• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Maps
 Introduction
 Index
 Bibliography
 History
 H.A.B.S. drawings discrepancie...
 Maintenance assay
 Interpretation






Old Nantucket Gaol
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE TURNER ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00000336/00001
 Material Information
Title: Old Nantucket Gaol
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Brown, Rosemary
Muse, Lee A.
Publisher: Preservation Institute: Nantucket
Department of Architecture, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Nantucket, MA
Publication Date: 1981
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Historic preservation
Coordinates: 41.28124 x -70.107159
 Notes
General Note: AFA HP document 936
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00000336:00001

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Maps
        Page 3a
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Index
        Page 2
    Bibliography
        Page 3
    History
        Page 5a
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    H.A.B.S. drawings discrepancies
        Page 18
        Page 18a
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Maintenance assay
        Page 75
        Page 75a
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Interpretation
        Page 118
        Page 118a
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
Full Text




MAP
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NANTUCKET TOWN, LOCATING EARLY LOT-LAYOUT PLANS ON THE HARBOR AND OUTLINE OF THE 1955 HISTORIC DISTRICT.
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Committed to a seven week stretch in Nantucket's Old Gaol, we were charged by Preservation Institute: Nantucket to bring it back to life during the Summer 1981 term.
Our sentence pronounced, we dragged John E. Fuller in as an accomplice and he did his best to steer us in the right direction.
Louise Hussey and Edouard Stackpole at the Peter Foulger Museum supplied us with the data that helped unlock the history of the Gaol. Taking advantage of visitation rights, Clarence Swift came to the Gaol and disclosed what he knew about its 19^7 restoration.
Herschel Shepard put us on the right path by preaching the merits of historical accuracy. Richard Frank confided his interpretation ideas and we stole them. When Paul Buchanan arrived, we were already on the road to rehabilitation of the Gaol, but he assured our eventual release with'' confessions of an architectural researcher.
Our sentence completed, we'd like to say xto learned "our lesson" and thank the people who helped us serve it.




INDEX TABLE ri i jv)
TOP jWhEkh W\,
1 I
LA P 4
INDEX TABLE
BIBLIOGRAPHY
HISTORY
TIME LINE
PHOTOGRAPHIC EVOLUTION WRITTEN EVOLUTION SOCIAL HISTORY GAOLKEEPERS
H.A.B.S. DRAWINGS DISCREPANCIES
H.A.B.S. DRAWINGS REDUCTION DISCREPANCY FORMS PHOTOGRAPHS OF GAOL AND SITE
MAINTENANCE ASSAY
INTERPRETATION
WRITTEN INTERPRETATION DOCENT SCRIPTS INFORMATION PLAQUES DRAWINGS REDUCTIONS


K^Yi Bibliography __
Historic American Buildings Survey drawings #120
The Old Nantucket Gaol, Edouard Stackpole, Nantucket Historical Association, 1968
Proceedings of the Nantucket Historical Association 1919, 19^
Historic Nantucket, Nantucket Historical Association July, 1956, October, 1970
Inquirer and Mirror January 2, 1886 April 22, 1939 March 20, 19^
articles contained in Grace Brown Gardner Scrapbook Number 19
Peter Foulger Library vertical files
Interviews, Edouard Stackpole, Clarence Swift July, 1981
Lancaster, Clay The Architecture of Historic Nantucket. 1972 pgs. 235-36
19th Century Nantucket
Austin, Jane, Nantucket Scraps, 1882 Nantucket Scrap Basket




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Time Line - Gaol History
EVOLUTION OF GAOL
1795 Escape from High Street prison, call for stronger gaol
1805 Nantucket Gaol constructed
1826 House of Correction constructed in Qualse
1854 House of Correction moved to Gaol site
1933 Gaol last used as a prison
1935 Historic American Buildings Survey team documents Nantucket Gaol
1946 Gaol and House of Correction deeded to Nantucket Historical Association by Nantucket County Commissioners
1947 Restoration of gaol by Clarence Swift
1948 Gaol's original lock and key returned, gaol opened to the public
1954 House of Correction demolished 1970 Fire in gaol
1981 Preservation Institute! Nantucket team surveys gaol for revitalization project
SOCIAL HISTORY OF GAOL 1805 Gaol constructed
1811 First escape from gaol - William Morse
1820 First murderer confined in gaol - Jabez Cushman
1846 Barker Burnell imprisoned on embezziement
i860 Patience Cooper imprisoned in House of Correction on murder charges
I870 no prisoners I876
1886 William H. Chadwick imprisoned for falsifying accounts at Pacific National Bank
1888 James Ramsdell escapes from gaol
1933 Charles Freeman escapes from gaol Gaol last used as a prison


