Study of William Rotch Building - Pacific Club

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Material Information

Title:
Study of William Rotch Building - Pacific Club
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Campbell, Donna L.
Monell, Taryn
Norris, Stephanie
Parrish, Louise V.
Sender, Randy
Publisher:
Preservation Institute: Nantucket
Department of Architecture, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Nantucket, MA
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Historic preservation
Nantucket, Massachusetts
Coordinates:
41.283785 x -70.097575

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00000332:00001

Full Text













WILLIAM


ROTCH BUILDING


PACIFIC


CLUB.


















STUDY OF WILLIAM ROTCH BUILDING PACIFIC CLUB


Conducted by :

Donna L. Campbell
Taryn Monell
Stephanie Norris
Louise V. Parrish
Randy Sender




Preservation Institute : Nantucket
Summer 1981
Professor F. Blair Reeves
August 6, 1981


















CONTENTS_






















TABLE OF CONTENTS





Chronology



Drawings



Architectural Evolution



Social History



Maintenance



Documentation


Inventory







Basic Ch~ortilo'v of Important Dates


1765 Land sold to William Rotch by the Macy's

1772 Generally accepted date of building construction

1780 First United States Customs House established on second floor

1804 Property sold to Gideon and Albert Gardner and believed conveyed

to William Coffin

1831 Sold by Union Marine Insurance Company to Commercial

Insurance Company

1846 "The Great Fire" Building gutted, no records of interior work

1854 "Pacific Reading Room" formed

1861 Pacific Club formed and purchased the building

1886 1904 Weather Bureau established on the first floor in the

back room

1900 1904 Towers on the building

1904 1918 Third floor vacant

1913 U.S. Customs House abolished

1915 Renovations to the east room on the first floor

1918 Pacific Club passed approval for the U.S. District Court to

occupy the third floor

1921 1922 Fire escape added

Judge Fits-Randolph occupies the east room on the second floor

until 1934-1935

1922 1925 Repair work done on the roof

1935 Fire on the second and third floors

Law office of Grace Henry occupies east room on the second

floor to the present








1941 1942 Extensive repairs to the roof

1966 September Chamber of Commerce occupies east rooms of

the second floor to present

1978 February Channel 5 television studio occupies third

floor to present



















DRAWINGS_
















































































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Add reduced supplement drawings here, pages 11, 12, 13


















ARCHITECTURAL EVOLUTION_








ARCHITECTURAL EVOLUTION


The origins of the William Rotch building has always been a subject of
controversy among Nantucket historians. Although it is generally agreed that
the date of construction is 1772, there is no obtainable documentation at
present. The exact appearance of the original building is unknown.
The most dramatic event in the building's history was the damage
caused by the "Great Fire of 1846." In that fire the building was gutted.
The existing structure has undergone only minor changes since the repar-
ations after the fire. Unfortunately there are no records as to the
reparations .and changes that may have resulted from the fire damage. The
local paper suffered extensive damage and the regular publication did not
resume for six weeks. There is no mention of the fire in the first month
after publication resumed One comment found in a later article states that
"in the reconstruction in 1846 the old gambrel roof of two slopes was changed
to its present form." 'a '. i
,. ~.dThie draings indicating the location of the Joist pockets on the east
and west gable ends (pages 23 26 ) show a few of the possible locations
of theold gambrel roof. There is also visible evidence of two changes
that may have been made in the reconstruction of 1846. On the east gable end
there is a shadow of a chimney located just to the right of the present
chimney. Evident in the west gable end are a pair of windows that have been
filled in with brick. The shadows of these former windows are located on
the west end elevation.
In Clay Lancaster's, The Architecture of Historic Nantucket, he makes
some statements concernning the building, such as i,."Sthe full top story is
known to have been added after the building was gutted during the Great
Fire of 1846." Lancaster includes a sketch of how the building may have ::,
appeared prior to the Great Fire including a gambrel roof. Another such
statement was: "After the fire, the south center doorway was enlarged into
the gaping entrance framed in brownstone that most disfigures the main
facade. The window frames were replaced and sashed changed from nine to
six panes... the walls were extended upward another story. For graphic
illustration of possible appearance, see drawing at the end of text.








