive
inoculations, and probably to the fact
that only the toughest individuals
had survived.
The chairman dealt with the health
work of both the OZE and JDC. In
Germany, after the liberation and
before the Polish influx in 1946,
nearly all the survivors were be-
tween the ages of eighteen and forty-
five, almost all of the aged and child-
ren having perished.
He then gave statistics of the vari-
ous sanatoria, hospitals, clinics and
child care institutions in Europe.

Welfare and Child Care
It was estimated that there were
160,000 Jewish children still to be
found in Europe of whom we have
given assistance, in one way or an-
other, to some 130,000.
The chairman went into consider-
able detail of the various activities,-
in *respect of schools and children's
homes which were being supported
and maintained by the JDC.
In 1945, there had been a terrific
amount of overlapping and lack of
co-ordination. This fact had been
frankly admitted at Conference, but
the position has since considerably
improved. There had also been criti-
cism in the past as to the composi-
tion of the JDC staff. The position
in this respect to-day is that there
were only 200 Americans employed
by the JDC in Europe, 150 from
other countries including Sopth Af-
rica and Canada, and tihe number of
indigenous employees was 2,000.

Educational and Cultural Activities
The JDC had been criticised both
for doing too much and for doing too
little, but the line it had adopted was
confirmed by the Conference.
Dr. Schwartz had'said that in Po-
land the JDC, through the Central
Committee, distributed large sums of
money on the understanding that the
Central Committee used its dis--
cretion on the basis of non-discrimi-
nation. This resulted in vigorous
Yiddish and Hebrew activities. The
Conference felt that Jewish values
must be stressed, and also accepted
that it would be wrong to lay down
a line of approach from which no
one was to deviate.

Cyprus
Referring to-. Cyprus, Mr. Spitz
said that the plight of the, D.P's.
still there was deplorablA. He paid a
tribute to a South African, Dr. Mary
Gordon, for the outstanding work she
had been doing for a long time in
this territory. Dr. Gordon had re-
ported that the clothing sent by the
SAJA Women's Section had been
particularly appreciated.

Jews in Islamic Areas
Mr. Spitz then dealt with the
plight of the Jews in Arab countries,
where it had been estimated there
are between 800,000 and one million
Jews.
Centuries of neglect and low stan-
dard of living, not only for the Jew-


ish populations, had resulted in con-
ditions which defy description.
There was no housing and people
lived in holes in the ground. There
was no medical care and the inci-
dence of certain diseases was very
high. Trachoma affected the popula-
tion, resulting in a high percentage
of blindness. The figure for tubercu-
losis was estimated at between 30 per
cent. and 50 per cent., and the infant
mortality was the appalling figure
of 250 per thousand from birth o
the age of one year.
There was an enormous task ahead
of us here and the Paris Conference
had accepted the need to divert large
funds for these areas.
In addition to the problem of
funds, however, there was also tie
problem of personnel because there
were no trained indigenous per-
sonnel to assist in any relief or re-
habilitation programme. In the im-
mediate future, the work of the Ort,
Oze and of the Alliance Israelile
Universelle, would be of increasing
significance.

Delegation's Mandate
The chairman then indicated how
the delegation had dealt with the
"mandate entrusted to it. They had
not succeeded in bringing about the
consultative body. The attitude of
Dr. Schwartz and his colleagues was
that it was not desirable to set up
such machinery with a diminishing
programme; there would be tre-
mendous difficulties in bringing to-
gether representatives from the vari-
ous countries should an emergency
arise; but his primary objection was
that in the absence of a firm and
stable budget, such a consultative
body would not be able to function.

JDC Acclaimed
The -delegation criticised the lack
of warmth in the JDC's attitude to-
wards Vhe D.P's., but he was bound
to say that although the South Afri-
can delegation levelled strong criti-
cisms, the representatives from the
"receiving" countries, together with
the delegates of the other countries,
were unanimous in their acclamation
of the splendid job of work accom-
plished by the JDC.

Housing in Israel
In regard to the housing scheme
in Israel, the delegation, could not
bring this before Conference because
.the JDC had taken the line in New
York that its activities were confined
to the European scene. Though as far
as the SAJA is concerned, the Coun-
cil has already confirmed the prin-
ciple of a housing scheme in Israel.
If American Jewry desired that
the JDC extend their activities to Is.
rael, they would have to provide the
additional funds when the JDC would
undertake the work. For this 'rea-
son, too, the JDC was nc9 prepared
at present to give the Ort and Oze
additional grants for their work in
Israel.

Tributes to Schwartz and Warburg
Summing up, the chairman was
convinced that the Conference had
served a very good purpose. Its suc-
cess was in a great measure due to
the splendid manner in which Dr.
Schwartz. presided and handled tfhe
proceedings; he won the admiration
of all the 250 delegates. Mr. Spitz
also paid a tribute to the tone and
high standard of the debate set' by
Mr. Eddie Warburg, whose example
was followed by many of the dele-
gates.
He was very proud to have led
such a splendid delegation as his col-
leagues, Dr. Sonnabend and Mr.
Greenstein, to whom he. paid tribute.






PAGE TWINTY-FOUR THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 19 s


[Tihe


South


African


Zionist Fed


Loyalty


And


Devotion


THeE South African Zionist Fed-
eration rose to its present
stature against a background of
Imity, loyalty and discipline dis-
played by local Zionists for half
a century. Despite the handicaps
of the great distance from the
main currents of Jewish life in
Europe, and the isolation of the
mattered Jewish communities in
South Africa during the early part
of the century, our Zionist Move-
imnt has been effective and vital
Amim the day of its inception. In
obrength of sentiment and in pro-
portionate material contributions,
i won for itself a leading place
in the countries of the Galuth, a
position which it has maintained to
the present time.
Although many Zionist societies
were functioning throughout the
country before 1898, there had
been -a growing feeling that their
work should be co-ordinated and
guided by a central body which
would be in direct communication
with the World Zionist Organisa-
tion. And so it was arranged
that representatives of 13 Trans-
vaal Zionist societies should meet
in Johannesburg on December 11,
1898. The result of this meet-
ing was the formation. of the
South African Zionist Federation.
Mr. S. Bebro was the first Pres-
ident of the Federation; but the
dominating figure was Samuel
Goldreich. He succeeded Mr.
Bebro as president, and shortly
afterwards became -Hon. Life
President. His influence was tre-
mendous, both among local Zion-
ists and the World leadership. It
was perhaps through his encour-


SAMUEL GOLDREICH
. . dominating figure


agement of the young Zionists,
"The Pfefferlach," as he called
them, that he made his greatest
contribution to Zionism. Among
the young "hot-heads" of that time
were Jacob Gitlin, Joseph Jano-
wer and the late Benzion S.
Hersch. Goldreich acted as their
mentor. He was to no inconsider-
able extent responsible for the po-
sitions they have attained in the
Movement over the last 50 years.
The Anglo-Boer War necessi-
tated the temporary transfer of
Zionist Headquarters to Cape
Town, and during that period Zi-
onists devoted themselves mainly
to local matters. The Federation
received authority to issue permits
to refugees enabling them to re-
turn to their "homes in the Trans-
vaal; and many other duties which
in these days would be undertaken


nussow, were his personal friends
by the South African Jewish
Board of Deputies were at that
time dealt with by the Federation.
Yet pre-occupation with.local af-
fairs did not- preclude the Federa-
tion from concerning itself with"
the World Zionist, Movement. As
early as 1902, it began to exercise
an influence in the realm of iin-
ternational Zionist politics when
Theodor Herzl called upon S.A.
Zionists to welcome Joseph Cham-
berlain to South Africa.
There were close ties between
Herzl and South African Jewry.
Samuel Goldreich, Lennox Loewe,
Benzion Aaron, Manuel Leo Ge-


the Federation's work was reached
in 1909 with the decision to pub-
lish a monthly bulletin-"The
Zionist Record."
Under the guidance of the late
B. S. Hersch, the "Record" de-
veloped and expanded until 1926,
when it became a weekly publica-
tion and the official organ of the
Federation.
One of the outstanding individ-
uals in the Movement in South
Africa was A. M. Abrahams,
President of the Federation from
1911 to 1931, and then Hon. Life
President.
The Federation's interest in in-
ternational Zionist politics began


BENZION S. HERSCH


and devout followers. Bernard
Weinronk, a founder of the first
Zionist club in Johannesburg, and
leader of the Zionist Movement in
Port Elizabeth from 1912 to 1936,
corresponded with Herzl on Zioi,-
ist matters.
An early event in the story of
the Federation was the first S.A.
Zionist Conference held in Johan-
nesburg in July 1905. The burn-
ing question of the moment was
that of Jewish settlement in
Uganda; the decision was in fav-
our of Palestine, and Conference
adopted the Basle Programme.
In this connection it should be
noted that the late Rev. M. I.
Cohen came down from Bulawayo
to organise the conference. At
that time he had already laid the
foundations of Rhodesian Zion-
ism which has played so import-
ant a part in the history of the
Federation.
A large number of distinguished
Zionist leaders have visited South
Africa over the years, and have
left their mark on the develop-
ment of Zionist work here.
The first of these was David
Wolffsohn who had succeeded
Herzl in the leadership ot the
World Zionist Movement. Before
his arrival, it was rumoured that
he had come to raise 5,000-a
rumour which caused as much
amusement as if he had set a
target of 10,000.000.
A landmark in the expansion of


to increase particularly at the be-
ginning of World War I. A con-
ference in 1915 drafted demands
for safeguarding Jewish rights,
and the recognition of the Jewish
claim to Palestine as part of the
post-war peace settlement.
Until 1921, the South African
delegation to World Zionist Con-
gresses was in fact -composed of
overseas nominees, although a few
South Africans had attended Con-
gress from time to time. In 1921,
Messrs. Bernard Gordon, Joseph
Janower, Leopold Kessler and
Rev. Isaacs constituted the first
direct delegation, and set a prece-
dent for direct representation of
South Africa at Congress.
The late Chief Rabbi Dr. J. L.
Landau was a dominating figure
in South African Zionist life. A
member of the Executive since
1916, he was appointed Vice-Presi-
dent in 1922 and Hon. Life Presi-
dent in 1931. Dr. Landau's schol-
arship, brilliant oratory and dig-
nified personality were factors of
great importance in his public
addresses, and his work as a mem-
ber of deputations to Government
authorities.
Dr. Shmaryahu Levin, one of
the greatest personalities in the
Zionist Movement, launched the
first Keren Hayesod Campaign in
South Africa in 1922. His per-
sonal magnetism and influence left
an indelible mark on the Move-
ment in this country.


CBy Gertrude Kark
---------- ..^^ ^^ gg^^ ^^ ^^ ^=s


First

S.A. Zionist

Conference

July, 1905


Since that time, several dis-
tinguished leaders have. visited the
country, in connection with the bi-
ennial Campaigns. Each has made
his own contribution to the fur-
therance of the cause. Mr. Nahum
Sokolow in 1926 and when he re-
visited this country in 1934, as
President of the World Zionist Or-
ganisation, exerted almost as
great an influence on the non-Jew-
ish public and South African Gov-
ernment circles as on his fellow-
Jews.
Enthusiasm on an unprece-
dented scale was aroused by the
visit of Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
Pilesident of the World Zionist Or-
ganisation, and Mrs. Weizmann, in
1932. Dr. Weizmann has always
been an inspired leader, and
during his visit he fired the im-
agination of South African Jew-
ry who were enthralled by his lu-
cid analyses of the Zionist
Movement, and his visions of the
development of the Jewish Na-
tional Home.
During their visit, Mrs. Vera
Weizmann initiated plans for the
establishment of the Women's
Zionist Executive Council, which
came into being in-that year, un-
der the Presidency of Mrs. Hed-
wig Reinhold. Mrs. Reinhold was
succeeded by the late Mrs. Jenny
Greenberg, who- led the Council
for eight years.
The Women's Zionist Council
has developed into one of the larg-
est and most important depart-
ments of the Federation. With its
affiliated societies, it -constitutes a
vast organisation and makes a
tremendous contribution towards
all aspects of Zionist endeavour.
In addition to the strong support
which the women give to the
W.I.Z.O., their unceasing work for
the J.N.F., their support for
Youth Aliyah, their intensive edu-
cational work and their present
participation in the Israeli
United Appeal, make a story in
themselves.
In 1928, the 11th South African
Zionist Conference conceded the
principle that the Zionist women
of South Africa should have di-
rect representation on the Feder-
ation. Mrs. Kate Gluckmann was
elected to the Executive in this
capacity and she has been a mem-
ber until the present time. Since
1936, Mrs. Gluckmann has held
the, position of National Chairman
-of the Jewish National Fund in
South Africa. She has played an
important role in the development
and expansion of the work of the
Federation, and has exercised
considerable influence in the
Movement. A number of other
women have served on the Feder-
ation. They include Mrs. Ethel
Hayman, Dr. Deborah Katzen,
Mrs. Jeanette Davidoff and Mrs.
Anna Franks.
To-day, the Jewish National
Fund is one of the most import-
ant departments of the Federa-
tion, yet it was only in 1928 that
this department was established.
In the "early days" supporters of
the National Fund made their
contribution by selling National
Fund stamps, greetings, messages
and trees under the aegis -of a
National Fund Club. In 1906, the
Club's treasurer, Joseph Janower,
was appointed its representative
on the Federation's J.N.F. Bureau.
A few years later, he became a
member of the Executive and
served as its Hon. Treasurer for
16 years. It was under his chair-


The Late Chief F
manship that th,
Department waE
1928. Since 194
wer has be)en a
World Board of
Keren Kayemeth
The biggest in
contribution to
tional Fund in tF
by Isaac Ochbei
ident of the Do:
of Cape Town. I
Fund enabled it
"Isaac Ochberg
maria.
Another SouMt
leader, whose n
ated through th
National Fund
Bernard Gordoi
Executive and
for many year'
African Settle,
rael at Maya;
worthy tribute t
Many well-kr
the Zionist Mov
South Africa in
National Fund
last of whom,
chairman of thi
Directors, camt
with Mrs. Grai
launch the bi-
Their vign prov
ulus to workers
stimulus which
to carry out th
tional Fund wii
tion.
There has be
assume that thi
apartments of th
constituted *its






PAGE SIX

JEWISH AND ARAB COMMAND]


MEET IN JERUSALEM
JERUSALEM, Tuesday.-Colonel Moshe Dayan, the Com-
mander of the Israeli forces, and members of his staff met
Abdullah Tal, Commander of the Arab Legion in Jerusalem, on
Sunday, this being the third meeting within eight days. It was
the shortest they have had so far, lasting only for one hour.
The meeting was held in an Armenian school in the presence
of members of the Consular Truce Commission and U.N.
observers.


The commanders discussed an
extension of the agreement of a
full truce to certain areas north of
Jerusalem, and also the imposition
of a truce on Arab irregulars, who
had taken over a number of aban-
doned Egyptian positions in southern
Jerusalem.
The Israeli commander suggested
that the sewage in no-mans-land be
repaired for the benefit .of both sides.
Another matter discussed was the
renewal of the water supply to Jeru-
salem via the Arab-held Latrun
pumping station and the demilitari-
sation of the Latrun area ini order


to allow free passage to Jerusalem
through the main road.
Following the meeting with the
Israeli Jerusalem commander, Ab-
dullah Tal, the Arab Legion Jerusa-
lem commander, proceeded to the
Transjordan capital, Amman, to dis-
cuss matters with King Abdullah and
to obtain his approval for a number
of measures to ensure peace along
the entire -front, where the Arab Le-
gion faces the Israeli army.
Abdullah Tal also participated in
talks with the acting Mediator, Dr.
Bunche,, concerning the opening of
peace talks and a final settlement of
the Jerusalem problem.


A GREAT DEAL TO -BE DONE


T is gratifying to me to be able to
express my congratulations to the
S.A. Zionist Federation on the occa-
sion of their Golden Jubilee. My first
recollections of the Federation go
"back to 1908 when I participated, with
some other children, in the formation
of the First Juvenile Zionist Society
in Johannesburg, under the guidance
of the late Dr. Hertz, who subse-
quently became the Chief Rabbi of
the British Empire.
In those days I first came to know
men like Mr. Abrahams, who was
president for 25 years; Janower, Ben-
zion Hirsch, Gitlin, etc., and remem-
ber hearing the late Wolffsohn, as
president of the World Zionist Or-
ganisation, address a mass meeting
in the old Zionist Hall in Commis-
sioner Street.
What a tremendous change in Zio-
nist outlook has occurred since those
far-off days!
Forty years of striving and build-
ing has brought us the achievement
of the State of Israel, and the Fed-
eration has grown in. stature and
maturity and is to-day a vast organi-
sation with a voice in the councils of
the World Executive.
Our heartfelt thanks go out to
those men and women who have
work I so hard for the past half cen-
tury, and to whose wise planning and
dogged pluck in laying truly and well
the foundations of our present or-
ganisation in this country, we owe so
much.
There is still a great deal to be


MESSAGE FROM


-m

MR. M. PENCHARZ,
Chairman, O.F.S. Zionist Council
done in regard to immigration, col-
onisation and training for the hun-
dreds of thousands of our homeless
Jews and we must, each and every
one of us, dedicate ourselves anew to
this vital task so that Israel can take
its place amongst the nations of the
world with its message and contribu-
tion to the wellbeing of mankind.
M. PENCHARZ,
Chairman.


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Dr. Bunche met King A
a three-hour talk. He st
wards that "the discuss
encouraging."
Talks between the comn
Jerusalem are expected t
this week. They are e
discuss the question of Je
the Wailing Wall and per
Arab ambulances to pas
Jewish Jerusalem, Bethl
Hebron. Since the Ara
holding the road connect
and Bethlehem with A
north and east of Jerus:
are at present using an u
mitive road surrounding
from the east. The comm:
discussed the opening of
Jerusalem road and rail
sections of which are still
hands. In return the Jeru
will supply the Arab part
salem with electricity and
of essential telephone lir
the truce.
The Arabs apparently
bringing several thousand
fugees to the Old City of
and to house them in quar
were abandoned by their
cupants.


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10. 194I
mRS CZECHOSLOVAK-ISRAELI
FRIENDSHIP SOCIETY
ESTABLISHED
bdullah for PRAGUE, Monday.-The constitu
ated after- ent meeting of the Czechosluvak
ions were Israeli Friendship Society was helix
in Prague recently, and an executive
committee was elected.
wanders of The meeting was attended by th
;o continue Health Minister, the Minister o
expected to Technical Works, the Israeli Minis
ws visiting ter Mr. Ehud Avriel, and the Deput:
mission for Chairman of the National Assembly
s through Mr. Benda, Departmental Chief 6
ehem and the Ministry of Information, ex
bs are not tended greetings to the gathering ii
ng Hebron the name of Minister Kapecky anm
rab areas promised the Friendship Society a]
alem, they possible assistance. Mr. Ploihai
builtt pri- Minister of Health, said, "I welcome
Jerusalem the setting up of the society, as
anders also member of the generation which]
the main fought and suffered for the sam
way, small ideals-freedom and democracy-a
11 in Arab the State of Israel. This State ha
salem Jews taken its place in the family c
s of Jeru- people's Democratic States even if i
a number has still to fight a bloody battle
aes during against its enemies. We are bound
the State of Israel by firm frien
ship."
ly intend Mr. Ehud Avriel concluded th
Arab re- meeting and in the name of thl
Jerusalem people of Israel, thanked Presiden
ters which Klement Gottwald, the Cabinet ant
former oc- the Republic for the friendship to
wards his country.


Greetings From Natal Zionists


ANNIVERSARIES offer a welcome
opportunity to look back. At the
50th Jubilee of the S.A. Zionist Fed-
eration, the Zionists of this country
can do so with the deserved satisfac-
tion that they, at all times, have done
their share in the work for the up-
building of our National Home.
If figures show that, in proportion
to its numerical strength, our com-
munity has for many years contri-
buted to our Zionist cause in many
respects much more than any other
communities in the Golah, then let
us not only take pride in this fact,
but also remember that it was the
devoted w-ork of the leadership as
well as of the rank and file of the
S.A. Zionist Federation which made
S.A. Jewry realise earlier, or more
intensively, than others, that their
duty was to help to secure the future
of our people in freedom on its own
soil.

Natal Jews, or Natal Zionists-
these terms have become almost
identical here-have in all these
years taken their full share in the
work of the S.A. Zionist Federation.
They know that, even when the war
has been won in Israel, the still
greater task lies in front of us to
win the peace. Only then can we
devote ourselves entirely to the still
more honourable task of constructive
work: to make Medinat Israel a land
worthy of our Jewish tradition, a


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MR. E. SCHRAGENHEIM,
Chairman, Natal Zionist Council.
pride to world Jewry, a shining e
ample to humanity.
Expressing on behalf of Natal Zi
nists, our heartfelt congratulation
on the occasion of the 50th Jubilee
the S.A. Zionist Federation, I ha'
the right to do so only because I f9
assured that in the great task st
ahead of us, Natal Zionists w
never fail in their duty.
E. SCHRAGENHEIM,
Chairms


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1WZ ion ist


The Organ
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10th, 1948


of South


Recor


African


Jewry
(Registered at the G.P.O. as a Ncispaper)


SPECIAL ARTICLES
AND FEATURES
DEVOTED TO THE:


OF THE


'5 SOUTH AFRICAN

ZIONIST FEDERATION


DECEMBER 11


1898


- 1948
AND


THE FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY
OF THE
ZIONIST RECORD


NOVEMBER 15
1908 1948


The arrival in Cape Town in
November, 1906, of Mr. David
Wollfsohn, successor of Dr. Herzl
as president of the World Zionist
Organisation. marked the begin-
ning of a series of visits by dis-
tinguished Zionist leaders to this
country. Photo shows members
of the combined Zionist Commit-
tees in the Cape (standing), left
to right: Mr. J. B. Shacksnovis,
Mr. J. Zuckerman, Mr. Advocate
Alexander (chairman), Mr. J.
Schwartz and Mr. B. Segal (hon.
secretary). Front: Mr. and Mrs.
D. Wolffsohn.













THE South African Zionist Federa-
tion as one of the territorial or-
ganisations of the World Zionist
Movement is faced to-day with im-
mense tasks and problems. The mili-
tary and political victories resulting,
in the proclamation of the State of
Israel have opened a new chapter in
the history of the Zionist Movement
and cleared the way to a constructive
effort of unprecedented intensity and
magnitude. Thus the South African
Zionist Federation celebrates its
Golden Jubilee at a time when great
changes 'are taking place in the Zion-
ist Movement.
The Jewish State is not an end in
itself. It is an indispensable" means
to the establishment of a National
Home for the. Jewish people. The
sovereign state removes all political
restrictions on immigration-and col-
onisation, and places Aliyah ana the
economic development of the country
under the control of the Jewish
people-the State of Israel and the
World Zionist Organisation. '
There are now four main tasks
tasks confronting the Zionist Move-
ment:
1. Organisation of immigration.
2. Comprehensive scheme of col-
onisation for the absorption of
large scale immigration.
3. Youth training in the spirit of
Chalutziut.
4. General Zionist Education.

Great Responsibilities
In the light of recent events in the
Jewish world, the first two tasks are
self-evident and need no elaboration.
The simple fact that the Zionist Or-
ganisation plans to establish in the
course of the next year 150 new set-
tlements, while in the course of the
whole Zionist history only 350 settle-
ments have been established, gives a
clear indication of the immense in-
crease of our responsibilities in the
field of colonisation.
The establishment of these 150
settlements is vital for the absorp-
tion of the immigrants and the
safeguarding of the frontiers of
the infant State.
The third task, too, assumes to-day
a much greater importance than ever


MR. ISRAEL DUNSKY
Treasurer, S.A. Zionist Federation


' ,z.


Infeld


Secretary, S.A. Zionist Federation



before. Chalutziut, the pioneering
spirit of youth, is indispensable for
the implementation of the new
scheme of settlement. The i'icreased
rate of colonisation necessitates an
increased tempo of chalutzic- educa-
tion.
Who will drain the svwamps of H:--
leh and transform them into flourish-
ing settlements; who will render the
-sands of the Negev habitable and
who will go to the frontiers of Syria
and Lebanon, Egypt and Transjor-
dan to erect fortress-like kibbutzim?
Without the unconquerable devotion
and the youthful vigour which have
always characterized our Chalutzim,
this- plan is impossible of achieye-
ment. And the responsibility of pro-
viding Chalutzim for the up-building
of the State of Israel rests with the
South African Jewish youth as much
as with the Jewish youth of any
other country.
The fourth task-the Zionist Edu-
cation and Propaganda-is of no less
importance. It is true that the Jew-
ish people as a whole with very few
exceptions, has rallied behind the Yi-
shuv in its struggle for survival, and
that the old conflicts between Zionist
and anti-Zionist have almost disap-
peared. But there is still a difference
of approach. To many the State of


...MR. M. KENTRIDGE, M.P.
tion.
Israel is nothing but a refuge for
Jewish displaced persons, and it is
the philanthropic sentiment and a
certain sense of national solidarity
aroused by the calamity of European
Jewry that have prompted them to
support it.

Relief Organisations
The Joint Distribution Committee
or our Jewish War Appeal have
made vital contributions to the Zion-
ist cause, but they are not Zionist
bodies. They are relief organizations
and do not represent a national move-
ment, although many of their leaders
and supporters may be staunch and
convinced Zionists. These organisa-
tions have directed -their activities
more and more towards Israel be-
cause this country happens to be al-
most the only part of the globe cap-


PAGE THIRTY-ONE


rTHN ZINfTT -P.EfORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948



Tle Future


MR. S. M. KUPER, K.C.
Vice-Chairman, S.A. Zionist Federa-
tion.
Jewish State, the propagation of the
Zionist ideology and the promotion of
Hebrew as a living national language
have become more urgent than ever
before..Hebrew is essential, not only
for those who want to settle in Israel,.
but for those who, while in the Dias-
pora, desire to be in communion with
the new cultural life in Israel.

The increased responsibilities of
the Zionist Movement require read-
justment of its organisational media.
It is true that the achievements of
the South African Zionist Federation
in all spheres of Zionist activity have
received general recognition, and
aroused the admiration of our lead-
ership in Israel as well as of Zion-
ists throughout the world. It is also
true that the organisational frame-
work of the Federation is regarded
to be the best in the Zionist world.
Nowhere else do you find a Zion-
ist Federation that embraces not only
Zionist parties but all Zionist or-
ganisations and institutions.
Consider, for instance, the be-
wildering organisational conditions
prevailing amongst Zionists of the
.S.A. The Zionist Organisation of
America (Z.O.A.) represents General
Zionists only, while other Zionist
parties, viz., Mizrachi, Poale Zion
and the Revisionists are separate
and independent organisational enti-
ties. The same applies to the Zionist
women and youth. There are several
women's and youth organizations in
America without any contact with
each other. Moreover Zionist fund-
raising activities are conducted there
by independent organizations, whether
it be the Jewish National Fund. or
the United Palestine Appeal.


Tasks


able -of solving the problem of Jew-
ish refugees.
To us Zionists the Jewish State
signifies the radical solution of the
Jewish 1--. oblemn in its totality. The
Zionist Movem; nt aims not at solving
the problem of Jewish refugees,, but
rather at removing its causes The
normalisation of our national life in
all its aspects, whether political o:
economic, social or cultural, is the
main object of the World Zionist
Organisation. It is natural thaL the
State of Israel should solve the prob-
lem of Jewish refugees, but Zionists
do not work for "them," but for all
of us-fo-' the Jewish p-onle az a
whole. For the Jewish problem is in-
divisible and is not confined to any
particular geographic area.

Personal Interest
Zionists are expected to have a
personal as well as national interest
in the upbuilding of the State of Is-
rael. With the emergence of the


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MR. S. M. GORDON
Vice-President, S.A. Zionist Federa-
tion.
Here in South Africa all these ac-
tivities are controlled by the South
African Zionist Federation through
its various departments, and all
Zionist bodies, including ,women and
youth are affiliated to it. This con-
centration of Zionist work in all its
aspects has made for greater effi-
ciency and raised the prestige and
authority of the South African '-ion-
ist Movement in the eyes of the Jew-
ish community and the general pub-
lic as a whole. And yet even the
frame-work of the Federation will
have to be subject to serious rec6n-
sideration in order to achieve a pro-
per adjustment of our organisational
media to the increased tasks facing
us, whether in the field of Hachsha-
rah and Aliyah or fund-raising pro-
paganda and Zionist education.
In the course of the first fifty
years the South African Zionist Fed-
eration has grown from a small be-
ginning into a strong vibrant or-
ganisation. We have no doubt that
also in the future the Federation
will measure up to its increased re-
sponsibilities and play its full part
in the upbuilding of the State of
Israel and the redemption of the Jew-
ish people.


=Z=5z - - - - - - - - - -






- iHE Z S GED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


"WE MUST HAVE LAND FOR


THE NEW SETTLERS"


THE fact that South African Jewry
is now celebrating the 50th
anniversary of the S.A. Zionist Fede-
ration shows that the tiny, scattered
community here must have been
deeply imbued with Zionist sentiment
in order to establish the Federation
so shortly after the organisation of
the World Zionist Movement. Its
history, therefore, is the history of
modern Zionism, and there are many
chapters in it which prove that South
Africa has made a great contribu-
tion to the realisation of our ideal.
Our rejoicing is the greater by the
- fact that our Golden Jubilee coincides
with the establishment of the Jew-
ish State..
The Keren Kayemeth has played a
predominant part in that great
achievement. It has not only been
the biggest fund of the Zionist
movement; it has supplied to Zionism
the specific and indispensable ideo-
logy of the return to the land. It
has stirred the imagination oT gene-
rations of Jews with its aim of a
Jewish nation rooted in the soil,
creative of new social reforms, pav-
ing the way to justice and freedom
not only for our people, but for all
the nations of the world. -
The workers and supporters of the
Jewish National Fund in South Africa
can take pride in the message which
President Weizmann sent to the
Keren Kayemeth at the time of the
proclamation of the Jewish State:
"Your work has helped in the con-,
summation of our great dream."
The time of rejoicing is, however,
also a time for serious reflection.
Much has been accomplished, much
remains to be done; land acquisition
is still-the vital need of the Jewish
people; we must have land for the
tens of thousands of immigrants from
the camps; we must have land for
settlers from other parts of the


Message from


MRS. KATIE GLUCKMANN
Chairman of the J.N.F. in South
Africa.
Galuth; we must found new colonies;
new industries must be established on
the land; afforestation, irrigation-
these are all the tasks of the Keren
Kayemeth. Our task is to provide
the means for the implementation of
these projects.
Constructive work has been our
policy in the past; that has led to
our success; constructive work must
be our policy for the future. The
infant Jewish State was born in tra-
vail; let us hope it will now develop
in peace and in harmony to serve as
an example of justice and tolerance
to humanity.,, It is in this spirit
that the Keren Kayemeth celebrates
this Golden Jubilee.


Commemorate Golden Jubilee


Through Sefer, Hamedinah


THE fiftieth anniversary of the South African Zionist Federation is a
red-letter day for every Jew in this, country. One's mind goes back
to the beginning of the movement, the handful of people who gathered
in Johannesburg to make the first formal declaration of allegiance to
Zionism.


The day of the Golden Jubilee of
our organisation is a day worthy to
be celebrated and to be commemor-
ated. In true Zionist tradition, this
celebration will take the form of con-
structive endeavour. Societies affi-
liated to the Federation will inscribe
the South African Zionist Movement
in the new Golden Book, Sefer Hame-
dinah. This privilege is also ex-
tended to individuals, and groups
of four individuals, who wish to place
on. record their appreciation of the
achievements of half-a-century. This
is the way Zionists celebrate and re-
member: by making their contribu-
tions to the Keren Kayemeth Leis-
rael to redeem more land, to settle
more Jews, and to establish more
settlements on our land.
For fifty years the Jewish com-
munity of South Africa has given
its full support to the Zionist Move-
ment, and has made a fine contribu-
tion to the upbuilding of Eretz Is-
rael. We can take pride in the de-


velopment of our Homeland: there
has been no phase of the work done
in which South Africans have not
played their worthy part. Not only
have we contributed to the industrial
development of Palestine and to its
housing' schemes, but the youth from'
this country have gone over as
chalutzim to build up the land, and
some of them have entered the ranks
,of those that have built the State and
its many institutions. Among those
who have sacrificed their lives in the
struggle for freedom can be found
South African boys and girls.
This special effort of South Afri-
can Jewry has been inaugurated to
set aside land for Israeli ex-service-
men and women. Thus, while we
pray-Shehechianu vekimanu vehi-
gianu laz-man hase-we will make
provision for the future to ensure
that generations shall be able to
celebrate their achievements in a
virile Jewish State.


PAGE TWENTY-THREE


Keren Kayemeth And


South African Zionism


T HE Jewish National Fund was
established in London in 1901,
with the object of -collecting funds
throughout the world for the redemp-
tion of land in Palestine. Its activi-
ties developed from very small be-
ginnings to the large fund-raising
and educational activities of to-day.
In South Africa, early attempts
were made to sell JNF Stamps, and
after Herzl's death in 1904, to sell
"trees" in memory of the founder of
the Zionist Movement. While the im-
agination of many young South Afri-
cans was stirred by the ideology of
the Jewish Land Fund, JNF work
was not then part of.the S.A. Zionist
Federation's activities.
For this reason the Johannesburg
Jewish National Fund club was
founded in 1904, with the late Ben-
zion S. Hersch as its chairman. In
1906, Joseph Janower, now a direc-
tor of the Keren Kayemeth in Jeru-
salem, was treasurer of the JNF
Club, and, in this capacity, was ap-
pointed its representative on the Fed-
eration's newly established JNF
Bureau. A few years later Mr. Jan-
ower became a member of the
Federation's Executive and served as
its honorary treasurer for 16 years.
In 1928 a special Jewish National
Fund Department of the Federation
was established under Mr. Janower's
chairmanship, anid all JNF work was
greatly intensified.
Fund-raising efforts were launched
on a much bigger scale, and new
methods for increasing the revenue
were evolved. Previously there had
been small efforts at campaigning
under the title of "Dunam Drives."
Now biennial campaigns for the JNF
became the established routine of the

*^fcMeA.U L.
/: ', ^


THE LATE BRIG. F. H. KISCH
who visited South Africa on behalf
of the J.N.F.

Department. Under the aegis of the
JNF, well-known personalities came
to South Africa in its interests.
Rabbi Zlotnik,, Dr. Benzion Shein,
Harzfeld, Baratz, Rabbi Meir Berlin,
Rabbi Solomon Goldman, the late
Brigadier Kisch, Dr. Alexander Gold-
stein, Dr. Yehuda Kaufman, Werner
Bloch and A. Baumgarten, Harry
Levin and, last year,, Dr. A. Gran-
ovsky, the chairman of the World
Board of Directors of the Keren
Kayemeth Leisrael, and Mrs. Gran-
ovsky-all these people not only


raised the standard of contributions
to unprecedented heights, but also
helped to engender a deep apprecia-
tion of the meaning of Keren Kaye-
meth work amongst the large num-
ber of workers and the thousands of
supporters of the Fund.
Headed by Rabbi Schwartz, a
group of South African workers have
rendered great service to the work of
the National Fund in South Africa.
With the appreciation of the Keren
Kayemeth's ever-increasing status
as the central organisation for crea-
tive Zionist work, several other in-
come-raising methods were evolved,
the most important -being that of
Bequests.


DR. ALEXANDER GOLDSTEIN
brilliant orator, who led South
Africa's effort for the Keren Kaye-
meth.

A comparatively large number of
Jews, some wealthy, some of more
moderate means, perpetuated their
memory by creating -living monu-
ments to themselves in our Home-
land, and at the same time enabled
the fund to acquire large tracts of
land and to -establish a number of
settlements.
The best-known of these indivi-
duals are the late Mr. I. Ochberg of
Cape Town and the late Mr. B. Gor-
don of Johannesburg. Mrs. Rosie
Lewis of Johannesburg, Mr. Epstein
of Kingwilliamstown, Mr. L. Landau
of Bulawayo, B. Linden and -J. Ep-
stein of Pretoria, deserve mention for
the outstanding contributions they
made to the JNF in their Wills.
Income from the "traditional"
sources-from boxes, inscriptions and
through the Tree Fund, began to
rise. When Mr. J. Janower relin-
quished his position and Mrs. K,
Gluckmann, the present chairman,
assumed the leadership of the JNF
in 1936, she saw unprecedented in-
creases in the fund-raising efforts of
the Department under her charge.
Her chairmanship has provided the
inspiration which comes from her
single-minded devotion to her task.
She has addressed meetings in prac-
tically every town and village in the
Union of South Africa, and has es-
tablished close contacts with the Zio-
nist Women's Soc;eties, amongst
whom one finds the most devoted
workers of the Keren Kayemeth. She
has witnessed, more particularly in
the present decade, an expansion of
JNF work which could have been a
dream only to the early founders of
the JNF in this country, yet she and
her committee continue to strive for
ever-greater returns for the Fund
upon which so much of the future of
the State of Israel will depend.