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Mammoth oak timbers and tons of iron � 5,817 pounds in all � joined forces in Nantucket's Old Gaol to constrain criminals, debtors,drunks, roosters and rum on the island for 128 years. Weighing more than 300 pounds, the gaol's door is secured with a hefty lock of 22 pounds that requires a 9|" key to release. There is evidence today of slots where a large wooden bar would*ve fit,forcing each cell door shut. Metal rods belt logs laid cabin-style for the gaol's walls, floors, ceilings and partitions insuring the iron-barred building's strength.
Said to represent the oldest type of penal institution in New England, Nantucket's gaol built in 1805, could be one of America's mast ancient. The four-celled institution of incarceration was built by John and Perez Jenkins who also built the island's South Tower and Unitarian Church, To build a gaol as "per contract"the Messrs. Jenkins charged $2,090.49, $700 of that total was for to, Today the records in the town building's tax accessor's office value the gaol at $19,300.
The gaol had to be formidable. It was constructed to replace the High Street prison which had proved too weak with the successful escape of two bank robbers at the close of the 18th century.
Constructed on Prison Lane, now Vestal Street, thegaol joined town buildings in the process of be-, ing moved from their old site north of High Street to the block south of Main Street and east of Grave Street, now Quaker Road. There is some speculation that the Old Gaol could date back to revolutionary times if it were moved and restored like other town buildings. The Historic American Buildings Survey drawings list construction dates as 1711 and 1805.
Built like a colonial cabin, the gaol is unique to Nantucket with its squared horizontal logs with lapped corners. Wide oak planks cover the logs for flooring. Sharp indentations in the planks could be evidence of hatchet marks from prisoners chopping kindling for their fireplaces in the upper and lower west cells� The Nantucket Gaol is one of few gaols in the nation with fireplaces in two cells.
In 1854, the House of Correction in Quaise was moved alongside the gaol. Built in 1826 of pine, the House of Correction was condemned as a fire hazard to the gaol and torn down in 1955*
It is difficult to distinguish what is original and what has been added or removed from the gaol. Clay Lancaster in The Architecture of Nantucket notes a 1920 restoration in which "a later east addiion was removed." The HABS drawingscompleted in 1935 differ greatly from the appearance of the gaol today.
The old gaol's cells, oftentimes empty and sometimes housing chickens and roosters jwere, relieved of "their confining, duties in 1933* Jampacked with alcohol and stills, the lower west cell once held goods confiscated during prohibition. At one time the solitary confinement cell, the lower east room would've likely contained arm and leg irons and shackles.
It's usefulness as a county gaol long since past, the Nantucket Historical Association requested that the town turn over the out-moded prison system. The gaol was deeded to the association on May 29, 1946 by the County Commissioners, One year later, the Historical Association secured the services of Clarence Swift to restore the gaol, The restoration was completed in the spring of 1948, According to the NHA Proceedings, "the interior sheathing and other modern conveniences were removed.


7!
� �
Evolution of the Old Gaol
The iron grills were restored and shingles were replaced on the north side. The main door, sagging on its hinges was re-hung. The staircase was secured," A high board fence still standing was constructed around the gaol grounds.
The HABS drawings were not consulted and no drawings were executed during the restoration according to Clarence Swift, now 82.
The gaol's iron fortification resulted in the use of numerous hacksaw blades when rotted timbers were replaced according to Swift. A pillory and stocks, not original to the gaol and no longer standing, were constructed by Swift in front of the gaol.
To complete the restoration, the gaol's original lock and key, replaced in I867 by a padlock, was re-installed on the front door. Traced to Mrs. Robert C. Langlotz of Daytona Beach, Florida, the key and lock had been missing for 80 years.
A fire set on August 21, 1970 narrowly missed consuming the Old Gaol, Kerosene was used to set theblaze at the steps of the gaol leading to the second floor. The fire spread from the second floor into the west cell and up through the roof as is evident by charred timbers.