According to the Inquirer & Mirror the building "underwent considerable
renovation in the period 1861-1915."2 Some evidence exists which details these
changes but mainly for the years 1900-present. The main sources detailing
these changes are the Inquirer & Mirror and the minutes of the annual meetings
of the Pacific Club. During the period 1900-1904 while the United States
Weather Bureau was stationed in the building two towers were erected. On May' 5,
1900 permission was granted to the United States government to erect a forty
foot tower The tower was erected in November of 1900 by W.H.Wyer & Co. and
stood on the southwest corner of the building. Desiring greater height, the
original tower was replaced (sometime between 1900-1904) and the new tower
was located slightly west of the south entrance. This tower stood until
1904 when the United States Weather Bureau relocated on Orange Street.
According to the club minutes a Massachusetts inspector, Joseph A. Moore
notified the Pacific Club that a fire escape should be installed. He suggested
the southwest window of the third floor ante-room as the point of access for
the fire escape. The Pacific Club responded that they would prefer the loca-
tion to be on the north side and noted that an" "iron awning frame" had recently
been placed on the suggested side of installation. One month later it was
decided by the Pacific Club to discontinue public use of the third floor so
a fire escape would not be necessary.
Some minor changes noted in the Pacific Club records at this time were:
1910 The gift of the tablet with the date of the erection of the club
building by Mr. Lally.
1911 Donation by Mr. Lally for toilet and sanitary work.
1912 Need of repairs to building (not specified.)
According to the Inquirer & Mirror, interior changes which occurred on the
first floor in 1915 included painting, hardwood floors, electric lights re-
placing oil lamps,renewal of the padded chairs and the retention of the
coal stove with iron foor railings. The article stated that at that time
the back room on the first floor was renovated as it had been vacated
eleven years previously by the United States Weather Bureau. It'was
"cleaned and ordered" for the expansion of the Pacific Club's increased
enrollment. The second floor was said to have remained unchanged and that the








remains "of' the old Customs House lingered like a ghost."3
In July 1918 the Pacific Club voted to rent the third floor to the County
Commission to be used as a courtroom. At that time the installation of a fire
escape was reconsidered and records indicated payment for the fire escape between
July 1921-July 1922. On August 28, 1918 there is a notation that a new toilet was
purchased. The location is not specified but it is possible that this refers to
the toilet located on 'the north side of the third floor. This would have
served the new third floor tenants, It is possible that the stairway, which
leads from the second floor to the attic, was closed off at! that time in order
to locate the bathroom.
During the years 1921-1923 there are notation in the Pacific Club records
of carpentry work, painting and roof repairs but none of the details are
specified. Also in July 1921 the Blair Sign Company was paid for decorating the
building. In July 1927 it was noted by the Paicfio Club to put the ceiling
of the courtroom in good condition.
The building was once agtain plagued by fire on February 14, 1935. Only the
4
two upper floors were subjected to flames. The blaze began near the stove in
the District Courtroom and the damage by the fire occurred mainly to the
partition on the third floor and in the office of Miss Henry on the second
floor. The details of the repairs are not in the Pacific Club's records
but the evidence of repairs is visible in the west gable end of the attic.
There is a notation, however, of extensive repairs in 1941-1942 which is not
detailed.
Contemporary changes to the building include exterior sandblasting
of the mafonly which occurred in 1965. In addition, the third floor
was remodeled to accommodate the Channed 3 television station. These
changes included installation of a dropped ceiling, partitions and new
wiring (see photo #1 of ceiling at end of text.)
In the documentation eif the Willaim Rotch building our team in
conjunction with our consultants noted any structural evidence of changes that
may have occurred in the building's evolution. Suppositions were made
concerning some of these changes.