PAGE TWENTY-FOUR



[Tlhe South




Loyalty

rHE South African Zionist Fed-
eration rose to its present
stature against a background of
unity, loyalty and discipline dis-
played by local Zionists for half
a century. Despite the handicaps
of the great distance from the
main currents of Jewish life in nussow, were his pe
-Europe, and the isolation of the by the South Af
amttered Jewish communities in Board of Deputies
South Africa during the early part time dealt with by t
oat the century, our Zionist Move- Yet pre-occupation
agnt has been effective and vital fairs did not, preclu
Atm the day of its inception. In tion from concernii
irength of sentiment and in pro- the World Zionist.:.
portionate material contributions, early as 1902, it beg
it won for itself a leading place an influence in the
in the countries of the Galuth, a ternational Zionist
position which it has maintained to Theodor Herzl calle
the present time. Zionists to welcome
Although many Zionist societies berlin to South Afr
were functioning throughout the There were close
country before 1898, there had Herzl -and South A
been a growing feeling, that their Samuel Goldreich, I
work should be co-ordinated and Benzion Aaron, Ma
guided by a central body which
would be in direct communication
with the World Zionist Organisa-
tion. And so it was arranged
that representatives of 13 Trans-
vaal Zionist societies should meet
in Johannesburg on December 11,
1898. The result of this meet-
ing was the formation. of the
South African Zionist Federation.
Mr. S. Bebro was the first Pres-
ident of the Federation; but the
dominating figure was Samuel
Goldreich. He succeeded Mr.
Bebro as president, and shortly
afterwards became Hon. Life
President. His influence was tre-
mendous, both among local Zion-
ists and the World leadership. It
was perhaps through his encour-


SAMUEL GOLDREICH
. . dominating figure


agement of the young Zionists,
"The Pfefferlach," as he called
them, that he made his greatest
contribution to Zionism. Among
the young "hot-heads" of that time
were Jacob Gitlin, Joseph Jano-
wer and the late Benzion S.
Hersch. Goldreich acted as their
mentor. He was to no inconsider-
able extent responsible for the po-
sitions they have attained in the
Movement over the last 50 years.
The Anglo-Boer War necessi-
tated the temporary transfer of
Zionist Headquarters to Cape
Town, and during that period Zi-
onists devoted themselves mainly
to local matters. The Federation
received authority to issue permits
to refugees enabling them to re-
turn to their 'homes in the Trans-
vaal; and many other duties which
in these days would be undertaken


And


y Gertrude Kar


personal friends
frican Jewish
were at that
he Federation.
n with. local af-
de the Federa-
ig itself with
Movement. As
*an to exercise
realm -of iii-
politics when
-d upon S.A.
Joseph Cham-
ica.
ties between
kfrican Jewry.
Lennox Loewe,
nuel Leo Ge-


the Federation'
in 1909 with t
lish a month:
Zionist Record
Under the g
B. S. Hersch,
veloped and ex
when it became
tion and the o:
Federation.
One of the o
uals in the- M
Africa was
President of th
1911 to 1931,
President.
The Federati
international Zio


BENZION S. HERSCH


and devout followers. Bernard
Weinronk, a founder of the first
Zionist club in Johannesburg, and
leader of the Zionist Movement in
Port Elizabeth from 1912 to 1936,
corresponded with Herzl on Zioin-
ist matters.
An early event in the story of
the Federation was the first S.A.
Zionist Conference held in Johan-
nesburg in July 1905. The burn-
ing question of the moment was
that of Jewish settlement in
Uganda; the decision was in fav-
our of Palestine, and Conference
adopted the Basle Programme.
In this connection it should be
noted that the late Rev. M. I.
Cohen came down from Bulawayo
to organise the conference. At
that time he had already laid the
foundations of Rhodesian Zion-
ism which has played so import-
ant a part in the history of the
Federation.
A large number of distinguished
Zionist leaders have visited South
Africa over the years, and have
left their mark on the develop-
ment of Zionist work here.
The first of these was David
Wolffsohn who had succeeded
Herzl in the leadership ot the
World Zionist Movement. Before
his arrival, it was rumoured that
he had come to raise 5,000-a
rumour which caused as much
amusement as if he had set a
target of 10,000,000.
A landmark in the expansion of


to increase part
ginning of Wor
ference in 1915
for safeguardii
and the recogni
claim to Palest
post-war peace
Until 1921,
delegation to V
gresses was in
overseas nom'in
South Africans'
gress from tim
Messrs. Bernar
Janower, Leop
Rev. Isaacs co
direct delegation
dent for direct
South Africa
The late Chi
Landau was a
in South AfricE
member of th
1916, he was ap
dent in 1922 an
dent in 1931. I
arship, brilliant
unified personal
great importai
addresses, and I
ber of deputati
authorities.
Dr. Shmarya
the greatest p(
Zionist Movem
first Keren Ha
South Africa i
sonal magnetism
an indelible mz
ment in this co


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIIAY, DECEMBER 10, 19T8


Devotion

Since that time, several dis-
tinguished leaders have. visited the
1. country, in connection with the bi-
ennial Campaigns. Each has made
his own contribution to the fur-
therance of the cause. Mr. Nahum
Sokolow in 1926 and when he re-
s work was reached visited this country in 1934, as
the decision to bub- President of the World Zionist Or-
hly bulletin-"The ganisation, exerted almost as
." great an influence on the non-Jew-
guidance of the late ish public and South African Gov-
the "Record" de- ernment circles as on his fellow-
xpanded until 1926, Jews.
e a weekly publica- Enthusiasm on an unprece-
fficial organ of the dented scale was aroused by the
visit of Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
outstanding individ- Pfiesident of the World Zionist Or-
lovement in South ganisation, and Mrs. Weizmann, in
A. M. Abrahams 1932. Dr. Weizmann has always
he Federation from been an inspired leader, and
and then Hon. Life during his visit he fired the im-
agination of South African Jew-
on's interest in in- ry who were enthralled by his lu-
nist politics began cid analyses of the Zionist
Movement, and his visions of the
development of the Jewish Na-
tional Home.
During their visit, Mrs. Vera
Weizmann initiated plans for the
establishment of the Women's
Zionist Executive Council, which
came into being in-that year, un-
der the Presidency of Mrs. Hed-
wig Reinhold. Mrs. Reinhold was
succeeded by the late Mrs. Jenny
Greenberg, who- led the Council
for eight years.
The Women's Zionist Council
has developed into one of the larg-
est and most important depart-
ments of the Federation. With its
affiliated societies, it constitutes a
vast organisation and makes a
tremendous contribution towards
all aspects of Zionist endeavour.
In addition to the strong support
which the women give to the
W.I.Z.O., their unceasing work for
the J.N.F., their support for
Youth Aliyah, their intensive edu-
cational work and their present
participation in the Israeli
United Appeal, make a story in
themselves.
ticularly at the be- In 1928, the 11th South African
rld War I. A con- Zionist Conference conceded the
Drafted demands principle that the Zionist women
ng Jewish rights, of South Africa should have di-
tion of the Jewish rect representation on the Feder-
ine as part of the action. Mrs. Kate Gluckmann was
settlement, elected to the Executive in this
the South African capacity and she has been a mem-
World Zionist Con- ber until the present time. Since
fact composed of 1936, Mrs. Gluckmann has held
ees, although a few the position of National Chairman
had attended Con- of the Jewish National Fund in
e to time. In 1921, South Africa. She has played an
rd Gordon, Joseph important role in the development
pold Kessler and and expansion of the work of the
nstitutecd the first Federation, and has exercised
n, and set a prece- considerable influence in the
t representation of Movement. A number of other
at Congress. women have served on the Feder-
ation. They include Mrs. Ethel
ief Rabbi Dr. J. L. Hayman, Dr. Deborah Katzen,
dominating figueA Mrs. Jeanette Davidoff and Mrs.
a n Zionist life. A Anna Franks.
pointe Executive since To-day, the Jewish National
pointed Vice-Presi- Fund is one of the most import-
d Hon. Life Presi- ant departments of the Federa-
t oratoryDr. Landau's schodig tion, yet it was only in 1928 that
t oratory and dig- this department was established.
ty were factors of In the "early days" supporters of
nce in his public the National Fund made their
his work as a mem- contribution by selling National
ons to Government Fund stamps, greetings, messages
and trees under the aegis of a
hu Levin, one of National Fund Club. In 1906, the
personalities in the Club's treasurer, Joseph Janower,
sent, launched the was appointed its representative
yesod Campaign in on the Federation's J.N.F. Bureau.
n 1922. His per- A few years later, he became a
m and influence left member of the Executive and
ark on the Move- served as its Hon. Treasurer for
untry. 16 years. It was under his chair-


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


A


Record


Of


PAGE TWENTY-FIVW



Unity


First

S.A. Zionist

Conference

July, 1905


The Late Chief Fabbi Dr. Landau
manship that th, iNational Fund
Department wa, established in
1928. Since 194;, Joseph Jano-
wer has hcen a member .of the
World Board of Directors of the
Keren Kayeneth in Israel.
The biggest in lividual monetary
contribution to the Jewish Na-
tional Fund in tl world was made
by Isaac Ochbeil one-time Pres-
ident of the Do:shei Zion Society
of Cape Town. I[is bequest to the
Fund enabled it to redeem the
"Isaac Ochberg Tract" in Sa-
maria.
Another Sout] African Zionist
leader, whose n mory is perpetu-
ated through th i establishment on
National Fund nfid, is the late
Bernard Gordoi member of the
Executive and ts Vice-President
for many yearF The first "South
African Settle mpt" in Eretz Is-
rael at Maya.a Baruch is a
worthy tribute t) him.
Many well-kr own workers for
the Zionist Mov ment have visited
South Africa in order to assist the
National Fund Department, the
last of whom, )r. A. Granovsky,
chairman of tht, World Board of
Directors, cam< to South Africa
with Mrs. Grai ovsky in 1947 to
launch the bi- nnial Campaign.
Their vitnu prov ded a fresh stim-
ulus to worker., for the Fund-a
stimulus which has enabled the'
to carry out th work of the Na-
tional Fund wiih increased devo-
tion.
There has be rn a tendency to
assume that thi fund-raising de-
partments of th, Federation have
constituted 'its entire nroe7anmme


of work, yet no picture could be
complete without reference to the
less publicised departments.
In 1932, a Youth department of
the Federation, which has de-
veloped and assumed great im-
portance was established. Prior
to that time, Zionist Youth So-
cieties were fostered and encour-
aged; but their planned develop-
ment really started with the es-
tablishment of the S.A. Zionist
Youth' Council in 1932. This
Council now controls the entire Zi-
onist Youth Movement throughout
South Africa and the Rhodesias. It
has made every effort to encour-
age and foster chalutziut and its
Hachsharah centres in South Af-
rica have trained many chalutzim
who have taken their place in the
life of the Yishuv. Mention may
also be made here of the founding
of the Habonim Movement in
South Africa by Mr. Norman
Lourie in 1932. This Movement
has made a great contribution to-
'wards Youth work.
In 1934, the Propaganda and
Information Department, -under
the chairmanship of the late A. I.
Miller, intensified its activities by
engaging the services of Maurice
Samuel to give a series of lectures
in South Africa. In the years that
have followed, a number of guest
lecturers have toured the country,
and the department has expanded
in other directions. It now Iakes
available films, educational pro-
grammes and publications of an
informative nature which provide
the basis of Zionist education in
this country.
Closely linked with this depart-
ment are the Federation's Libra-ry
and Book Department. The Pales-
tine Office, which was active prior
to World War II, was re-consti-
tuted in 1943.
A comparatively new depart-
ment of the Federation, but one
which has assumed great import-.
ance in recent years, is the Politi-
cal Department." Its -work in-
cludes the distribution of publica-
tions and information to all sec-
tions of the local community, and
contacts with prominent non-Jew-
ish personalities on Zionist mat-
ters. Its work assumed new im-
portance at the outbreak of World
War II.
The youngest of the Federa-
tion's departments is that of
Youth Aliyah which was estab-
lished only in 1947. Prior to that,
Youth Aliyahl campaigns under
the National Chairmanship of Dr.
Deborah Katzen, were undertaken
by leading Zionist workers and
the Women's Zionist Executive
Council in an unofficial capacity.
Reference to the Federation's
departments would be incomplete
without mention of the Treasury.


The first South African Zionist
Conference, held at the Free-
mason's Hall, Jeppe Street, Jo-
hannesburg, on Sunday, July 9,
1905. The following centres were
represented:
Bulawayo, Rev. M. I. Cohen.
Bloemfontein, Rev. Z Lawrence
and H. Goldberg.
Beaufort West, E. Guilaroff.
Boksburg, B. Mendelson.
Brandfort, L. Hoffman.
Cape Town, Dorshei Zion, M. L.
Genussow, S. Goldreich and M.
Solomon.
Capo Town, Y.M.ZA., J. B. Shaks-
novis, Dr. Landau and Dr. Abel-
heinm.
Cape Town, Juveniles, Mrs. Dr.
Hertz.
Cape Town, Bnoth. Zion, Mrs. To-
das and J. Turbovitz.
Calvinia, J. H. Goldreich.
Ceres, R. Goldseller.
Durban, Rev. M. A. Levy.
Durban, Ladies, Mrs. Dr. Landau.
East London, H. M. Cohen.


The least vociferous of all depart-
ments, its directors have usually
been "silent" workers. Sam Gor-
don, member of the Executive
since 1924 and its Hon. Treasurer
from 1933-1947, seldom appears
on public platforms. Yet he exer-
cises a great influence in the Fed-
eration.
The departments of the Feder-
ation have received invaluable as-
sistance in the implementation of
their programmes of work, from
the provincial Zionist councils, the
first of which was established in
the Eastern Province in 1939. Al-
though the Western Province
Council was not established until
1943, the Dorshei Zion Society in
Cape Town led by the Zionist
veteran, Jacob Gitlin, virtually
served as a Council for many
years.
Jacob Gitlin, the acknowledged
doyen of the Zionist Movement in
South Africa, who celebrates his
70th birthday simultaneously with
that of the Golden Jubilee of the
Federation, has probably exer-
cised a greater influence on the
Movement than any other single
individual.
The Late Moses Morrison, of
Natal, was another distinguished
figure over many years. With the
indefatigable assistance of his
wife, he exerted considerable in-
fluence on Zionist activities
throughout the country-
Although the Federation has
never made a general call for sup-
port of the Hebrew University, it
has always co-operated in the
work of the Friends of the He-
brew University.
The late Mr. I. Schwartz en-
dowed a Chair of Modern Hebrew


Grahamstown, D. Starfield.
Grdaff-Reinet, A. Sprinz.
Gwelo, E. J. Edelstein.
Heidelberg, J. Reichenberg.
Harrismith, Dr. D. Horwich.
Jeppestouwn, W. Rabinson and J.
Bloch. "
Jeppestown, Juveniles, Miss Rab-
inson.
Johannesburg, B. Danziger, H.
Graumann, H. Solomon and L.
M. Patlansky.
Johannesburg, Ladies, Mesdames
Lurie, Glasser, Greenberg and
Miss Micalitski.
Johannesburg, Herzl Society, A.
M. Abrahams.
Kimberlcy, A. Hern.
Kingwilliamstown, H. M. Cohen.
Kroonstad, Rev. East.
Krugersdorp, S. Canter.
Krugersdorp, Juveniles, Miss
Ethel Judes.
Klerksdorp, A. Kirson.
Koffyfontein, Rev. Woolf.
Middleburg, C.C., M. Cohen.
Maf eking, S. Levisohn.
Maraisburg, E. Lewy.


Literature at the University as
early as 1922. In 1925, when the
University was opened by Lord
Balfour, Mr. Schwartz was one of
those who represented the Federa-
tion at the ceremony.


DR. SHMARYAHU LEVIN
launched first Keren Hayesod
Campaign

Despite the magnitude of the
Federation's programme of work,
it still does not possess its own of-
fices. Yet a centre for Zionist ac-
tivities was established in 1936
when the Federation acquired Cor-
onation Hall in Johannesburg,
mainly as the result of the gener-
osity and far-sightedness of Woolf


Oudtshoorn, I. Abrahams.
Paarl, Rev. D. W. Hirschowitz.
Port Elizabeth, Louis Woolfe.
Potohefstroom, B. Levy.
Pretoria, B. Goldberg.
Pretoria, Ladies, Juveniles, Miss
G. Friedmann.
Queenstown, S. Shapiro.
Randfontein, L. Pessen.
Riversdale, ManTred Nathan.
Roodepoort, J. Levy.
Simonstown, -. Woolf.
Springs, J. H. Alexander.
Standerton, Rev. Lipkin.
Somerset West, E. L. Mosley.
,ftellenbosch, Rev. S. Maonne.
Uniondale, Dr. Hertz.
Veoreeniging, M. Patlansky.
Vryheid, Woolf Davis.
Volksrust, Rev. Hillcowitz.
Willowmore, B. J. Chaimowitz.
Witbank, I. Caplan.
Worcester, Sam Metz.
Wynberg, C.C., R. Hirsch and H.
Lurie.
Mizrachi, C. J. Kark, J. M. Traub,
A. Rabinowitz and A. Abrq
hams.


Senior, a member of the Executive
for many years.
The decision to establish a Zion-
ist Council was taken at the 17th
Conference in 1939. The Council
meets between conferences and
also whenever any matter or
great urgency arises.
Since the outbreak of World'
War II and particularly as a re-
sult of the development of air
communications, the ties between
South African Jewry, the World
Zionist Organisation and the Yi-
shuv have become closer and
closer. One of the most active and
influential personalities during
this period, has been N. Kirsch-
ner, who held the position of
Chairman of the Federation from
1935-1947. No platform, no depu-
tation or delegation has been com-
plete without his leadership. Dur-
ing these years he has visited
Eretz Israel and Europe on many
occasions to participate in discus-
sions, to express the opinion of the
Federation, and to consult with
our leaders as to the most effec-
tive measures to be .taken by,
South African Jewry in the cause
of Zion. Other members of the
Executive have travelled between
Palestine and South Africa on
many occasions. South African
servicemen, both Jewish and non-
Jewish, who visited Palestine dur-
ing the war, strengthened the per-
sonal ties between local Jewish
families and the Yishuv.
An increasing number of South
Africans have settled in Eretz Is-
rael in this period, following in
the footsteps of Lazar Brr:do,
member of the Executive Federa-
(Continued on page 34)


African


Zionist Federation


Ito

WN
*00






PAGI UIGRT THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1940



ZIOnist Record At The UNO Assembly.In Paris
-The Organ of South African Jewry

"Zionism aims to establish a publicly-assured, legally
secured Home for the Jewish people in Palestine."
Basle Programme.


Permanent Buildings
Telegrams: "Kadimah"


Commissioner Street
Johannesburg


Telephone 34-1931
P.O. Box 150


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Golden Jubilee
THE Golden Jubilee of the S.A. Zionist Federation coincides with a happy
year in the annals of Zionist history. Yet, it is also a critical year.
In Israel our people are still at war and the Jewish State is still obliged
to keep the flower of its youth under arms. Until such time as Israel
dwells securely there is no room for rejoicing.
The Federation has, therefore, wisely decided not to convert the anni-
versary into a season of celebration, but to go on with the usual and urgent
daily work as befits a period of emergency.
Nevertheless, we make no apology for devoting considerable space in
this week's columns of the "Zionist Record" to the history of our move-
ment in this country and to its founders. It is right that we recall their
memory so that their faith, their enthusiasm and their devotion should
serve to stimulate us to further efforts.
This is a time for renewed dedication. Just as the Mandate was a
challenge to the Jewish. people to build their National Home, so is the
proclamation of the State of Israel a challenge to build the Jewish State.
To-day we have only the foundations and the beginning of the building;
the structure is yet to be completed.., Within the next couple of years the
population of Israel has to be doubled. To achieve that-and it is a task
which will incidentally rehabilitate hundreds of thousands of homeless
Jews-the Jewish people will have to mobilise every ounce of its energy
and strength.
Israel must become a viable State. Our experience in the past has
taught us that no one will help us to build our State; that we must depend
on our own resources. It has been one of the outstanding features of
South African Zionist history that at all times, in days of success and in
days of setback, we insisted that our contribution to the cause can best be
expressed through constructive 'effort.
Our pioneers and early Zionists were never deterred by the fact that
Palestine was smarting under the oppression of the Turkish Sultan. Later,
after the first World War, when immigration into Palestine was stifled by the
Mandatory Power, we were undeterred and helped to build new settlements
for the accommodation of more immigrants. When the purchase of land
was restricted we went on with the acquisition of land.
All along we were animated by faith in the future. In the earlier
days, when the waverers and the indifferent regarded the Zionist as a
dreamer and Zionism as a Utopia, there was indeed need for extraordinary
faith in the success of our efforts. To-day, the world is convinced of the
reality of Zionism. The Jew must equally become convinced that we are
now confronted with our greatest opportunity since the beginning of our
exile.
Far from being carried away by the gratitude and praise which the
Zionist leadership is extending to us on this solemn occasion, we must
recall with all humility the fact that Providence has spared our commu-
nity from the fate endured by our brethren in Europe and that we were
privileged to do what we could for a great cause.
The fifty years of effort were indeed worth while. To those of our
pioneers and builders who are no longer with us we now pay humble
tribute. We who had the "Zechiah" of witnessing the climax of Zionist
endeavour are animated by a feeling of thanksgiving: "Baruch Sheheheyanu
Vekiyemanu Lazman Hazeh."


The "Zionist Record"
IT is impossible to divorce the "Zionist Record" from the general scheme.
of the Federation's activities during the past forty years. The main
task of the journal was to maintain contact, firstly, between the outside
Jewish world and the local community and, secondly, between the communi-
ties in South Africa and the Federation.
In its broader sense the term "contact" demanded an organisation of
Jewish enlightenment-historically as well as geographically. In order to
be well informed the reader will seek in his paper the -necessary con-
tact with our historic past, with our present-day literary achievements and
with the ideals that inspire the Jewish people-and the cause of Zion. Geo-
graphically the reader has to be made familiar with the developments in
Eretz Israel and in other Jewish communities throughout the world.
The past few years have demanded an emphasis on political work.
The fight for the independence of Zion is as old as Herzl's first speech, but
the pitched battle was first launched in 1938, in the days of the White
Paper. Since then the Jewish press has been, of necessity, enlisted into
the great political fight.
At a time when inspired newspaper correspondents conducted a per-
sistent and regular campaign against us, it was the duty of the Zionist
newspaper to bring to the people in this remote land a full and authentic
account of events and a true version of our aims. The "Zionist Record"
endeavoured to supply the demand for enlightenment to the best of its
ability, and we are gratified to note that the journal has attained a repu-


Goldie Myerson, Israeli Envoy to the U.S.S.R, is conversing with Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt, member of the American delegation and widow of the
late President Roosevelt. Mrs. Myerson is now on a visit to Israel prior
to her return to Moscow.


station in the Anglo-Jewish world of which we have every reason to bi
proud.
As with every other department of Jewish activity, great response
abilities devolve upon the Jewish press during the coming years, both i
regard to the upbuilding of Israel and our communal life in South Africa
We have tried to meet the emergencies of the times and to keep pace witt
the progress of the movement through the introduction of an extensive
news service, the publication of the journal twice a week and the enlist
ment of competent correspondents and commentators.
As for our own community, the "Zionist Record" has at- all time
regarded itself as its "faithful servant." We have tried to stress th
constructive elements of our communal endeavour and to encourage unit
within our ranks as well as the establishment of religious, cultural an
social institutions.
We pray and hope that before long, when the Jewish State has attaine
peace, it will be possible to reduce the space'devoted to Zionist "politics
and to concentrate on educational material. A Jewish newspaper is basic
ally an educational institution. Its task is to propagate, in a non-Jewis
language, the values of Judaism and the knowledge of positive achieve
ments of the Jewish people.
It will be our resolve on this our 40th anniversary to be worthy o
the traditions of our founders and to continue to serve the cause of Zionisr
and the community of South Africa.

Educational Centre
THE consecration of the Linksfield Educational Centre marks y<
another important milestone in the progress of the S.A. Board
Jewish Education. During a comparatively short period of activity t
Board has acquired a "-number of imposing buildings and has establish
a network of institutions ranging from nursery schools to a Teacher.
Seminary. The S.A. Board of Jewish Education has indeed displayed vision
and imaginativeness. Undeterred by the Jeremiahs who keep on talking
of "apathy" and "indifference," they continued to build new institution
and to provide better facilities for the development of Jewish education
The community is indeed greatly indebted to them.
Johannesburg is to-day one of the leading educational centres in tl
Union. Apart from the large local Jewish school population, the cit
attracts annually Jewish students from all parts of the country. At th
same time the community itself has spread over a wide area and it
obvious that with the development of suburban congregations the preser
school accommodation will be totally inadequate. The Linksfield Educe
tional Centre is situated in an area with a large Jewish population an
will thus cater for them, but its main Value lies in the fact that it is th
first determined effort for many years to establish a Jewish day schoe
in Johannesburg.
The day school has met with initial success, but it is only a beginning
The community must now enable the Board to proceed with its magnify
cent undertaking and to establish the institution on a sound footing.
The Board of Education deserves well of South African Jewry.
is entitled to expect generous assistance. Some of its institutions should
be endowed by generous members of the community, so that they are fre
from the burden of mortgages and from the cost of upkeep. Johanner
burg Jewry can never have too many educational centres. Our very futu
is dependent on them.




THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY,


*

Congratulat


to the SOUTH AFRICAN ZIONIST
FEDERATION and the
ZIONIST RECORD on
attaining their respective
ANNIVERSARIES

*1

HENDLER &
HENDLER

I SHEET METAL WORKERS AND
MAiNUFACTURERS OF ALL TYPES OF TINWARE


ions....


~NI


(Established 1920)
Office and Works:
Industrial Sites, Heidelberg Road, Johannesburg
P.O. Box 7025 Telegrams: "Metalware"
Phones: 22-3341 and 22-3273


DECEMBE


R 10, 1948





PiRk ROBeS-TWO


"Givers"


Jewish partisans' and othi
vivors.
Of the relief work don
1945 this. dramatic fact sh
remembered, that never bi
history had private


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DfEGMB~ '10, 1 8'


And


Reipi


On The Same Lev



At Relief Conferen


Dr. Sbnnabend's Repo rt To S.AJ

Council
ADDRESSING the special meeting of the Council 6f the
Jewish Appeal on Sunday, Dr. H. Sonnabend referred t
report given by the chairman (published on page 41) and
that as an expert on the compilation of statistics he wa
r'erwhelmed by the figures given by the chairman, for fi,
could be made to tell whatever was required. He would
About two things: the background of the Paris Conferen
Relief and what the South- Afrieam delegation had achier


S Background of Conference
excellent spirit had..permeated
"'-C erence, a spirit similar toa. that
Ofe ish soldiers defeating German
fo*,es in 1944. and meeting, the ffirst


fio


and, 8tlrikting' printecb 8tyle&
Brand ed~ 'Tebilized',


it resists creasing, much
as woob db.es.








/


This is the era of
"something new" ..
new shapes, new styles,
new- lengths,. new- contours.
It's a relief to, find some-
thing which always reauiw
constant-the quality and
serviceability ofTootalse
famous washing fabrics-"
their reliable good taste
in colour and-design.


GU. T A A~kNTED FABRICS


el


ents Met

achieved anything on so gigantic
a scale, having spent at. least
250000;000 dollars voluntarily col-.
lected, from Jews all over the
" world.


It had been a Conference of both
e^A gives and recipients who met on the
n. same level, there being no hostility
or even embarrassment.. The 250,
delegates represented vastly dif-
. A ferent ideologies, outlooks and coun-
r. tries, but all' were united in the view
of there being a' Jewish nation. (pre-
viously only Zionists,, Bmndists- and-
anti-Semites had been convinced that
there was such. a nation). The
S.A. efforts in the spheres, of relief' and
o the rehabilitation had had-a. deeper sig-
nifihance than the mere rendering, of
I said aid' for the survivors: it had united
Snot . .
gures Delegates" Acleivemenft
speak The delegate( had be ashed to.
ce on take up the following three things:
(:) 'Ths setting-up of an overall
plhn and to see to its implementa-
er sur- tion by a permanent consultative
body;
e since (b) Ttte-eliminationa of overlap,
iould be ping and for activity- in each sphere
before in to be carried out by one specialist
agencies organisation;
(c) That reconstruction and re-
habilitation be regarded, as of para-
mount importance.

A Plan
While we had not quite achieved
our wish for a comprehensive .blue-
print, we had not entirely failed.
Dr. Schwartz had declared emphati-
cally at Conference that it was
necessary to work out a three-year
plan. At an interview given shortly
after the Conference,. Dr. Schwartz
and Mr. Warburg had stated, that
the JDC had decided to embark on
such a plan, and that they intended
in this period to liquidate the prob-
lem of the 145,000 D.P's.
They also intended helping to train
or retrain vocationally 75,000 people,
even more than the most optimistic
ORT target. They also planned- to
render medical aid to a large num-
ber, and- altogether planned to spend
75,000,000 dollars in 1949.
On the negative side, our hope
S that .something would actually be
worked out at Conference was not
achieved. A permanent co-ordina-
ting body would be a. very impor-
tant part of such a plan, but the
JDC considered that the setting
up of a "miniature" conference
was undesirable.
It. must .be .faced that an' organi-
sation- of the magnitude-of the JDC
would, not want others to have a say
'in their budgeting. He felt, how-
-. ever, that the fact that the JDC'had
stated they wished to work on a plan
was no mean achievement.
Specialisation!
In this field 'something had been
achieved. A beginning had been
made in the work of co-ordinating
the efforts of JDC and HIAS in the
emigration field. Tremendous vested-
interests had to be 'considered in
both organizations. The bringing of
this problem before a 'world forum
would force something to be done.
Here the S.A. Jewish Appeal
was fortunate, because in spite of
being a giving country, we had no
vested interests. As far as 'ORT
was concerned, much had been
achieved. JDC realized that it could
not do ORT's job for technical rea-
sons; ORT had specialised in its field
for many years. Much of the work
of vocational training was already
in the hands of ORT and soon it
would be doing the work of voca-
tional training entirely by itself. As
far as the ORT was concerned, here
again there were vested interests


and there were considerable dif-
ferences between thle OSE' and the
JDC, but the chairman by his tact
and diplomacy, had brought these
two organizations much closer to:-
gether, and it was hoped that ulti-
mately all medical work and prob-
lems in the sphere of health activi-
ties would be left. to the ORT. A'
start had already been made in Cze-
choslovakia and Italy, and also in
North Africa, where the work would
be done by the OSE, but they would
be subsidized by the JDC.
Reconstruction
The Jews of South Africa felt
that reconstruction should be prior-
ity No. 1. This, however, did not-
mean that it did not realise there
were tremendous other needs. Basi-
callyi reconstruction meant the
fitting of people into the economic
structure of the country in which
they lived. This could be achieved
mainly by vocational training; and
much had. already been done. There
were two symbols which proved that
the ORT viewed. the problem both
practically and with vision. It was
proved, practically by the Mountreuil
School in Paris, and' by the estab-
lishment. of the seminary in Geneva
where teachers and leaders-would be
instructed.
-Regarding. North- Africa, it -was
-felt, that these Jews must be helped,
even though they had lived in great
distressed. -or many centuries. Jews
liid'dheveloped the consciousness of
being a nation and they felt that the
North African Jews were part, of
that nation and therefore must be
helped, particularly as their positibn-
was being worsened. because of the
conflict between Israel and the Is-
lamic world; they were, by their ii-'
creased suffering, paying the price
for the building-up of Israel.
Many languages had been spoken
at the Conference- and Yiddish was
the basic tongue, but the common
spiritual link was the realisation by
-the Jews that they were members' of
one nation responsible to and for
each other.
Dr. Sonnabend concluded his ad-
dress' stating that South Africa's
contribution to the Paris Conference
had' been a very considerable one,
and he felt that we would ultimately
-achieve our objectives if we "stuck
to our gauis."
Budget
The chairman then submitted the
Question of the budget; to the Coun-f
cil meeting, and suggested- that the"
S.A.J.A. should make its budget
year the calendar year January to
December, to conform with the prac-
tice of the J.D.C. and. other overseas
bodies. He also suggested that
henceforth the budget- should cover
the- total' estimated income for the
year and should' not provide for any
reserves. The emergency was far
too great. His colleagues- on the
'delegation gave the matter very. full
thought and he submitted their sug.-
gestions*that the budget should deal
with the following priorities:
S1: EMIGRATION, and that our.
vote. under this head should provide
a certain grant for the merger acti.'
vities of the JDC and HIAS.
2. RECONSTRUCTION A N0D
HEALTH: with the proviso that for
vocational training activities we
should, make our remittances direct
to the ORT JJnion, and for the health
- programme we should "deal directly
with the Union OZE. In this way,
we would be expressing the wish of
the South African community and
* underlining where we felt the em-
phasis of further work should be.
3. A GRANT should be made for
general welfare work covering chil-
dren's homes; homes for the aged-;
the establishment of further co-oper-
atives; for cultural, educational and
religious work, and for direct relief
essential until the final clearance-of
the camps, and also for our admin-
istrative expenses.
(Continued- on page 46) _. _


L stawi thusroct'rayom. 0,~
r1 suommer frooI&--cffpJ2& 8 this
8&LasO, sin superb' new colo'ars





THE ZIONIST -RPCORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948
Israeli United Appeal


Crowded Kensington Meeting

Addressed by Mr. Tager


On Sunday, November 21, approxi-
mately 400 people crowded Kensing-
ton Communal Hall to listen to an
impressive address by Mr. L. Tager,
National Chairman of the Israeli
United Appeal, on the latest de-
velopments in Israel. Mr. Getz pre-
sided in the absence of Mr. Jack
Bloch, the chairman of the Kensing-
ton Committee. He introduced the


Mr. J. Bloch, chairman Kensington
I.U.A. committee, who organised the
meeting

speaker and made a warm appeal
for support of the I.U.A. A well
deserved vote of thanks to the
speaker was proposed by Rabbi B.
Rabinowitz in which he also appealed
to the community not to relax for
one moment in the tasks that lie
ahead and to assist that small band


of workers in Kensington who have
done such fine work. In conclusion
some of the latest films from Israel
were shown which brought the even-
ing to a fitting end.
.. And at Southern Suburbs


Mr. H. Rubinstein, chairman I.U.A.
committee for Southern Suburbs
On Wednesday, November 24, a
representative gathering of the Jew-
ish community of Southern Suburbs
listened to an interesting address
given by Mr. Leo Tager,. National
Chairman of the Israeli United Ap-
peal, who spoke on the position in
Israel to-day. Mr. H. Rubinstein,
the chairman of the I.U.A. Commit-
tee in Southern Suburbs, presided
and introduced the speaker. The
evening was brought to a close with
the showing of a few Israeli films.


IUA CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED
IN WARMBATHS
The Israeli United Appeal in Warm-
baths was launched at a meeting held
at the Jewish Communal Hall on
Sunday, November 28. Mr. I. Isakov
presided. Rabbi Dr. M. C. Weiler
gave an illuminated address on his
experiences overseas. He was ably
supported by Mr. L. Franks.
During the evening a very forceful
address was delivered by Rabbi Haz-
dan, the newly-appointed minister to
the the Warmbaths Jewish commu-
nity. The appeals of the speakers
met with a good response.
After the meeting tea was served
at the Residency .Hotel. Special
thanks are due to Mr. and Mrs. Perl
for arranging this function at their
hotel.
The delegation was accompanied by
. Messrs. L. Sachs and L. Coleman.
Special thanks are due to the newly
appointed committee consisting of
Mr. I. Isakov, Mr. M. Cohen, Mr. E.
Taffelstein and Mr. C. A. Perl.
Ise


PAGE FORTY-THREE
MEETING AT ALBERTON
An Israeli United Appeal meeting
was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
A. Lisoos, Alberton. The meeting
was addressed by Rabbi DIr M. C.
Weiler, Mr. S. Shewitz and Mr., M.
Ettinger. Mr. J. Abraham presided.
There was a satisfactory response to
the appeal.

SABIE, PILGRIM'S REST,
GRASKOP NELSPRUIT
An Israeli United Appeal meeting
for Sabie, Pilgrims Rest, Graskop
and Nelspruit Jewry was held re-
cently at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
J. Kibel, Sabie, and was presided over
by Mr. A. W. Greenstein. Mr. Y.
Marshak delivered an illuminated ad-
dress and Mr. J. B. Miller proposed
the vote of thanks. Mr. Marshak
was ably supported by Mr. N. Schultz
and Mr. M. Ettinger. The response
to the appeal was satisfactory.


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Our congratulations to the S.A. Zionist Federation
on its 50th Anniversary


_______ .iI ".._ 1






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

"May This Anniversary.