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Social history of Nantucket Gaol
Some say that Nantucket never really needed a gaol. That the island itself, 30 miles from the mainland, was a prison. After all, where could the prisoners go?
But not only did Nantucket have a gaol from 1805 to 1933, but a mighty one at that. Replacing a prison located on High Street, the Old Gaol might never have been built except for the escape of Zeb Withers, Randall Rice and a companion, all accused of robbing the Nantucket Bank in June, 179^ They unlocked the cells with keys fashioned' from pewter spoons and fled. After that, the Nantucket townsfolk demanded a more formidable gaol.
The Old Gaol was built some 10 years later in 1805 on Prison Lane, now Vestal Street.
It's record reflects the pulse of Nantucket. Prosperous whaling days kept the cells occupied, but as Nantucket's livelihood lulled, so did gaol occupancy until the island's revival as a summer resort. As the gaol deteriorated, so did its usefulness until it eventually transformed from a felon to a tourist trap.
But not after serving Nantucket for 128 years. Over a century and a quarter of incarcerations and escapes.
The first prisoner to penetrate the precincts of the Nantucket Gaol was 14-year-old William Morse. While being led into the gaol, young Morse, accused of
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stealing"upwards In $100 in cash and some other articles" twisted free from the sheriff, never to be recaptured.
The first murderer to inhabit the Nant-� ucket Gaol was Jabez Gushman accused of murdering Barnard Graham in March, 1820.
In 1833, a committee appointed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts visited the gaol. In their report on gaols published in 1834, the committee said, "the Keeper's wife is said,
by the prisoners, to be very good about keeping the bedding clean; food good, and enough of it three times a day. Gaoler and his family said, by the prisoners, to be very attentive; washing done for the prisoners by the Keeper's family."
The gaol keeper's cottage was located off Vestal Street in front of the gaol. The house, sold to Ruth Chagnon in 1936, now owned by John Gilbert, is where the prisoners' meals were prepared and laundry cleaned.
In 1846, the Nantucket Gaol became "home" to Barker Burnell, cashier at the Manufacturers and Mechanics Bank. He was accused of embezzling $130,000 and confined to the second floor west cell in lieu of $25,000 bail.
Some six years later, in 1854, the House of Corrections was moved from the Town Farm in Quaise onto six rods of land adjoining the land of the Nantucket Gaol. Confined within the walls of the House of Correction were "debtors, victims of the drink habit and petty offenders" who were allowed to ply their trades


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Social history of Nantucket Gaol
until release.
1888 was considered a very prosperous year for the gaol. Fourteen prisoners were confined in its cells. The Old Gaol had stood empty from 1870 to 1876. And from 1885 to 1888, only nine inmates saw the insides of the gaol. One of the inmates of 1886, William Ii. Chadwick,was imprisoned for falsifying accotxnts at the Pacific National Bank. It's said that he moved into the second floor west cell with his furniture (interview Edouard Stackpole).
In 1888, the daring escape of James Ramsdell became the most exciting in the gaol's 128 year history.
James Ramsdell, along with three others,was placed in prison following a sentence to state institutions for breaking and entering. Ramsdell escaped using a key that his wife had duplicated. He made his way to Madaket, appropriated a dory and oars and fiitchhiked" a ride to Vineyard Haven aboard a schooner. Prom Martha's Vineyard, he boarded another schooner bound for New York. And that's where his escapade ended. A police officer, hearing of James Ramsdell*s escape via a telegraph from Vineyard Haven, boarded the boat and Ramsdell served five years in the state's prison.
The May, 1888 report of the Legislative Committee on Prisons said "the commit-
ment to and detention of convicts in this institution is a complete farce. Two small wooden buildings, surrounded by fences which are useless, and equipped with practically nothing that enforces restraint, constitute., the prison of the county. . ."
In 1920, according to Clay Lancaster in The Architecture of Historic Nantucket, the gaol was restored. Other sources don't mention a 1920 restoration, however.
For many years, the State Prison Commissior recommended condemning the gaol. The prison on Vestal Street finally closed its doors to inmates in 1933.
The same year that Charles Freeman escaped. Awaiting trial before Superior Court, Freeman was confined to the gaol's second floor west cell. He called to gaol keeper Edgar Ellis for some water. With a jagged piece of masonry broken off from the fireplace, Freeman struck the keeper when he entered and fled down the stairs. It's said friends smuggled him off the island in a laundry basket. No trace of Freeman was ever found. Until five years later in December, 1937 that is. Nantucket tax collector C. Ray Morris received a letter from a prisoner in California inquiring about the property of a Mr. Freeman in Siascon-set. Morris' suspicions led to an investigation that revealed Freeman as the California prisoner. He was brought back to Nantucket for trial and sentenced to 25 years. Freeman's letter netted him a 15 year sentence for his


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Social history of Nantucket Gaol
1
original crime, five years for assaulting Keeper Ellis and five years for escaping from the gaol. The Nantucket Gaol long since closed, Freeman served his sentence at the state's prison in Charlestown.
To prevent similar escape attempts, a pass-through grill was placed in the
cell door. But it was too late by then. The Nantucket Gaol had seen its last prisoner.
Human prisoners weren't the only inhabitants of the gaol,however. Roosters and chickens were said to inhabit empty cells at times. And sometimes even sheep.
Prisoners petitioned the town authorities for protection against sheep who used to enter the gaol in the night and bite them.
During the decade of prohibition, the lower east cell was used to confine liquor, stills and other boot-legging booty. So much so that when the room was cleared out, it took a crowbar to do it.
On May 20, 1946, the Nantucket County Commissioners deeded the Old Gaol and House of Corrections to the Nantucket Historical Association. During that year, a preliminary survey of the property was undertaken and restoration plans devised.
.Restoration of the Old Gaol was underway ln 1947. it Was completed and open to the public in 1948. Due to the unsafe condition of the House of Correction, rest-
oration efforts were concentrated on the gaol.
In 1954, the House of Corrections, identified as a fire hazard to the gaol, was demolished.
The flames of a fire set on August 21, 1970 ravaged portions of the Old Gaol and repair work was done soon after. Charring from the fire blackens some areas still.
A property of the Nantucket Historical Association for 35 years, the Old Gaol is part of the Association's walking tour. Students of Preservation Institute: Nantucket have undertaken its revitalization as a Summer 1981 project. Documentation to update the 1930s HABS drawings of the gaol are completed, along with a maintenance assay and an interpretation study ' to inspire more interest in the 128 year history of the Old Nantucket Gaol.