There was evidence of many structural changes in the basement. If
William Rotch used the basement as a storage space, the ground level would
have been three or four feet lower than it is presently. At some point
fill would have been added as the present supports are resting on the
current ground level. These supports are constructed of a variety 'of
materials including brick, concrete block and wood.
In the north east corner of the basement a blind arch is visible.
In keeping with construction of the eighteenth century this may have
the bulkhead entrance. Also visible in the basement are ruins of two
chimney foundations. One is located on the east wall and the other is
on '-the west wall. The reason for the movement 6f the position of the
chimneys is not known.
Located on the north side of the basement is a vault. The brickwork
of the vault indicates that it is not original to the building, but the
exact date of construction is not known. The vault was most likely built
as added support for the .safe located on the first floor. Also found
in the basement are fins extended from the east walls. These may have at
one time been the retaining walls for a coal bin. A vent located near
these fins(on the south wall) shows evidence of having been filled in.
Perhaps this was the location of a chute for the coal bin.
One piece of evidence found in the interior on the first floor
(east exposed brick wall) is the shadow of a chimney. The fireplace most .
likely rested on the first floor framing members as there is no evidence
of a foundation in the basement.
There are a few pieces of evidence to be noted on the exterior of
the building. There is some evidence of alteration in the brickwork around
the window openings. Also, the five upper courses of brick and the cornice
are later additions. On the north wall, vertical seams in the brickwork
are evident. These seams may outline openings located in the wall when
the building was used as a warehouse.
In the brickwork of the attic there is evidence of two changes. On the
west elevation there are two windows which have been filled in (photo #2
following text.) on the east wall a shadow of a chimney is located to the








right of the present chimney ( photo #3.) The structural members
in the truss are mortise and tenon and are illustrated by photo #4.
Another structural item to be noted are the four posts which
protude the roof sheathing and the cross-bracing connecting them (photo
#5.) These posts may have supported a captains' walk located in a
different position than the one seen today.
The changes which have occurred in the William Rotch building
were intended to provide the occupants with adequate facilities. In the
process,the changes have resulted in damage to the original fabric
and character of the building.



Fbotnotes

Nahtucket Journal, April 9, 1891

2InaIuirer & Miror, December 5, 1947

3Ibid.

4Ibid, February 16,1935. In this article it also mentions that the roof
was covered with slate at the time of the fire. Discarded pieces of slate
may still be found in the attic.





































Sor


VAULTED CEILING & DROPPED CEILING 1


20































FILLED WINDOWS 12


CHIMNEY SHADOW 3




































MORTISE & TENON


PROTRUDING POSTS & CROSS-BRACING


22


'4








LEGEND
---- CENTE-R
LINE.
TC JCIST
POCKET5.


/^ -


/ 'No TO SCALE




THIP FLOOR LF-L
/
/
/
/




THIP.P FLOO LE-.VQL"^_I


-SHADOW LINE.
OF CHIMNEY


LOCATION OF JOIST POCK~.T~ OH EAST GA5L~. ~ThJV ~CALE: 'k"~I'Q"


LOCATION OF JOIST POCKET


ON EAST


GABLE_


EN P. 5CALE: '14" I'O"








LEGEND
---- CENTE-R
LINE.
T ,J015T
POCKET.
-- PO551'BLE
ROOF
CHANGE.


THIR~P FLOOR LE-VF--L-_ _


LOCATIOhi OF JOIST POCK~.T~ OH EAST ~A~LE.


= = =~=----k ~~d~ ~


LOCATION OF


JOIST POCKET ON EAST GABLE._


E- MP. SCALE.:' 4", 1'0"








L. EGN D
IF JOIST POCKETS


1KJFILL


I NL-l

BRICK IkB1LL


LOCATION


OF JOIST POCKETS


ON WEST GABLE E:ND


SCALE-: 4"= I'LO,


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WEST GABLE


SCALE : I LO'


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SJO)IST


LOCATION OF JOIST POCKETS ON
















































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SUGGESTED '
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1 ANTUCKET.


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SOCIAL HISTORY








,rom serving as a warehouse to a men's club, the William Rotch building has
enjoyed quite a diverse social history. The land, upon which the brick
structure would be built, was purchased by William Botch from the Macy fam-
ily on October 31, 1765. As stated in the deed the lot description is as
follows: "tNrearea bounded on the south by the highway at the corner of Old
or Middle Wharf; on the west by a highway which seems to be northward; on
the north by a highway which runs to the shore; and on the east by share #2.
Refer to map number 1 and 2, dating 1765, now located at the Registry of
Deed, Book number 1 page 11 through 13. In 1774, and 1775, Rotch received
additional plots of lamd in the same area. These are often confused with
the plot upon which the warehouse was built.