Day Become A Starting


Point For New


Efforts"

Special Message From


,Dr. Claim


Weizmann,


President


Of Israel
THE 50th anniversary of the foundation of the South African
Zionist Federation is a major event in the history of the
World Zionist Movement.
The time has not yet come for the assessing of the out-
standing contribution made by the numerically small Jewish com-
munity of South Africa to the Jewish national revival and the
establishment of the Jewish commonwealth in Palestine. Only
those possessing intimate knowledge of the history of the last
30 years know of the yeoman service rendered by your Federa-
tion during the most critical phases of our movement.
Your Zionist enthusiasm and judgment has been a tower
of strength to leaders of the movement at every stage of our
struggle.
I feel that with the establishment of Israel, co-operation with
South African Zionism in upbuilding the Jewish commonwealth
will now be even more significant and creative. May this Anni-
versary Day become the starting point for new efforts, out-
shining even your past unique achievements. -


"Tell South

Zionists.


Special


PAGE NNE

African



From


David Ben Gurion, Prime Minister

-Of Israel


(Cable from Coblin Legum)
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-We
were sitting in Army Headquarters
with Israel's Premier, Mr. Ben
Gurion. It had taken me nearly a
week to get the interview, and
only through influential and high
Government contacts.
Outside, the waiting room and cor-
ridors were choked with deputations
representing almost every branch of
economic and military life in Israel.
Suddenly one of the doors in the
room opened and an unannounced
man of stocky build walked in
smiling. The Prime Minister looked
up and watched the man for a while
and then said: "Walk across the
room again." The man did so with
the air of one trying to show some-
thing off.
A few moments later Mr. Ben
Gurion walked across to him and
shook him warmly by the hand. We'
then learned that this young man had
lost a leg in the fighting in Galilee
a few months ago, and had just come
out of hospital with an artificial leg.
His first impulse on his discharge
from hospital was to come and show
his old Haganah commander, Ben
Gurion, how well he had been fitted
up. It was a mere informality for
him, while for most people it was
a difficult and elaborate procedure
to get an interview with the Prime
Minister.
This air of informality prevails in
most quarters in Israel to-day, and
there is much here reminiscent of
the early years of Government in
South Africa. Just as all old com-
rades of war came to call on Generals
Botha, Hertzog and Smuts to discuss
their daily problems, so men from
the kibbutzim and Haganah come
to see their -friends "at court."
During the interview Mr. Ben
Gurion gave me a message to South
Africa on the occasion of the fiftieth


anniversary of the S.A. Zionist
Federation. "Tell South African Zio-
nists," he said, "that we in Israel
are proud of the role it has played
in helping to make the Jewish State
a reality. It has played its part
well. South African Zionism need
not be ashamed of its 50 years .of
activity. Proportionately it has done
as much as any other country, Israel
always excepted.
"In fund-raising it has done more
than any other country, apart from
Israel. South Africa has always
played its part in sending chalutzim,
but not enough has been done in
this respect, and much more must
be achieved.
"If all the Jewish people were
of the same calibre as South Afri-
can Jewry, we would have little
to complain about.
"But as much as South African
Zionism has done in the past 50
years, it has not been sufficient. We
need more young people to help in
building Israel and securing the
future, and we also require more
money to be invested in the JewiSh
State.
"South African Zionism must im-
prove on its own high standards.
"We, of course, all hope for an
early end to this war, and there is
some justification for believing that
peace is not far off. But we must
nevertheless be ready to continue the
fight if the necessity arises.
"My personal regards and warmest
good wishes to all my friends .in
South Africa and to all South Afri-
can Zionists," concluded Mr. Ben
Gurion.
It was a moving experience for
me, Louis Pincus and Elli Kirschner
to hear this message personally de-
livered by the Prime Minister. Be-
hind it lies the warmth and integrity
of this greatest living Jewish genius
-a man who is widely recognized as
having been the key figure in the
establishment of the Jewish State.


Messa~,e






PAGE -FORTY -FOUR


COLOSSEUM
IAfrican Consolidated Theatres, Limited)
Phone 22-1744
SATURDAY at 10.15 a.m., 2.15, 6
9 p.m.

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ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
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Book at Theatre or Publix (Carlton)

S.A. Jewish Ex-Servicemen's
League, Pretoria Branch
To the Memory of Pretorians
who fell in World War II
A PLAQUE
will be unveiled on
Sunday, December 12th
at 3.30 p.m.
in the
Jewish Memorial Hall
Beatrix Street, Pretoria
THE PUBLIC ARE INVITED
TO ATTEND


Teachers'


Summer


Vacation Oourse
CAPE BOARD OF JEWISH
EDUCATION
and
HEBREW TEACHERS'
ASSOCIATION
A 'series of educational lectures of
particular interest to all Hebrew
Teachers will be held in Cape Town
under the auspices of the above
during the period 2nd January to
o* 8th January, 1949.

For particulars apply:
THE SECRETARY
P.O. Box 2578, Cape Town


THE ZIONIST -RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, IMs


EMPIRE
(African Consolidated Theatres, Ltd.)
Phone 22-2281
DAILY at 2.15 and 8 p.m.
SATURDAY at 10.15 a.m., 2.15, 6
9 p.m.
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ROBERT MONTGOMERY
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JOHN PAYNiE
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"New York Herald Tribune"
30th September, 1948.
Book at Theatre or Publix (Carlton)

CARMEL RES. HOTEL
THE MODERN
KOSHER HOME
High-Class Menu
22 MULLER STREET, YEOVILLE
JOHANNESBURG
(Phones :
43-2250 Office 43-3003 Residence


Important Announcement

THE JEWISH MUSICAL
INSTITUTE OF S.A.
announces the opening of. the

SCHOOL of MUSIC
(Director: SOLLY ARONOWSKY)
on
JANUARY .17, 1949
at the
GINSBERG HALL
All Instruments and Singing
Taught by Experienced Teachers
Nominal Fees
Those interested please contact:
The Director
Phone 44-4896
3 7 p.m.
or-
The Secretary
Phone 24-4132
10 a.m. -1 -p.m.


METRO
Bree & Phone
Hoek Sts. 22-4411
Daily at 2 and 7.15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m., 2.15 and 7.45 p.m.
(Feature commences daily at
2.10 and 7.25 p.m., Saturdays at
9.10 a.m., .2.25 and 7.55 p.m.)
M.G.M. Proudly Re-presents
David 0. Selznick's
TECHNICOLOUR PRODUCTION

"GONE. WITH

THE WIND"
featuring -
CLARK GABLE
VIVIEN LEIGH
LESLIE HOWARD
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND
and a cast of thousands
Full. Length, Unchanged !
No Increase in Prices!


A CONCERT
of the
JEWISH MUSICAL INSTITUTE.
will take place on
SUNDAY, 12th DECEMBER
at 8.30 p.m.
at the
GINSBERG HALL
GORDON TERRACE, BERTRAMS
-On the Programme-
Yiddish and Hebrew Music and Songs
The Youth Symphony Orchestra
The Artists :
Fanny Sugarman (Popular Soprano),
Cantor -Dov Propis (Celebrated Pales-
tinian Tenor), Hannah Seinick, Sheila
Smith, Sarah Zundelewitz, Mary
Davidov, Helen Ichilchik, Gertie
Santop, Sonnie Barnet and Hylton
Smith
All proceeds in aid of the
YIDDISH FOLKSCHOOL


MAARIV SERVICE
Cantor J. Eidelson will
conduct Maariv Service at
the Witwatersrand Jewish
Aged Home, 10 Louisa
Street, Doornfontein, on
Monday, 13th Inst., at 7
p.m.

PRIZE MONOGRAPH
COMPETITION
THE S.A. JEWISH SOCIOLOGICAL
AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY
wish to announce that the closing
date of the above Competition is:
DECEMBER 31st, 1948
All enquiries and manuscripts to
be addressed to: The Secretary,
P.O. Box 1180, Johannesburg.

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR
Removed Permanently
As many as 150-160 in half an
hour by the latest radiomatic
machines.
MADAME RITA
(New York Diploma)
35 Downing Mansions
Cor. Eloff and Plein Streets
Phone 22-4551
Consultations Free


Social




ISRAEL UNITED APPEAL
WOMEN'S SECTION
present a
MOVING AND DRAMATIC FILM-

SIn My Father's House"

By MAYER LEVIN
at the

CORONATION HALL
Son

MONDAY, 13th DECEMBER
and

WEDESDAY, 15th DECEMBER
at 8.15 p.m.
Tickets: 4/10 (including tax)
obtainable at door


MALATER & DISTRICT SOCIETY
RAKISHKER SICK BENEFIT &
LOAN SOCIETY
AN
Open Air Dance & Braaivleis
in aid of
PARCELS FOR REFUGEES
IN ISRAEL AND EUROPE
at
K. BACHER'S FARM
on
WEDNESDAY EVENING
15th DECEMBER, 1948
MAX ADLER'S ORCHESTRA
Double Ticket, 10/6
Enquiries re transport: 22-7730 and
22-8296 43-4938 (after hours)
In the event of rain dance will be
held indoors
Directions to Farm:
Proceed along New Main Reef Road
to Randfontein until Circle, then
straight along Randfontein Road to
Signpost "Bacher's Farm" on left-
hand side coming from Johannesburg.
Watch for Native with lantern.
Grills, Refreshments, Amusements,
Entertainment



MOSAIC WOOD FLOORS
(PTY.), LTD.
68 MARLBOROUGH ROAD
SPRINGFIELD
JOHANNESBURG
Parquet Floors supplied, laid &
sanded from 15/- per sq. yd.
Phone 32-4509, After Hours 33-6270
P.O. Box 2570

ACCOMMODATION OFFERED
IN MUIZENBERG
Newly Furnished Private Home, Excellent
Cuisine (strictly Kosher), under the personal
supervision of Mrs. Melamed.
For reservations please apply to Mrs. A.
Melamed, "Mavista," Cromer Road, Muizen-
berg. Phone 8-5021.


MAGEN DAVID ADOM
VOLUNTARY FIRST-AID ASSOCIATION
DAY AND NIGHT MAGEN DAVID ADOM STANDS
READY IN PALESTINE TO RENDER MEDICAL
SERVICES TO THE SICK AND WOUNDED
Enrol NOW as a Member of
MAGEN DAVID ADOM IN SOUTH AFRICA
P.O. Box 9228 Johannesburg Phone 33-2782
(This space is sponsored by RADIOLEK (ETKIND BROS.)
| | s






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMI


"Our Efforts


Have Borne


Fruit"


Greetings. From


Joseph Janower

(Tel Aviv)

M Y most hearty greetings to you
from Medinath Israel on the
occasion of the 50th anniversary of
Zionist work in South Africa.
It recalls memories of the first
Zionists who answered the call 'bof
Herzl and with faith and devotion
laid down the foundations which
later inspired others to carry on in
spite of disappointments and set-
backs.

South African Jewry can indeed be
proud of the role that they played
-from small beginnings to the mag-
nificent contributions of to-day in
the achievement of our aim. We can
all be happy that our efforts have
borne fruit and that we. are privileged
to see in our time the establishment
of the State of Israel. JOSEPH
JANOWER.


American Leather Co.
Wholesale Leather & Grindery
SMerchant
FOR BENDS, SQUARES,
RUBBER & GRINDER
57,' Commissioner St., Johannesburg
For Urgent Orders I'hone 33-6656


BER 10, 1948 PAGE SBVEN

Commandant Of Ossewa Brandwag Cals


.-" T For Cmmon Action

M 1e II With Jews


"DTIE O.B." published the following
statement froffi its "Comman-
dant General,, Dr. Hans van Rens-
burg, in which he says:
"According to Transvaal news-
papers, Mi. Nossel, a Jewish mem-
ber of the Cape Town H.N.P., who
professes to be in close touch with
the HI.N.P. leadership, stated that
the Transvaal H;.NP. Congress (as
opposed to the. Cape). dismissed
the question of removing the dis-
crimination against Jews as. pros-
pective members) because if they, did
so, they would; also have, to liftt the
ban on the O.B:
"The reasoning- would appear to
have been that, since the Transvaal
H.N.P. cannot include Jews without
including: O.B's they would rather
exclude the Jews also. .
"I do not know how far Mr.
Nossel's alleged opinions reflect the
actual position; also we do not want
to interfere in the internal affairs of
the H.N.P-especially those of us
who. are members of the Afrikaner
Party, because the bond 'between the.
two parties must be taken into ac-"
count.
"But when we see the danger
which threatens white humanity, and
specifically white South Africa, then'
we feel that it is just as well to em-
phasise that in spite of racial and
religious differences there are cer-
tain common white interests which
are connected with the survival of
everyone of us who has found his
only fatherland here. There come
times when you can undertake com-
mon action, with your English-
speaking or Catholic (or Jewish)
neighbour in the interests of the
whites, -without affecting one iota or
tittle of your Afrikanerdom or Pro-
testantism.
"And as we notice the rising
waves which are approaching then
he must be a very phlegmatic on-
looker who says: 'That time has not
yet come.'
"It is for this reason, amongst
others, that the majority of the
O.B's so easily found the road into
the inclusive thoughts of the Afri-
kaner Party, which as a fundamental
test places the Hertzog demand of
'South Africa first.'
"On other questions, every one of
us can have his own opinions: but by
every one who is ready to faithfully
follow this principle, common South
African interests can be pursued,"
concludes Dr. van Rensb-$rg.


A Book
By A Jourmalis-
MR. BENJAMIN BENNET, the
news editor of the "Cape
Argus," is' one of South Africa's
best known Jewish journalists. .His
special interest has been criminology
and he was the crime reporter on
the "Star" for many years.
He has four books to his credit,
"Down Africa's Skyways," "Hitler
over Africa," "Up for Murder" and
"Famous. South African Murders."
His latest book is- entitled; "To6 late
for Teats," and' tells' the. story of 12
famous South African murder trials..
Tho two most interesting chapters
naturally cover our two most recent
murder trials, that of Mrs. Lee who
was hanged. recently, and- of James
Camb, who was found guilty of mur-
dering Gay Gibson aboard. the "Dur-
ban Castle."
*
Mr. Bennet has collected some in-
teresting material about Mrs. Lee.
During the trial one got the picture
of Mrs. Lee as being a cold-blooded
calculating murderess. This she may
well have been, but at the same time
Benjamin Bennet draws a 'picture of
a full-blooded person who enjoyed
life to the full. Some .of the stories
he, tells about her in the court are
most human. He tells that on one
occasion Mrs. Lee remarked on the
poor quality of the photographs that
appeared in the 'newspapers and
would willingly have sat for new
and more flattering photographs had
she been permitted to do so. She
certainly made a more attractive
show than the likenesses available to
the press.
During one short adjournment she
noticed a reporter place a pepper-
mint in his mouth. Inquiring sym-
pathetically whether he suffered from
indigestion, she advised him to be
careful as it might be a case of gas-
tritis. He should consult a doctor.
"I suppose I will before it is too
late-but it will have to wait till
this trial is over," he replied in jest.
"Of course it might not be- gas-
tritis at all," she added with a smile.
"Imagination plays a big part in
illness as you've probably realized
after listening to the evidence in
this case for a couple of weeks."


Mr. Bennet is not one of those
journalists interested in criminology
because of the morbidity of the sub-
ject. He has an attractive and a;
human approach which. makes his
book eminently' readable. This: book
deserves a wide circulation and can
be strongly recommended for those
who do not find this kind of study
too upsetting.
The book is published by Howard
Timmins, Cape Town, at 12s. 6d.


Cargoes, For Israef
UNDER the heading "Cargoes fbr
Israel," the "Cape Argus?" car-
ries the following report:
"The Cape route is becoming the
highway. of the blockade-runners, to
Israel from the East. Two ships
loaded with relief' cargoes at Union
ports have already passed' through
Table Bay, taking the roundabout
route up the west coast and through
the Straits of Gibraltar to avoid-inter-
ference- by the Egyptians; who' con-
trol the passage through the- Suez
Canal.
"During the next few. weeks seve-
ral more will pass- along the same
way. They include ships: that! loaded
in Australia and India. The' ships
from India are to- travel 13,000 miles
via the Cape and Gibraltar rather
than 4,000 via Suez.
"The first ship. from Australia, the
Norwegian motorship Heogh Trader,
will pick up 2,550 tons of cargo for
Israel here.
"The Danish motorship Benny Skou,
which has already penetrated the
blockade from the Union, will round
the Cape this week on her way to
begin her second loading at Durban.
She will complete it at Cape Town
early in December."



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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Jerusalem Completes First


Quiet Week

From Moshe Brawer And Colin Legum

JERUSALEM, Sunday.-Jerusalem to-night completed its
first quiet week for many months. Since the new agreement for
a full truce came into force on the morning of December 1 not
a single shot has been fired across the front line, and it was only
during. the initial days of the agreement that a few isolated
sniping incidents occurred.
Your correspondent, on visiting the Jerusalem fronts during
the week-end, saw Israeli and Arab soldiers watching each other
across the narrow no-man's-land. Following the first storm of
the cold season, the soldiers from both sides stood outside their
fortifications and warmed themselves in the bright winter sun-
shine. - '
Over the shell-ridden walls and to some extent, returning to normal,
rows of sandbags I could clearly see -- though this has been so for the last
Arab Legion men cleaning their rifles, three months and is not directly con-
while puzzled Arab civilians came to nected with last week's agreement.
the front to try and look into the On Friday morning a convoy
Jewish town. At certain sections of taking guards, maintenance, person-
the front, where showing oneself to nel and supplies to the demilitarised
the enemy a week ago meant death, zone of Mount Scopus, reached its
the Israeli soldiers who now hold the destination and returned without in-
advanced positions, stretch them- cident, nearly 60 guards having been
selves on exposed verandahs, read- relieved and brought back to Jeru-
ing newspapers and resting. salem.
The first three days after the sign- U.N. observers, accompanied by
ing of the agreement the troops Arab Legion officers, drove the con-
from both sides began fraternising voy consisting of two armoured
and exchanging greetings, cigarettes buses and three trucks through the
and chocolate. The officers from Arab lines. This was carried out in
both sides even raised their glasses accordance with an agreement signed
for a lasting peace. On Sunday, how- between the Jewish and Arab corn-
ever, the chatting across the front manders, providing for a fortnightly
,stopped, the Arab soldiers apparently convoy through the Arab-held area
having been instructed not to frater- to Mount Scopus.
noise. A cable from *Colin Legum describes
Why F gh-t? a visit to Jerusalem shortly after
git. the signing of the truce. He writes:
'-Shouting across the no-man's-land, A group of Israeli soldiers were
a -heavily moustached Arab Legion squatting near us playing a game of
sergeant told your correspondent: cards, while a few yards away two
**The Arabs and Jews are brothers. Arabs were being drilled without any
Why fight each other? We want arms in punishment of some minor
peace." misdemeanor. On one of the roof-
A Bedouin soldier, who was stand- tops some Arabs were dancing a
ing next to him, shouted: "King Ab- slow-debka, but without the tradi-
dullah will bring you peace. He is well tional swords.
disposed to the Jews." The sergeant Later we were taken through the
,then added: "Allah give wisdom to grandiose Cathedral of Notre Dame,
the Jews and the Arabs to end hos- which borders the old and new cities
utilities and which served as a citadel during
On the other sector of the front an the hostilities.
Arab Legion soldier told me: "We Although Notre Dame has not been
poor soldiers are only fulfilling orders, irreparably damaged, the signs of
We have nothing against you, while war are evident everywhere, the
you surely have nothing against us. severest damage having been done
We are both serving warmongers." to the beautiful mosaics in the under-
Several other of my attempts to ground chapel. This cathedral was
speak with the Arab soldiers by taken over by the Arab Legion when
shouting across the" lines failed. the British withdrew from the city
Some Arabs made signs that they and was later captured by Israeli
dared not speak, while others looked forces.
at us with contempt. Yet some The superb Madonna and child
Others spat towards us. -which stands 20 feet high on Notre
Near the Jaffa Gate I walked into Dame has been almost undamaged,
the no-man's-land and saw Arab and only a slight chip off the nose
Legionaires playing football on the serves as a reminder of the battle
road behind the gate. On Friday Is- which raged in the city.


raeli soldiers saw Arab troops coming
into no-man's-land dancing Arab
national and Bedouin dances.

Crowded Streets
Looking from the top of a roof of
a high building near the Jerusalem
wall at the usually deserted Old City,
I saw that the narrow lanes were
surging with people doing their mar-
keting for the day. From the build-
ng on Mount Zion I watched wor-
shippers going into the Dome of
Rock for Friday prayers. Soldiers
stationed at the same place told me
that this Friday more people had
ione into this mosque than at any
nime since the fighting started.
Though the tension along the front
,ine has disappeared, mutual suspi-
:ion is still noticeable. Soldiers from
)oth sides are becoming more daring
and trusting in the good faith of
;he other side from day to day. Life
n the Jewish part of Jerusalem is,


Notre Dame Cathedral
The streets of the Old City were
filled with Arab troops, some of them
wearing brilliant yellow headdress.
Israeli soldiers were guarding the
Notre Dame Cathedral, and nothing
whatever of the valuable manuscripts
and relics is being allowed out of
the building. The Jewish soldiers
who had defended the Cathedral were
stretched peacefully in the sun, or
going casually about their daily
tasks. They might even have been
mistaken for disinterested sight-
seers. It is only when they tell of
the incidents of the past few months
-of the friends who fell at that post
there, and how many were killed
forcing this particular entry, and how
many were wounded when that wall
was blown in, that one realises the
real tragedy of the battle that has
been waged so unnecessarily in this
holy place.


IRAQ HOPES TO OBTAIN

LOAN FROM BRITAIN,
LONDON, -Monday. Huzahim
Amin Pachachi, Prime" Minister of
Iraq, disclosed in a recent interview
that Iraq hoped to obtain a loan
from Britain, says a Reuter dispatch
from Baghdad. He declined, how-
ever, to say when the loan might be
obtained or whether negotiations had
yet started.
Reports circulating in Baghdad
earlier this month said that Iraq,
heavily burdened by the Palestine
war, might get a British loan
"shortly." Iraq also expects three
million Egyptian pounds in January.


PAGE THRBE
HISTADRUTH ORGANISES
ARAB WORKERS
TEL AVIV, Monday.-The task of
organising Arab workers in Israel is
Continuing and the Histadruth has
already had considerable success in
its efforts. After the capture of
Majdal a delegation of the llistad&
ruth visited the town and a branch
of the "Brit Poalei Erez Israel"-
the Arab section of the Histadruth-
was set up.
Representatives of the Histadruth
also visited the villages in recently
captured Central Galilee and laid the
foundations of the workers and pea-
sants trade union organisation there.
Every village elected a council in
which the various sections, such as
smallholders, young peasants with-
out land, and hired labourers are
represented.
The representatives of the Histad-
ruth were received with great friend-
ship everywhere, and their insistence
that the poorer sections of the vil-
lages and the workers must be given
adequate representation on the coun-
cil was received enthusiastically.


YAIR SALTZMAN KILLED


IN ACTION


The "Zionist Record" regrets to report that Yair Saltzman, only son
of Mr. and Mrs. Saltzman, of Tel Aviv, and brother of Pnina Saltzman,
the famous pianist, was killed in action in the Negev. Yair, who was
21 years of age, was studying in Paris when hostilities broke out in
Palestine. He did not wait to be called up and enlisted immediately.
Yair was a gifted and promising violinist and conductor. On several
occasions he appeared on concert platforms with his sister. The above
photograph of Yair and Pnina was taken shortly before he joined up.


Post Office


Accepts Parcels


To Israel

It is learnt that the Post Office
will accept for delivery to Israel par-
cels containing food and clothing,
provided that the maximum weight
does not exceed 4 lbs. 6 ozs.
These parcels are accepted as Let-
ter Post, the rate being 3d. for the
first ounce and 1l'd. for every ounce
thereafter. Therefore it would cost
8s. 10d. for a parcel weighing 4 lbs.
6 ozs. This charge does not include
customs duty which will have to be
paid at the other end.
The regulations covering the con-
tents are:
(1) The maximum value of either
food or clothing parcels cannot ex-
ceed 1.
(2) Butter, rice, cheese and con-
densed milk may not be included.
(3) Clothing is to be second-hand.
i


GOLDIE MYERSON IN ISRAEL
TEL AVIV, Wednesday. Mrs.
Goldie Myerson, Israeli envoy to
Moscow, has arrived in Israel for a
short holiday. She described the cor-
di-l welcome accorded to her in Mos-
coWr, and the puzzling impression the
establishment of the Israeli mission
in the city had made on the Russian
Jews who could not believe that the
Jc:.'s really had a state.



"DUET FOR TWO HANDS"
THERE is an air of unreality about
the play "Duet for Two Hinids"
shown by the Repertory Players at
the Library Theatre. Because of the
improbability of the plot the pro-
ducer might well have been advised
to dim the lights on the stage so
that the events assumed a fantastic
air.
Theo Sacks gives a memorable per-
formance o-f a difficult part. Donald
Wayne is .nost convincing. Terry
Parris and Doreen Mantle both man-
aged to convey the complicated
situations of the plot.





PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT
ANNIVERSARY EVENING AT
DURBAN
THE Zionist Council of Natal has
planned an interesting function
for Sunday, 12th inst. Associating
with the Council for the occasion are
the Durban Zionist Association, the
Durban Women's Zionist League, the
Durban Young Israel Society, and
the ITabonim.
Recognition will be made of two
anniversaries, the first of the UNO
partition decision and the fiftieth of
the establishment of the Zionist Fed-
eration.
Mr. S. N. Herman, the brilliant
young South Africaiy, who has re-
cently returned from the U.S.A., and
who is well known here, is to be the
guest speaker.
Miss Jocelyn Kahn, who is a gifted
young Durban singer, and who has
recently had training in New York,
will sing a group of Hebrew songs.
Mr. Harold Freed, who is one of the
best known stage and radio person-
alities, will read excerpts from mod-
ern Hebrew poems, and the Habonim
are staging a camp fire finale.
It is also hoped during the evening
to present Golden Book and tree cer-
tificates to those workers whom
various organizations have decided to
honoeir during the 'year.
A warm invitation is extended to
visitors to Durban to attend this
function.

Contributions at Pidyon Haben
A SUM of 25 was raised at the
Pidyen Haben of the infant son
of Mr. and Mrs. Joselowsky of 152
St. Amant Street, Malvern, Johan-
nesburg. k20 was donated to the Ha-
bonim Hachsharah, and 5 to the
United Minsk Society.


Specialists in . .
Highest Grade Worsted and
Woollen Piece Goods and
General Merchandise

KINDER BROS, LTD.
Wholesale Merchants
DURBAN
Phone 2-3896 P.O. Box 958
Warehouse and Offices:
66a COMMERCIAL ROAD
Tel. Add.: "Jackets," Durban


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, D


Q-v~
>,,J*
-' -% 7


News And Names

Of Survivors

In Europe
Will anyone able to furnish any itoz.
Inatlon concerning the following people
kindly communicate with the S.A. Tew
lah Board of Deputies, P.O. Box 11280
Johannesburg. or call at 2nd Floor, Coat
mercial House 124 Fox treet, Johanw

EIDELMAN, Abraham, originally
from Ligemian, sought by Betty
Wiseman, niece of Gite Pesse, also
from Ligemian.
EHRLICH, Walter and Jacob
Frankenberg, sought by G. Baygel,
man. l
GOLDWASSER, Berel, born in
Give, lived in Kovno for many years,
now believed to be in Cape Town
sought by Fanny Gal, now in Israel;
GOTZ or GOCS family, originally.
from Schaulen, Lithuania, sought by
Alexander Goes, son of Leib from
Schaulen.
MACHT, Oscar and brother, orig-
inally from Hamburg, sons of Sara
and Jack, sought by cousin Edith
Comaroff.
NIEDERMEIER, Franz from Des-
sau, now believed to be in Johannes,
burg..
STERN, Ida, married name un-
known, originally from Mannheim,
sought by Edith Maria Neuwahl.
SILBERSTEIN, Jacob and Sara
(nee Schoenberg), and uncle Max
Schoenberg, originally from War-
saw, sought by Michael Silberstein,
now in Israel.
SAPOSNIK, Chaim Vigdor, sought
by his neice Sheve Shapiro.
WEINMAN, Otto, originally from
Vienna, Neubaugasse 2, sought by
Max Jamie.
YANES, Abraham, originally from
Vienna, Neubaugasse 2, sought by
his nieceS. Blosht (nee Brostein).


American Leather Co.
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FOR BENDS, SQUARES,
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Telegrams "NORWIOH"
Johannesburs


Jewish Musical Institute

Establishes School Of Music

TO OPEN IN JANUARY
ANUARY 17, 1949, will be a notable date in the musical history of
Johannesburg, for it will mark the opening of the new School of Music
established by the Jewish Musical Institute at the Ginsberg Hall. The
School, which is non-sectarian in character, offers tuition in all the various
branches of music. Experienced teachers will guide each of the different
sections of the string instruments, the brass, woodwind and singing. A
ballet school, which is already in existence, will continue its activities


in association with the school.
Tuition- is available for beginners
and advanced students, whether chil-
dren or adults. Preparation for ex-
amination, both for South African
and overseas degi-ees is a major
function of the school, which awards
its own certificates as well.
To bring musical benefits within
the reach of everybody the fees have
been fixed at what is virtually a


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G.B.S. Products
Factory: Railway Street, Woodstock, Cape
1j,bannesburg Office: 5th Floor, Toronto House, 110 President Street
Phone 22-1252 P.O, Box 3829


nominal figure-15s. per month for
members of the Institute, and non-
members will be charged 20s. It is
also the aim of the school to award
bursaries to promising students.
The first director of the School
of Music has already been appointed
in the energetic person of Solly
Aronowsky, whose- activities in every
sphere of music in Johannesburg
have made his a musical household
name.
Serious training has up till now
been mainly a prerogative of the
city's well-to-do. This courageous
new venture by the Institute opens up
a new avenue for less fortunate
musical pilgrims.
Those interested please contact the
Director, Phone 44-4896, from 5 to 7
p.m., or the Secretary, Phone 24-4132,
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.-



Comedy at Jewish Guild
Sheila Nathan- r is present-
ing "Flat To Let," `t various come-
dy in three acts, at the Jewish Guild,
on Sunday, December 12, 1948, 'at
8.15 p.m. sharp. Members may in-
troduce guests. Booking at the Jew-
ish Guild office.


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Manufacturers of K.C. Meal, Samp
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Quotations on application




THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


1Ae
" P---------


IT is nearly three in the morning and pouring
with rain. The signal along the line pierces the
darkness, and the Patrolman knows that in a few
minutes the night mail will be passing through.
To him falls the task of keeping this stretch of
line safe and clear. Yet he knows that when the
night mail goes by, and his .lamp blinks its greeting,
the only answer will be a cheery wave from the
train crew. They will know that all is well.


passengers

sleepingg. .


The passengers are sleeping. None of them
even knows of this Patrolman, and few are aware
of the many like him who keep vigil day and
night . who work while we sleep . constantly
and carefully checking and testing equipment along
the 14,000 miles of our Railways so that rail
travel throughout our land will be maintained
at the highest standards of safety, comfort and
reliability.


SOUTH


AFRICAN


RAILWAYS




THE ZIONIST RECO D,- FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


The


Two


Small


Rooms


In


PAGE



Portland


THE two small rooms in Portland
House with their ob:~urufe and
modest furnishings, the files and
stacks of papers, and pictures cover-
ing the walls, .was for me a place of
pure and wonderful romance. To
my youthful imagination it was an
alchemist's wonderland. There men
and women came together, and sat,.
talked, paced about, telephoned and
wrote. And as a result of all this
a new land was being built in a place
far on the other side of the earth-
the land of the Jews. These
memories of my childhood stand out
clearly from the mist of the years
that have passed away.
I can have known little of what
history meant. Palestine was no
more than the wonderous name of
a phantom land that belonged to the
heroes like Moses and Joshua, the
Maccabees and Bar Kochba and to
me. My knowledge of the Jews in
our time was confined to those in
Doornfontein, and the un-named vic-
tims of oppression in Europe. My
first experiences in Portland House
were moments of great illumination
for me. There the idea of the Jew-
ish people began to crystallise. It
was there that I received a sense of
a conscious Jewish past, and its bond
with a conscious Jewish future, and
my own association with them. It
gave me a sense of history, too, in
a wider sense, and made me realize
what men were prepared to do for
an idea.
A Strange Business
It was a strange and wonderful
business. With deep awe I watched
the makers of history hurrying in
and out: Benzion Hersch, Joseph
Janower, A. M. Abrahams, J. L. Lan-
dau, Loewe, and it was a source of
perpetual pride to me that my big
sister was then secretary of the S.A.
Zionist Federation, and was on
familiar terms with these men. I
watched and listened, and stuck
stamps on envelopes. I was not
present officially, so to speak. But
I was nevertheless a witness to all
that was going on. I was even a
particle on the surface of this
strange and wonderful world. There
was something about sticking
stamps on envelopes in that office,
that was different from all other-
stamps and envelopes.
From the enchanted piles some of
the letters certainly winged their
way ultimately to the golden land
where the Jews would come together
from all over the world-men like
Moses and Joshua, the Maccabees andl
Bar Kochba and I, too, and thel
names of Jews would ring .gloriously
throughout the world. For one little.
boy the stature of the figures of
those days, and the dreams they
inspired were to persist long after
the intrusion of a greater knowledge
and harsher realities.
Soon the boyhood life became a


CBy Harry


Levin


serious matter; there were new and
fascinating ideas, and many new pro-
vinces to be explored, and stern am-
bition asserting itself to extend be-
yond the achievement of stamp lick-
ing. But the image of the golden
land did not waver in its strength or
recede at all.
And in due course the personal
part of that dream was fulfilled. In
1926 Palestine became my home. It
was not golden, unless the sunlight
shining on the endless mud was seen
a transmuted gold. But it had other
riches. There, I realized, existed
many "brands" of Zionism, each with
its own accents, differently toned and
not insignificant, and South African
Zionism was one of them. It was a
proud "brand." If .it did not open
new paths, it certainly won warm re-
spect.
Sometimes, with some embarrass-
ment, one became a symbol rather
than a person. Here, too, I realized
clearly that there was a Zionist his-
tory and also a history of South Af-
rican Zionism which was contri-
buting all its force to the first, but
still enjoying its own life and dis-
tinctions.
The Alchemists
I am sitting in my studio in Jeru-
salem now, my mind wandering back
to the years of South African Zion-
ism, with which I have remained as-
sociated even since Eretz Israel be-
came my home. Outside my window
a group of Israeli soldiers are walk-
ing down the street, lustily singing
a song of the Negev. "Kol Israel"
brought me news over the air from
Tel Aviv only a few minutes ago.
And around me were a score of
visible reminders-were such things
necessary ?-of the Jews of South
Africa who helped to make the dream
of Israel come true. A long row of
alchemists hurrying in and out of
Portland House, and an even longer
road from the first years of the
Golden Jubilee of South African
Zionism. The multitude of mem-
ories that lie along this road, the
large things and little things, but
mostly the little things-for that is
history. It is only in retrospect, in
later years, do world shaking pat-
terns stand out as series of
tumults and brilliant pageants. But
the herrt of history is motive, and
constant little things, and a few
large things, and then the thread
which binds them all together. And
by that definition-or by any other
for that matter-South African
Zionism made history.
These fifty years may have ended,
and the State of Israel has now been
established. There will have to be
redefinitions of Zionist terms. But
one thing is clear, Zionism is a time-
less ideal, because the ideals of
Judaism are timeless. It will go on
but the stresses will be changed. Now
it will not be the consequences of
lack of complete nationalism that
will come to the fore, but the conse-
quences of what we make of it now
that we have it.
In tho immediate and ultimate
'new tasks i Israel, South African
Zionism will continue to have its
part to play. There will be changes
and new habits of thought, and new
meanings to old forms. But it will
continue to be a great and creative
part, worthy of those first fifty years.


Complete The Prophetic



-Vision


O reetin~,s


From


Lazar cBraudo

(TEL-AVIV)

FIFTY years of Zionism has
brought us our Medinath Israel.
The work is far from having been
completed, and I am sure that the
South African Zionist Federation
will continue to work with even
greater force to help complete the
prophetic vision.-LAZAR BRAUDO,
Tel Aviv.


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-----------------
i





PAGE FOUR

ISRAELI MEMBERSHIP OF UNO


BE DELAYED
PARIS, Wednesday.-The acceptance of Israel as a member
of the United Nations this session has become extremely unlikely
and will not be finally considered by the Security Council before
the end of the week, when the General Assembly has taken a
decision on the resolution which is being submitted by the British
delegation.