K^Y^ Gaolkeepers of the Nantucket Gaol
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OLD NANTUCKET GAOL KEEPERS
1805 Isaac Myrick, first gaol keeper 1885
1833 Henry Starbuck, keeper for 6 monthi 1889
1854 Benjamin Lawrence 1914
1855 � 1914
Sheriff Uriah Gardner
1865 1924
Roland Folger
1932
Stephen S. Gibbs
Frederick F. Parker
Arthur Eldridge Sheriff Johnson Edgar Ellis
(This list is as complete as the investigation into the Gaol's history could uncover)




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The Old Gaol located on Vestal Street in Nantucket, Massachusetts was documented by a team from the Historic American Buildings Survey in 1935. Particular areas and details of the Gaol were drawn but several areas were omitted. Our original intent during the summer of 1981 through the Preservation Institute: Nantucket was to use the existing H.A.B.S. drawings, document more of the Gaol and draw the plans that the H.A.B.S. team did not include in their documentation. This would have provided a more thorough account of the Old Gaol structure. However, upon checking the drawings and examining the existing Gaol structure it was obvious that the structure had undergone extreme alterations which resulted in numerous discrepancies between the existing documentation drawings and the present structure. Therefore, the most practical route for us to follow would be to make note of all the discrepancies in the drawings in their association with the existing Gaol structure so we could obtain a more concrete idea of what changes had been made to the Gaol during the intervening forty-six years.


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lit. DEPARTMENT CF THE INTERIOR OFFICE OF RATIONAL PARKS. BUILDINGS AND RESERVATIONS BRANCH OF Pl>'"
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OLD � GAOL � NANTUCKLT ' NANTUCKET'CO. � MASS.
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SOUTH ELEVATION


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H.A.B.S. DRAWINGS DISCREPANCIES K�Y; SOUTH ELEVATION_
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1. Chimney is only 13 brick courses high with stepped top. Flashing position around base of chimney is also different than what the drawings indicate.
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Square brick chimney is existing, approximately 7 brick courses high, with third and fourth courses from top raised one-half brick width.
1 1
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4. Top horizontal bar of exterior window grill is attached to window frame head not building as drawings indicate
5. Bottom horizontal bar of exterior window grill is attached to window sill frame not shingles as drawingsindicate.
6. Fastening bolt is missing.
7. Fastening bolt is missing.
8. Fastening bolts are missing.
9. Thirty-nine shingle courses, not thirty-seven.
10. Window grill bars are vertically oriented, and more window frame around the grill shows than the drawings show
11.
12. 13.
15.
16. 17. 18.
19.
Existing stairway is different than stairway in drawings because of the 1 970 fire which made it necessary to replace the stairway illustrated. Door has four planks on exterior side. Strap does not appear on existing door. Strap is not present on existing door.
Door has been replaced with new version but items from door shown in drawing might have been used in the refurbishment of the door.
GENERAL NOTE: Two top windows have double hung windows with left window having 6 panes of glass over 9 and
the right window having 4 panes of glass over 4. Both have wire screening behind grills. Red circles indicate bolt heads not existing on current door. New door and frame, iron straps on door are either missing or different. Bolts circled by red are missing from grill.
Horizontal cross-pieces have extrahtolas that drawings do not show.


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20, Elevation drawn is the existing .east elevation though it has been titled "WEST ELEVATION" on the drawing and the secondary chimney on the east side of the roof has been omitted.


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21. Exterior chimney is square, brick and straight not in separate sections. See note #2.
22. Corner detail is different. Roof rafter facia board rests outside the horizontal facia board, not inside as indicated.
23. Existing window grill does not have center horizontal strap. Bolt of lower right corner is missing. Existing window sill does not extend pass window sides. Interior vertical bars are square.
24. Top and bottom horizontal straps of grill are not curved as illustrated. Vertical bars are round.
25. Metal strap from window grill is attached to window sill.
26. Window frame is damaged and sill is completely missing. 2k. Foundation is concealed by grade.


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25. Division in planks no longer visible, covered by concrete.
26. Smoke alarm equipment mounted on wall.
2f. Concrete poured over existing planks and metal straps to fill rotten portion of floors.
28. Two vertical bars inside window frame.
29. No shutter on window.
30. Only one vertical bar inside window frame. 31 . Two bunks for beds added.
32. Smoke sensor located on surface of cell ceiling logs.
33. Hole in ceiling logs for chimney stack.
34. No interior window moulding.'
35. Smoke sensor located in ceiling on surface of logs.
36. Portion of privy seat broken away.
37. Part of interior window moulding existing on window possibly for sliding shutter.
38. 13 stair treads.
39. Support posts for stairway are 4"X4" POSTS.
40. Hearth is broken into pieces with brick below.


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H.A.B.S. DRAWINGS DISCREPANCIES
K^^Y: EAST/SOUTH WALL FIRST FLR. WEST CELL
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41 . Two bunk beds have been added in alcove.
42. Logs are covered with boards, approximately 11* wide, vertical from floor to ceiling.
43. Twelve iron straps, approximately 6" O.C., are bolted to logs, vertical from floor to ceiling.
44. Window framing missing with no glass.
NORTH WALL FIRST FLOOR WEST CELL_
45. Eighteen iron straps positioned vertically along wall attached to logs at approximately 6" O.C.
46. Cleat holes now have bunk beds built in them.
WEST WALL FIRST FLOOR WEST CELL
47. Portion circled has been painted red.
48. Hole in chimney for fireplace stack.
49. Fourteen iron straps are bolted vertically to logs approximately 6" O.C.
PRIVY FIRST FLOOR WEST CELL
50. Privy seat composed of 3 pieces of wood, not one as drawn. Red lines indicate where seat seams occur.
51. Portion of seat broken away exposing iron and wood frame below. Red lines shown indicate where seat top is missing.


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K�Y! FIRST FLOOR VESTIBULE S0U?H WALL
52. Strap .iron.jnissiDgj..
53. New board with galvanized bolt added in this space.
54. Item not existing on wall.
55. New wood door frame member with three bolts spaced along door height.
56. Strap of iron missing.
57. New wood framing member.
58. Strap of iron missing.
59. Strap of iron added in this position.
60. Alarm system box and auxiliary equipment attached to wall above door. VESTIBULE FLPQRJPLAN_
61. Shadow of iron strap with bolt below concrete surface.
62. Jagged red lines indicate where poured concrete has been poured to fill where wood floor planking has deterioated. Concrete in front of west cell door is broken in pieces.
63. Wood planking broken off on edges creating jagged hole opening.
64. Concrete painted gray has been poured over wood planking.
65. Jagged edge between planking.
VESTIBULE CEILING
66. Three new boards have replaced plank ceiling over doorway, immediately starting from South Wall. DOOR-TO-EAST CELL_
67. Piece of door not existing.
68. More bolts than are illustrated are present on the door interior.
69. Portion of door has been broken away exposing iron straps and three bolts.
EAST WALL__________
70. Top and bottom door hinges attached to wall not shown.
71 . Two iron bars in wall that are probably a U-shaped iron bar that has been cut-off are existing.
73. Flat piece of iron with bolt head.
74. U-shaped iron rod for door strap to slide over to lock door.


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ALL FOUR CELLS aRE 14 FEET LONG AND APPROXIMATELY 11i FEET WIDE. THE CELL TO YOUR LEFT IS TYPICAL HAVING TWO BUNKS, AN EARTHEN HEARTH FIRE PLACE ANL COMMODE. . THE OPPOSITE CELL WAS USED FOR SOLITARY CONFINEMENT

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75. Portion present not evident on existing wall. WEST WALL
76. Smoke alarm equipment located above privy clean-out opening.
FIRST FLOOR EAST CELL
77. Not documented by H.A.B.S. drawings.


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?8. New plank flooring has been laid in vestibule. Existing sizes do not correspond with drawing.
79. Fireplace hearth of loose bricks laid parallel to fireplace opening.
80. Inside window bars are missing.
81 . Privy seat missing and pieces are missing.
82. Smoke alarm sensor located in middle of room attached to ceiling logs.
83. Smoke alarm sensor located in middle of room attached to ceiling logs.
84. Iron frame in window opening to form interior grill with horizontal bars.
WEST CELL SECOND FLOOR DETAILS_
85. Fireplace hearth is composed of loose bricks set in place.
86. Wall is covered with vertical boards, each approximately 11" wide, with no evidence of iron strapping
WEST CELL SECOND FLOOR NORTH WALL
82. Vertical boards approximately 11" wide are bolted to logs covering the log wall structure,
88. Horizontal top board fits between two vertical boards.-
89. Window with glass panes is missing.
90. Bottom horizontal board is smaller than window as drawn indicates.
WEST CELL SECOND FLOOR EAST WALL
91 . Vertical boards are covering logs in alcove for bunk beds. Each approximately 11 " wide.
92. Two bunk beds have been built into alcove using the vertical boards with cleats drawn in drawings,
93. Horizontal boards, approximately 11" wide each cover this portion of the log wall.
94. Privy has been replaced with new similiar but smaller privy with no interior iron framing.