It is improbable that the British
proposals, even though they have been
whittled down considerably, will re-
ceive the necessary two-thirds majo-
rity to make them effective. Gradu-
ally the realisation is becoming ap-
parent that, with the present align-
ment of forces at UNO, there is little
chance of the Assembly settling the
Palestine problem and that a solu-
tion will have to be sought else-
where.
Both the Soviet bloc and the Arab
States are opposed to the British re-
solution, although for widely different
reasons. Britain dare not sugg.,.st any
further concessions to the Arabs for
fear of losing the support of
America.
Despite the fact that Britain was
compelled to mitigate her demand
for the application of the major pre-
mises of the Count Bernadotte plan,
the resolution still provides that the
Conciliation Commission to be ap-
pointed should have the power to
make recommendations which are not
in conformity with the' original par-
tition decision of UNO.
The British delegation has been


for nearly fifty


busy these past few days endeavour-
ing to find a way out of the dead-
lock, and have been in almost con-
stant contact with the Foreign Office
in London. They are hoping to per-
suade the six nations who abstained
from voting on the resolution in the
Political Committee to support their
proposals. British efforts are also
being directed towards getting six of
the nations who voted against the
resolution to abstain from casting a
vote in the Assembly. Only thus
could the two-thirds majority --be
achieved.
According to some observers the
British are prepared to amend their


THE ZIONIST RECORD, -FRIDAY, DECEMBR 10. 1948


MAY


resolution even further, if it will
serve to achieve a definite decision.
Now that the British schemes to
have the Arab part of Palestine in-
corporated in TransJordan have
failed, the United Kingdom is an-
xious to find bases in the former
Italian colonies of North Africa and
is seeking to obtain a trusteeship
over these territories..
It appears that one of the main
objections to the British proposals is
that the composition of the Commis-
sion is to be left to the five great
powers.
There is much annoyance in British
quarters at the Arabs, who helped to
efeat the original resolution "and are
now in somewhat of a quandary with-
out any positive approach to the
whole matter. certain sections of the
Arab League are hoping to win sup-
port from Russia,. which is strongly
opposed to Abdullah being awarded
any part of Palestine. Besides- a
mutual desire to thwart the ambi-
tions of Abdullah, there is little else
in common between these two forces
and not much prospect of any defi-
nite stand.


Greetings From Eastern Province


(Message from Mr. N. E. Rosen-
berg, Chairman, Eastern Province
Council.)
The Golden Anniversary of the
South African Zionist Federation i's
indeed an occasion for celebration
and rejoicing, coinciding as it does,


years


South Africa 's


leading publishing house

and distributors of
newspapers
periodical s
ma g azin e s
and books
published in South Africa and overseas


offers its congratulations
to the

S.A. Zionist Federation


with the anniversary of the estab-
lishment of the State of Israel.
Who could have dreamt when a
handful of ardent Zionists gathered
on the 11th of December, 1898, that
fifty years later we would see the re-
birth of the Jewish nation; that the
prayers -and lamentations of genera-
tions through the centuries, from
every part of the world, would, in
our day, be answered.
We are indeed to be humbly
grateful that we are the privileged
generation to have lived to see this
great event. But nationhood brings
with it responsibilities. We Jews in
South Africa must realise that
whilst the State of Israel has been
established, there can be no slacken-
ing in our efforts. There is so much
to be done. There are so many prob-
lems to be overcome. Tens of thou-



















MR. N. E. ROSENBERG
- sands must be brought to Israel.
They need to come, just as Israel
needs them.
Let us therefore re-dedicate our-
selves; let us realise that we shall
go forward with determination, to
carry on our Zionist work in South
Africa.
Let every Jew realise his duty and
responsibility and if we do that, we
shall be worthy of having been the
privileged generation to see the re-
birth of Israel.


Greetings From

Belgian Conpo
In a message to the S.A. Zionist
Federation Mr. Abner Soriano, pre-
sident of "The Association Sionist
du Congo Belge," extends, on behalf
of his society, sincerest congratula-
tions and best wishes on the occasion
of the 50th Anniversary of the Fed-
eration.
"It is very fitting that this mile-
stone in Zionist history should be
marked with the establishment of
the State of Israel, which despite the
blood and tears it has already cost,
and the sacrifices that may yet have
to be made, is a glorious and wonder-
ful achievement, in which we have
been privileged to participate.
"We are sincerely -grateful for the
very small part that we have -been
.able to play in the foundation of Is-
,rael, and it is largely due- to .the lead
that the South African Zionist Fed-
eration has given us, and to her ini-
tiative that we have been able to


MR. ABNER SORIANO


play even this small part. Zionist
Societies in all parts of Southern Af-
rica have looked to the South African
Zioni.st Federation for guidance in
the past, and will continue to do so
in the future.
"May your endeavours grow from
strength to strength, and may they
be crowned in the very near future
with the establishment of peace inr
Israel, so that in the future all your
endeavours, and ours with yours may
be directed to the peaceful expan-
sion and consolidation of our State
of Israel."

Message to "Zionist Record"
"The Association Sionist du Conge
Belge" has also sent a message t(
the "Zionist Record" which reads aw
follows:
Your publication has been the
pioneer of Zionism in Southern Af
rica; and has always been foremost
in the defence of Jewish civil an(
political rights, in the launching o:
all campaigns which have been th(
life blood .of the young Jewish State
The "Zionist Record" is truly worth:
of the most heartfelt congratulation
for the part it has played in thi
creation of a strong healthy Zionis
Movement in Southern Africa. _
Despite the fact that your public
cation is written in a language whicl
.is not the one with which we arn
most familiar in the Belgian Congo
your paper is very widely read i1
this Colony. Members of our com
munity have always looked to thi
"Zionist Record" to bring them th
news of current events in ever;
sphere of Jewish life in the Yishu
and the Diaspora.


L II


Support the Israeli United Appeal







Friend of the Grand Khedive and Physician to the Zanzibar Sultan


South


African


Link


With


Pioneer Zionist


Dr. D'Arbella Scholar, Traveller

and Humanitarian


ON the occasion of the present-cele-
bration of the foundation of the
South African Zionist Federation
some fifty years ago the present
writer considers it a privilege to res-
cue from oblivion, one of the most
remarkable Jews ever to have visited
South Africa. He was one who seems
to have received as yet scant atten-
tion from the Jewish historian, of
either to-day or of. yesteryear. He
certainly deserves, to be remembered
not only as a pioneer Zionist but,
also, as one of the most outstanding
personalities of the Palestinian Jew-
ish scene of the last quarter of the
nineteenth century.
The man I refer to is Dr. Isaac-
some know him, too, as Israel-Greg-
ory d'Arbella respecting whom little
information as yet can be gleaned
from Jewish reference sources in this
country.
An ardent Jew who was interested
in the welfare of his people wherever
he sojourned, Dr. d'Arbella--his real
surname is unknown to the writer
at the moment-has an association
with this sub-continent which was of
an unusual kind. His was, indeed, a
most varied career, details of which
I have been able to obtain as a con-
sequence of perusing some of the
Jewish periodical literature of his
age, notably the London "Jewish
Chronicle."
Served In
Russo-Turkish War
A Russian Jew, he was first a stu-
dent of the Imperial Medical School
of St. Petersburg, following which
he attended the University of Rome
where he graduated as an M.D.
He returned, subsequently, to his
native land where, in the course of
his seven years' military service, he
fought in the Russo-Turkish War of
1877. He was wounded on the bat-
tlefield, and such was the personal
gallantry he displayed in the latter
sphere that he was decorated by the
Czar-a distinction which very few
of his co-religionists in Eastern
Europe then gained. Incidentally, a
brother of his, also, at the time
served as an artillery officer in the
Russian army. All told, he received
six or seven medals from a number
of European sovereigns.
Elkan Nathan Adler, one of Anglo-
Jewry's foremost bibliophiles, who, as
a young man met him in Jerusalem in
October, 1888, said, "his inlaid guns
and diamond-hilted sword are a
sight to see."
He was not in Europe for long, and
before the 1870's closed he was to
be found in Africa. I am as yet un-
acquainted with --the -reasons that
ultimately prompted him to come
here. At any rate, at the turn of
the 1880's, he lived in Cairo, where,
by the way, he became a friend of
the Khedive.
Not long afterwards he made his
way to Zanzibar where he lived for
some years not only as a private
physician to the local Sultan but
also as surgeon major-general of the
later's army. "In that capacity,"
notes a contemporary, "he was able
to do much for the advancement of
civilization, and rendered good ser-


vice to British interests, as Sir John
Kirk has testified. He vaccinated ail
the dusky members of Stanley's fol-
lowing, when that adventurous trav-
eller started on his last journey into
the interior of Africa, and was the
last European to bid him farewell.
The great explorer confided to him
that he had other objects in view,
besides that of relieving Emir Bey.
To such a degree had the Sultan
of Zanzibar become attached to him
that on one occasion, late in the year
1887, he was charged by the latter
to deliver, on his behalf, a certain
communication to the Khedive at
Alexandria. Following his ac-
knowledgment of the document con-
cerned, the Khedive gave a cordial re-
ception to Dr. d'Arbella on whom he
conferred the title of Bey.
Congregation
In Zanzibar
In spite of all this, he was not the
one to forsake his Faith even at a
place like Zanzibar, where, incident-
ally,-he helped to organise the first
Jewish congregation. States the Lon-
don "Jewish Chronicle" of May 15,
1885-the source is quoted by an In-
dian Jewish historian, Kehimkar,
whose work on the Bene-Israel was
re-published some years ago by Dr.
I. Olsvanger, a well-known figure in
South African Zionist circles of some
two decades ago-"the small Jewish
colony at Zanzibar, owing to the ex-
tension of commerce with that Afri-
can country, has within recent
months received a slight accretion to
its numbers. Dr. Gregory d'Abrella
mentions that that colony now con-
sists of seven Europeans, more than
a dozen of the Bene-Israel from In-
dia, and two or three Arab Jews
from Aden. The Jewish residents
are sufficiently numerous to form a
congregation, but this is as yet im-.
possible owing to the difference, be-
tween the rites of the Ashkenazim
and the Sephardim, which are still
very marked in the East, and partly
also owing to the unfriendly attitude
observed by Arab Jews of the pure
type towards the Bene-Israel, whom
they -regard as half-caste."
Zanzibar, .however, was not the
only place of African interest he
knew; he was as well acquainted with
the Durban of 1884 respecting whose
Jewry he penned this account which
was reprinted by the "Cape Times"
.of September 10, 1884, from the
London "Jewish Chronicle."
"The second day after my arrival
at Durban I rambled over the neat
little town to find some trace of a
synagogue,, but all my migrations had
been without avail," he wrote. "A
letter of introduction to a Durban-
ite merchant, who also happened to
be an Israelite, put me on the right
track. Following his directions, I
found in Grey Street a neat little
building, very simple but very decent,
which periodically served the Metho-
dists as a chapel. At the back of this
synagogue is a cottage for the mar-
riage officer, as a chazan, shochet
and mohel is styled here.
"The next Sabbath I went to the
Synagogue to' hear the service. There
was not more than a minyan, and all


STANDARD


the congregation consisted of Russian
and Polish Jews. The poor fellows
arc all artisans, getting, a. living by
their several handicrafts; they have
collected some money amongst them-
selves and bought the present build-
ing, and are supporting the minister.
There are a great many German
Jews, who do not take any.part in'
this laudable undertaking, and have
completely left Judaism, having in-
ter-married with Christians, and who
try to hide their Jewish origin; but
they are despised by both Christians
and Jews..
"The greatest speaker in the Leg-
islative Council, and the best bar-
rister in Durban," added Dr. d'Arbel-
la, "is Mr. Escombe, of Jewish ori-
gin, and I heard many colonists say,
'he is clever because he is a Jew.' If
Natal receives Responsible Govern-
ment he is pointed to as the future
Premier.
"A great many English and for-
eign Jews are in trade, the names dis-
played on their shops and stores in-
dicating who the owners are to a
man who knows something of Jew-
ish names: Emanuel, Samuels, Sha-
pira, Weinstock, Adler, Woolf, Pin-
cus, Gumpelsohn, Isaacs, etc. There
are many jewellers in Durban and
Pietermaritzburg who have the clas-
sical names of Levi and Cohen. Many
have their wives with them and


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THE ZIONIST RECORiD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


PAGE THIRTY-THREE


By

S. A. ROCHLIN

their children attend a Hebrew class
held at the house of ehe minister.
"Next week," he concluded. "I am
going up-country, and shall certainly
write to you about the Jews in the
Transvaal gold fields, where they are
said to be found in very large num,-
bers."

Described Durban Jewry
Not only was he content to describe
Durban Jewry in the columns of the
London "Jewish Chronicle" of 1884
but he also gave practical expression
of his interest in the local commun-,
ity by donating, in Septembef, 1884,,
the sum of twelve guineas to its
funds. It is only lately I have dis-
covered this fact whilst perusing
the earliest membership book of the
Durban Hebrew Congregation which
I then found to be in the possession
of Mr. Philip Wartski, who passed
away earlier this year.
So far I have not been able to
corroborate the statement whether
(Continued on page 16)





PAGE TWENTY-TWO


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Greetings from the

Executive of the



Jewish Agency

and the


World Zionist Organisation
W RMEST greetings from the Jewish Agency and the World
t Zionist Organisation on the occasion of the South African
Federation's jubilee, symbolising 50 years of unceasing activity
and sacrifice to the Zionist ideal.
South African Jewry was always among the first to respond
to the great needs of the hour, and to help restore the Jewish
people to their land and to establish the Jewish State.
We are confident that you, our brothers in South Africa,
will mark this occasion by re-dedicating yourselves anew to
Israel's present-day struggle, when for the first time in history
20,000 of our people, men, women and children, reached in one
month the shores of their homeland, thus consolidating the
Jewish State.-EXECUTIVE, JEWISH AGENCY AND WORLD
ZIONIST ORGANISATION.


SOUTH AFRICAN CHALUTZIM
(Continued from page 21)


neighbours, Kfar Giladi-to-day a
massive modern farm village; defiant
Mettula, up on the Lebanese boun-
dary; Dan, Daphne, Kfar Szold,
whose fields are in the Syrian's
frontlines. But this lusty infant of
the Huleh is full of rich promise.
We visited Phyllis and Yoel Palgi
and the youthful Palgi. Yoel is re-
covering from a motor accident in
which he fractured his leg.
Classic Defence
At Degania Aleph we .talked to
Betty Horvitz, wife of Gideon
Baratz. She talked of this pioneer
settlement's classic defence against
the mechanised power of the Arab
Legion as if she were talking of a
Muizenberg summer season.
We could not reach Ain Hanatziv,
where several of our Mizrachi youth
-including some evacuated from
Kfar Etzion-are settled. The botz
made it impossible to get through.
From all reports our settlers down
there include some of the best
material that has come from South
Africa.
The fighting prowess of Miz-
rachi youth is deservedly famous
throughout Israel.
Cut Off for Months
Timorim is perched in the hills of
Nazareth, which nestles comfortably
less than a mile away. It was not
very comfortable living up in these
parts until a month ago when Nazar-
eth was taken from the Arabs. The
settlers at Timorim were cut off for
months, lived in the rocky shelters
hewn out of the hill and had a ring-
side view of the fighting in the hills
around them-except those who were
involved in the operations. They
now sit and watch Yoel Palgi's para-
troop division do its operations on
the plains of Esdraelon below them.
The settlement is less than six
months old, has sixty-five members
of whom 30 are South Africans.
Another fourteen are expected soon.
Electricity is being installed, a trac-
tor has arrived, a flock of sheep is


due next, and they expect the first
arrival for the Beit Yeladim soon.
In the meanwhile there has been
much discussion as to whether a
Special Beit Yeladim (children's
home) should be built, or whether
the first child should have a room
beside its parents.
From Timorim, one looks over the
circular Nahalal, the airfield of
Ramat David, the forests of King
George, Balfour and Masaryk. No
wonder Maisie Zagganoff said: "Poli-
tics seem so remote to us here. We
are far more interested in Zionist
politics in South Africa than we are
here."
Maisie's husband, Isaac, and Karl
Zilberman hid gone to Haifa on kib-
butz business. Karl holds the ele-
vated positions of both Secretary and
Treasurer of Timorim-he is the "big
shot" around the place and is tre-
mendously admired. The Zionists of
Mayfair should have a special in-
terest in Timorim, the majority of
whom come from Johannesburg's
western suburb. But the Yeoville and
Berea chaverim are determined to
end Mayfair's stranglehold soon if
they can, Maisie and Solly Myers as-
sured me.
A few Cape Town chevra aim to
eliminate the entire domination of
Johannesburg. But all agree that
while they want their suburban lands-
leit to be in the majority, they don't
care much where they come from, so
long as they come-because the
beautiful fields below Nazareth are
crying out for labour to work them.*
Nearby at Beit Kesher, 10 South
Africans have moved in and formed
the garin (nucleus) of a useful unit
which needs to be developed as soon
as possible.
This is the period of South.African
aliyah. One has that feeling -wer-fe-
ever one goes-but the question is
whether this aliyah that has been
started with much promise will be
fulfilled soon. I know that the
chalutzic spirit is strong among the
youth of our country. Zionist leader-
ship must be directed towards canali-
sing it with vigour and enthusiasm.










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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, -1)436EMBER 10. 1949-


PAGE .EIGHTEEN





-TH- .^tS_'I' RECORD. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


"Pixy Pix"
3ir,-In your recent "Fac
(issue dated Friday, Nove
there are two statements
fact, are rather pixy.
The given Hebrew name
ring can in all probability
to the family 'of "mad herr
correct name of a normal
"Dag-maluah."
More pixy is the other
that "The Rose is never me:
the Bible." It is enough to
while to that Garden o:
naturally: The Song of S
one can easily pick more th
dozen of lovely-lively fresh
So-why mix pix with f


P,O. Box 14
Lusaka, N.R


Yours, etc.,
A. BORN
1,
.


Neglected
Communities
Sir,-I see that, according
port of a Board of Deputies
Conference, which appeared
"Zionist Record" last week,
plaint is made that the sma
communities are neglected
the course of fund-raising.
As one who, after living
years in a small country to


newcomer to Johannesburg, I can
sympathise with that complaint.
Separated from the large Jewish
communities, in many instances, by
hundreds of miles, these Jews thirst
in vain for a "Yiddishen wort" but
the only time they are honoured is
when there is a campaign, when the
speakers and lecturers are there, like
bees around a honey pot.
Yet it is these Jews who are the
backbone of all fund-raising efforts,
giving, in proportion, far more than
their city brethren. In the towns
there are thousands who are never
even approached, whilst in the small
centres there is hardly anyone who
does not contribute.
Surely our national organizations
should pay far more heed to the
needs and desires of these small cen-
tres and see that speakers should
visit these centres not only during
campaign' periods but at frequent
intervals right through the year.
Frankly, I think the remedy lies
with these country centres them-
selves. If only they would decide on
concerted action and declare that
they will refuse to contribute to any
funds unless speakers are sent to
them at frequent intervals, and not
only for campaign purposes, they
would soon bring our national or-
ganisations to heel.
I realise, of course, the practical
difficulties and the costs involved, and
I would therefore suggest that the
main national organizations, such as


1RE ED I 0
EDITOR

the S.A. Zionist Federation, the S.A.
Jewish Board of Deputies and the
;ts in Pix" S.A. Board of Jewish Education
mber 26), should establish a special lectureship
which, in fund, to be maintained by these or-
ganisations- for the sole purpose of
for a her- sending lecturers to the smaller cen-
refer only tres at frequent intervals.
ings"; the At present, with each organisation
herring is working independently, overlapping
in some centres and sheer neglect of
statement other centres often take place. -
ntioned in You have the spectacle of the Zio-
turn for a nist Federation sending a speaker to
f Scent- a centre and two weeks later the.
ongs-and Board of Deputies sending one of its
an half a lecturers to the very same centre.
roses. Then months pass before a visiting
facts? speaker is heard in that town again.
You also have cases where one
STEIN, centre is visited by two, three, four
and more speakers from various or-
ganisations, whilst another centre,
for some reason or another, does not
get even one speaker. "
By having a common panel of,
speakers to serve all the national or-
ganisations and by drawing up a
proper timetable ensuring that every
centre be visited, the present state of
affairs would be done away with.
The panel of speakers should be of
g to a re- so diverse a nature that it should
Regional contain speakers able to serve the
ed in the needs of all the organizations and
the corn- the timetable should be drawn up in
caller rural such a manner that every cehtre
except in should be visited at least once a year
by someone able to expound the view
for many of each organisation represented on
wn and a the scheme.


Yours, etc.,
G. KRAMER.
130 Becker Street,
Bellevue.

Public Spirited,

Families
Sir,-I wonder how many of your
readers were struck by the fact that
no less than three Gerings figured
prominently in your news columns
last week. And was it mere co-inci-
dence or was it intentional that the
three "stories" dealing with the three
Gerings followed each other in
three successive pages?
On page 17 was the report of the
opening of the Israeli United Appeal
Campaign in Durban at which Mr. B.
Gering, chairman of the S.A. Zionist
Federation, was one of the principle
speakers.
On page 18 you had details about
the Transvaal Automobile Club Din-
ner for the Israeli United Appeal in
the capable and energetic hands of
Mr. I. Gering, the vice-president of
the Automobile Club.
On the very next page there was
the report of the Witwatersrand He-
brew Benevolent Association, of
which Mr. D. Gering was elected
president.
There is yet another Gering, Mr.
Jack Gering, who plays a prominent
role in the life of Israel.
This is indeed a family record of
national and communal service of


which any family can justly be
proud.
I can. think of only one other Jew-
ish family in South Africa that can
compete with the Gering family in
public service and that is the Dunsky
family, which can boast of having
two members on the S.A. Zionist
Federation, a third member who is a
leader of the Zionist Youth in this
country, and yet a fourth who seems
to be following in the footsteps of
the other three brothers, not to men-
tion the other members of the family
who all play active parts in the Zio-
nist movement in Germiston.
It would be interesting to hear if
any of your readers can give details
of any other Jewish families in this'
country with similar records.
Yours, etc.,
J. MEYEROWITZ.
142, Jan Smuts Avenue.


EXCELLENT YIDDISH REVUE
AT HIS MAJESTY'S
JUDGED by pure musical-hall
standards the latesT Yiddish
revenue at His Majesty's ("Broadway
Star") is altogether excellent Un-
like some of the previous perfor-
mances there is no over-abundance of
hackneyed dialogue and forced
humour.
Every one of the actors has a
chance, to display his talents and
perhaps for the first time, Aron
Alexandroff was able to show what
he can do. His rendering of a ghetto
poem was a masterpiece of acting
and the manner in which the audi-
ence responded to him showed that
when it comes to serious acting
"Johannesburg can take it" and need
not always be fed on "Ga-ga." He
got the biggest applause of the even-
ing and well deserved it.
Not that we decrv light-hearted
comedy, but if it be Amusic-hall stuff
we want it good and solid, without
too much melodramatic sob-stuff and
pseudo-tragic nonsense.
That is why "Broadway Star" is
most pleasing. Every one of the
actors has something to do and does
it well. Anga Rappel, for example,
held the audience spell-bound with
her character sketch of a teen-ager:
excellent mimicry, good sfiging and'
good dancing. Samuel Silberberg
was not lost on the stage as on
earlier occasions. He let himself go
and produced a delightful Litvak,
whose every movement evoked
laughter and merriment.
Of the local artists Zygielbaum
and Farber were funny, while Eng-
lander and Angorin moved with ease
in minor roles. Our South African
actors well deserved the tribute paid
to them by Perlman. The latter
again attrajed much attention. "Five
Cents" waswdelightful and the "Ben-
zine-song" caught on.
G.


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PAGE FORTY-SEVEN


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10,: 1948


PAGE ONE


PLANS TO SETTLE A MILLION JEWS


IN ISRAEL

J\ TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-Plans are being prepared to settle
,000 Jews in Israel within the next five years. Immigrants
1,0 ow coming into the country at the rate of 20,000 per month.
This was reported by Mr. Abraham Harzfeld, head of the Settle-
ment Department of the Histadruth, during the celebration of
the reopening of the wing of the Jewish Agency Building, hous-
ing the Jewish Foundation Fund, which was blown up last


spring.
Mr. Harzfeld stated that 35 new
Jewish settlements had been estab-
lished since- the termination of the
mandate in the middle of May. Fifty
more settlements are to be estab-
lished within the next six months.
Two settlements were established
to-day, but details are still unavail-
able.
The wing of the building has now
been completely repaired and only
minor scars of the original damage
caused- by the explosion are still
visible.


D.P. Camps

Empty!
ROME, Wednesday. With
the departure for Israel of 238
Jewish immigrants from Italian
D.P. camps the mass emigra-
tion to the Jewish State from
Italy has been completed, ac-
cording to a statement by one of
the officials in charge of the
camps.
In future there will only be
small batches of emigrants
leaving for Israel from the
camps in this country, which
have been emptying steadily
during the past few months.



Anti-Everything

Except Himself
Comment on Douglas Reed
MONTREAL, Wednesday. The
Chief Librarian of the Public Lib-
rary in Toronto has ordered slips to
be pasted into copies of the notori-
ous book "From Smoke to Smother"
by Douglas Reed. The slips state:
"Readers should be warned that this
book expresses the extreme and in-
dividualistic views of its writer. He
is not only anti-HitleriAt, anti-Fas-
a1ist, anti-Zionist, anti-British Labour
government; he is anti most things
and most people-but firmly pro-
himself."
"Library News," a Canadian mag-
azine, has withdrawn Reed's book
from the list of publications recom-
mended to its readers and states:
"In Reed's book the author's anti-
Semitic prejudices ) with which no
sane and fair pers'A could ever agree,
lead him into .tch fantastic flights
lof imagination as to discredit his
view on the particular subject."


AND NOW WE CONTROL
THE ATOM BOMB!
NEW YORK, Wednesday.-Jona-
than Ellswoith Perkins, one of the
leading anti-Semites in this country,
is presently distributing a six-page
pamphlet entitled "The Jews Have
Got the Atom Bomb" which alleges
that Jews in this country, led by Ber-
nard Baruch and David Lilienthal,
have obtained control of the secret
of the atom bomb in order to gain
power, it was reported here by the
"New York Post." The pamphlet,
mailed from Delavan, Wisconsin, of-
fers for sale a number of pieces of
anti-Semitic propaganda, including
copies of the forged "Protocols of the
Elders of Zion."


Renewed Fighting On

Egyptian Front
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-Fighting flared up on the Egyptian front
again this week, when Israeli patrols, 12 miles south-east of Gaza, in the
vicinity of the settlement of Nirim, encountered Egyptian sappers who
were mining the roads between Jewish settlements in the Negev and who
had damaged the Negev pipeline. The Egyptians withdrew hurriedly when
they were discovered by the Israeli troops.


Following these clashes during
which the Egyptians were forced to
abandon a strategic height, the
Egyptians on Tuesday used about 20
tanks in the area in support of their
sappers.
The Israeli forces engaged the
Egyptian tanks, destroying five of
them and. forcing the rest to re-
treat.
It is reported that the tanks are
British made and of a type never.
used previously by the Egyptians.
The position, at the time of
cabling, is still fluid.
Commenting on this incident, an
Israeli military spokesman stated -
that the Egyptian army had been
active in this, area since the third
week in November, indicating that
the intentions of the Egyptians were
not peaceful.


New Road To Jerusalem


Officially Opened
TEL AVIV, Tuesday.---Mr. David Ben Gurion, Prime Minis-
ter of Israel, on Tuesday afternoon officially opened a new road
to Jerusalem called "Kvish Hagvurah" ("Heroism Road"). This
road connects the coastal plain with Jerusalem and by-passes.
the Arab areas around Latrun. It was built within eight weeks
by the Israeli Army 'and recruited labour, including a large num-
ber of Arab villagers.


The new road is 27 miles long, has
a metal base and connects in the
vicinity of Rehovoth. It links up
with the Old Jerusalem Road near
Rehovoth. It is only five miles
longer than the main Jerusalem-Jaffa
Road of which the Arabs hold a small
but vital section.
When the corridor to Jerusalem
wvas widened during the military
operations in July, the Israeli army
decided to build road constructions
made of a special mixture. During
the first week in May Haganah re-
alised that the saving of Jerusalem
from starvation was only possible by
building a road through the hilly
country south of Latrun.
During May hundreds of Israeli
soldiers, working under shellfire,
built the 10 miles long Burma Road.
This primitive, so-called Burma
Road saved Jewish Jerusalem during
the city's most critical period.
It became obvious, however, that
the Burma Road was unsuitable for
heavy traffic in winter.
Addressing the gathering at the
official ceremony, Mr. Ben Gurion
said: "The battle for re-opening the
Jerusalem Road was a tragic and
heroic episode, and was the turning
point in the battle for liberation."
At the same time the foundation-
stone was laid, on a hill overlooking
the area through which the road
passes. The stone is in the form of
a memorial statue to the heroes who
died in the battle for the opening of
the road. The ceremony ended with
a parade of all those units which


participated in the fight to establish
the corridor and those forces which
built and maintained the road
against aggression.
While the road was being opened
two new settlements were estab-
lished in the area through which it
passes.
To protect the road permanently
the Israeli Government has already
prepared a plan for setting up a
string of settlements between Jeru-
salem and Tel Aviv.


Mysterious Disappearance
Of Communist
Secretary
TEL AVIV, Wednesday. A
special committee yesterday began
inquiries into the mysterious disap-
pearance of Sioma Mironianski,
secretary of the Communist Party,
who has not been seen since his
arrest in the summer of 1941.
A former ,C.I.D. official, Michael
Cohen, who was sentenced two
months ago to 15 years' imprison-
niefit for the murder of his wife,
told the inquiry committee that he
saw three Jewish police officers brut-
ally torturing Mironianski sevep
years ago in order to extract from
hi-i information concerning the mem-
Lcuihiip and activities of the Com-
munist Party.
The witness said that the torture
of prisoners by the Jaffa C.I.D. at
that time was a daily occurrence.
Cohen alleges that the Jewish
police inspectors, Shamai, Ben Eph-
raim and Steinberg were involved,
the latter having struck the fatal
blow on Mironanski's head.
Mironianski's body was later re-
moved while the officers warned the
witness not to disclose the incidents
he had witnessed. He feared to dis-
close this murder during the British
rule.
Originally when Mironianski dis-
appeared, the Communist Party, then
illegal, published illegal posters ac-
cusing the officers of the murder of
their secretary.
All the three po Iice officers
at present occupy prominent posi-
tions in the Israeli police. They are
continuing to hold their positions
while the inquiry is being cqjiducted.


AT THE UNO ASSEMBLY: Mr.
Moshe Shertok enjoys a joke
with Dr. Ralph Bunche, Acting
U.N. Mediator


Support the Israeli United Appeal





THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Women Shared In The Responsibilities


O-DAY when the S.A. Zionist
Federation is celebrating its
Golden Jubilee, our thoughts go back
to the beginning of women's partici-
pation in Zionist activities in this
country, and one contemplates with
a certain degree of satisfaction, the
advance made since that time.
Until 1932, the women for the
most part, played their role only
through general Zionist Societies and
there were few separate women's
societies in existence the Bnoth
Zion of Johannesburg (later the Jo-
hannesburg Women's Zionist Lea-
gue), the Bnoth Zion of Cape Town'
and small groups in Pretoria, Port
Elizabeth and Oudtshoorn. These
societies, however, were in no way
linked together and had no specific
women's tasks to perform. They
were content to assist in certain
J.N.F. activities. The one exception
to this occurred in 1924, when the
first women's Keren Hayesod cam-
paign in the world was inaugurated
in some of the larger centres by Dr.
Alexander Goldstein, during his visit
to South Africa.
Unification
It was only in 1929, that the first
suggestions came for a unification of
women's work, and when in 1931 the
S.A. Zionist Conference was called,
the women decided to hold a semi-
official conference of their- own to
discuss their work.
It was in 1932, through the efforts
of Mrs. Kate Gluckmann (the first
woman to sit en the S.A. Zionist
Federation Executive, representing
women's work) supported at first
only by Mrs. Ethel Hayman and Mr.
Janower (both members of that Ek-
ecutive) that the Federation agreed
to the formation of the S.A. Wo-
men's Zionist Counc'l. Some mem-
bers of the Executive at that time
felt that this would bring about the
downfall of Zionism in this country,
but to-day we can afford to smile at
that viewpoint.
The Women's Council was anxious
to arouse more fully the national con-
sciousners of Jewish women through-
out South Africa and the Rhodesias,
and to organise them as an effective
force within the .Z'onist organisa--
tion. The aim of the Council was
also to co-ordinate the work of exist-
ing societies and to establish new
ones throughout the country. It is
a Department of the Federation by
which it is guided on all major mat-
ters of policy.
The first president was Dr. Hedwig
Reinhold, -,nd the first vice-president
the late Mrs. Clara Patley. Mrs.


DR. DEBORAH KATZEN
President of the Council (1941-47)
and National Chairman of Youth
Aliyah.


JENNY GREENBERG
Who was President of the Council
for eight years.

Thousands of Garments
Apart from these activities for
WIZO women, as far back as 1934,
formed themselves into sewing and
knitting groups, and thousands of
garments for infants and older chil-
dren have been sent to the various
WIZO institutions. During the
second world war and during the
present war in Israel, very large
numbers of soldier's comforts have
been made by these groups.
The President and the two vice-
Presidents of the Women'3 Council
sit on the WIZO Galuth Executive;
and in 1935 for the first time South
Africa sent delegates to the WIZO
World Conference; this was con-
tinued until the war in 1939. In
1946 South Africa had a country-
wide election and seven elected dele-
gats attended the first past-war
WIZO Conference held in Basle, at
the same time as the 1946 Zionist
Congress. As one of the largest con-
tributors to WIZO, South Africa is
entitled to a strong delegation at
these conferences, in order to be able
to direct the future policy of that
organisation.
All these efforts for WIZO have,
however, in no way interfered with
other important Zionist activities,
and there is no dOubt that to the
women goes the credit for putting
the day to day J.N.F. work in this
country on a firm basis. Since the
day that women undertook the re-
sponsibility of placing and clearing
regularly all J.N.F. Blue Boxes, the
insignificant proceeds of the Blue
Box have attained globular 'figures.
Every women's society undertakes a
quota for the J.N.F. in addition to
this work, and under the Council's
constitution the J.N.F. has the right
to all monies raised through fune-


Reinhold was followed as president,
after a year of office, by the late
Mrs. Jenny Greenberg, who remained
president for eight years. It was
under her regime that the Council
grew to become a large and impor-
tant body; her untimely death was
a severe loss to Zionism in this
country. It was when Mrs. Greenberg
took office that Mr. Kate Gluckmann
became the vice-chairman of the
Council and she has served the Coun-
cil in that capacity ever since. From
1941 until last year Dr. Deborah
Katzen held the reins of this fast
growing organisation.
Affiliated to WIZO
It was in 1932 too, through the
efforts of the present First Lady in
Israel, Mrs. Vera Weizmann( then
President of W.I.Z.O.) that the S.A.
Women's Zionist Council became
affiliated to the Women's Inter-
national Zionist Organisation; but
with its constituent bodies, it al-
ways retained its broader Zionist
character, as a general Zionist or-
ganisation, because it wished to be
associated with 'every aspect of the
upbuilding of Israel.


ETHEL HAYMAN
Former member of the Zionist Fede-
ration and Chairman of the Keren
Hayesod.

It was in that year that the women
requested the Federation to allocate
to W.I.Z.O. fifty per cent. from all
women's Keren Hayesod campaigns.
This request was granted, and since
that time the women's campaigns in
this country have been known as
WIZO Keren Hayesed campaigns
(with the exception of the 1948 bi-
ennial campaign, which was known
as the Wizo Emergency Campaign.)
The Council has brought out many
outstanding personalities as dele-
gates for their campaigns. They
have included amongst many distin-
guished names Mrs. Vera Weiz-
mann, Mrs. Rebecca Sieff, chairman
of World WIZO, Mrs. Hadassah
Samuel, chairman of WIZO in Is-
rael, and Mrs. Rosa Ginzberg, trea-
surer of WIZO in Israel.

Growing Programme
Until 1942 the Council's constitu-
tion did not permit any other finan-
cial contributions to WIZO; but by
that time its role in Israel-or Pal-
estine, as it then was-had become
such -an important one, due to its
growing programme of work (which
embodied vocational and other train-
ing;' infant and child welfare work;
care of the immigrant women and
children, and other activities in the
field of social services, often ren-
dered by a state) that it was decided
that additional financial support
from South Africa was essential. It
was therefore agreed, with the con-
sent of the Federation to increase


W.40's allocation from women's
campaigns to seventy-five per cent.
Moreover it was agreed upon that an
annual WIZO Month be in -ugurated.
Thn monies from this WIZO
Month for the first few years were
to be earmarked for the building of
a new Mothercraft Train ng Centre
in Tel Aviv and its equipment; since
the existing building was far too
small to house the many under-
nourished, weak and prematurely
born infants who required' to be
nursed back to health; and because
South African women were anxious,
too, to see that such an essential in-
stitution should have the -necessary
accommodation for the nurses who
were receiving their training there,
under excellent supervision.