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95. Window has been repaired with double-hung window with six panes of glass over nine. Screen outside D.H. window with both exterior and interior iron grills.
96. Vertical planks have camphor edges on the edge facing the window, not away from window as drawing illustrates.
97. Wall is covered with vertical boards running from ceiling to floor with each approximately 11" wide.
WEST WALL SECOND FLOOR WEST CELL
98. Wall is covered with vertical boards running from ceiling to floor with each approximately 11" wide.
99. Fireplace and chimney have been coated with cement. Granite lintel is painted red with everything above lintel painted gray.


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100. New plank floor has been laid in vestibule. Existing planks are in a different configuration than the planks illustrated in the drawings and it is physically obvious that the existing planks are recent additions.
SECOND FLOOR VESTIBULE CEILING_
101. Log ceiling in vestibule has been charred by fire of 1970.
WEST WALL SECOND FLOOR VESTIBULE_
102. U-shaped iron rod for fastening strap to slide over is in wall. .
103. Privy clean-out has been covered by boards.
SECOND FLOOR VESTIBULE D00R-T0-EASI CELL
104. String attached to door has been charred and has been painted over.
105. Square piece of iron in door.
106. Bolt heads in door.
107. Red dots indicate bolt heads in door not shown on drawings.
SECOND FLOOR VESTIBULE DOOR-TO-WEST CELL
108. Bolt missing from strap.
109. Red dotes indicate bolt heads in door that drawings do not show.
110. Bolt heads on door.
111. Wood above door on interior and exterior has been charred by fire.


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112. Holes existing in walls.
113. Galvanized bolts with washers have been added.
114. Bolt head not existing where drawings indicate.
115. No 3" step at door threshold. Sill has been cut to make flush with vestibule floor.
116. Corner of log has been cut away with short metal iron strap placed in spot with bolt for fastener.
SECOND FLOOR VESTIBULE EAST WALL
117. Privy clean-out is not covered by boards.
118. Top and bottom hinge pegs are attached to wall.
119. Top of board has been notched out.
SECOND FLOOR VESTIBULE NORTH WALL
120. Ends of iron bolts are exposed in wall.




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121. East cell not documented by H.A.B.S. drawing
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Primary chimney
Secondary chimney
Facia board
Window � second floor west cell
Brick chimney approximate, ly 13 brick courses above roofline exposed. Moss is growing on brick and staining white flashing.
Chimney is covered with moss with no flashing appearing at roofline.
Board is weathered with several knotholes.Slightly warped. Pacia sags towards middle of structure above second floor door, caused by roof problem.
Grill has numerous bolts with washers missing.Top left window loop is missing. Grill is rusting onto window sill.
Brick chimney covered with moss. White flashing is loose and pulling away from chimney. Framing irregularly placed on front of chimney. Brick chimney approximately 9 brick courses exposed above roofline.
Composed of two separate members running length of facade covering top of end corner boards. Approx imately #�� thick, 5i" wide
Second floor west cell wood frame with iron grill attached. Screening behind grill. Double hung window with 6 panes over 9 inserted into opening, largest window on gaol.
Moss needs to be cleaned from chimney and flashing replaced around base of chimney at roofline.
Moss should be cleaned from chimney and fashing added at base of chimney at roof edge-line .
Replace facia board with red cedar board. Repair roof sags. See roof.
�Remove grill, screening and double hung window. Rework window to coincide with HABS # 120 drawings. Replace grill to same and stabilize rusting to keep from staining surrounding area.


17
K^Y! South elevation \V___
I ,7
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Window
Window {�^
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Second floor east cell. Wood frame with iron grill. Screening added behind grill. Double-hung window inserted into opening.
First floor, west cell. Wood frame window with iron grill. Attached to frame. Flashing across top of window head. Bars inserted into interior of window. No glass.
First floor, east cell Wood frame with iron grill.
Window and grill in good condition. Rust from grill is staining window sill and screen.
Iron grill is missing bolts and washers. Window frame in good condition. Rust from grill is washing onto stairs below and staining stair treads. Window is cracked from bolts being driven into frame that supports grill. Sill is allow, ing water into structural interior.
Remove double hung windov and screen. Rework to HABS drawings #120. Stab-J ilize rust on grill to prevent further staining to surrounding areas.
Windov5; sill needs to be reworked using larger members for the framing to prevent cracking. Sill should be slanted toward the exterior to allow water to drain out of the building not into the walls.


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Door entry
Stairway

Exterior - wood door of four vertical boards on two iron strap hinges. Middle iron strap for . earlier crank lock. Keyhole in door. Door and frame.
Interior - horizontal boards bolted into place Galvanized metal bolt heads exposed. Door doe: not fit flush into frame due to warpage and sagging, but opens and closes easily.
Stairway to second floor entry. 12 treads, 13 risers. Three sets of support posts 4"x4", total of 6. Stairway has rail composed of flush boards. Approximately ��" thick x 5" wide nailed to support posts. Landings of wood planks.
Moss is beginning to grow along top of door. Door boards are warping so that they are uneven allowing water to enter inside of door. Door frame is in good condition except door head is cracked in the front allowing water to seep in and moss is beginning to grow on head. Plashing is minimal along edge between head and wall surface. Interior horizontal boards are badly warped' and cupping. Some have cracked with pieces broken away.
Stairway is unstable. Bannister xs loose. Top horizontal, covering board has cupped allowing water to si on board and run down middlfc of board. Top board is extremely weathered and cupped and is cracking in' middle. Starr treads are loose and of 3 different types
Head of door frame shoulc be replaced with more anc deeper flashing added across top of head. Seams with jambs should be fit tighter to eliminate water getting into joint. Horizontal boards on interior of door should be replaced. Moss on exterior of door at top should be cleaned off.
Stairway should be stabilized. All support posts should set square and firm on a solid foundation. The handrail should be strengthened so that it does not move under pressure. The top board of the handrail should be slightly slanted away from the stairs so water will drain off and not stand on top.


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Nail heads are working out. Treads have cupped and cracked allowing water to stand on stairs. Nosing on stairs are becoming worn. Risers on some stairs have cracked leaving holes stairway. Landing i's
posed of 4 - 91". wide with approximately ing between each board. Boards are cracked and weathered. Beginning of stairs stringers rest on ground. Post B is cracked with piece missing with stringer resting on right edge of post. Post sets directly on ground. Post C i� setting on stone, shows weathering and moss signs. Post D is setting on ground with several cracks and is slanting away from facade. Post H rests on a stone and has a long crack approximately 3/4 the length of the posts. Post G has several
surface cracks and sets on a rock setting on a piece of s t one. Fc ohtInne d}


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Post E sets on the ground and is loose. Post P sets halfway on a small block of wood that sets on a stone. The posts act as newel posts for stairway. �


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Door-entry
Door-frame
Wood door of 2-2" thick panels fastened together with iron holts over entire door. Iron strap hinges are located on the exterior side. Middle iron strap originally for crank lock is in center of door. Keyhole for original lock and lock used today is existing.
Interior - Door hoards are vertical with iron straps positioned vertically on door with bolt ends and washers through straps. Straps' are 5" on center and 3/4" thick, by 1-3/4" wide.. Original lock is on door cover by iron strapping.
Wood frame not original to the structure. Outline of horseshoe above doorway opening. Frame formed by square members 6x
r� OS.
Poor is in good condition. Iron is rusted with minimal staining on the wood. The door opens and closes but the hinges squeak and door is heavy to open and c"lose.
Galvanized bolts and wa&hers are exposed along -jamb.. Lock closing not original to structure.
Inappropriate galvanized bolts, locks etc, should be removed.


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WE.ST � ELEVATION
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East elevation \iy
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Shingles
Foundation
Right eave-facia board
Shingles are in good condition. Beginning to show some signs of warping. The shingles were placed over building paper and another layer of wood shingles that are nailed directly to the log structure.
Most of foundation is covered by- earth, with' medium sized shrubbery growing against building, possibly even in foundation.
Facia board sloping towards rear of structure
Shingle work was improperly completed leaving gaps where the shingles should extend. Building paper is exposed. Water can get behind shing* les causing damage to log structure.
Both shingle building pan removed. Th ure should b and/or repai covered with paper. Hori ring strips nailed to lo shingles put
face nailed ring strins.
1 ayers and er shou"1 d be e log struct-e stabi'i^ed red then
building zonta"1 fur-shou1 d be gs and new
on the sur-
to the fur-
The foundation is of rocks covered by earth with shrubbery growing against foundation. Shrubbery is also making scratch marks on shingles.' Shingles behind shrubs are more deteriorated
Facia board is in bad condition showing signs of rot. Cracked portion missing. End at top of corner board is new and has been used as patch.
Clear earth away from foundation and remove
all shrubbery.
New eave facia board should be installed.


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^�Yj West elevation Iff

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Shingle;
Corner boards
Shingle siding loose, some missing. Rake board warped and beginning to split.
Boards are in fair condition but cracks need to be repaired.
Shingles are weathered and warped and need to be replaced. It is not an emergency situation.
Check periodically for degree of weathering and missing shingles. Replace rake boards.
As boards need replacing replace with red cedar ". boards. Repair and fill all cracks.


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|/^Y; North, elevation (Vy
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foil 1 I Window � top right
Window � "bottom left
Window � top left
Second floor west. Wood frame with iron grill covering. No glass.
First floor, east cell. Wood frame. Head has 2 holes to accomodate grill bolts. Sill has iron strap with bolts and �;� .. washers still attached. No glass.
Second floor, east cell. Wood frame window with iron grill intact. No glass.
Grill is attached to frame at each corner with bolts and washer. Lower right hand bolt and washer is missing and grill is wired in place.
Window frame is in good condition. Interior boards have been placed�in "onening -to stop water washing into log walls.
Window appears in good condition. Window framing members, particularly jambs, are beginning to show signs of decay.
Replace wire ho'1 ding device with bo11 and washer to match othei 3.
Window needs to be checked for water tightness. Iron grilL needs to be re-n"1 aced on window according to HABS drawings # 120.
Stabilize window to make sure the window sin is not al"Vowing water to rot 1 og wall.