Anna Franks
President, S.A. Women's Zionist
Executive Council.

tions, with certain exceptions de-
cided by conference.
Although the Youth Aliyah was
until 1946 P. separate organisation,
the Council and its constituent
Societ es have played an important
part in all Youth Aliyah campaigns
in this country. The National Chair-
man of that organisation since its
inception has been Dr. Deborah Kat-
zen, and its national vice-chairman
is also a woman. Now that Youth
Aliyah-is a department of the Fed-
eration, it has become a regular fea-
ture of our work.
But in addition-to all these activi-
ties, the Council has always stressed
the extreme importance of edu-
cational work. At first this aspect of
our work was not altogether satis-
factory, but through perseverance
we have won through, and many So-
cieties throughout the country now
fully appreciate the fact that with-
out a full knowledge of our cultural
heritage and present-day work in
Israel, practical achievement must of
necessity be limited.
The Council issues reading
material for sewing group's and for
societies. Various titled News Di-
gests have been published from time
to time: it is the Council which has
since 1947 been responsible --
through its educational sub-commit-
(Continued on page 36)


DR. HEDWIG REINHOLD
First President of the S.A. Women's
Zionist Executive Council


PAGE THIRTY-FIVE

TBy


Of Zionist Progress




"-SBVMPAGE TWELVE

Important NEWS!!!
to

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pleasure in announcing the opening of the
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manufacturing
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Laminated Boards-Veneers
to specific trade requirements. Quality of
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the technical management of fully
trained overseas staff.

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Factory, Boksburg-Benoni Roads, Industrial Sites,
Boksburg East.


Sales Enquiries to:
P.O. Box 5650


22 BOK STREET, corner Twist Street
JOHANNESBURG Phone 44-7191


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


II


,"If f'r O "' ' 'I .vii '\ I I



PIcT RIAL


SERVICE
TO THE ADVERTISING
AND PRINTING TRADES
FOR ALL
PRINTING BLOCKS




PH ONEWS'S3-77/5 KCD* w 61


WE HELPED TO BUILD ZIONISM
L. R U B I N, Established 1S96

JOHANNESBURG'S PIONEER BOOKSELLERS

For 53 years the firm of L. RUBIN has contributed towardsthe growth of Zionism and the dissemination of Jewish know-
ledge by bringing Jewish books to the homes of South African Jewry. . ,2


Jews scattered in all parts of the country, traders in outlying districts,
settlers in remote areas, from Cape Town to Nairobi, have turned to
RUBIN'S for their Hebrew, Yiddish and Anglo-Jewish books and
periodicals.
The firm of RUBIN'S was always glad to be of service to the' com-
munity. To its founder, the late Mr. Liebman Rubin, and to his successors,
it was a labour of love to bring the message of Judaism to practically
every Jewish home.
Most of our leading Zionists in this country have turned to our book-
shelves for inspiration.. We are proud of the fact that on this Golden
Jubilee of the S.A. Zionist Federation, we can humbly claim that we have
helped in the advancement of the great cause.
As in the past, we shall continue to bring the message of Judaism
to Jewish readers throughout the country.
L. RUBIN has distributed the "Zionist Record" and numerous other
Zionist publications from the very first day of the inception of the firm.


THE LATE MR. L. RUBIN
We recall with pride the pioneers of Zionism in South Africa who patronised our firm and we greet the present
Zion on this momentous occasion.


builders of






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIO.Y, DECEMBER 10, 1945


PAGE THIRTY-TWO


GOLDEN


ANTHONY JOEL LEADER. In-
scribed on the occasion of his birth,
14th May, 1948, by his grandparents
Mr. and Mrs.-H. Kremer.
MR. JACOB GITLIN. Inscribed on
the completion of his term of office
as Chairman of the Palestine Mari-
time League by the Palestine Mari-
time League of Cape Town, South
Africa, in appreciation of his wise
and effective leadership and as a tri-
bute to an admired senior colleague.
AARON AND EDITH ROSE
SHANDLING. Inscribed on the oc-
casion of their marriage, 26th' Au-
gust, 1948, by their father Louis
Freedman. Cape Town.
MR. ERICH SCHRAGENHEIM.
Inscribed by the First Natal Zionist
Conference, held at the Durban Jew-
ish Club, Sunday, 6th June, 1948, in
recognition of his valuable services
rendered to our National Cause.
MRS. MILLICENT BROOMBERG.
,inscribed by the Durban Women's
Zionist League for 15 years unbroken
and devoted service to the cause of
Zionism. Durban.
MISS GERTIE FISHER and MR.
H. BROWN. Inscribed on the occa-
sion of their marriage, 27th August,
1948, by the Union of Jewish Wo-
men, Grahamstown Branch.
ERIKA STEINLAUF and
ERNEST KAHN. Inscribed on the
occasion of their marriage, 27th
June, 1948, by their parents. Johan-
nesburg.


BOOK




MRS. ANNIE GERTRUDE KARK.
Inscribed by the Hillbrow Branch of
the Johannesburg Women's Zionist
League, in recognition of services
rendered.
ANITA RUBIN (Nee NOWOSEN-
ITZ). Inscribed in commemoration
of her Aliyah to Israel, by the Jew-
ish Community of Randfontein.
PHILIP NOWOSENITZ. Inscribed
in commemoration of his Aliyah to
Israel by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
DAN GOLDBLATT. Inscribed in
commemoration of his Aliyah to Is-
rael, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
HARRY GOLDSTEIN. Inscribed
in commemoration of his Aliyah to
Israel, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein .
MICHAEL KRUSS. Inscribed in
commemoration of his Aliyah to Is-
rael, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
MAX KANGISSER. Inscribed in
commemoration of his Aliyah to Is-
rael, by the Jewish Community of
Randfontein.
GORDON MANDELZWEIG. In-
scribed in commemoration of his Ali-
yah to Israel, by the Jewish Com-
munity of Randfontein.
JULIE PEARL. Inscribed in com-
memoration of her Aliyah to Israel,
by the Jewish Community of Rand-
fontein.


efer M



BAR MITZVAH
gg^^ ^g~gg-g~gg=ga==g^.=~gss^^g~gg=^gg^ggg==ggI


BASIL SELWYN BORTZ. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 20th November, 1948, by his
parents Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Bortz.
Benoni.
SAMUEL GROLMAN. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 27th
November, 1948, by his parents Mr.
and Mrs. M. Grolman. Benoni.
NEVILLE NORDAUX RUBIN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 4th December, 1948, by the
JExecutive of the Bnoth Zion Associa-
tion. Cape Town.
DAVID BERTIL FRIEDMAN. In-
scribed on -the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 23rd October, 1948, by his
parents Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Friedman.
Durban.
MICHAEL GEORGE MOSHAL.
Inscribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 30th October, 1948, by his
parents Mr. and Mrs. B. Moshal.
Durban.
FREDERICK KAHN. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 6th
November, 1948, by his parents Mr.'
and Mrs. S. Kahn. Durban.
MICHAEL RONALD BEARE. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 27th November, 1948, by
his parents Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
,,Peare. Durban.
ANTHONY BRIAN KAPLAN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-


mitzvah, 9th October, 1948, by his
uncle and aunt Mr. and Mrs. A. Kap-
lan. Durban.
/
KEITH MAISELS. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 30th
October, 1948, by .the Observatory
Branch of the Johannesburg Wo-
men's Zionist League.
ALAN MICHAEL LEVY. Inscribed
on the occasion of his barmitzvah,
26th June, 1948, by his parents Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Levy. Johannesburg.
LESLIE BEREL CLEMANS. In-
scribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 13th November, 1948, by
the Port Elizabeth Women's Zionist
League,
SAMUEL TROCKI. Inscribed on
the occasion of his barmitzvah, 6th
November, 1948, by his parents.
Queenstown.
BERNARD WOHLMAN. Inscribed
on the occasion of his barmitzvah,
13th November, 1948, by his parents
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney WQhlman.
Springs.
RICHARD JONATHAN EPSTEIN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his bar-
mitzvah, 13th November, 1948, by
his grandmother Mrs. Sarah Epstein.
Springs.
NORMAN PANOVKA. Inscribed
on the occasion of his barmitzvah,
4th December, 1948, by Mr. and Mrs.
David Panovka. Springs.


DESMOND KAHN. Inscribed on
the occasion of his birth, 27th Sep-
tember, 1948, by Mrs. Judelman, Mrs.
Syfrin, Mrs. Meyers and Mrs.
Cohen. Benoni.
LEON SHER. Inscribed on the oc-
casion of his birth, 7th October, 1948,
by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Max
Sher. Benoni.
MICHAEL LEON SCHMULIAN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
16th October, 1948, by Mrs. Kahan-
owitz, Mrs. Kelmowitz, Mrs. Philips
and Mrs. Friedstein. Benoni.
PATRICIA VERITY SACKS. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
30th May, 1948, by Mr. and Mrs. B.
Sacks. Bloemfontein.
HAROLD GOLDBERG. Inscribed
on the occasion of his birth, 2nd
June, 1947, by Mr. and Mrs. G.
Goldberg. Bloemfontein.
IVOR HAARBURGER. Inscribed
on the occasion of his birth, 20th
July, 1948, by Mr. and Mrs. H. Haar-
burger. Bloemfontein.
NOLA LANDSMAN. Inscribed on
the occasion of her birth, 17th May,
1947, by her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
M. Landsman. Bloemfontein.
SEON HYMAN. Inscribed on the
occasion of his birth, 28th October,
1946., by his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. B. Chein. Boksburg.
HYLTON ROY RABINOWITZ.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
22nd October, 1948, by his grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Rabino-
witz. Bulawayo.
ANN SIMONE LUBINGER. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
31st August, 1948, by her grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Salber,
Claremont. Cape.
JONATHON ANTHONY FREED-
BERG. Inscribed on the occasion of
his birth, 11th August, 1948, by his
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Freedberg,
Parow. Cape.
JOYCE MERLE WINNETT. In-
scribed on the occasion of her 1st
birthday, 12th November, 1948, by
her parents. Cape Town.
DESIREE ANN GORDON. In-
scribed on her birth, 28th May, 1948,
by her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. I.
M. Gordon, Wynberg. Cape.
MERVYN GANS. Inscribed on the
occasion of his birth, 3rd July,.-1948,
by friends and relations. Durban. ,
BRIAN ERIC LIEBESMAN. In-t
scribed on the occasion of his birth
4th August, 1948, by his parents. Jo-
hannesburg.
BRIAN DENNIS SUSMAN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 10th October, 1948, by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Susman.
Johannesburg.
RAYMOND JEFFRY STEIN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 14th October, 1948, grand-
father, Nathan Abelman. Johainnes-
burg.
PHILIP MORRIS FEINSTEIN.
nscribed on the occasion of his birth,
'25th June, 1948, by his grandmother,
Fanny Fainstein. Johannesburg.
NORMAN NATUS. Inscribed on
the occasion of his birth, Johannes-
burg, 2nd November, 1948, by his
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Wil-
kov. Randfontein.
'MICHAEL JOHN NATHANSON.
Inscribed 'on the occasion of.,his Bris


l]4ilah, 3rd October, 1948, by his
friends. Johannesburg.
CARMEL ARONOWITZ. Inscribed
on the occasion of her birth, 20th
August, 1948, by her grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. H. Aronowitz. Johan-
nesburg.
GEOFFRY MENDELSOHN. In-
scribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 25th November, 1948, by Mr.
and Mrs. .Mendelsohn. Johannesburg.
JEFFREY RONALD FEHLER.
Inscribed on the occasion of his Bris
Milah, 31st October, 1948, by his
grandmother, Mrs. S. Fehler. Johan4
nesburg.
TESSA LYNN TEEGER. Ins-
cribed on the occasion of her birth,
3rd November, 1948, by the Chair-
man and Committee of the Highlands
North Branch of the Johannesburg
Women's ZiZonist League.
OSHER SAMUEL AND EDA
PESSA COHEN. Inscribed on the oc-
casion of their birth, 28th October,
1948, by Mrs. Flora Ben-Dror. Jo-
hannesburg.
RODGER DAVID. Inscribed by his
grandfather, Mr. N. Lincow. Kim-
berley.
ROSALINE HOTZ. Inscribed by
her grandfather, Mr. N. Lincow.
Kimberley.
DAVID DAVIDSON. Inscribed on
the occasion of his birtli, 22nd Oc-
tober, 1948, by Chaya and Israel
Adelson, Krugersdorp.
BEULAH AVRILLE BONER.
Inscribed on the occasion of her birth,
16th January, 1948, by her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. L. Boner. Roode-
poort.
SANDRA SEGALL. Inscribed on
the occasion of her birth, Sea Point,
17th October, 1948, by her great-
grandmother, Mrs. Annie Bernstein,
Port Elizabeth.
LESLEY ANNE BENNUN. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
13th August, 1948, by her grand
parents, Mr.- and Mrs. S. Bennun.
Port Elizabeth.
GRAHAM MARTIN SHULMAN.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
23rd September, 1948, by his par-
ents. Pretoria.
JONATHAN HERBERT BRAUDE.
Inscribed on the occasion of his 2nd
birthday, 2nd March, 1948, by his
grandmother, Mrs. Miriam Ziman,
Pretoria. -
JEANOT CECIL BUISANSKY.
Inscribed on the occasion of his Pid-
yan Haben, September, 1948, by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Buisansky.
Pretoria.
CHERRY RICHMOR. Inscribed by
Mr. S. Chazen for coming first in
her class at the Randfontein Hebrew
School.
HILTON IRVIN SKUY. Inscribed
on the occasion of his birth, 19th Sep-
tember, 1948, by his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. I. Skuy. Springs.
ADEL HELEN STRAUSS. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
13th October, 1948, by her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. S. Strauss. Springs.
- RAYMOND EDWARD CHALOM.
Inscribed on the occasion of his birth,
13th October, 1948, by his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Chalom. Springs.
DAPHNE MARION DAVIDS. In-
scribed on the occasion of her birth,
16th August, 1948, by her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. P. Davids. Springs.






PAGE TWO


House of Commons Debates Recogni


Of Israel

LONDON, Tuesday.-The admission of Israel into UNO was
discussed by the British House of Commons this week. The
discussion ensued following questions put to the Under-Secretary
for Foreign Affairs about the Cyprus detainees.
Mr. Mayhew stated that the view of the British Government
was that Israel's application. at the present juncture was pre-
mature.


Replying to a question about Cy-
prus the Under-Secretary stated
.,that the May truce resolution of the
Security Council had called on all
governments not to introduce fight-
ing personnel in Palestine and into
the Arab states. The attitude of the
British Government was that the
entry into the Jewish area of Pales-
tine of a large number of men of
military age would create a situation
of military advantage' to one party,
thereby defeating the objects of the
truce.
Meanwhile women and children and
men of non-military age were free
to go to Palestine.
MR. IAN MIKARDO (Lab.) asked
how many British personnel were en-
gaged in guarding the detainees.
Mr. Mayhew was unable to reply.


SYDNE Y SILVERMAN
Since the people were ori-
detained under the manda-


tory power whose. jurisdiction has
now ended, what legal or constitu-
tional basis does there exist for de-
priving the liberty of these people?
MR. MAYHEW replied that he
must have notice on the question of
the legal point.
MR. W. McADAM (Lab.) asked
whether the Cyprus Government was
financially responsible for the main-
tenance of the refugees.
MR. MAYHEW replied that the
answer was in the negative.

Even Criminals Have the Right to
Know
DR. SEGAL (Lab.): Since the re-
fugees are now in despair, would it
.not be fair, in the name of humanity
and common decency, to let them
know how many months, or years,
they will have to suffer this enforced
detention. Even criminals have the
right to know that.


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MR. MAYHEW replied
people wehe held in accoi
the U.N. resolution.


SERVICE:
LUXURY:


THE0 ZIONIST RECOI FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10. 1948'
Ill lll llll llllIIIIIIIII IlllllIllllIllll I lllllllll lIllllllllll I lll

tion WE CAN BE

that these PROUD OF
dance with OUR CONTRIBUTION'


MR. SILVERMAN thereupon
asked that the House be informed
what resolution of UNO had asked
the Government to keep these men
unlawfully detained in Cyprus.
MR. MAYHIEW did not accept the
charge that the detention of the Cy-
prus detainees was unlawful.
Admission to UNO
MR. PLATTS MILLS (Lab.) asked
that the Foreign Office should in-
struct the British delegation at UNO
to support the application for the
admission of Israel into the United
Nations.
MR. MAYHEW: The Government
does not wish to exclude the possi-
bility of Jewish entry into UNO at
some stage, but the present appli-
cation is regarded as premature, as
the future of Palestine is still under
discussion in the General Assembly.
Met With Failure
MR. PLATTS MILLS said that
the. policy of the Secretary for War
and the Secretary for Foreign Af-
fairs, who set themselves up against
the Jews in Palestine, had met with
the failure it richly deserved.
"The State of Israel had em-
erged and established itself and
would not be altered by the For-
eign Secretary. Was it not high
time for the Foreign Secretary
to pocket his prestige?"
MR. MAYHEW resented manydof
the assumptions contained in the re-
marks of Mr. Platts Mills.
MR. NORMAN SMITH (Lab.) in-
tervened by saying that the State of
Israel was obnoxious and odious to
most British workmen.
LORD JOHN HOPE (Cons.) said
that the statement by Mr. Platts
Mills would give a wrong and mis-
chievous impression in the United
States.
MR. GALLACHER (Com.) said
that sooner or later Israel must be
recognized. Did not the Minister
agree with the decision of the Labour
Party Conference to keep the pledges
given and to make recognition
sooner.
MR. FANK BYERS (Lab.), while
dissociating himself with some of
the remarks of Mr. Platt Mills, asked
that the Government should recon-
sider the matter because many people
were anxious to see an equitable
solution. He believed that that could
only be done if Israel's application
for admission into UNO was sup-
ported.
MR. MAYHEW sa d that he was
aware of these views but the ques-
tion was how to obtain an equitable
solution. It .was not necessarily
helpful to take the action suggested.
MR. SILVERMAN said in view of
the long standing policy of the Lab-
our Party, the Minister should re-
pudiate the suggestion that the State
of Israel was "obnoxious to British
workmen,"
MR. MAYHEW replied that 'many
insinuations had been made which
ho entirely repudiated.
MR. IVOR THOMAS (Lab.) said
that it would be premature to admit
Israel into UNO when Eire, Portugal,
Italy, Transjordan and Ceylon were
still waiting.
MR. MAYHEW agreed that certain
states had much stronger claims than
Israel.


JACOB GITLIN,
Veteran Zionist

ONLY a year ago we were
able to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the World Zionist
Organisation, and now, on the
occasion of the jubilee of th
S.A. Zionist Federation it i
possible for us to look back and
estimate the great contribution
of South African Zionism to the
progress of our cause.
Few people can realise to-day how
difficult the struggle was in those
early days. Not many in our com-
munity understood what Zionism
would mean for the future of the
Jewish people, and the few workers
who had the cause at heart had to
fight against tremendous odds.'
However, they persevered and even.
tually they built up a strong and
healthy movement. They were for-
tunate in working amongst people
who were traditionally-minded and
with whom the love of Zion was part
of their upbringing.
Now that the Federation is fifty
years old it is right that we should
pay tribute to those stalwarts whi
have raised it to the high place i
now occupies in world Zionist affairs
It is impossible to mention the name
of all those pioneers but we shal
always be grateful to them for hav-
Ing shown the way. It is a matte
for deep regret that they did no
survive to see the establishment o
the State of Israel and the fruits o
their labours. In particular, I would(
like to recall three leaders who ar<
no longer with us, Samuel Goldreicj
and A. M. Abrahams, both past presi
dents of the Federation and m
dearest friend and collaborator, Be
zion Hersch. I shall never be abl
to forget all that Benzlon Hersc
undertook and achieved for Soutl
African Zionism. He devoted him
self, life and soul, to the creation o
a strong movement here, and his un
timely death was one of the greatest
blows we ever had to suffer.
Looking back at this jubilee, w
can be proud of our contribution t
Eretz Israel by our support of th
funds, by our investments, by on
political world and the activities o
those South Africans who haveTet
tied in the homeland. I hope tha
South African Zionists in the year
to come will be privileged to play a
even more distinguished part i
Israel's future.
ll ll lllll l! ! l lll ~l l~l!l !]llll~l ll lll~ l ll l llllll lll~ lll l[ INl l l lllll tl lll


MR.
(Lab.):
ginally


Support the Israeli United Appeal




PAGE FOURTEEN


Helped


To Build The


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ESTABLISHED 1902


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BUILDING MATERIAL MERCHANTS


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We extend our best wishes to the S.A.
Zionist Federation on its 50th Anniversary
and for its continued success.





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and also have a Branch Office in Johannesburg.
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East London Office: P.O. BOX 48
Johannesburg Office: P.O. BOX 1558
Telegraphic Address at all Offices: "STEAD."


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


~II


ii~ --


PATLANSKY BROS.
AND

PATLEY (Pty.) LTD.


!FIRST


IN 1898 FOREMOST IN


1948


Who Have Been Advertisers In

'THE ZIONIST RECORD'

Since Its Inception . .
extend best wishes to the S.A. Zionist
Federation on its 50th Anniversary
and to "The Zionist Record" on its 40th
birthday.
Readers of "The Zionist Record" have always
relied on UNIVERSAL OIL for Household Use.
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OF
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PROGRESS

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Our motto has always been
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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


J. H. ISAACS & CO., LTD.
Established 1902.


A progressive establishment keeps


.1wJ


pace with the growth of a great city


REAL ESTATE
INSURANCE
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HENRY CARO ISAACS Joint Managing .. Alternate: WILFRED ISAACS
AARON JACOB ISRAEL r Directors .. Alternate: LOUIS IRAEL
ALFRED ERNEST TROLLIP, M.P. .. .. .. Alternate: ERNEST JOSEPH TROLLIP
MAJOR EDGAR BADEN ISAACS
DAVID D. AITCHISON
ISRAEL GESHEN
Bankers :
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Johannesburg.
Secretaries and Registered office :
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Transfer Secrotaries :
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DAVID D. AITCHISON Directors .. .. Alternate: WILLIAM D. FIELD
FELIX CHARLES HOLLANDER, J4P.
MONTAGU SIMPSON

Bankers :
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Johannesburg.


Secretaries and Registered office :
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PAGE THIRTY-FOUR
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LET YOUR SAVINGS

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Balance 2%

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FIXED PERIODS

J.B.S. Fixed Deposits give 310% per annum
on amounts of 25 and over, deposited for
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SHARE

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annum.
Full particulars of J.B.S. Savings Plans will
be given by any branch.


+4.+


JOHANNESBURG

BUILDING

SOCIETY
Established 1888.
Registered under the Building Soelety Act 62 of 1934.



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Agents all along the Reef and throughout the Union.
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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, JPECEMBER 10, 1948

HOW MIZRACHI GROUP WAS

FORMED IN 1905
A VERY interesting document has been received by the Mizrachi office
in Johannesburg from the late Mr. A. Rom, of Yeoville. The docu-
ment is an extract from an old minutes book of the Mizrachi Organisa-
tion dated 1905 and deals with the establishment of the Mizrachi group
in South Africa-the first Zionist party in South Africa.


Mr. Rom recounted that in Ellul,
1905, Rabbi Arieh Rabinowitz, who
was born in Shavel, published an an-
nouncement in the journal "Hako-
chav," which was edited by Mr. Y. -N.
Traub, in which he said that Rabbi
Reines, the renouned founder of Miz-
rachi, had turned to him with the
request that he establish a Mizrachi
organisation in Johannesburg.
Well over one hundred people at-
tended its first meeting at which
were present the leading Rabbis and
Zionists of the town. An executive
was elected which .included Rabbi
Arieh Rabinowitz, 'chairman; Mr.
Chaim Cooper, treasurer; Mr. A.
Rom, secretary; and Rabbi S. Res-
nick, Mr. E. Shliezs, Siegmund
Shapiro, Chaim Peretz Goodman,
Jacob Traubowitz and Shalom Tovia
Braude.
The organisation numbered 126
active members who conducted Miz-
rachi work and who each paid a
membership subscription of Is. 6d.
per month. The organisation was
.active for three years until Rabbi
Rabinowitz left for America, where
ho becam"3 Rabbi of Baltimore.
Because of the great interest
which those early Zionist pioneers in
South Africa will have for present-
day readers, we" print the names of
all the original members. They were:
Abraham Abrahams, Aron Balta,
Arieh Liev Batvanik, Einhorin,
Yaakov Blieden, Yosef Menachem
Blumberg, Moshe Lave Bloch, Mena-
chem Bush, Moshe Brazer, Sholom
Tovia Braude, Sholom Abrahams,
Sholom Yosef Berkman, Sholom
Blosberg, Leib Osrin, David David-
owitz, Chaim Dubnov, Moshe Jacobs,
Moshe Gershom Diamond, Moshe
Sonnenburg Peretz Dryzentok,; Elie-
zer Pobritz, Asher Falkov, Chaim
Zvi Etzman, Isiah Fineberg, Leib
Epstein, Harav Moshe Freedman,
Meyer Finger, Moshe Edelson.
Saadye Freiman, Edelstein, Yaakov
Friedgut, Shumeil Etzman, Avigdor
Freed, Chatzkelson, Benyamin Galis,
Chaim Peretz Goodman, Chaimowitz,
Moshe Helfand, Moshe Simcha Hor-
witz, Shumeil Godrich, Michael Gold-
berg, Dov Hotz, Abraham Moshe
Cohen, Isaac Kaletz, Benjamin Cap-
lan, Zalman Joffe, Zundel Cohen,
Zeev Cohen, Chaim Yaakov Kark,
Chaim Kes, Chaim Cooper, Moshe
Cooper, Israel Cooper, Mordecai
Joffe, Moshe Cohan, Getschel Cohen,
Itzchak Cohen, Dov Katzev, Yud Get-
schel Cohen, Elchanan Sheinson,
Itzchak Shlom, Israel Shewitz, Moshe
Aron Steinbach, Menachem Shapiro,
Shaul David Sacks, Shumeil Stein,
Moshe Zaied, Zvi Itzchak Stark,
Moshe Yehuda Weinberg, Abraham
Balta.
Itzchak Cohen, Dov. Katzev, Isiah
Yehudah Cohen, Moshe Kaplan
Eliahu Zalman Kaplan, Abraham
Moshe Luntz, Eliezer Lazerson,
Moshe Alexander, Asher Meltzer,
Herschel Levy, Itzchak Levitan,
Yaakov Lurie, Yosef Mureinik,
Yosef Levy, Maisel, Zvi Yaakov
Merimow, Isiah Zvi Moll, JAiathan
Papet, Israel Michael Traub, Joshua
Zdlik Shapiro, Yitzchak Shein, Mena-
chem Tucker, Nachman Shewitz,
Shalom Treisman, Shneier Solomon,
Zaviel, Salman Weitzman, Shalom
Arenson.
Moshe Polentzski. Eizriel Ofsh-
owitz, Shlomo Yaakov Kromnick,
Rabbi Arieh Rabinowitz, Gershon
Resnickowitz, Yaakov Eliezer Rieb-
nick, Isiah Reiss, Michael Reifman,
Ezriel Ehuda Rom, Rabbi Shabtai
Resnick, Shlomo Rosenberg, Yaakov
Ringel, Chaim Yoel Rinder, Eliahu
Shliezs, Aharon Zarankin, Abraham
Shapiro, Benjamin Zeev Traub, Sus-
man Stein, Itzchak Yaakov Zaaran,


Israel Schumlian, Yaakov Trubowitz,
Menachim Stern, Zvi Troim, Simcha
Tucker, Simson Swartzberg, Yaakov
Yehuda Zeidel, Chaim Gershon
Wooli, Abraham Abrahams.
In 1943 Rabbi Arieh Rabinowitz,
who was then living in Tel Aviv,
wrote to "Our Future" as follows:
"Thirty-eight years ago we founded
the Mizrachi Organisation of South
Africa. But even before that on my
arrival in Johannesburg, I was ac-
tive in enlarging and strengthening
Zionism generally, which was then
very weak and quite small. It was
on my becoming Rabbi and Dayan of
Park Station Shul that I began work-
ing for the establishment of the Miz-
rachi Organisation.

(Continued from page 25)
tion for many years, and its one-
time President.
Another South African leader,
Jack Alexander, the Federation's
Secretary from 1917-1943, who
was largely responsible for the or-
ganisational development of the
Federation, has made his home in .
Israel.
In 1947, there was a fundamen-
tal change in the constitution" of
the Federation, when the election
of members of the Executive took
place for the first time on the
basis of Party representation. Un-
til that tme, the "best man" basis
of electid8 had operated, although,
from 1931; provision was made
for individual representatives of
parties to be members of the Ex-
ecutive. There are still many Zi-
onists who have refused to join
any political party and their fu-
ture status within the Federation
is as yet undetermined.
L. A. Pincus, member of the Ex-
ecutive for a number of years, and
one of its vicechairmen until his
departure for Israel early this
year, was largely responsible for
the development of the Zionist
Party system in South Africa.
Without doubt, the period since
the United Nations resolution of
November 29, 1947, has been the
most arduous which the Federa-
tion has had to face. The crisis in
Palestine following the UNO .reso-
lution; the outbreak of hostilities
there; the withdrawal of Britain
from the Mandate; the procla-
mation of the State of Israel, and
the war into which the new State
was plunged-all these develop-
ments called for a great increase
of the Federation's work, as well
as the assumption of new and un-
foreseen responsibilities. The im-
mediate response of South Afri-
can Jewry, under the leadership of
Bernard Gering, chairman df the
Executive, his colleagues and key
workers throughout the country,
was to forget all party and per-
sonal differences and to unite in
loyalty and discipline to bring aid
to the Yishuv.
This unity, coupled with the de-
voted service which has been of-
fered by the staff of the Federa-
tion, under the guidance of the
Secretary, Zwi Infeld, has at-
tained results of great propor-
tions. The Palestine Special
Emergency Fund and the I.U.A.
have yielded unprecedented cam-
paign results, yet these are but
two -of the commitments which
have been undertaken by the Fed-
eration during the present year.
South African Jewry is taking
part in the making of history, and
is too close to that history to beJ4
able to evaluate or appreciate its
contribution.






THE ZIONIST' RECORD, RmIDAY, 'rECEfel 10, i4S'

Ex-Editor In Reminiscent jMood

(Continued from previous page)


FURNITURE
AND GARDEN REQUISITES
SUPPLIERS AND ERECTORS OF ALL TYPES OF FENCING

African Gate & Fence Works
LIMITED
188 BREE STREET, JOHANNESBURG
Phone.: 33-2010 and 34-1581 P.O. Box 7544


"'Some Memories"
May I relate a few lighter inci-
dents ?
A fond father came to me on one
occasion with his young son. He
wanted the boy to be taken onto the
staff of the paper. It did not matter
even if he started as a messenger
boy. The father, however, was keen
to know what were the prospects for
the boy in the future.
"He could, if he worked hard for
a ,number of years, and showed pro-
mise, become the editor," I said en-
couragingly. The father looked at
the boy, then at me.
"That's hardly good enough," he
remarked. He got up and took the
- boy with him.
Good Enough
It will be recollected that when
Jack Alexander wiote many of the
editorials in the "Zionist Record"
there was often a generous distribu-
tion of Latin and Greek quotations
in them. The writings were often
specimens of classical English.
A certain veteran Zionist of those
days wvho had never conquered the
intricacies of the, English language,
although he had been thirty-five
years in South Africa, said to me on
oniie occasion:
"What I like about the "Record"
is Jack -Alexander's writing."
"Why," I asked, "do you under-
stand it?"
"Hardly a word," was the reply,
"but I feel it is good Oxford Eng-
lish."
"In Spite"
.I remember some fifteen years
ago, at an interval during the pro-
ceedings at a bi-annual Zionist con-
ference, an elderly loyal Zionist
worker of the old school was annoyed
with the "Zionist Record." He com-
plained to me over a cup of tea.
"But," I replied, "the journal was
merely expressing the official opinion
of the Zionist Federation."
The old gentleman continued to sip
his tea in disgruntled fashion.
Finally he stood up and said in a
voice full of righteous indignation:
"I tell you, Dainow, Zionism will
succeed in this country in spite of
the Zionist Federation."

A Curious Visitpr
On another occasion, a Yiddish-
speaking farmer-storekeeper in a
back-veld area, came to see me. He
appeared a good soul with plenty of
time on his hands. His mission was
an unusual one. It appeared that
his children used to read and trans-
late to him every Sabbath the ar-
ticle by "Hamabit." This he enjoyed
intensely, especially the anecdote at
the end of each contribution. I
thanked him and promised to convey
his congratulations to the writer.
"But I want to meet hinT," he
exclaimed. "I would like to see how
and where he writes."
At that time the secret of "Hama-
bit's" personality was well kept. Only
a few knew that the writer of this
article was the culprit. I could not
permit myself the pleasure of telling
my visitor that he was now gazing
upon the writer of the weekly fea-
ture he so much liked. So I white
lied and told him that "Hamabit"
was unknown even to myself as edi-
tor. I declared that he just sends
his contributions from outside and
they are then published. *
"If so," asked niy visiting Jewish
farmer, "how do you send him your
cheque in payment?"
I had to answer that no payment
was sent, which happened to be liter-
ally true.
"He writes without payment?"
asked my persistent visitor.
"Yes," I replied.
"Nu," he commented, "iz er nit nor
gut, er iz auch meshugga!"


PAGE THIRTY


Old Colleagues
Finally, to be serious again, -I
would like to pay tribute to some old
colleagues. Edgar Bernstein, the
well-known journalist, got his first
real journalistic job with the "Zio-
nist Record."
Another person whom I drew into
the orbit of the "Zionist Record" was
S. A. Rochlin. He then lived in Cape
Town and appeared not to wish to
know new people. I landed on hidt
during a visit to Johannesburg. Ha
rebuffed me nicely, but I persisted.
I felt here was great talent, the born
archivist and historian. It was for
me a personal victory when his first
contribution appeared in the coluinis
of the "Record."
Besides the journalistic association,
a great personal friendship sprang
up between the journalist and the
archivist, a friendship which is likely
to last .out our lives. It is a pleasure
for me to know that the great talents
of S.A. Rochlin are beginning to be
appreciated by South African Jewry.
May I, too, join in congratulating
the Federation on the celebration of
its fifty years of effort. I am grate-
ful that the privilege was mine dur-
ing two decades to help in the great
work for Zion. They were for me
happy and unforgettable, years. May
they prove equally so for ,my suc-
cessor in the editorialship of the
Federation's official organ!
,I must here pay a tribute, too, to
one who took over the burden when
Benzion Hersch fell by the way and
was later lost to us. I refer to
Joseph Daleski, who was chairman
of the Editorial Board. He did
valiant work for six years and left
an indent on the journal's history.
After him came S. M. Kuper, who
carried on the work for a few fur4
their years and showed great devotion
to his responsibilities.

ORT-OZE MEETING IN BENONI
At the second annual general
meeting of the S.A. Ort-Oze Wo-
men's Section sub-committee of the
Union of Jewish Women, Benoni,
held at the residence of Mrs. D.
Schneider recently, it was reported
that over 20 children had been
"adopted" under the Foster-parent
scheme and that numerous functions
had been held during the year, in
aid of Ort-Oze funds.
Mrs. M. Furman and Miss R. Corin
attended the annual meeting on be-
half of'the Ort-Oze Women's Central
Executive and addressed the meet-
ing. The following 'committee was
Selected:
Chairman, Mrs. A. R. Serebro;i
vice-chairman, Mrs. R. Druian; hon.
treasurer, Mrs. Y. Baker; hon. sec-
retary, Mrs. L. Schneider. Commit.-
tee: Mesdames E. Alter, L. Anolik,
D. Bernstein, M. Danin, F. Frankel,
H. Gewer, J. Joffe, Kelmowitz, Kah-
anowitz, F. Koseff, H. B. Lieberman,
P. Mandelstam, S. Nakan, F. Nakan,
R. Perkes,. D. Schneider, M. Schwartz,
Mrs. Druian presided and Mrs. P.
Mandelstam proposed a vote of
thanks.

S.A. Betar Holds Kinus
The Kinus Artsi of the Berit Trum-
pledor of Southern Africa held in Jo-
hannesburg recently passed a number
of resolutions, including one urging
that the movement in future place the
greatest emphasis on Aliyah and
Hachsharah.
The Kinus was opened by Quatsin
Kaplan, who dealt extensively with
the fundamental problems facing
Betar in this country.
The Kinus concluded with greet-
ings to Madame Jabotinsky, Mena-
chem Beigin, Tenuat Hacherut, and
the World Revisionist Movement.
Greetings were also extended to all
Betarim and soldiers of the army of
Israel.






PAGE FORTY








WOMEN'S SECTION


USUALLY at this time of the year there is a slackening of
activity as workers prepare for the annual recess. The
urgent necessity for increased support for the I.U.A. has, how-
ever, encouraged all committees to further efforts, and from
communities scattered over Southern Africa come reports of
successful functions and novel fund-raising efforts.