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K^Yl North elevation V7
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Foundation
Shingles
Window � bottom right
Foundation has been covered by earth and the bottom shingle course touches the ground.
Shingles are badly deteriorated. The top course is missing. The facia board appears loose. The roof overhang is composed of rotten wood shingles. Around each window there is clear evidence of water running down building face. Moss is beginning to grow on shingles. Facia board is cracked.
Small window that has modern frame flashing across top. Head has two round holes in each end. Sill is missing exposing deteriorated wood behind.
Condition is holding moisture against the foundation causing deterioration to both foundation and bottom course of shingles.
Shingles have weathered severely due to a combination of water running off roof directly onto wall an<5 a northern direction with minimal sunlight.
Y/indow srill is missing. Window has no glass or covering allowing water into wall of building. Flashing has rusted and window has begun to rot. Iron grill covering v/indow is missing.
Earth needs to be dug out from foundation to expose it and halt weathering of shingles. Level site to prevent earth from collecting against f ounctefcicn
Roof overhang and window frames need to be stabilized to stop water ex-, posure to wall. New shingles than need to be put on wall. Facia board should be replaced.
gntire window condition needs to be re-worked and re-designed to coincide with HABS drawings #120 and to stop water from entering the wall of the building. Grill should be replaced on window.


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SOUTH WALL
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first floor - west cell
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South, elevation
East wall
Alcove ^R)
North wall

See south elevation east cell
Window <�>
Vertical planks from 8" to l'-2" wide spiked to log wall. Whitewash finish.
Double bunks existing built of planks, not original.
8"x8" log construction with iron straps. Whitewash finish.
Logs have been replaced by newer boards around v/indow. Window opening l'-2" wide x 11" high. 3 - 1" square iron bars inserted into window opening. New' trim around window opening badly deteriorated, working loose from wall. Shadows on logs
at window opening show earlier window frame. Ends of exposed logs at west side of window opening are badly deteriorated.
Evidence of insect damage throughout.Vertical saw-marks evident on boards in northeast corner of alcove.
Bunks contain miscellaneous wood pieces.
Replace deteriorated wood.
Replace and secure new trim around window opening.
Remove miscellaneous wood from bunks. Replace with ticking stuffed with straw in keeping with 19th century gaol life.


j^�Yj First floor - west cell
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North wall (cont^d)
West wall
Brick
chimney and fireplace
Window
Window opening approximately 7" square.
8"x8" log construction with iron straps and whitewash finish.
Brickwork painted red at lentil and below. Brickwork above has beer plastered and whitewashed. Chimney breast has opening for flue pipe from earlier stove no 3_onger extant.
Hearth made up of several large pieces of bluestone.
Wooden window sill extreme-rotted and deteriorated. New wood installed at jambs and head of window. Frame for sliding window still intact. Sliding board missing. Logs around window opening badly deteriorated from water and insect damage. Evidence of steel strapping in different location than existing.
Large portion of whitewash still intact. Evidence of water infiltration - water stains.
Pencil marks and dirt cover whitewash. Large gaps in brickwork. Mortar apparently lacking preventing proper draft. Fireplace corbels outward above lentil on north side Lentil cracked. Fireplace contains numerous pieces of wood, brick and debris.
Do not allow fires in chimney. Stabilize brickwork. Clean debris from fireplace.


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First floor - west cell
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Ceiling
Floor
Privy - east wall
Exposed logs running north - south. Whitewashed.
One inch square iron bars running perpindicular through logs evident in east cell hut do not exist in west cell. Only one such bar exists. Evid4 ence of iron straps running perpindicular across tops of logs and beneath second floor finish.
Boards approximately 9" wide to l'-8" wide ru: north - south. Fastened with metal spikes.
Enclosure consists of 21" thick boards and protective metal straps within chamber.
Evidence of beetle damage. Whitewash deteriorating.* Metal straps in northeast
corner installed as brace to support new board spliced into existing floor of cell above. Newer wood badly deteriorated from insect damage. Portions of older logs at splice also badly deteriorated. Exposed smoke detector at center of cell. Logs above privy have large sections chipped out, ends of bolts exposed.
Floorboards at north wall beneath window show much water and insect damage.
Floor slopes downward from west to east. Evidence of earlier stove from shadows and burn marks in front of hearth. Insect damage to ends of boards along south wall.
Two metal straps rusted out. Wood seat damaged. Chamber pot missing. Iron straps and bars within chamber.
Replace rotten wood. Conceal exposed smoke detector. Cover exposed bolts.
Replace chamber pot. Stabilize privy and replace missing wood. Remove miscellaneous debris


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