LU.A. COLLECTION TINS
From reports' received of the first
clearance of these Tins it is appar-
ent that both guests and hostesses
have taken the Voluntary Entertain-
ment Tax seriously. The splendid.
financial results prove that the I.U.A.
is being remembered at simchas and
private gatherings. It is confidently
anticipated that as the Tin and the
Voluntary Tax become integral parts
of all entertaining this source of re-
venue will add further substantial
sums to the fund.




1949 DIARIES
There are still supplies of the 1949
Diary available at the J.W.Z.L.,
'phone 33-7704, or the I.U.A., 'phone'
22-4403. I.U.A. receives the total
revenue from these Diaries.




JOHANNESBURG
Without a respite from the bril-
liantly successful Donor Dinner, Jo-
hannesburg I.U.A. workers are plaii-
ning other large-scale functions.
On December 13 and 15, at the
Coronation Hall, will be shown pub-
licly for the first time in South Af-
rica the moving dramatic film "In
My Father's House," written and
produced by the eminent American
journalist Meyer Levin. Tickets are
4s. 10d. (inclusive of tax), and book-
ing is at the door.
Entertainment of another c'har-
acter will be offered to the public at
the Library Theatre on February 1,
2, 3, and 5, 1949, by the Parktown
and Melrose branches. Frederic
Lonsdale's scintillating comedy "On
Approval" produced by Anna Romain
Hoffman is bound to be a great at-
traction to the theatre going public.
The show will be dressed by Louis
Jacobson and the cast will include the
well-known South African actor
Johann Nell. Tickets may be ob-
tained from Mrs. H. Herber, 'phone
42-3181 Melrose, Mrs. B. Gordon,
'phone 44-1617, and Mrs. S. Gavron-
sky, 'phone 44-4713 Parktown. Book-
ing at Greatermans will open on
January 17, 1949.



PRETORIA
The Pretoria women -have in
recent weeks been extremely active
on behalf of the I.U.A. A Grand
Fete has been planned for the 8th
and 9th March next, and conveners
of the various stalls are exceedingly
busy arranging subsidiary functions.
Morning Markets are being held
practically every Friday in different
homes, and women are asked, in view
,of the organising entailed, to put
aside this morning to take their
friends to tea and do their shopping
amidst pleasant surroundings.


In addition several novel func-
tions have taken, place, such as a
Fashionable Race Meeting- at the
Memorial Hall, and a Braaivleis and
Dance at Wingate Club, which event
was unfortunately dampened (in
more ways than one) by the
weather. Record crowds turned up
at this function, -the catering ar-
rangements were excellent, and had
the weather been kinder, it would,
undoubtedly, have been an outstand-
ing success.
The Flower Stall also has some
novel ways of raising money' and
has been very active. "The Israeli
Girls," as they style themselves, un-
dertake floral decorations for par-
ties, Barmitzvahs, weddings, etc.
This also entails a great deal of
hard work, but the results, both from
an artistic point of view as well as
monetary, are well justified.
Many of the other stalls have
planned functions to take place early
next year and, with all the activity
and enthusiasm prevailing, it is
hoped the I.U.A. will benefit by a.
considerable amount from the Fete
next year.




VEREENIGING
The Women's Section of the Ver-
eeniging Israeli United Appeal, un-
der the chairmanship of Mrs. L.
Friedman, held a most successful
Fete and Children's Fancy Dress
Parade at the Isaac Lewis Hall on
Wednesday, November 17.
The Mayoress, Mrs. T. O. War-
wick, in opening the Fete paid tri-
bute to the women of Vereeniging.
for their efforts on behalf of local
charities, and hoped that -the com-
munity would show its appreciation
by supporting this function. She
said that the cause was a most
worthy one, one of the aims being
the care and mental rehabilitation of
children who had suffered terrible
ordeals in the concentration camps
in Europe. She hoped that the
efforts of the women would be
crowned with success.
Mr. Max Shapiro, chairman of the
Vereeniging I.U.A. Executive Com-
mittee, thanked the Mayoress for
opening the Fete and the women
members for all their hard work.
Judges for the Children's Fancy
Dress were Mrs. T. -0. Warwick,
Mrs. Rose Falcke and Mrs. F. Jacobs.
The music was-provided by Mrs. J.
Benjamin and 'Mr. Louis Sacks.
There were many stalls catering
for a variety of tastes and a Braai-
vleis organised by the youth contri-
buted towards a happy atmosphere.

aa

THEUNISSEN
Theunissen has formed an I.U.A.
committee as fo,' pws: Co-chairmen,
Mrs. Motavsk nd Mrs. Ogince;
secretary, Mrs.7Kotzen.


THE ZIONIST


HENNEMAN
Henneman has formed an I.U.A.
committee as follows: Chairman,
Mrs. Sam Hersch, and hon. sec-
retary, Mrs. Mitchell Hersch.


GERMISTON
The Germiston Branch of the
I.U.A. held a very successful "mock
wedding" at 'the Germiston Town
Hall ,on Saturday, November 20.
This function was an outstanding
success both socially and financially.
The net financial result was a re-
cord in Germniston.
The Berea Zionist Youth Society
brought out their .cast for the "mock
wedding," which was a most taining and enjoyable presentation.




POTCHEFSTROM
The following I.U.A. Committee
has been formed in Potchefstroom:
Chairman, Mrs. I. F. Waks; vice-
chairmen, Mrs. B. Shapiro and Mrs.
D. Kirsch; hon. treasurer, Mrs. I.
Glaser; hon. secretary, Mrs. B. -Law-
rie. Committee: Mesdames D. Bortz,
I. Gamsu, M. Gamsu, S. Diamond,
W. Herr, L. M. Lewin, B. Metz, S.
Miller, A. Sandier, H. Sandier, M.
Singer, M. Wes. and J. Waks.
Potchefstroom 'has arranged a
series of novel and successful func-
tions during the past few weeks, in-
cluding successful evening gather-
ings, Jumble Sales, Bring and Buy
Sales, a Children's Concert and the
notable Israeli Ball.
On December 19, at the Cheder
Hall, at 8.30 p.m., a Tape Derby will
be run. The Potchefstroom public
Swill spend a diverting evening while
supporting the I.U.A. F


SRUSTENBURG
Recently an open air cinema per-
formance was given at the farm of
Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Fram, which re-
sulted in raising a substantial sum
for the I.U.A. Films of Jewish in-
terest and an excellent feature film
"Until the Clouds Roll By" made a
pleasant evening. Mrs. Fram was
responsible for the lovely refresh-
ments.
On November 21- a Children's
Fancy Dress Party was held at Mr.
and Mrs. H. Ritchken's farm. This
was probably one of Rustenburg's
most successful functions judging by
the numbers present and the in-
genuity and beauty of. the -childrpn's
costumes. Judging of the cdsf-uiim&
and the Grand Parade wasg followed
by swimming in fhe lovely pool.




DURBAN.
The Circle Bowling Section of the
Durban Jewish Club, for the first



E. ISRAEL
(PTY.) LTD.

"ELLIS"

Blouses and Skirts

310 AIOP HOUSE
VON BRANDIS STREET
Phone 22-1511


RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

Rustenberg I.U.A. Fund-

Raising Committee


Back row: Mr. S. Wolpe, Mesdames
S. Rapeport, A. Been, Mr. L. Wulf-
sohn. Middle row: Mesdames R.
Been, S. Wolpe, B. Been. Seated:
Mrs. M. Ritchken, Dr. N. Hurwitz,
Mrs. E. Wulfsohn.

time in its history, arranged a mixed
Bowling Tournament last week-end.
They wished to give expression to
their enjoymment in a worthwhile
manner, and they, therefore, raised a
sum of money which they had handed
to the Women's Section of the Dur-
ban Israeli United Appeal. The com-
mittee is appreciative of the Bow-
ling Circle's efforts for the I.U.A.


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THE ZIONIST RECORIk, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948
The* Challenge Before Us Is How To Build


FRUITFUL RECIPROCAL RELATIONS

BETWEEN OUR COMMUNITY


AND ISRAEL
IT gives me very great pleasure
to express my warm congra-
tulations both to the S.A. Zio-
nist Federation and to the
"Zionist Record" on the occa-
sion of these notable anniver-
saries.
It was a happy thought to
make a joint celebration of the
50th anniversary of the Zionist
Federation and the 40th of the
"Zionist Record." For although
each has functioned separately,
they have been the two major
pillars of the Zionist structure
in South Africa, playing a role
that cannot be over-estimated
in promoting the Zionist ideal
and strengthening the Zionist
movement in this country.
We may take justifiable pride in
the fact that the jubilee celebration
of the S.A. Zionist Federation fol-
lows so close upon the jubilee of
modern political Zionism itself, show-
ing how deep are the Zionist roots
in this country.
We are particularly fortunate that
we celebrate this anniversary in the
auspicious circumstances of to-day,
when the State of Israel is an ac-
complished fact and when, as we hope
and believe, complete international
recognition and the restoration of an
abiding peace are not far off. South
African Jewry has the deep satisfac-
tion of knowing that it has itself
made no insignificant contribution to
this historic achievement.
Now that we have moved from the
period of striving and aspiration into
the era of' accomplishment so far as.
political Zionism is concerned, we
must naturally expect that the Zio-
nist movement in the Diaspora will
undergo important changes. The em-
phasis in Zionist work is likely to be
altered.


Message from


MR. B. A. ETTLINGER, K.C.
President, S.A. Jewish Board of
Deputies.


The challenge before us in South
Africa is how to build the most fruit-
ful reciprocal relations between our
own community and the people of Is-
rael. As citizens of this great coun-
try we do not recognize any political
allegiance outside of South Africa
itself, but I believe it will be to our
advantage, both as Jews and South
Africans, that we should continue to
take a lively interest in the fortunes
of the Jewish State and to draw
cultural and spiritual inspiration
from the new life in Israel. We
shall thereby not only enrich our
own communal life but also enhance
the contribution which we make as
citizens to the well-being of South
Africa as a whole.


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PAGE THIRTY-NINE


Forge Firm Links

Between Israel and Galut


AM delighted to send you
greetings and best wishes on
the 50th anniversary of the
Zionist Federation and the 40th
anniversary of the "Zionist
Record."
You can happily look back on
years of great achievement
when your contribution to the
upbuilding of the Jewish State
was noteworthy. The tasks of
Zionism are not yet ended, and
you must now undertake new
duties in fulfilment of this his-
toric hour.
The establishment of Israel is
the "culmination of the first
phase of our endeavour, and
now the urgent duty of Zionist
Federations all over the world
is to forge firm links between
Israel and the Galut, which will
fructify the Jewish future.


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PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDA,'Y, DECEMBER 10, 1948


CONSECRATION OF LINKSFIELD EDUCATIONAL CENTRE


Large Gathering oAt Open-Alir ..

Ceremony "

ABOUT 1,000 people attended the official opening and conse-
cration of the Linksfield Educational Centre, held in the- .
grounds of the institution, last Sunday afternoon. The cere-
mony marked yet another important milestone in the develop-
ment of Jewish education in South Africa, and all present Were
deeply impressed by the -achievements of the S.A. Board of
Jewish Education.


The ceremony took. place in a
huge marquee, where refreshments
were served to the visitors.
A feature of the proceedings was
the impressive consecration 'service
conducted by Chief Rabbi Dr. L.
Rabinowitz, hon. vice-president of
the Board, assisted by Cantor S.
Mandel, by courtesy of the Berea.
Hebrew Congregation, and the Great
Synagogue choir, under the direction
of 'Mr. G. Grosberg, by courtesy of
the United Hebrew Congregation.
Mr. J. A. Grosberg was at the organ.,
At the conclusion of the speeches
groups of people inspected the
school, and had nothing but praise
for the' achievements of the Board.
Opening the proceedings Mr. Her-
ber welcomed all present, especially
'Mr. I. J. Hersch, the senior vice-pre-
sident of the Board of Education,
who had .now recovered from his re-
,cent indisposition.
Referring to the work of the Board*
'since it took over the control of Jew-
ish education five years ago, Mr.
Herber said that despite tremendous
opposition and difficulties and the
lack of public support, they had
!every reason to be satisfied with the
progress that had been made during
this short. period. The Board had
been compelled to borrow money for



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its building schemes and the sooner
the loans were repaid the less it
would cost the community in the long
run.
"We cannot make a proper contri-
bution to the State of Israel without
providing our children with a sound
Jewish education. We are faced
with tremendous tasks, but with the
wholehearted support of the com-
munity we shall be able to build an
educational structure which will be
a credit not ofily to South African
Jewry, but to Jews everywhere," he
concluded.
Mr.. C. ISAACSON conveyed
greetings on behalf of the S.A. Jew-
ish Board of Deputies, "one of the
parents" of the Board of Education.
Mr. Isaacson emphasised the need
for bringing the message of educa-
tion to every Jewish home. Unless
this was done, he said, many of our
co-religionists would be lost to Juda-
ism. The Board of Deputies would
do everything in its power to assist
in this task.
MR. B. GERI.G, chairman of the
S.A. Zionist Federation, paid tribute
to Mr. Herber and his associates for
all they had done in the cause of
education, and especially congratu-
lated them on their latest achieve-
ment. He said it was the duty of
those who believed in the cause of
Jewish education to show their -in-
terest by rendering service to the
Board.
"We are to-day engaged in the
tremendous task of building a State,
but we also have to rebuild the Jew-
ish nation itself. The latter task
calls for the same enthusiasm, and
energy as have been displayed in
support of the State. Without edu-
cation there is no future for Jewry
in the Diaspora, and for Jewry as a
nation," he declared.
In calling upon the community to
give the Board its wholehearted sup-
port Mr. Gering also pledged the
continued co-operation of the S.A.
Zionist Federation in the tasks still
facing -the Board.


-- T .

71


Mr. H. Herber addresses the gather ing.


MR. B. I. JOFFE, president of the He paid warm tribute to Rabbi
United Hebrew Schools, said that the Zlotnik, whom he described as "the
differences which had existed be- mind and the power behind every-
tween the Board and the institution thing that has been achieved." He
he represented, had been amicably also expressed the thanks of the
resolved, and they were working in Board to the Assistant Director, Mr.
complete harmony for the common Goss, the Principal of the Linksfield
cause. The high standard of Jewish Junior School, Mrs. R. Sykes, and
education in this country was due Mrs. R. Osrin, who was in charge of
largely to the untiring efforts of Mr. the Nursery School, and all the
H. Herber and his assistants, members .of the staff.
Chief Rabbi Rabinowitz based his RABBI J. L. ZLOTNIK expressed
sermon on the "Sedra" of this week, his admiration for what the Board
and said that as in the case of Jacob had accomplished during the past 12.
of old, it was the courage and vision years. In the short space of five
of Rabbi J. L. Zlotnik which led t) years the Board had acquired six
the creation of the fine educational magnificent buildings, including its
structure we have to-day. This task latest acquision near the Herber
was achieved in the faca of opposi- House for the establishment of a
tion, apathy and disbelief on the part Seminary.
of the public. "This magnificent achievement was
It was regrettable to think that due to \vision and daring and to a
the cause of Jewish education should spirit for expansion and consolida-
have to be .fostered not because of tion. What has been created are
the inner convictions of the heart, strongholds of Judaism which can
but because of external pressure. never be destroyed," he declared. "
Dr. Rabinowitz warned the corn- Continuing Rabbi Zlotnik said that
munity to heed the times in which the Board had created a demand for
we are living and to follow the ex- Jewish education and now would
ample of .other denominations by He to conern itself wthe growth of
providing its own educational insti- He referred to the growth of
providing its own educational ist pupils in the pre-School, as well as
tutions. the nursery schools and to the
MR. P. FROMAN, chairman of the "proud record" of the Seminary. He
Institutions Committee of the Board, mentioned that 19 students who had
described the establishment of a attended the Seminary were at pre-
Jewish day school as the "Board's sent in Israel, while six were to-day
greatest enterprise." occupying positions as teachers. Two
In giving a survey of the Board's students would "shortly proceed over-
activities he pointed out that 66 seas for further studies.
schools, with a total of over 1,500 In conclusion he stressed the need
pupils, were affiliated to the Board. for the establishment of a students'
In addition the United Hebrew home and for the further develop-
Schools, with a total of 18 schools, meant of those institutions already in
and 900 children, now .formed part of existence.
the Board. There were also 21 nur- Mr. L. Rubik, president of the He-
sery schools, comprising 865 children, rew Teachers' Association, con-
under the Board's supervision. eyed a message in Hebrew, and
other speakers were Dr. Mendelow,
*.. , chairman of the Parents-Teachers'
K WAssociation of the Linksfield Junior
School, and Mrs. Jeanette Cohen,
K W V Tchairman of the Nursery School.
E de Co lo On behalf of the school Mrs. Cohen
Eau de Cologne presented the Board with a menorah
& Lavender Water in appreciation of its services.


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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


They-


Were
'


B3ornl

FIFTY years old!
At that moment of his career,
the average human is in his prime,
at his peak; but he knows that, after
a further term of full-running life
and achievement, the current of his
days must flag and in due course
cease to flow.
A "movement" is-not'like that. It
is the expression of the group mind
or the incarnation of a group aspira-
tion. Its expectancy of life is
limited not by those mortal ills that
flesh is heir to, but by its own in-


A. M. ABRAHAMS
Compounded of devotion,'
integrity an d sweet
reasonableness.

trinsic worth and the vitality of the
group in which it lives and works.
Measured by this yardstick, South
African Zionism need fear neither
decline nor dissolution. For not only
does it stand for a great and noble
concept, but it is of *the very essence
.of the South African Jew. For him
it is no mere "cause" or "object"; it
is part of him, of his way of life as
a Jew; he does not merely believe
in it and work for it: he feels it, he
lives it.
I came to South Africa, 37 years
ago, already a convinced Zionist; but
I sobn found that the inferences I
had drawn from logic and history
were but a skeleton framework, and
ttat I must go to school to these
Jews from the towns of Kleinstettlach
of Lithuania, from the cities and vil-
lages, of South Africa, to learn what
living and feeling as a Zionist
meant, to clothe the dry bones of rea-
son with the warm pulsating sub-
stance of sentiment and hitlahavuth,
to find the secret of the golden chain
that binds Jew to Jew, running back
from generation to generation, from
the tohu-vavohu of to-day, through
the communities and ghettoes of the
Dispersion, to Zion and to. Sinai and
to our father Abraham. It was in-
deed a favouring wind of fortune
that brought me amongst men and
women who showed in every act and
thought that what they could do for
Zionism was far transcended by what
Zionism could and did do for them.


Mainspring Of Their Life
Some are born to Zionism; some
achieve it, by intellectual conviction
or by the awakening of latent senti-
ment; some have it thrust upon them
by persecution or the feeling of "not
'belonging." South African Jews are
for the most part in the first cate-
gory; their brand of Zionism is dyed
in the wool. And that is why, for
them, these fifty years are but a for-
mal division of time in their Zionist
life. There were Zionists in South
Africa before the Judeastaat was


. f


To


Zionism


written in 1895 or the First Zionist.
Congress held in 1897. Chibbath
Zion existed and functioned before
Herzl and the Dreyfus case; the very
name of one of our societies-the
Chovevi Zion of Bulawayo-takes us
back to those early days, and organ-
ised Zionist groups were to be found
up and down the country before the
official world movement came into
being.
And, by the same token, South Af-
rican Zionists will carry on in an
unflagging tempo in the years to
come. To them the argument that
the achievement of Jewish statehood
in Israel has 'taken some of the sig-
nificance and urgency out of Zionist
effort has just no meaning at all; not
because of the anus that obviously
rests upon world Jewry to consoli-
date and develop and bring to full
fruition the glorious" bcgnning which
this annus mirabilis haF w:tAessed,
but because Zionism and its expres-
sion in action will continue to be'the
mainspring and the motor of their
life as Jews.
From hand to, hand, from genera-
tion to generation, the torch is


M. I. COHEN
He won Rhodesia for
Zionism.

passed-a Ner Tamid, never to be
extinguished. South African Zionism
of to-day presents the picture of a
community standing in serried ranks,
disciplined, loyal, enthusiastic, re-
sponsive; from the oldest veteran to
the youngest recruit, ready and eager
for service. Like our vanguard in
the Yishuv, they have at all times
been steady and devoted; the ups and
downs of our national fortunes, the
so-called "crises," have not daunted
them; free from defeatism on the
one hand and extravagance on the
other, they have always pursued an
even course consistent, hopeful,
"practical."


The Old Guard
It is hard for me to refrain from
referring to some of those men and
women and youngsters who ex-
emplify these qualities: but it would
be a task not only invidious but im-
possible, for it would mean a
"Who's-Who" of hundreds, maybe
thousands, of names. But I will take
leave to recall a few typical figures
-out of many-no longer with us, of
whom I cannot think without rever-
ence and emotion.
I call to mind the picture of Idel
Schwartz of Cape Town, standing in
the van like a rock of rugged
granite; of Manuel Leo Genussow,
for whom the tiniest Zionist service
in the remotest hamlet was a holy
duty; of A. M. Abrahams, com-
pounded of devotion, integrity and


L


MORRIS MORRISON
Inspired a whole genera-
tion of Natal Jewry.

to demand more and more depart-
mentalisation. But all has grown
naturally and evenly, by living and
organic process; soundly, steadily,
progressively, the superstructure has
been built on a firm foundation. And
the same is true of the Funds.
The Blue Box of to-day, with its
frequent yields of ten, twenty or
thirty pounds at a clearance, is th"
lineal heir of the one which, thirty
years ago, was doing well at five
shillings a time. The great sums
given in our latter-day campaigns
are. in a natural progression from
the efforts of an older time, when a
contribution of one hundred pounds
was a rare simcha. No longer do we
need "distinguished visitors" to gear


PAGE ELEVE

Reflections on Tn1i

50th Anniversary

r y'i
'J~yI;


sweet reasonableness; of Jacob Wer-
ner, of Piet Retief, whose boyish en-
thusiasm never deserted him; of
Morris Alexander, the champion of
.every good cause; of Isaac Epstein,
who first in Rhodesia and later in
Pretoria played an unobtrusive but
decisive role; of M. I. Cohen, who'
carried Rhodesia for Zionism; of
Benzion Hersch, that restless soul
whose burning zeal literally con-
sumed him; of Meyer Melmed .,of
Queenstown, ex-soldier of Czarist
Russia, who from his deathbed
directed that he be buried in his
talith, and that Hatikvah' be sung,
and a collection for the Keren Kaye-
meth made, at his graveside; of
Louis Policansky and Bernard Gor-
don, dear and gracious souls, who
never made a speech and never
wearied in service; of Moses Morri-
son who, from the sick-room which
was his only home for twenty years,
inspired a whole generation of Natal
Jewry; of many another, to whom,
if only space allowed, I would wish
to pay tribute.
These were of the Zionist "Old
Guard"; they and such as they set
the indelible stamp of their person-
ality and their example upon the
character and development of the
movement. A host of their coevals
are still, happily, amongst us; still
greater numbers of the younger gen-
erations are following in their path.


From Strength To
Strength
Progress has been vast since those
earlier days. Societies have multi-
plied. Parties have emerged. Nat-
ional and Provincial Councils have
come into being. The women and
the youth have built up formidable
organizations of their own. Our
press and our propaganda have con-
stantly expanded. The-work has be-
come so widespread and so varied as


Jack Alexander
Secretary, S.A. Zionist Federations,
1917-1943

us to a special effort; in all essen.
tials the work 'is done ahead. 1"
long self-discipline we have learned,
and all but perfected, the "art o6
giving"; and nowhere is this art befr
ter known and practised than in thN
dorps and hamlets, whose responsive
ness-moral as well as material-4
is an object-lesson to many a largej4
community.
In the esteem of the Zionist world
no community stands higher thahi
ours; they recognize its unswerving
loyalty, its constructive and practi
cal quality, its good organisation, it
freedom from internal dissensim
and (within human limits) from
pettiness. Nor must it go unmei
tioned that no group enjoys great$
regard in the Yishuv than the Soulj
Africans who have made it thel
home. .
Ever stronger become our direct
ties with Israel. The South Africapi
aliyah, not insignificant even in earT
lier years, bids fair to become 'i
steady stream. The growing momeri-
tum of Chalutziuth is guiding th,
flower of our youth to Aretz. South,
African Companies, groups and il4
dividuals have brought their re-,
sources, experience ani iniative. Thle
stirring events of the past twelve,
months have evoke-! a standard both
of financial contribution and of p ;1
sonal service unprecedented a-d al
most undreamed of: and ever: ihis$i
one feels, is only an earnest of still
vaster efforts to come.


Spirit Of The Maccabees
For the Jewish Nation has still a
long and difficult road to tread. In
the last analysis, we stand alone; our,
own will and our own power-noth-i
ing but these will carry us through,,
as they carried our Maccabean anh
cestors, whose heroic and successful'
stand we are about to celebrate. And-'
just as these Maccabees joined to'
the achievement of national redemp,-
tion the re-dedication of the people-i
of Israel to its faith and its high!
mission, so our new State, won by!
our modern giborim, calls to the Jew-,
ish people, in and out of Israel, tW'
sustain and intensify its determina-
tion its enthusiasm and its ideals. -
Our National Council, in its Pro'
clamation of the State of Israel on:
the Fifth of lyar, declared that "the.
Jewish people remain faithful to thqe
land of Israel in all the countries of
their dispersion." South 'Africa has
assuredly been faithful these 50
years: it will assuredly be so in the.
years to come.






PAGE FORTY-EIGHT
COMPANY MEETING.


ACKERMAN'9


LIMIT

CHAIRMAN
The second annual general meet-
ing of the shareholders of Acker-
man's Holdings, .Ltd., was held on
Friday, November 19, 1948, at 11
o'clock in the forenoon, at the offices
of the company, 164 Market Street,
Johannesburg. Mr. H. Herber, the
chairman, who presided, said:-
Ladies and Gentlemen,-The direc-
tors' report,' balance ,sheet and ac-
counts for your company for the year
ended June 26, 1948, have been cir-
culated to members, and I propose
they be taken as read. The compara-
tive figures for the previous year are
shown in the margin of the accounts
to enable you to compare the results
with those of the previous financial
.year. I now propose dealing with a
few items shown in the accounts.

BALANCE SHEET,
The balance of 45,195 standing to
the credit of share premium account
at June 26, 1947, has been trans-
ferred-to general reserve and, in ad-
dition, a further 15,000 was trans-
ferred from profits, thereby increas-
ing the general reserve to 75,195
at the end of the year under review.
,-jVith regard to the item "royalty
agreement at cost 200,000," the roy-
alties received from subsidiary com-
panies during the year amounted to
68,341, which added to the amount
received last year makes a total re-
ceived over the two years of 139,320.

NET PROFIT
During the year under review, in-
terest has been' charged on all inter-
company balances. This is reflected
in the increased amount received by
your company as interest, and the
corresponding decrease in dividends
received from subsidiary companies.
The total net profit for the year,
before providing for taxation,
amounts to 255,104, to which must
be added the balance brought forward
from last year of 103,123, making
a total of 358,227.
The following allocations have been
made:-


Final dividend of 6Q per
cent. in respect of the
year ended June 26, 1947
Interim dividend of 6 per
cent. in respect of this
year ......... .....
Dividends on preference
shares for the year to
April 30, 1948 .. .. ...
Provision for taxation .. ...
General reserve .. .. ...


71,500

66,000

18,000
50,855
15,000


221,355
leaving a balance available
for distribution of .. .. 136,872
358,227
Your directors have recommended
the payment of a final dividend of
6h per cent. (3.9d. per share), mak-
ing a total of 12A per cent. (7_d. per
share) for the year. This will absorb
71,500, leaving a balance to be car-
ried forward to next year oif 65,372
compared with 31,623 last year.

CONSOLIDATED ACCOUNTS
The consolidated accounts which
show the position of your company
and its subsidiary companies as a
whole, are self explanatory. The in-
crease in freehold properties com-
pared with last year is 61,706. This
is due to the acquisition of the
premises occupied by branches at
V*eniging and Mossel Bay, and a
standd adjoining our Woodstock


RBE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECErMBR" 10, i 'S


3 HOLDINGS


[TED


'S REVIEW
branch. The Vereeniging branch
premises were acquired by purchas-
ing the shares of a private company.
The consideration payable for the
shares was based on the value of the
property which was 14,159 in ex-
cess of the book value. This resulted
in the increase in the item "excess
cost -of shares over book value
234,666" compared with 220,507
last year. Your directors are satis-
fied that the whole of this item
amounting to 234,666 is covered by
excess values of properties over their
book figures.
The net profit of the group for the
year under review amounted to
266,864. After providing for divi-
dends, taxation and transfers to re-
serves, the balance on profit and loss
account carried forward to next year
is 151,092, which is 36,287 higher
than the balance brought in from
last year.
DIRECTORATE
I wish to take this opportunity of
welcoming Messrs. V. Roumanoff
and M. Cassell as members of the
board. Mr. Roumanoff is a director
of Greatermans Stores, Ltd., and
Mr. Cassell is a director of all our
subsidiary companies and general
manager of Ackerman's Ltd. The
business experiences of these two
gentlemen will be of great value to
the board.
In conclusion, I wish to congratu-
late Messrs. G. Ackerman and L.
Segal, the managing directors of the
subsidiary companies, on the results
achieved during the past year, and
to express to my colleagues on 'the
various boards, the managers, execu-
tives and staffs, my appreciation and
thanks "for their loyal co-operation
and support during the past year.
The balance sheet and accounts for
the year ended June 26, 1948, were
adopted, and a final dividend of 6.;
per cent. (3.9d. per share), making a
total of 121 per cent. (76d. per
share) for the year ended June 26,
1948, was declared payable on De-
cember 15, 1948, to holders of ordin-
ary shares.
The appointment of Messrs. V.
Roumanoff and M. Cassell as direc-
tors was confirmed, and Messrs. H.
Herber, S. Herber and W. G. F. Still
were re-elected directors of the com-
pany. After fixing the remuneration
of the auditors, Messrs. Price,
Waterhouse, Peat and Co., the chair-
man declared the meeting closed.


Y.M.C.A. Quiz Team at

Jewish Centre
On Tuesday evening, November 30,
a large audience attended a Quiz
Contest, which took place between,
the Jewish Centre and the Y.M.C.A.
at the Jewish Centre.,
Rabbi Dr. I. J. Harris, the Cen-
"tre's Director, welcomed Mr. Ian
Balfour of Broadcast House, and the
two teams.
Messrs. D. Shaw, J. Wright, T. V.
Peter and Misses W. Swann and M.
Page comprised the Y.M.C.A. team,
and Joe Katz,. Z. L. Sacks, R. L. Nar-
uisky and Misses M. Lutrin and Y.
Touys represented the Jewish Cen-
tre.
Mr. H. Moore of the Y.M.C.A. ren-
dered a vote of thanks on behalf of
his organisation, and Messrs. M.
Salovy, chairman, and M. Itzikowitz,
vice chairman of the Jewish Cen-
tre's Debating Club (Kadimah), un-
der whose auspices the Quiz took
place, expressed their appreciation
of -the close co-operation of the
Y.M.C.A. in arranging this contest.
Miss Badana Chertkow, a young
pianist, played a number of light
works during the interval and was
accorded an- extremely fine reception.
Mr. Simon Friedman, Instructor
in Dramatic Art at the Jewish Cen-
tre, proposed a vote of thanks.


UNION OF JEWISH WOMEN
GENERAL MEETING
The annual general meeting of the
Johannesburg branch of the Union of
Jewish Women was held at the Sky-
line Hotel, Johannesburg, last week
and was addressed by Rabbi Dr. E.
Neufeld, who gave an informative re-
view of the political position of the
Jews in the world to-day. He dis-
cussed developments in Israel and ap-
pealed for the maximum support to
assist in bringing about a speedy
settlement in Palestine.
Mrs. Adler, the retiring chairman,
spoke of the work of the Union dur-
ing the past year and of its inten-
tion to subscribe the funds necessary
for the completion of a hostel at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
The following committee was
elected for the ensuing year:
Chairman, Mrs. B. Susman; vice-
chairmen, Mesdames G. Hayden and
J. Pinchuk; hon. vice-chairman, Mrs.
M. Adler; hon. treasurer, Mrs. R.
Jacobson; hon. secretary, Mrs. S.
Silverman; chairman, Public Rela-
tions and Publicity Sub-Committee,
Mrs. A. Franks; executive, Mesdames
-. Abt, B. Alexander, J. Davis, P.
Duchen, M. Ettlinger, D. Gavronsky,
B. Gordon, I. Jacobson, L. Joffe, H.
Khhr, M. Miller, M. Million, I. Oshry,
D. Palmer.


MDA Function
The Branch Rishon of the Magen
David Adom is holding a "Hagi-
gah" at the Ginsberg Hall on Wed-
nesday, December 15, at 8 p.m. The
Chevrayah Jazz Band will be in at-
tendance, and refreshments will be
served.
Dr. Lionel Melzer, who has recently
returned from Israel, will deliver a
message of greetings from MDA
headquarters in Tel Aviv.
Tickets are 10s. 6d. per double, and
all enquiries should be made to
'Phone 33-2782.

Two New Mi)A Branches
Established
Two new branches of the Magen
David Adorn have been formed in
Johannesburg during the past fort-
night. The one branch which is to
be known as the Levontin Branch,
was formed after an inaugural meet-
ing at the residence of Mrs. L.
Wunsh.
Mrs. J. Kaplan, chairman of the
Women's Section, addressed the
gathering.
The following office-bearers were
elected: Chairman, Mrs. L. Wlinsh;
vice chairman, Mrs. Finkelstein;
hon. joint secretaries, Mrs. Levitan
and Mrs. Peskin; hon. treasurer, K.
Heitner.
Will all those interested in joining
the branch please communicate with
Mrs. Heitner, 'phones 41-3203 or
33-2782 on week-days.
At a meeting convened by Mr. L.
Oppenheim, Council member of the
MDA, the following committee for
the Doornfontein branch was formed:
Chairman, Dr. J. S. Zidel; vice-chair-
man, Councillor H. Miller; hon. sec-
retary, Miss E. Joffe; hon. treasurer,
Miss M. Levin.
Those wishing any further infor-
mation please 'phone Miss Joffe,
44-5925, or 33-2782.

ACTIVITIES OF WOMEN
ZIONISTS
VICTORIA WEST
The Women's Zionist Society in
this town is perhaps the smallest in
the country, but what it lacks in
numbers is made up in enthusiasm.
The five members meet regularly
under the guidance of their chairman,
Mrs. S. Musikanth, and devote much
of their time to sewing and knitting
for Israel. There is also consider-
able cultural activity in this small
centre.
UPINGTON
Upington Women's Zionist Society
recently held its annual general
meeting at which the following wo-
men were elected office-bearers for
the ensuing year: Chairman, Mrs. B.
Jacobsohn; vice-chairman, Mrs. L.
Hirschfield; secretary-treasurer, Mrs.
Nat Davis. The outgoing chairman,
Mrs. J. Kowen, submitted a report
which showed great enthusiasm and
excellent results in every field of Zio-
nist effort.
PORT ELIZABETH YOUNG
\ WIZO
This active group of youthful Zio-
nist workers meets regularly and de-
votes considerable effort to the cul-
tural aspect of Zionism. One of its
most successful recent ventures was
a "Living Newspaper." Freda Red-
house, as editor, recalled the inau-
guration of the group some five years
previously and demonstrated the
many and various methods of assis-
tance which it had given to other
-movements in Port Elizabeth.
NORTHERN O.F..S. GOLDFIELDS
Recently Miss Doreen Guinsberg,
organiser to the Women's Zionist
Council, visited this society, which
comprises the women of Hennenman,
Whites, Virginia, Ventersburg, Kalk-
blakke and Odendaalrus. Although
somewhat scattered, the society is
very active in fund raising and has
also sent substantial parcels of gar-
1 ments to Israel.


DUGSON HOLDINGS LIMITED
(Incorporated in the Union of South Africa)

Notice of Preference Dividend No. 4.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Dividend No. 4 on the 6%
Cumulative Preference Shares has been declared in respect of the six
months ended 31st December, 1948, at the rate of six per cent. (6%)
per annum and will be payable to all Preference Shareholders regis-
tered in the Books of this Company at the close of business on the
28th December, 1948.
The Preference Share Registers_ will accordingly be closed from
the 29th December, 1948, to the 31st December, 1948, both days in-
clusive, and Dividend Warrants will be posted on or about 29th
January, 1949.
By Order of the Board,
ARTHUR M. GOLDSTEIN, Secretary.
Transfer Office:
Messrs. Security Registrars (Pty.), Ltd.,
7th Floor, Transvaal House,
80, Commissioner Street,
Telephone 33-1851, Johannesburg.
6th December, 1948.






THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


WHAT


ZIONISM


HAS


DONE


PAGE FIFTEEN


FOR


THE ZIONIST


By

C. Gershater


FROM all parts of the world
%leading Zionists have show-
ered upon us greetings and
compliments on what we, the
Jews of South Africa, have done
for Zionism. On many previous
occasions we have. heard- of
these compliments and it is
about time that we started
thinking not of what we have
done for Zionism, but of what
Zionism has done for us.
In a broader sense, everyone to-
day acknowledges the debt which the
Jewish people owe to Zionism.
Everybody knows of the contribution
which Zionism is making to-day to-
wards a solution of the problem of
Jewish homelessness; of its general
answer to the question of Jewish re-
habilitation-in the polTtical, social or
economic fields. Let us,- however,
leave the broad issues and ask a more
restricted question: "What, if any-
thing, did South African Jews receive
in return for the fifty years of
labour in the cause of Zion?
The ifs" of history are always
fascinating. It has been suggested
that the best way of getting a proper
perspective of events of the past is
to reverse the process and to specu-
late on what would have been the
position to-day if this or that event
had not occurred. On the same lines
it might well be profitable to try
and imagine a state of things based
on the assumption of "South Afri-
can Jewry Without Zionism." We
could, firstly, build up an imaginary
picture of communal and social life
and, secondly, an analysis of the per-
sonal life of each and every Zionist,
from the leaders to the rank and file.
Neither of the two can be done here
in detail. The former-the commu-
nal picture- would require a book;-
the latter-the individual analysis-


I. ABRAHAMS
First Editor of the "Zionist Record"


is of a far too personal character.
In any case, self-analysis, which is
better expressed in Hebrew by the
term "cheshbon hanefesh," is at all
times a good thing and -on this occa-
sion each individual Zionist might
well be inclined to take stock of his
own spiritual life and to decide
whether or not-he had benefited from
the time which he devoted to Zionist
work.

Parents and Grandparents
For the younger members of the
movement it will be equally fascinat--
ing to give some thought to the ex-
tent of their benefits from the Zio-
nist activities of parents and' grand-
parents. Many of our leaders to-day
belong to second or third generation
active Zionists and in this connec-
tion one may be permitted to observe
that South African Zionism was, on
the whole, very fortunate in its chil-
dren.
It is to the credit of the move-
ment that so many of our founders
here have left behind them devoted
successors. Many of our pioneers
who are happily with us to-day may
well take pride in the fact that their
children and other members of their
families are active in the movement.
Furthermore, that a proportionately
large number of their children have
settled in Palestine and are render-
ing direct service to the building of
of the Yishuv.
This is a great blessing and is
illustrative of the. spiritual har- THE MODERN MAGIDIM.-
mony which Zionism introduced THE MODERN MAGIDIM.-
into our homes. The gulf between to South Africa have had a pi
father and son, between one gene- Photo shows Mr. Sokolow a
ration and another in Jewish life, picture was take
which elsewhere might have been
the cause of friction and conflict,
was here bridged by a movement
which appealed to every age group.
It made tradition live and assume opened South African Jewry to the
the air of reality in our social life; Jewish world.
it provided spiritual continuity in a Almost from the first day of their
Violently changing world, organised existence, South African
Zionists have been arranging visits
A Bundle of Sorrows of overseas delegates. The distin-
guished visitor came here for the
The Jewish settler who came to this purpose of assisting with campaign's
country was often still a young man. for funds. Yet, on watching the
He brought with him a bundle of audiences listening attentively and
sorrows, an aching heart at having eagerly to the speeches, one was re-
been uprooted' from a cosy environ- minded of the itinerant preacher, the
ment where life was static, poor, but "magid," who moved about the vil-
friendly. He came mainly from lages qf old Lithuania.
small villages where tradition dies The role of the "magid" in the past
hard. He knew everybody and few hundred years of Jewish history
everybody knew him. His way of has not yet been fully appreciated.
life was determined by a rigid set Unlike the "Ray," who was settled
of religious laws and social conven- in one place, busy with scholarly
tions. His migration was not merely books, which were accessible only to
from one continent to the other. It the select few: who frequently was
was a transportation from the primi- not even blessed with the gifts of ora-
tiveness of the village to the temp- tory and therefore maintained a cer-
tations of the city. tain detachment from the masses of
The first reaction was one of iso- the people, the "magid" was a wan-
lation. At a time when a letter took during preacher who created vital con-
.many weeks to reach these shores and tacts between one community and the
when the newspaper press had not other. He, too, collected funds and
yet assumed the dimensions .of to-day was a "meshulach" at the same time.
(how many of the early settlerrA Occasionally the "magid" came direct
could have received overseas period -Ifrom Jerusalem. Yiddish readers will
cals regularly?), it was not easy to recall Sholom. Aleichem's description
retain contact with the traditions of 'of the Jerusalem preacher who came
the old home. to the village and told an excited
Pent-up emotions had found their audience about people who speak
outlet in the building 6f congrega- only Hebrew, about graves of pro-
tions and synagogues wherever pos- phets and about goats that feed on
sible. The synagogue provided a re- ipe olives. He would also speak of
minder of a dim and warm past. Its his wanderings amongst other Jews,
atmosphere was a re-creation of a of their problems, their joys and their
recently abandoned environment. sorrows.
Within its walls the Jew was brought As we recavisited the great Ziwe aonnots
back to the old village, or (if he who visited these shores, we canngid.ot
were imaginative) to the very an- but be ire mnd e d of the ol d "magid
cient traditions of the Bible. Apart The naivete and amazement displayed
from the villationse nd apartBible. frt by the South African Jew at the re-
Biblical tradition, the big, wide world. Sokolow or Alexander Goldsteinahum
ain its Jewish connotation, remained were reminiscent of the Kasrilevke
Jews in Sholom Aleichem's stories.
Zionism has opened the world to Who can possibly estimate the bene-
the South African Jew and has fits and the blessings that the South


African Jew has derived from the
early Zionist Magidim; the inspira-
tion which he received from the
printed Zionist message?

A Long Way
We have travelled a long way since
1898. For the past ten years the
radio and the daily press bring news
from Palestine. The Jewish press has
a wide circulation. Thousands of Jew-
ish soldiers visited the country during
the war. People fly up to Palestine
with the ease of going to Muizenberg.
Many hundreds have close relatives,
sons and daughters, in Israel and are
in regular correspondence with the
country. But when Palestine had a
Yishuv of 50,000 at the end of World
War I, contact hardly existed. Few
of our early pioneers ever visited the
country of their dreams, a thing
which would appear improbable to-
day.
The big change has come about
during the last 10 or 20 years. In
the meantime, it was the Zionist mis-
sionary, the propagandist, who kept
the lines of contact going. He gave
the community much more than he
took from it. His importance be-
comes even greater when it. is rea-
lised that, unlike to-day, the Jews of
South Africa were at one $ime scat-
tered in numerous villages and ham-
lets. The Zionist preacher brought
the message to remote parts. He
talked to the rabbi or to the teacher
who was overjoyed by his stimulat-
ing company. He instilled new life
into the people. He gave them a
task to perform.
Changing Times
Times are changing. To-day
South African Jewry is well estab-
lished as a community, yet Zionism
has grown as a source of spiritual
strength together with the develop-
ment and growth of the community.
(Continued on page 16)





THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

A Veteran Recalls


Early


Of S.A.
W HEN Abraham Kirson, an ardent
young member of the Chovevei
Zion in Radvitski near Shavel came
to Johannesburg in 1892, he found
that there was no Zionist activity or
even awareness of the Zionist Move-
ment here.
In 1894 he made his home in
Klerksdorp, where his only contact
with Zionist affairs came through
such reports as were published inthe
local paper, the "Mining Record." It
was in the "Mining Record" that he.
read brief reports of the first Zion-
ist Congress held in Basle in 1897.
His enthusiasm was rekindled and
he determined to initiate Zionist
work in Klerksdorp. His knowledge
of English was at that time very
slight; but with whatever assistance
he could gather he framed a letter
for publication in the "Miping
Record" in order to stimulate the
Jewish population in the Klerksdorp
area.
By pre-arrangement, the late Bar-
ney Starfield replied to his letter.
They followed this up by calling a
meeting of the Jewish community at
which the Klerksdorp Zionist Society
was formed early in 1898.

Worked Unobstrusively
As he worked unobtrusively behind
the scenes to establish and consoli-
date his first little society, so has he
worked throughout the ensuing years.
A Mr. Hanson was Klerksdorp's first
chairman; neither then nor sabse-
quently has the name of Kirson ap-
peared in any executive position. Yet
it was Kirson who planned the work
of the society, work which consisted
of selling shares in the Jewish Colon-
ial Trust Bank, and later, after the
establishment of the J.N.F. in ar-
ranging for the transfer of the in-
terest accruing from shares to the
J.N.F.
He recalls with grave amusement
the "figureheads" whose names were
important to the Movement; but who
were disinterested, ignorant, and al-
most unwilling to be coached for their
parts.
In 1898, Kirson represented
Klerksdorp at the meeting which was
held in Johannesburg and at which
the S.A. Zionist Federation wag
formed. It was an adventure to travel
from Klerksdorp to Johannesburg in
those days-a journey which lasted
for a day and a half and was cov-
ered partly by coach and partly by
train. Yet he found the adventure
worth while, for despite the desire of
so many people to make their voices
heard at the meeting, whether they
had any contribution_ to make or not
-or whether they were able to speak
or not-their great enthusiasm pro-
vided fresh stimulus for those who
were working almost alone.

One Of The Crowd,
A much greater stimulus came
from David Wolffsohn's address
1906. Kirson was one of the tremend-
ous crowd which gathered at Germis-
ton Station to welcome the great Zi-
onist leader, and he was one of those
who accompanied Wolffsohn to Jo-
hannesburg. He recalls the unprece-
dented enthusiasm with which local
Jewry received Wolffsohn's address


Days


Zionism


Interview


With


Abraham Kirson



at His Majesty's Theatre. On this
occasion, Kirson was busy once again
behind the scenes, when he was
among those responsible for arrang-
ing the platform and seating accom-
modation.
In 1907 -Iirson returned to his
home in Russia where he remained
until 1912. There Zionist' work Was
continuing despite the vigilance of the
police who succeeded in disbanding
every meeting that was called. On
his return to Johannesburg in 1912,
he found that big strides had been
made in local Zionist work.


Zionist Hall
He visited the Zionist Hall in Com-
missioner Street, presided over by
the late B. J. Chaimowitz, and the
focal point of all local Zionist work,
discussions and functions. He soon
fitted -into this atmosphere and re-
sumed his silent but penetrating work
for the furtherance of the Zionist
ideal. Until the visit of Dr. Shmar-
ayhu Levin in 1922, Kirson's work,
like that of most other Zionists, was
mainly in the interests of the J.N.F.
Dr. Shmaryahu Levin's visit initiated
work for the Keren Hayesod and
raised the whole tempo of Zionist ac-
tivity to a much higher level.
In the succeeding years, Kirson has
played his full part in all aspects of
Zionist endeavour; but his main de-
votion is still to the J.N.F., on whose
National Gommittee in South Africa
he has served for many years. The
example which Abraham Kirson has
set has been closely followed by his
children. His daughter, Jane Katz,
and his daughter-in-law Celia Kir-
son, are very active members of the
Johannesburg Women's Zionist
SLeague; his son, Maurice, works in-
defatigably to further the cause
which is so dear to his father.


PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN


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PAGE THIRTY-SIX

Women Shared In Responsibilities

Of Zionist Progress

(Continued from page 35)


tee-for the collation of material in
an Educational Folder, which it
sefids throughout the country. Days
and weeks of work go into the pre-
paration of each of these folders,
and it is heartening to know That
to-day it is eagerly awaited and
widely used.
Since the beginning of this year,
the Council has established its ownp
Women's Paper, presently called
"News and Views. Much time,
energy and work is put into this
publication .which has within a year
grown from a four paged leaflet to
a full-blown magazine. This paper
is sent to every member of our Zio-
nist Societies through the Council
offices.
In addition to the written word,
mapy prominent Zionist women visit
large and small centres and take the'
message of Zionism to our affiliated
societies; but with the growth of our
organisation it became -impossible to
carry on through honorary workers
alone, and in an attempt to improve
the organisational side of our acti-
vities, and to spread our work still
further afield, we invited in 1943 Dr.
Anni Samuelsdorff, an important
member of WIZO in Israel, to pay
an organisational visit to this coun-
try, which proved a very successful
inipvation.
Later in 1945 when Miss Marcia
Gitlin returned from a visit to Is-
rael, she joined our Council and un-
dertook a similar mission on our be-
half for a period of twelve months.


In 1948 at our special request Miss
Tonie Hauser, general secretary of
WIZO, visited this country, and in
addition to the very fine work which
she did for the WIZO Emergency
Campaign (for. which she was our
chief .delegate) she assisted us very
considerably in the organisational
side of our work. To-day we have
two organizers, Miss Sally Burstein
and Miss Doreen Guinsberg as mem-,
bers of our staff.
We have 112 societies and 44 cor-
respondents in South Africa and the
Rhodesias with whom we keep con-
tact, a far cry from the handful
of societies with which we started
in 1932. Membership has, during
this period, increased to approxi-
mately 16,000.
- The Council's president automati-
cally sits on the Federation's Ex-
ecutive, but without a vote on poli-
tical matters.
The Council was also a party to
bringing about the present merger-
of most major women's organi'sa-
tions in the interest of the Israeli
United Appeal (Women's Section).
It is no exaggeration to say, that.
in the hand of the women lies a
large part of the responsibility. for
the progress- of the Zionist move-
ment in this country; for through
our mothers we have brought Zion-
ism into .our homes. Every emer-
gency has found the women ready
to respond to the demands of the
critical days in which we are living.


The Rand Kosher Meat Market
(STRAUSS & OPPENHEIMER)
29 BEIT STREET, DOORNFONTEIN, JOHANNESBURG


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Meats, Polonies and Sausages
Under the special supervision of the local Beth Din




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THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, -94"

ANNIVERSARY COINCIDES


WITH FIRST, UNITED


EFFORT


FOR


ISRAEL


AND JEWRY


eMessa~,e


From


L. Tager
National Chairman, Israeli United
Appeal.
THE 50th anniversary of the South
African Zionist Federation,
which coincided with the first anni-


versary of UNO's decision in favour
of a Jewish State, takes place within
a few months of the proclamation
of the State of Israel.
It also coincided with the first
united, and biggest, effort the South
African Jewish community has ever
made for the needs of Jewry in Is-
rael and Europe.
There is no doubt whatsoever that
during the past 50 years the South
African Zionist- Federation has suc-
ceeded in instilling in the South
African Jewish community an appre-
ciation and understanding for the
Zionist cause which resulted in a sub-
stantial contribution towards the up-
building of the Homeland, and ensured
the solid support of the whole com-
muiity .behind the State of Israel
front the time of its establishment.
Even those members of the comic
m-anity who did nof share the poli-
tical aspirations of Zionism realized
.the .tremendous achievement and
significance of the establishment of
the State of Israel.
The South African Zionist Fede-
ration still has- important tasks to
perform within the community for
the sake of the State of Israel,
as well as for the sake of that sec-
tion of world Jewry which is depen-
dent upon the State of Israel for the
satisfaction of its fundamental needs.
There is no solution of the problem
facing these people'outside of immi-
gration to Israel.
On behalf of the National Execu-
tive and the workers of the Israeli
United Appeal, I 'wish to extend my
warmest congratulations to the
South African Zionist Federation on
its jubilee.
I express my sincere belief that
the South African Zionist Federation
will continue to discharge success-
fully its important functions to the
advantage of the South African Jew-
ish community, world Jewry and the
State of Israel.


Rhodesia Has Shared The Work

From The Beginning
N sending a message of greetings on
the occasion of the Fiftieth Anni-
versary of organised Zionism In eFr
South Africa, I am constrained to M eSSage From
mention that Rhodesia has shared
in the work from the very beginning..
of Zionist efforts in Southern Africa.
This work has not always been easy.
It was necessary to convince the
sceptics and win them over to the
conception of Zionism as the solu-
tion to the problem of Jewish Home-
lessness.
Only a fanatical belief and faith
could sustain the effort on the part
-of the few amongst the considerable
large number who required persuad-
ing and convincing.
- If we are now reaching a stage in
the practical realisation of the Jew-
ish National ideal it is essential to
pay tribute to South African and
Rhodesian pioneers in Zionism. The
"Zionist Record has played a distin-
guished part in the task.
In the Rhodesias we are conscious
of the ever-increasing responsibili-
ties that devolve upon every Jew in
the final consummation and estao- a. muel Rabinovitz
lishment of the J'wish State. Now
is the time to combine in a big heave
in the present struggle confronting Chairman, Rhodesian Zionist
the Jewish people. Council.


.t 152 Market Street


Johannesburg






THE ZIONIST REC0R~ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948 PAGE TWENTY-NINE


David Dainow



N the dim atmosphere of the badly
ventilated and poorly lighted
rooms in the Old Stock Exchange
Buildings in Fox Street, Johannes-
burg, I was welcomed one-morning
in 1923 by Jack Alexander, the then
chief of the "Zionist works"-as it
were. e
It was an historic moment for me.
I had entered the service of the Fed-
eration for a year. I did not, how-
ever, leave that service until twenty
years afterwards.
Originally my arrival in South Af-
rica a year earlier had been due to
an invitation by the late Isaac Och-
berg to help him to place in institu-
tions and homes the orphans from
pogromen areas of the Ukraine,
whom, he had brought to this coun-
try. -
That work being over in a few
months, I was about to retuiln to
England. A call, however, reached
me from the S.A. 'Zionist Federation
to take up tentatively the secretary-
ship of the newly formed Keren
Hayesod; so I reported for duty.
The First Campaign
The great Nahum Sokolow was to
have come to inaugurate the cam-
paign. He would be assisted by a
person who then was an unknown in
South Africa. Then came the news
that Sokolow was prevented from
coming at the last moment. The
opening of the campaign was well
upon us. It was too late to send for4
another "star." The duty then de-
volved upon me to "boost" Sokolow's
lieutenant, Alexander Goldstein.
I set about the task with deter-
mination. Gold-ein was to be the
leading figure a the campaign-ban-
quet in Johannesburg. He became a
great force in the work of the cam-
paign, which proved highly success-
ful. '
A New Appointment
In the quiet period after the cam-
paign, I had been making my plans
to return "home." Suddenly, how-
ever, I was called upon to attend an
informal meeting of a few leading
Zionist workers and informed that I
was to become the editor of the "Zio-
nist Record"-the organ of the South
African Zionist Federation.
The journal was then a small
monthly magazine. It was edited in
the midst of his many duties as
secretary of the Federation, by Jack
Alexander. In order to effect a
break-away, an office separate from
the Federation headquarters was
hired. I found myself in a small
room with a junior typist, a type-
writer, a couple of chairs, a table
and a desk.
My first duty was to publish the
monthly journal each month. There


AN EX-EDITOR IN



REMINISCENT MOOD


had been an occasion or two when
that obvious "regularity" had been
lacking! At that time the advertising
revenue per issue approximated 35.
My task was to increase revenue and
I remember going to many firms
securing advertising contracts on
forms I had typed at the office.

A Fortnightly
After some little time it was de-
cided to turn the monthly magazine
into a fortnightly newspaper. This
was looked upon as a momentous
decision. The proposal was opposed
by many members of -the Executive
Council of the Fedeieation, who did
not wish to be burdened with the re-
sponsibility of a widened publication.
It was the late Benzion S. Hersch,
who put up "an heroic fight" for the
fortnightly edition.
By that time, when the project was
being discussed, a company had been
formed, with the Federation as chief
shareholder.
The basic idea of establishing
the Kadimah Press, Ltd., was to
avoid a "chillul hashem" in case
the publishers at any time were
sued for libel!

Success of New Venture
Hersch had become chairman of the
editorial board of the "Zionist Re-
cord" and a member of the- board of
directors o0 fihe Kadimah Press. His
power of persuasion and enthusiasm
led finally to a favourable decision.
The "Zionist Record" began to ap-
pear as a fortnightly newspaper. Sub-
scription rates were increased, but
instead of circulation falling off, it
became larger. Advertising support
came along easier. It did not take
very long before Mr. Hersch could
declare with just pride to his pre-
viously wavering colleagues on the
board of the Kadimah Press: "I told
you so."
The phrase "a tower of strength"
might well describe the contribution
made by Benzion Hersch in the
gradual development of what had now
become recognized as the leading
Jewish journal on the sub-continent
of Africa. He would come into my
office as often as ten times a day and
would be overjoyed at every evidence
of growth. The publication became
a favourite child of his. As it
matured into newspaper manhood he
grew in stature. Hersch was talented
and his advice and co-operation
were of immense value.
.. As I was also Advertising and Cir-
culation Manager, beside being the
editor, it was impossible for me to
write all the editorials, so Hersch
wrote some, which he signed with the
initial H. Jack Alexander wrote some
of his distinguished editorials, which
he signed with the initial A. My edi-
torials were signed with D. At that
time a quip -went around that the
readers of the journal were being
editorially "HAD."

Advertising Support
Some years passed. The staff had
increased and the services of an ad-
vertising canvasser secured. -
I well remember when a handsome
contract arrived dealing with the
marvellous properties possessed by a
certain famous brand of pills and
how eagerly the Board of Director,,
"stomached" it.
Meanwhile the "Zionist Record" in-
creased in size and in literary and
news importance. It was whilst still
a fortnightly that the famous series
of "Letters to my Son" by Ben Elie-
zer (D. Merowsky) appeared in serial


form. They were later published as
a popular volume of essays. At that
time, too, "Hamabit" began his series
of "Current Communal Comments"
which went on for fifteen years.
Hersch, who was very serious
minded, did not approve of the light
pen and the mild criticism of "Hama-
bit." Seeing, however, that the
editor insisted on having some light
relief in an otherwise heavy journal,
he did not press the matter.

A Discovery
Finding himself one day in Bula-
wayo, he was spoken to by a leading
Zionist worker. The latter said he
was not so keen/ on perusing the
"Zionist Record."
"One thing, however, I do like in
it, Mr. Hersch" went on the Zionist
worker, "and I turn to it always
with alacrity-that is your own con-
tribution under the pen-name of
Hamabit."
Hersch was comradely enough to
tell the story. After that he began
reading "Current Communal Com-
ments" and enjoyed it to the day of
his lamented passing.
The big task which confrorted Ben-
zion Hersch came when he decided
that the time had arrived to turn the


MR. JOSEPH DALESKI
A photograph taken during his chair-
manship of the Editorial Board

fortnightly "Zionist Record" into a
weekly newspaper. The idea seemed
then veritably preposterous. There
was much heat shown in the pro-
nounced opposition to the project. It
seemed it was claimed that Hersch
was out on a' ruinous campaign of
expenditure. Benzion Hersch, how-
ever worked like a tiger. He gained
by his enthusiasm the support of
leading men like Joseph Janower and
Lazar Braudo. Finally, the day of
victory arrived when a resolution
was carried giving the Kadimah
Press, Ltd., permission to issue the
"Zionist Record" as a weekly pub-
lication. Hersch gave a party at his
house' to celebrate the event.

The Weekly Publication
The journal entered its new career
under good auspices. The writer of
this article had hoped the Federation
would have taken the opportunity at
that stage to change the name to
"The Jewish Record." One of the
bitterest opponents to such change
was Hersch, who felt that a sacred
tradition hung to the old name.


Again the rates of subscription
were increased to meet the added ex-
penditure upon weekly printing, and
again the circulation, instead of de-
creasing; began to increase. The
paper, by the addition of new fea-
tures, did indeed become a lively
journal of general Jewish, besides
specifically Zionist, interest. It be-
gan to arrange a cable service, to
pay. more generously for literary
contributions and to encourage local
Sriters.
.It was during the early period of
its entry as a weekly publication that
the "Zionist Record" began to pub-
lish articles from the pen of a writer
who, many years later, became my
successor in office and who now so
capably edits the newspaper. I had
met Chaim Gershater on his arrival
from Vilna. He was a young, man
who had a good knowledge of Yiddish
and spoke a flawless Hebrew. He
knew German ,and other languages,
but had only a slight knowledge of
English. His cultural make-up and
his keen Jewish enthusiasm attracted
me. When he went to Bulawayo to
occupy ap educational post I kept 4.
touch with him.
The Future Editor
On his first re-visit to Johannes-
burg I noticed he had made enor-
mous progress in English. He wrote"
for me impressions of his visit to
Doornfontein, which was at that time
a live centre of Jewish life and ac-
tivity. The contribution was pub-
lished in the "Zionist Record" and
was much .admired.
During my regime there wrs in-
troduced the enlarged issues of the
journal on each Rosh Hashonah.
These increased special numbers
offered an opportunity for the publi-
cation of special feature articles from
the pen of some of the greatest
writers in the Jewish world. When
the years of depression came we
went through a difficult time, but
finally weathered the storm.
The twenty years I spent in pro-
ducing the "Zionist Record" were
happy ones. The work was heavy,
but never tedious. Each number as
it came from the press filled those
associated with it with pride. Not
only was 'the paper performing a
service to the community and the or-
ganisation which created it, but we
felt it was helping in the resuscita-
tion of Israel as a nation.
Gaining a Reputation
The paper gradually gained for it-
staff. The "Zionist Record" ex-
pressing an ideal permeated an
idealism which was strange to the
ample of the highest form of Jewisth
journalism. Its columns and editor-
ial op'nic'n were greatly respected,
not only in Johannesburg, Pretoria
and Cape Town, but in Jerusalem,
New York and Montreal.

The Printers
-There was. always a fine spirit of
comradeship among members of the
staff. The "Zionist Record" expres-
sing an ideal permeated an idealism
which was s t r a n g e to the
goyim-the printers. Thee latter
colleagues throughout the years col-
laborated loyally and became deeply
concerned as one Jewish "crisis" fol-
lowed upon the other. The printers
most of whom are of non-Jewish
faith have much to be thanked for
their daily devotion to the "job" of
bringing out on good time the red6p-
nised organ of South African Jewry.
(Continued overleaf)


THE ZIONIST RECORDI. FRIDAY, PECEMBER 10, 1948


PAGE TWENTY-NINE


(BvT





PAGE FORTY-SIX

Maccabi

Conference
THE next conference of the Mac-
cabi World Union will be held
"in Tel Aviv on December 26. The
traditional custom of a flaming torch
-being carried by relay runners from
SModin, the burial place of the Mac-
cabees, to the Tel Aviv Town Hall,
will again be observed.
At the beginning of the Arab-Jew-
.ish war it seemed that this feature of
Sthe TMaccabiad would have to be
dropped, as Modin is situated in the
.Arab territory of Judea. However,
.the Israeli victory along the Jerusa-
lem corridor has secured a free road
:between Modin and Tel Aviv.-J.T.A.

SIt Happened In

Vienna
VIENNA, Monday. Several
`clashes occurred at a soccer game in
Vienna last week between the Hakoah
"and Vienna Sparto teams when
spectators shouted anti-Semitic in-
sults at the Jewish team and Jewish
members of the audience. The mem-
bers of the team protested to the
city's police headquarters because
policemen assigned to keep order at
the game failed to intervene and
made no effort to apprehend the anti-
Semitic rioters.


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1bT, 19if

Mr. M. ,estadt M.P.C.

with

M.C.C. Stars


This photograph, taken during the recent visit of the M.C.C. team to Benoni, shows Councillor Morrie Nestadt,
M.P.C., shaking hands with F. G. Mann, the captain of the visitors. Others in the picture are: S. C. Griffith,
the M.C.C. vice-captain (extreme left) and D. Compton (extreme right), who scored a brilliant 300 in the match
against North-Eastern Transvaal. Mr. Nestadt, who takes a prominent part in Jewish affairs, is the president
of the North-Eastern Cricket Association, the East Rand Cricket Association, as well as chairman of the Willow-
moore Park Club.


DR. SONNABEND'S
REPORT
(Continued from page 42)
4. Finally, a substantial grant
should be made for housing in Is-
rael, in conformity with the principle
that had already been accepted by
+this Council to participate in a large
project of housing in Israel. In this
scheme the chairman envisaged the
participation of the local Landsmann-
schaften.
Mr. Segal hoped that before the
final figures were adopted, the Pro-
vinces would be given an opportunity
to express their views.
The meeting unanimously accepted
the chairman's suggestions. In view
of the importance of this question,
it was resolved to adjourn the meet-
ing until Sunday, December 12, so
that there could be a further dis-
cussion by the Council on' the re-
ports of the budget proposals.




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Telephones- -- 33-7693/7.


Prominent South Africans


Helped To Build Zionism
(Continued from page 5)


Tielman Roos represented the
Union Government at the opening of
the Tenth Conference of- the S.A.
Zionist Federation in Cape Town in
1926. In the course of a sincere and
moving address he conveyed the good
wishes of the State, and said: "I
am here not only to' represent the
Government of the Union-of South
Africa, but also to assure you of my
personal goodwill. It could not, in-
deed, in my case, be otherwise, as I
have a wide circle of valued friends
belonging to your community who
have been tested by the passing
years."
Governors-General
The S.A. Zionist Federation has
been fortunate in finding so many,
friends among the non-Jewish ele-
ments of the population. Prince
Arthur- of Connauglit, the Earl .of
Athlone and Sir Patrick Duncan,
during their respective terms of of-
fice as Governor-General of the
Union all placed on record their hope
for the realisation of a Jewish
National Home in. Palestine.
While it is evident that the funda-
mental tasks in the establishment of
the Jewish Stiate were performed by
the people in Israel, the importance
of the support rendered to Zionism
by responsible public personages in
far away South Africa- should not be
underestimated.
Public Declaration
In 1928 Tielfnan Roos, Colonel
Cresswell, General Smuts, Patrick
Duncan, as well as the administra-
tors of the- four provinces of the
Union, and many other prominent


figures, signed a declaration signify-
ing sympathy with the "aspirations
of those who seek to re-create in
Palestine a" National Home for the
Jewish people." This document im-
pressed a large section of the South
African population who saw it as an
avowal of high-minded idealism,
free of any political intent.
Mr. Hofmeyr
One of the most ardent exponents
of the cause of Zionism among the
non-Jews of South' Africa has al-
ways been Mr. J. H. Homeyr, whose
splendid dignity and courageous, af-
firmation of the-rights of all peoples
earned him the absolute devotion of
the Jewish people. Mr. Hofmeyr, de-,
spite the almost overwhelming de-
mands on his time wa4 always
pleased tb attend a Zionist function,
or-prepared to deliver one of his
scholarly and scathing addresses
directed against the forces endeav-
ouring to cripple, in advance, the
prospects of a Jewish State. While
Minister of Finance he was associ-
ated with the South African Parlia-
mentary Pro-Palestine Committee
which was set up in 1944.
The chairman, of this committee
was Senator Edgar Brookes, 'a man
with a similar outlook in many re-
spects to Mr. Hofmeyr, and fearless
in his logical denunciations of anti-
Semitism. The Pro-Palestine Commit-
tee was extremely active and was in-
strumental, through public meetings
and various other measures, in bring-
ing about a greater awareness of the
issue involved in the Palestine ques-
tion.
Dr. Colin Steyn, tile Minister of
Justice in the last Government, and
a long standing friend of Zionism,
was also associated with' the Com-
mittee, which consisted of the fol-
lowing: Mr. Morris Kentridge, Dr.


L. Bosnian, Mr. Morris Alexander,
Senator F. C. Hollander, Dr. L.
Steenkamp, Senator G. Hartog, .the
Rt. Hon. J. Stratford, and Senators
D. D.,C. Murray and G. J. Hugo.
Senator Conroy and Piet Grobler,
. who was a member of General
Hertzog's. Cabinet in 1926, Professor
Dingemans, of Rhodes University,
and George Barrel, for many years a
member of the Cape Provincial Coun-
cil, did much to assist the Federa-
fion by their willingness to appear
on Zionist platforms. This they did
with remarkable regularity.
A number of prominent South Af-
rican judges have, on various occa-
sions, associated themselves with the
Zionis' movement. Incidentally,
Mr. Justice Greenberg and Mr. Jus-
tice Millin, both members of the Jew-
ish community, have played an im-
portant part in ,the Zionist move-
ment. Justice Greenberg in particu-
lar was closely associated with the
movement. He was honorary presi-
dent of a number of Zionist cam-
paigns, presided at numerous Zionist
functions, and was responsible for
-some brilliant Zionist orations which
left a deep impression on audiences
in this country.
These public figures, together with
a number of others who have unfor-
tunately had to be omitted from
. mention in this review, have made a
-worthy contribution to Zionism, and
helped to strengthen the rightful
.claims of the Jewish people for a
State. J.B.


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--W.IIE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


Sabbath begins Friday, December 10, 1948,
at 6.34 p.m.
Sabbath ends Saturday, December 11, 1948,
at 7.14 p.m. .

BIRTH
GIER.-To Percy and Ray (nee Gecelter)
af daughter at the Moedersbond Nurs-
ing Home, Pretoria, on December 5.
Both Well.

BARMITZVAH
LADEN.-Mervyn Baron, only son of
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Laden, Sea View
Hotel, East London, will read a
portionn of the Law and Maftir at the East
ndon Synagogue on Saturday, December
18, 1948.
SHEAR.-Brian, younger son of Mr. and
S Mrs., t_ Shear, will read a portion
of the law at the Western Road
Synagogue, Port Elizabeth, on Saturday,
December 11, 1948. Brocha at 6 Trinder
Mansions, Whitlock Street, after morning
service. No cards.

MARRIAGES
LOOM -- SACHS.-The marriage of
Marion, younger daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. II. Sachs, of Bulawayo, to
Myer, elder son of Mr. and Mrs E.
Bloom, of Kimberley, will take place at
the Bulawayo Synagogue on Tuesday, De-
cember 14, 1948, at 11.30 a.m. No cards.
Address: 24 Fort Street, Bulawayo.
M ANN WOOLF.-The marriage of
Rahlyn, only daughter 'of Mr. and
Mrs. N. Woolf, of Bloemfontein, and
David K, Mann, of Johannesburg, young-
est son of the late Mr. and Mrs. I. H.
Manaschewitz, formerly of Oudtshoorn,
will take place at the Bloemfontein Syna-
gogue on December 12, at 12 noon.
RASKIN -- MOWSZOWSKI.-The mar-
riage- will take place at the Bula-
wayo Synagogue at 10.30 a.m. on
Sunday, December 12, between Gertrude
Guta), eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
L. Mowszowski, 4 Walter Howard Road,
Bulawayo, formerly of Bialystok, Poland,
to Harry Louis, only son of Mr. I. Ras-
kin, of Cores, C.P., and the late Mrs. B.
Raskin. Reception, Guild Hall. Relatives
and friends cordially invited
OSENBERG NOTELOVITZ. -- The
marriage of Alex; son of Mr. and
Mrs. Myer Rosenberg, of Johannes-
burg, to Ray, only daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. A. Notelovitz, of Pietersburg, will be
solemnised on Sunday, December 12, at
2.30 p.m. at the Great Synagogue, Wol-
marans Street.
RINK-BLOCH.-The marriage ot Min-
nie, eldest daughter of Rabbi I. Bloch
and the late Mrs. Bloch, of Port
Elizabeth, to Harry, younger son of Mrs.
A. Katz and the late Mr. B. Trink, of
Luderitz, South-West Africa, will take
place at the Raleigh Street Synagogue,
Port Elizabeth, on Sunday, December 12,
at 11.30 a.m. Congratulations, 21 Glen
Street, Port Elizabeth.
ENRY TREISMAN advises you to per-
petuate this momentous occasion In
your life by photographing yourselves.
Wbhe natural, therefore the most beautiful,
results will be a lovely reminder of your
happiest day. Make your appointment:
Phone 22-7314.
SPECIALISTS in liquor catering for wed-
dings, engagements, and all festive
occasions. Largest range of whisky,
champagne imported and best South Afri-
can wines, liqueurs, brandies, etc. P. J.
Joubert, (Jhb.) (Pty.). Ltd., Main & Kruis.
Streets. Phone 22-1575, Johannesburg. Also
at Darban. Port Elizabeth. Pretoria, Ver-
aeniging. Randfontein and Brakpan.

CONSECRATION
H U RWlTZ.-The consecration of the
tombstone erected in memory of, the
late Harry Hurwitz, of East Lon-
don, will take place at the West Park
Cemetery on Sunday, December 12, 1948,
at 11.15 a.m.

IN MEMORIAL
BEROLD.--Barney Isaac. In fondest
memory of my beloved husband and
our dear Dad who passed away on
December 13, 1936. Thoughts drift back on
bygone days. Life moves on. But sweet
memory stays. We who l'-, d l iim will
never forget. Fanny and children.
LASS. Lieut. David Emanuel
(S.A.M.C.) died of wounds In
Libya, on the 1st December, 1941
corresponding to the 11th Kislev.) Ever
remembered by his loving mother and
father, sisters Alice. Hilda, Sylvia,
brothers-in-law Sam. Hymie and Jack,
nieces Sheila, Joyce, Reena and Desire6,
and uncle Moses Klass.
SEINKER.-Eigo. In loving memory of
our dearly beloved mother and grand-
mothlir who passed away on the
51l (lay of Kisliv 5199, corresponding to
December 3, 1938. Always remembered. by
her Inving children and grandchildren.


-- ...


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For particulars please phone 25-1887, or
write "P.Z.," c/o "Zionist Record," P.O.
Box '150, Johannesburg.

CAPE TOWN
REMISES to let as Kosher high class
cafe and .restaurant at 22 Commer-
cial Street, Cape Town, reasonable
rental. Phone 2-1200 or write P.O. Box
2402, Cape Town.

FLAT TO LET
TWO-ROOMED flat, 17 10s. African
Ace, 705 Alris Building, 3 Rissik
Street, Johannesburg.

WHERE TO STAY
O N arrival in Johannesburg, stay at tt,-
Mirkin-Seeff Kosher Hotel, 2B
O'Reilly Road, Berea. Modern and
strictly Kosher. Excellent cuisine. Phonee
44-8815. manager's office; 44-4517. visitors.

MUIZENBERG
HILE on holiday get your copy of the
"Zionist Record" at the C.N.A.
branch, Muizenberg.

MUIZENBERG
A pleasant Holiday for you at
PIED A TERRE "
Alexander Road Phone 8-4483
Some vacancies available for School Holidays
A Home from Home
Continental Cuisine and Service
Mr. and Mr& E. Hirschfeldt
(Formerly Cafe De Luxe)

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Applications are invited for the
position of

SPIRITUAL LEADER, HEBREW
TEACHER AND CHAZAN
for the Nigel Hebrew Congrega-
tion. Please apply, giving full
details of qualifications together
with copies of recent testi-
monials.
David Wolff, Honorary Secretary
P.O. Box 8, Nigel


SITUATION WANTED
TEMlPORARY or part-time job wanted
as attendant in milkbar, hotel, etc.
Middle-aged man competent ener-
getic. trustworthy, also to act as man-
ager. Write: Advertiser, P.O. Box 4216,
Johannesburg.
A BLE, willing, Jewish married man
seeks position in outfitting and tail-
oring or clothing factory in Johan-
nesburg or on the Reef. Experienced cut-
ter/designer men's, juvenile clothing;
knowledge of salesmanship, supervising,
etc. Able to assist generally in firm with
prospects. Please help. Write M.R., c/o
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nesburg.
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requires position. Capable of hand-
ling receiving and despatch departments,
maklung-up and checking of order as well
as supervising. Please reply: "F.B.," c/o
P.O. Box 150. Johannesburg.
CUTTER, designer, with exceptional
qualifications in ladies' slacks,
ladies' and men's overalls, dressing
gowns, and ladies' blouses, seeks position.
lease write to "Advertiser," P.O. Box
3395, Johannesburg.'


FARMING
The S.A. Ort-Oze Vocational
Guidance Bureau has a vacancy
for a young man who wishes to
learn farming. Apply immedi-
ately to: 10 Unity House, 100
Fox Street, Johannesburg.


PROFESSIONAL APPOINTMENTS
Chartered Accountants have vacan-
cies for matriculated youths to be
trained as Articled Clerks. Duties to
commence 2nd January, 1949. Appli-
cants who are writing their Matricu-
lation examination or awaiting re-
stilts will be favourably considered.
Apply P.O. Box 3428, Johannesburg.


UNITED HEBREW INSTITU-
TIONS, GERMISTON
Applications are invited for the
post of:
1.-Hebrew Kindergarten
Teacher
2.-Trained Nursery School-
Teacher
Applications must be addressed
to:
"Gan," P.O. Box 31, Geimiston
to reach the office not later
than 15th January, 1949.


CYRILDENE OBSERVATORY
HEBREW CONGREGATION
A FULLY QUALIFIED

HEBREW TEACHER

required as and from 1st January,
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Apply:
THE SECRETARY
P.O. Box 5506, Johannesburg



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mises. Apply Secretary,
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v _







PAGE SIXTEEN

South African Link With


Pioneer Zionist


(Continued from page 33)

Dr. d"Arbella ever visited the Trans-
vaal. Should such, indeed, have
been the case then his document on
Jewry here in the days before the
Discovery of gold on the Rand in 1886
would certainly prove a most valu-
able source of historical information.
In all likelihood, he may have visi-
ted, besides Durban, other parts of
this quarter of Africa, of which no
record of his has yet come to light.
One finds it worthwhile to postulate
an assumption like this. The pres-
ent writer bases this contention on
a report .published in the first Afri-
kaans-paper ever to be issued in this
,country, "Die Patriot," of Septem-
ber 26, 1884-it was edited by the
pioneer of the Afrikaans tongue, the
Rev. S. J. du Toit-to the effect that
"Dr. Isaac Gregory d'Arbella be-
lieves that the Ophir of Solomon was
in Africa. While. at Chiloane, twenty
miles from Africa, he met natives
who were going to the mines in the
Transvaal. He was impressed by the
'Jewish types' of these natives."
Not always was he keen to remain
in Africa, and his thoughts, it seems,
were more often than not centred on
Palestine Jewish Palestine in
whose National resuscitation he
hoped to make his own specific con-
tribution. A fact it is, and, among,
others, who have confirmed this as-
sertion was none other than Elkan
Nathan Adler, who met him a year
after he had arrived in the land of
his fathers.
"Dr. d'Arbella is a man of means,".
opined the Anglo-Jewish scholar,
"and the primary object which
prompted him to settle in the Holy
Land was his desire to assist in the
upbuilding of the Yishuv, and to
give his charming little girl and
boy a Jewish education. His dark
bright-eyed little daughter is sweet-
ly pretty, and speaks English with
charming shyness. She is only seven,
but has already made a conquest. The
doctor takes much interest in the
agricultural colonies, and has a con-
siderable pecuniary stake in them.
He owns half-a-million vines in the
Rishon colony, and has a profound
belief in its future."

Went To Eretz Israel
Such, indeed, was the object he had
in view when he left our shores for
good some time in 1885 or 1886. By
mid-1887 he was already to be found
in the country of his ancestors. He
certainly did not find it easy to en-
ter there, for he came at a moment
when the Turkish authorities of the
time were doing their utmost to re-
strict the" movement of Jews in that
quarter of the earth. He was adam-
ant in his particular quest, however,
and it was only on account of his
profession as a medical man that the
then Turkish Governor eventually
permitted him to enter the Land of
Israel.
Within a little while Dr. d'Arbella
made his mark in the Palestine of his
age, and it was immediately after
his arrival there that he, in 1887, was
engaged as medical officer of the col-
ony of Rishon le-Zion-a settlement,
it will be remembered, which was
founded in 1882 by seventeen fami-
lies who were all members of the
Russian Chovevei Zion Society.
He was not there for long, however,
and late in 1888 he was asked to act
'as physician to the Rothschild Hospi-
tal in Jerusalem-a position he held
for years.
He always appeared to take a seri-
ous view of his vocation as such,
and wherever possible endeavoured


to succour. ailing man. For instance,
on one occasion, in 1891, after wit-
nessing the sad plight of Persian
Jewry in Palestine following an out-
break of cholera in Syria he ap-
pealed to folks outside the country
to help them as much as possible. "I
am the only person who speaks Per-
sian," he then declared, "and I know
their terrible conditions."
Not only was he concerned about
the physical conditions of these
Persian Jews-most of them were
Marrahoes who fled their natal land
-but he himself, as befits a -man, of
knowledge, was interested :in their
cultural life as well. Possessor of a
facile-and ready pen, he wrote essays
on them as well as on other topics
for the London "Jewish Chronicle" of
his generation. He was, also, in com-
pany with some of the most renowned
Jewish intellectuals of the day like
Moritz Steinschneider, David Kauf-
mann, Lector- M. Friedman, Joseph
Halevy and Alexander Harkavy, a
contributor to the "Jerusalem Jahr-
buch" for 1889 which was edited and
published by Abraham Moses Luncz
(1854-1918), the famous Kovna-
born blind scholar and pioneer Heb-
rew printer in the Land of Israel.
Dr. d'Arbella spent much ot his
time. in Palestine in advancing the
Hebrew language within the bound-
aries of the ancient Land. Such was
the interest he displayed in espous-
ing this cause thit, in 1890, he was
elected President of the Jerusalem
"Safa Berura," which was founded
in 1889. It was an organisation which
had for its aim "the substitution of
pure Hebrew for the diverse mongrel
jargons, as the home language of
our co-religionists in the Holy Land."
A year later, in 1891, he, on their
behalf, issued an appeal for finan-
cial assistance. "Considerable pro-
gress has been made already," he
wrote, "but funds are needed to sup-
ply teachers for the girls, to purchase
books, and for the publication of use-
ful conversational guides, the want
of ithe latter being much felt." And
it is, mainly, for an activity such as
this on his part that one can well
claim him, in company with his bet-
ter known contemporaries Eliezer
Ben-Yehudah the lexicographer and
Jechiel Michael Pines the writer, as
among ,the pioneers of the Hebrew
tongue in the land of his fathers.
At the same time he was, also,
equally devoted to the cause of Jew-
ish education in the Holy City. He
was often, for example, present P't
the examination of pupils of the
Evelina de Rothschild Girls' School
in Jerusalem.


Held, In High Esteem
That he was a man generally held
in high esteem in the Holy City of
his era is a fact that cannot be gain-
said. To such a degree was this the
case that early in the 1890's, for
instance, he was appointed by the
Government of the Netherlands as
their Consul in Jerusalem.
What was the personal impression
that he made on his contemporaries?
"Dr. d'Abrella," observed one of
them, Elkan Nathan Adler, "may
not be scrupulously observant, ac-
cording to Jerusalem notions, but he
never eats 'trifa' or smokes on 'sab-
bath.' He is a handsome, active man,
and though he mourns for the wife
he lost, he is too much of an ideal-
ist or an enthusiast to be anything
but the most agreeable and refresh-
ing of companions."


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948

What Zionism Has Done For The Zionist
(Continued from page 15)


We have experienced a number of
great upheavals. The physical de-
struction of European Jewry might
have brought spiritual destruction
elsewhere. The rise of Hitler in the
30's could have brought about moral
decay amongst a small and helpless
people faced with so ferocious an
enemy. At the time when Hitler was
sprawling across Europe, reaching out
for the entire civilised world, we
held on to our Zionism. It offered
not merely fruitless consolation, but
bright rays of hope and an outlet for
constructive work. The grim feeling
of helplessness was relieved .by the
thought that "despite everything"
we have a goal in -front of us -and
are moving towards it. To use a
crude and cruel analogy, Hitler had
taken from the Jewish people in the
course of five years much more than
Zionism can take from them in the
next thousand years. Yet, the com-
pensation received by the Jews (de-
spite their significant contribution to
the war effort) from the Allied
Nations, was nil, while the reward
which Zionism has given, us has .ex-


pressed itself in a thousand ways and
reached its climax during the last
glorious year of 1948. How can we
adequately describe this reward?
How can it be measured? The sta-
ture of every Jew, wherever he may
be, has been raised. Young Jewry
is fighting its enemies and heroic-
ally defending its soil! The very
thought has electrified not only those
who had worked for Zion, but thou-
sands who stood outside our ranks.

A Mission
Zionism has indeed done for the
Zionist .much more than the Zionist
has done for Zionism. It gave him
a mission-the type of mission of
which the fruit can be gathered in
our own time. It provided a link,
firstly, with the .great past, and,
secondly, with the expanse of Jewry
in other parts of the world. It gave
content to the Jewish home and
created a harmony which on the final
analysis is an inestimable contribu-
tion towards the development of local
communal life, in face of many social
and political handicaps.


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PAGE TWENTY

THE BARMITZVAH YEAR


(Continued from page 19)
he resembled Wolffsohn slightly.
Tall, upright and straight-forward,
his mind was directed to his great
master, Moshe Leib Lilienblum: "He
was the greatest Zionist in my young
days. A great Lamdan, a great
Apikoires, a great. Zionist and above
all a greisser Yid un a greisser
monsh, dos is geoven der emes allein.
Did you read his books?
"I have them all here."
"Really, come let us go, I would
like to see them."
The old lady, a pious woman of
the traditional type with a sheitel, a
real Zaddekes, laughed at his excite-
ment and stopped him: "Wait, let us
have tea. You have been talking all
the time. Moshe .Leib can wait."
Tea was served and old Kantoro-
witz, brightening up considerably,
told us this story.
When in the course of his efforts
to prevent a ban on Shechita in
Europe the famous Dr. Dembo
visited Switzerland he went up to
Basle, to the first Zionist Congress.
Ussishkin was pleasantly surprised
to. see him.
"Glad to meet you Herr Doctor, as
a Zionist," he said to Dr. Dembo.
"I am not a Zionist."
"Then why are you here?"
"Well, I heard that you Zionists
are assembled here to establish a
Jewish State in Palestine so I came
to see to it that you don't prohibit
the Shechita there."
We all laughed and Morris heard
all these stories and did not say a
word. A homo novus in local Zion-
ism, he kept silence but followed the
talk intently.
Earlier, in England, at the age of
14, Morris used to write reports of
Jewish gatherings for the "Jewish
Chronicle." In Durban he and Mr.
Joseph Rabinowitz were the hon.
secretaries of the Zionist Society.
They were called Die Umsiste
Schreibers.
Incidentally, Mr. Kentridge told
me that in the early days he once


called a Zionist meeting in Durban.
He gave his speech in advance to the
"Natal Mercury." The next day the
speech was published verbatim, but
the meeting was never held! The
"Natal Mercury" described it as a
"packed house."
The mantle of Morris Alexander
subsequently fell on Morris Kent-
ridge, who is now the doyen of Jew-
ish M.P.'s in the Union. Whenever' I
see him I recall the conversation at
his father's home in Harrismith
which took -place on Pesach 5671.
I came to Johannesburg in May,
1911. I presented my credentials to
the Zionist Federation where I saw
the acting chairman, Mr. A. M.
Abrahams, his brother Isaac, who
was the secretary of the Zionist Fed-
eration, and Mr. Isaac Caplan, who
was the honorary treasurer.
I gave them this message: "Your
President sends his best wishes and
mazeltov on your Barmi.tzvah." They
looked at me with surprise.
"Isn't it the Barmitzvah-year of
your Federation?"
"Oh, yes," Caplan smiled, placed
his hat on his head and rattled off
the Haftorah of his own Barmitz-
vah.
A. M. Abrahams claimed that he
could do the same, but was inter-
rupted by his brother, who told him
not to bother since he would not re-
ceive any presents. He then asked
after the Chief.
Mv message was not too cheerful.
T related that Wolffsohn was suffer-
ing from the Zionist sickness-heart-
disease. He had inherited it from
Herzl. The wags said that his con-
dition had become worse since he
had started to learn English. The
editor of the "Razsviet," Idelsohn,
had advised Wolffsohn not to attempt
the study of English, saying to him:
"Herr President, the English people
are fortunate in having acquired
English as their mother-tongue. If
they had to master the English
language they would not have had
time to conquer the world."


THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 194S


I told the people at the Federation
that we must assist Wolffsohn and
that I was at their disposal. I would I
be a good Zionist missionary.
This made the "Barmitzvah boys"
very happy. I then addressed the Ab-
rahams brothers: "Sokolow told me
to ask whether you knew anything
of your great Landsman, Jules
Verne. Sokolow had told me that
both of you and Mr. Goldreich orig-
inate from Plotsk, in Poland. In that
town there was an old Jewish
teacher. His name was Olszewicz. He
had a son who went to France, be-
came baptised and changed his-name
to Verne.
This piece of information was met
with the biggest astonishment, so I
asked them if "Die Welt" of 1905
was available. The volume produced
was from Sam Goldreich's library
and I pointed out an article bv M.
Berkowitz: "Jules Verne-ein Jude"
("Die Welt," 1905, No. 35.)
They all felt that we should write
to Sam Goldreich about it. While
looking at "Die Welt" an envelope
fell out of .the -volume. On the back
-of the envelope was printed the in-
scription: "Nicht reich aber doch
Goldreich." This was the motto on his
letter-heads.
During my conversation with the
Zionist leaders I discovered that A.
M. Abrahams was an old friend of
Zangwill and that he was not "ex-
territorial." He had Territorialist
inclinations. His knowledge of Zion-
ism was very poor at the time-the
others knew even less.
I afterwards met Benzion S.
Hersch, the editor of "Die Judische
Pahm." I started to speak to him in
Hebrew. He answered in Polish. He
was a son of a Talmid Chacham,
Meyer David Hersch, a Gemora Lam-
dan. I was also introduced to S. Len-
nox Loewe, a son of Dr. Ludwig
Loewe, the secretary of Sir Moses
Montefiore.
Dr. Ludwig Loewe mastered 38
languages. His son was, however, a
taciturn man and could keep silent
in all the 38 languages. B. S. Hersch,
who was full of temperament and
most talkative, was the first politi-
cal Zionist in South Africa; he was
the first in South Africa to corres-
pond with "Herzl about Zionism.
When I asked him if he had read
Hess and Salvador he looked at me
and answered: "I am a "gemeiner"
in the army of Allgemeine Zionosten.
I am a plain soldier, a hard-working
man. I have no time to read. Work
for Zionism-that is the main thing.
I can assure you that if Herzl were
to have read all these writers he
would never have had time to write
his immortal book 'Der Judenstaat.'
The greatest Zionist of Anglo-Jewry
was Sir Moses Montefiore, whom I
remember well from my infancy. He
did a lot of work for Palestine, but
never read. My father once said of
him, 'he was the greatest Jew of
his time and the greatest Am-
Haaretz'."
S. Lennox Loewe had a small
circle of friends, he used to call them
"Maccabeans." (Hersch called them
Mcbeans).
My next call was on Dr. Landau. I
had a letter to him from S. I. Hur-
witz, who stirred up a controversy in
the Jewish world with his Hebrew
year book "Heatid." In 1909 he orgi-
nised the first conference for the
.Hebrew language and culture and he
requested Dr. Landau to establish a
branch of this organisation in South
Africa. Dr. Landau made a deep im-
pression on me. He was a great
scholar and well versed in Hebrew
and world literature. He reminded
me of a sage of the golden epoch of
the Jews in Spain.
I asked Dr. Landau about the ac-
tivities of the Hebrew movement in
Johannesburg and he replied that
they had a Hebrew circle "Ivriyah,"
but no Hebrew scholars apart from a
few of the old type melamdim. He
said: "I hope you will give us a He-
brew lecture soon. My house is open
to you and I will always be glad to
see you. I avoided discussion on Zion-
ism because of the information I had
had from Rev. Kantorowitz. How-
ever, during the tea served by Mrs.


Landau I glanced through thn pape:'.
-on a little table and amongst them I
came across an issue of the "Judishe
Fohn" dated May 4, 1911, which con-
tained a little feuilleton by Devorah-
sohn entitled "garei At-in the He-
brew High School." This epistle sub-
sequently led to a court case involv-
ing Dr. Landau and the Hebrew High
School. This was a scandal and a
Chilul Hashem.
I also managed to visit Dr. J. H.
Hertz,'- who was about to depart for
New York. Dr. Hertz was somewhat
embittered, though he did not express
it, but his efforts to assist in the es-
tablishment of Transvaal Jewish
Board of Deputies had placed him in
disfavour -with the Zionists. Sam
Goldreich refused to attend the in-
augural mass meeting of the Board
which was held at the Wanderers in
1903. Lord Milner noticed his ab-
sence and asked "where is the little
man?"
The Zionists were opposed- to the
establishment of the Board of Depi-
ties, and Isaac Caplan publicly said:
"You will come to your Board over
our dead bodies." (In his youth Cap-
lan was an Anarchist and a Socialist,
who had no love for the Peverenrls).
In 1911 Zionism was- dull and lifp-
less despite the fact that the 10th
Zionist Congress and the 4th S.A.
Zionist Conference were held in that
year.
Glancing through the May issue of
the "Zionist Record" of 1911 I re-
called Bismark's description of Ber-
lin: "A desert of bricks." That issue
could be described as the scribbling
of freaks. The editorial containing
this gem: "It is not rather a fact
that the Jew has never suffered from
a dislike of learning . The prayer
book and his literature stand as liv-
ine and eloquent memorials to these."
(That was an argument against Cul-
tural Zionism). Here you have the
Siddur Yid-the ideal of Chief Rabbi
Adler of London: We do not need
the Gemora Yid or Misha Yid or even
the Tanach Yid-we must have the
Siddur Yid.
In the desert of Reports and Cor-
respondence there was only one
article by S. Lennox Loewe, F.A.A.
on Political Zionism. It commences:
"When Adam had been created, the
first work he undertook was to give
names to all animals and inanimates
around him." The author then pro-
ceeds to give an analysis of practical,
cultural and political Zionism. Prac-
tical Zionism he described as "the
burial ground" which "amongst Jews
in termed the House of Life."
The only good work of the Johan-
nesburg Zionists was the Zionist
Hall. Every evening the hall was
packed by the Jewish masses for the
purpose of reading periodicals and
books in Hebrew, Yiddish, English,
Russian and German.
The 4th Conference of S.A. Zion-
ists was a failure. There were fewer
delegates than at any other previous
conference. There was only one ju-
venile delegate present and neither
the Mizrachi nor the Poalei Zion
were represented. The "Zionist Rec-
ord" boasted that in South Africa
there was no room for them. In all it
was a catastrophic year, "a schwa z
vor." The 10th Congress was the
last to be attended by Max Nordau
who could not bear the ruination of
Herzlian Zionism.
That was my first year in South
Africa.. Thirty-eight years have
passed and like the Phoenix Zionism
rose from. the ashes. During these
years the movement had its up and
downs, but to-day it is the only guid-
ing star in the Jewish firmament.
On the occasion of the "Golden
Jubilee" of the S.A. Zionist Feder-
ation I offer my heartiest congratula-
tions.
In conclusion I also congratulate
the "Zionist Record" on its 40th
birthday, and I heartily congratulate
my old friend Levi Chaim Gershater
under whose able editorship the
journal has beaten all the
"Records." My wish for him is that
he will celebrate the Diamond Jubilee
of the organ of South African Jew-
ry in Israel.


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P.O. Box 5139 Telephones: 22-1683, 22-9558, 22-6770


We extend
our congratulations to the S.A. Zionist
Federation on its 50th Anniversary and
wish it continued success.




THE ZIONIST EECOEij, k~E1DAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948 PAGE FIFrEEN


INSCRIBE THE GOLDEN JUBILEE
OF THE S.A. ZIONIST MOVEMENT


THE


STATE


OF


ISRAEL


GOLDEN BOOK


SEFER HAMEDINAH


The proceeds


of these inscriptions will


redeem a tract of land in Israel for the


settlement of


ex-servicemen


THE ZIONIST RECORu, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1948


PAGE FIFTEEN






TRE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 0, 0. 1948
I Statement by M- :B. Gering C chairman S.A. Zionist Federation



WE ARE FACED WITH.


UNPRECEDENTED


RESPONSIBILITIES


PHE 50th Anniversary of the
establishment of the South
african Zionist Federation co-
ncides with the year in which
:he' actual ideal for which Zio-
iism was established became a
reality; and it is now possible
:o consider i n retrospect
whether Zionism has justified
itself.
i One of the minor incidents in the
!ge-old tragedy of the homeless Jew-
,h people, the Dreyfus trial pro-
iced a great historic event. Theo-
or Herzl was stirred by the
,reyfus trial, and it kindled
him the spark which led him
conceive the idea of a Jewish
tate as the only solution to the
problem of Jewish homelessness. The
'reyfus -tragedy fades into insignifi-
ince by comparison with the- suc-
.ssion of tragedies of increasing di-
mensions which have befallen *the
ewish people since that time.
!During the period the world has
witnessed the pogroms under Czar-
it Russia; the discriminatory laws
against Jews. in so many parts of
ie world; the barring of the doors
-other countries as the posi,tiion of
lie Jews in the country in which they
'ere living deteriorated; Jewry's
sses during the first World War
hen tens of thousands were driven
their homes, when families
:ere separated and indescribable
ardship.s were endured and when
indreds of thousands of lives were
st, only because they were Jewish
res.
'And then, there occurred the
greatest tragedy of all, when under
the Hitler regime, six million Jews
were massacred and hundreds of
thousands more were cast out from
their homes and debarred from
entering any other country.
Never Questioned
It is fortunate that bands of ideal-
;s throughout the world never
estioned Herzl's idea of Jewish
a,tehood. The early immigrants
)m Eastern Europe brought Herzl's
2al to South Africa, and spread it
roughout the villages and towns of
is country. Only a year after the
*rnption 'of the World Zionist Or-
nisation the decision was taken to
:ablish the South African Zionist
aeration. On the occasion of the'
aeration's 50th Anniversary, let
pay tribute to the men and women
o laid the foundations of the Fed-
ition as we know it to-day. The
;ceeding generations have guarded
Zionist heritage re should-
ng with fervour and& determination
great .responsibility arising from
establishment of the Jewish
te.
'rom the small beginnings of fifty
trs ago when the departments of
)paganda, Finance and the Hebrew
guage were established, the Fed-
tion has developed into a far-
ig vibrant organisation embrac-,
many departments and provin-
1 offices. The growing personal
itacts of the Jewish community of
ith Africa with the State of Is-
J1 has, in addition, necessitated the
ablishment of the Federation's of-
in Israel.

Tribute to General Smuts
'he achievements of the South Af-
in Zionist; Movement have been
atly stimulated by the tremendous
uence exerted during visits to


South Africa of our world Zionist
leaders, including David Wolffsohn,
Shmaryahu Levin, Nahum Sokolow,
Vladimir Jabotinsky and Chaim Weiz-
mann, first President of the State of
Israel.
We must record with appreciation
the support given by all successive
Governments of the Union of South
Africa to the Zionist cause. And we
must pay special tribute to General
Smuts, the only surviving architect
of the Balfour Declaration and the
champion of the Zionist cause.
The great achievements of the
South African Zionist Federation in
the course of the five decades of its


MR. BERNARD GERING


existence have been due in no small
measure to the fact that it succeed
in bringing about the full' co-opera-
tion of all Zionist groups, including
the women and youth; and to the
fact that it has worked in harmony
with other leading Jewish organisa-
tions. This unity of the Jewish com-
munity has been demonstrated by the
way it has responded to the emerg-
ency in Israel during the last year,
and by its contribution to the strug-
gle of the newly established S'tate
for its survival.
The State is an established fact.
Many battles have been won, but final
victory has not yet been achieved.
The Zionist Movement is now con-
fronted with immense tasks in the
fields of immigration, land redemp-
tion, colonisation, chalutziut and
Zionist education. The absorption of
ten to twenty thousand immigrants
every month places unprecedented
responsibilities upon World Jewry. I
trust that as in the past, the South
African Jewish community will play
its full part.
On the 50th Anniversary of the
establishment of the South African
Zionist- Federation let us pay tribute
to the leaders who have steered us
from Herzl's dream to the achieve-
ment of the Jewish State; and to
the builders and fighters of Israel;
let us assure them that we have re-
dedicated ourselves to Zionist service
and that we shall continue to bring
them our maximum support.


PAGE .1VSS

Prominent South Africans Who


Helped To Build Zionism

NO record of the history of South African Zionism would be
complete without reference, however brief, to the part
played by prominent statesmen and other public figures of the
Union in the furtherance of the Zionist cause. It is noteworthy
that support for Zionism came from all sections, irrespective of
party allegiance.


Of all the prominent non-Jews in
South Africa who have used their in-
fluence for the benefit of Zionism,
pride of place must undoubtedly go
to General Smuts, one of the prime
movers in bringing about the Balfour
Declaration. General Louis Botha, it
profound humanitarian, and an un-
compromising champion of justice for
the Jewish people, was another who
saw the merits and urgency of Zion-
ism when the movement was still in
its teens.
The powerful moral influence ex-
erted by General Botha on the Brit-
ish Government during the latter
part of the first World War helped
immeasurably to overcome the oppo-
sition from many influential persons
to the signing of the Balfour Declar-
ation.

General Botha
Botha was concerned with the Jew-
ish problem in all its aspects, and
was prepared to go to any length to
remedy the evils which were being
perpetrated against the Jews. Dur-
ing the deliberations of the Peace
Conference he became intimately ac-
quainted with conditions in-Europe.
At Versailles he insisted on the
drafting of a proclamation to ensure
the protection of national and relig-
ious minorities in Europe. That this
proclamation, eventually adopted by
the Peace Conference, failed to
achieve the effect envisaged by its
chief architect, reflects only on
those who recognized no law other
than their own ambition.
As early as 1910 General Botha
opened a J.N.F. Bazaar in Johannes-
burg and said that "the object of


ISRAELI ARMY OCCUPIES
112 LEBANESE VILLAGES
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-The Is-
raeli army is occupying 100 square
miles of Lebanese territory, includ-
ing 12 villages with 15,000 inhabi-
tants.
This fact was disclosed during a
press tour of the Israeli-Lebanese
border this week. Almost every day
notables from -villages inside Le-
banon cross the front and approach
the Israeli army with a request for
their protection.
Lebanese villagers told the corre-
spondents that they felt happy under
the Israeli rule, though they are. fac-
ing economic hardship, since they are
cut off from their sources of supply
and former markets.


WAR PRISONERS TO BE.
EXCHANGED
TEL AVIV, Wednesday. Red
Cross representatives are making
preparations for the exchange of
a second group of P.O.W's shortly.
Last week the clergy and notables
of Christian Arabs visited P.O.W.
camps in Israel to meet prisoners and
see conditions.
The prisoners held a special recep-
tion for the visitors, who later -ex-
pressed to the Israeli authorities
their full satisfaction at conditions
prevailing in P.O.W. camps. Recently
Arab broadcasting stations re-
peatedly issued false stories about
the mishandling of Arab prisoners
in Israel.


creating a great centre in Palestine
which will represent the home of
your people has my fullest support."

General Smuts
The constant and positive assist-
ance of General Smuts to Zionism
has always been a source of consid-
erable strength to the Zionist Move-
ment. His feelings for Zionism de-
rived from a real and vital respect
for the contribution of the Jewish
people to world civilisation, and from
a thorough understanding of the
wrongs they had suffered through the
ages.
In 1926 Nahum Sokolow visited
South Africa and in the course of an
extensive tour of the country was af-
forded every hospitality by the Gov-
ernment and the various Municipal
bodies. I-
It was shortly after his visit, and
as a result of the impression cre-
ated by him on members of the
Government, that the Union Cab-
inqt unanimously passed a resolu-
tion on September 4, 1926, express-
ing its determination to do what-
tever lay in its power to assist in
the establishment of a Jewish
National Home.
General Hertzog was Prime Min-
ister at the time and he, together
with Tielman Roos and Colonel Cress-
well, in a series of public statements
expressed their sympathy for Zion-
ism. In any appraisal of the achieve-
ments of the Zionist Federation every
recognition must be given to these
men who never permitted expedi-
ency or bigotry to intrude on their
sense of justice.
(Continued on page 46)


WE ARE "MECHUTONIM"!
TEL AVIV, Wednesday.-In the
presence of the Israeli Minister
for Minorities the swearing-in
took place in Northern Israel on
Monday of several Druze units of
the Israeli Army.
Prominent Druze sheikhs parti-
cipated in the ceremony conducted'
by the Druze officer, who for many
years served with the Transjordan:
frontier force.
Greetings included messages
from well-known Druze leaders
outside Palestine.
Sheikh Suleiman Arif, speaking
at the conclusion of the ceremony,
praised the kinship between Is-
rael and the Druzes, stating that
their friendship dated back thou-
sands of years when Moses mar-
ried the daughter of the Druze
prophet Jethro.


Moshe Kleinman Evening
On the occasion of the death of
the veteran Hebrew writer "and editor
Moshe Kleinman, a special evening
has been arranged, to be held on
-Monday, December 13.- Among those
who will take part are Mr. C. Ger-
shater (editor, "Zionist Record"), Mr.
J. Batnitzky (editor, "African Jew-
ish Newspaper"), Mr. L. Feldberg
(editor, "Jewish Times"), Mr. J.
Bokalchuk (editor, "Dorem Afrika")
and Mr. Ben Moshe (editor, "Our
Future").







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PAGE TWENTY-SIX


DAMELIN





THE ZIONIST RECORD, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10. 1948

Understanding,


Zeal


And


Devotion


MESSAGE FROM DR. A. GIAANOVSKY, CHAIRVIAN, BOARD
OF DIRECTORS, KEREN KAYEMETH
I EXTEND my warmest greetings to all South African Zionists
on this historic occasion. The Golden Jubilee of South Afri-
can Zionism coincides with the close of an epoch in Jewish his-
tory. It has been an imperishable epoch, stupefying in its dis-
asters, but sublime in its ultiniate. achievement of the State of


Israel.
South African Jewry has been
privileged to know every stage along
this tremendous course, and from the
very beginning has played its part
in the struggle. Although remote
from the centres of Jewish life, the
founders of South African Zionisnm
brought with them from their "old
home" in Europe the seeds of the
Zionist ideal, and when Herzl sounded
the call they were quick to respond.
I recall reading, during my youth-
ful years, parts of "Die Welt," by
Herzl, which included reports of en-
thusiastic and loyal work by the pio-
neers of South African Zionism.
What Zionism owes to these pioneers
is only too well known.
South African Zionism has grown
considerably in its deeds and in its
conception since those days, when
South African Jewry was small in
size and poor in pocket.
.In every sphere of Zionist activity
the Zionists of South Africa have
done their share. Indeed, proportion-
ately they have participated in a
greater measure than the people of
most other countries of the world in
support of National- Funds and semi-
public and private enterprises in Is-
rael; the part that South African
Jewry is playing has made its r.amne
ring throughout the world. It has
also won a distinguished place for
itself for its fine work in the field
of Political Zionism.

Magnificent Strides
But I feel it incumbent on this oc-
casion to recall the particularly
splendid work it has done for lhe re-
demption of the land of Israel through
the J.N.F. This started during the
earliest days of this century, when
the tireless efforts of my friend,
Joseph 'Janower, and others led to
the creation of a special J.N.F. de-
partment of the Zionist Federation,
which is to-day making magnificent
strides in its work. The love, under-
standing and devotion cf South Afri-
can Zionists, from the first dark
days, has been one of the distinguish-
ing factors which have enabled the
J.N.F. to provide the land upon
which the Homeland has been
steadily built and upon which the
State of Israel came into being.
I know that the Zionists of South
Africa realise that the birth of the-
State is but the fulfilment of the at-


DR. A. GRANOVSKY
tributes of Jewish n:-tionalism. This
in itself is not our ultimate vision, but
is the means to an end. It is the
means whereby our nation will be en-
abled to build a life of freedom and
justice and to implement the ideal it
once proclaimed to mankind.
We are at the beginning of a new
epoch in our national destiny and are
realising the age-old yearnings of our
people. Our responsibilities are
greater than any we have borne until
now.

Increased Task
The J.N.F. belongs to the Jewish
people throughout the world, and is
the instrument for providing land for
the masses of immigrants flocking to
Israel. The J.N.F. is confident that
it will measure up to its increased
tasks in this great year of triumph.
I regard it as an honour to add my
tribute on this occasion to South
African Zionism and to the men and
women who brought it to its present
stature. I know* that in the years
ahead the name of South African
Zionism will continue to echo in Is-
rael and throughout Jewry for its
understanding, zeal and devotion to
the ideals of Zionism.


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PAGE 4SEVENTEBN

THE FEDERATION HAS

BECOME ROOTED IN


THE. LIFE OF
FIFTY years ago the few
scattered Zionist- societies
joined together and formed the
South African Zionist Federa-
tion, thereby declaring that the
Jewish State as conceived by
Herzl had become the aim and
ideal towards the fulfilment of
which the Jews in South Africa
as a whole pledged themselves.
The leaders who fifty years
ago accepted the common re-
sponsibility stem from and are
the inheritors of the tradition
that to forget Jerusalem is to
let the right hand wither.
The vicissitudes of the mass
of Jewry in Europe bound the
,South African Jewish commu-
nity closer and closer to the
fate of their brethren and
forged ties which grew stronger
and stronger as the tragedy
grew greater and the need for
a Jewish land became more and
more a question of life or death
for the Jewish people.
The State of Israel stands
to-day, gallantly fought for and
nobly won by those who came
and were driven there from the
four corners of the world.
Through the fifty years' work
of the South African Zionist
Federation, the old and the new
generation of South African
Jewry has a part in what has
been done and has yet a great
task before it in all that is to


S.A, JEWRY


eMessa~,e


From


~%**


Mr. N.


Kirschner


ikjone there. The Federation
become rooted in" the life
o\0-- '- h African Jewry. It is
sti in the strength that
Jew y gives it, and I know that
it will grow stronger yet in
measure to help to bring Israel
to full stature amongst the
nations of the world and to the
full hope that it has for all
Jews.


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MR. D. GEARING
Toronto'House, 110 President St., Johannesburg

and

MR. H. SHAMES
Railway Street, Woodstock, Cape Town


~I Take this opportunity of extending congratula-
tions to the S.A. Zionist Federation on its 50th
birthday and wish it continued success.