In 1772, construction was begun on the building which was to serve as a
warehouse and offices for William Rotch and Sons. Rotch was well estab-
lished in the growing whaling industry and maintained a thriving busi-
ness locally and abroad in England andFrance until 1812. William Rotch
was an admireable man, often referred to as Friend Rotch. He was the ob-
ject of profound respect to his fellow men, a fine specimen of a merchant of
strictest integrity. He was frank,generous, high-minded in the trust sense,
and truly humble in his own self-estimation. Rotch was tall, dignified
and had a face expressive of benevolence; he maintained broad and liberal
views keyed by principles of peace and good will. 2


With growing discontent on the mainland the Revoluntionary War was brewing.
However, Nantucket, with Quaker ideas and citizens apart from the mainland
both geographically and spiritually, was imbued. The commercial world
for the Nantucket whalers had a prosperous future, therefore, they were not
eager to disrupt trade locally or abroad. Nevertheless, three of William
Rotch's whaling ships, the Eleanor, Beaver, and Dartmouth, which were
chartered by the East India Company to convey cargoes of tea, cleared from
the Botch Building, received cargoes of tea and returned to deposit them
into the Boston Harbor on the night of December6, 1773. Following the war,
the Bedford was the first ship to fly the star and stripes in a British port,
and the Beaver was the first to sail around Cape Horn, in 1791, under the
direction of Captain Paul Worth.








William Rotch and Sons maintained their business headquarters at the base of
Main Street, Nantucket until 1804, when they transfer to New Bedford. The
Botch Building was then sold to Albert and Gideon Gardner. Documentation of
the buildJng's function under the Gardner ownership was not found. It is
thought that the building was conveyed from the Gardners to William Coffin
in 1804, 3 however, this transaction is not listed in the Registery of Deeds,
Town Building, Nantucket. William Coffin was the president of the Union
Marine Insurance Company, which is documented for havil sold the building in
1831,-.and consequently must have occupied the space in the early parts of
the 19th century. The Rotch Building held a significant position in the
town of Nantucket as expressed by Edouard Stackpole and M. Sumnerfield in
Nantucket Doways Thresholds to the Past," with the resurgence of the
island' s whaling prosperity in the first decades of the 19th century this
building with its Custom House and Insurance firm was one of the most import-
ant centers in the town." 4 The first United States Custom House was estab-
lished in the Rotch Building in 1789 and remained there until 1913, when it
was abolished because it was a "losing proposition."


On July 18, 1831, the William Rotch Building was sold by the Union Marine
Insurance Company, President- Joseph Mitchell, for the sum of $6,050.00,
as recorded in the Registry of Deeds, Book 31, page 365. The Commerbial
Insurance Company maintained ownership of the building until 1861, when
they sold it to the current owner, the Pacific Club. "The Great Fire"
that destroyed much of the Main Street area of Nantucket left the Botch
Building completely gutted with only the walls remaining. This tragedy oo-
cured on July 13, 1846, when the Commercial Insurance Company occupied the
building. "During the fire a few hours earlier, the safe of the insurance
company, had been dragged into the street and the books removed, but the safe
standing in the fierce heat of the street, was literally consumed."5
As Mr. EdouardStackpole noted, little information, if any, exists on the re-
building of the destroyed area.


With the Rotch Building under the ownership of the Commercial Insurance
Company, the front room was known as the "Cap N's Room". On July 22, 1834,
the official "Pacific Reading Room" was established in the building, still








before the Pacific Club was formed. In the summer of 1862, seven whaling cap-
tains decided to cruise to New York to inspect the Great Eastern, a marvel of
a steamship. Among those making the journey were Capt. Samuel Wyer, Capt.
George Palmer, Capt. Obed Swain, Capt. William Chacwick, Capt. Charles Veeder,
Capt. James Wyer, amd Capt. Samuel Swain. When these men were recounting the
incidents of the cruise, one suggested the organization of the Pacific Club.
The motion was favorable to all and the club was established on January 28,
1861.6 Seventeen other men joined the seven and of these twenty-four men,
twenty-two had been masters of ships engaged in the whaling business in the
Pacific Ocean. On February 2, 1861, the Club was officially formed, "Be it
known, that we, the undersigned, do by these present form ourselves into a
club or association, under the name and title of the" Pacific Club of
Nantucket" the purpose of which is to establish a room for social
meetings, and for the government and maintenance of the club,were ordain
"7
and establish the following articles..." They established nine Articles
of Governance, dealing with the funds of the club, real estate, stockholder
shares and leadership. All funds of the club were to be invested in
Real Estate and divided into twenty four shares, this Real Estate was to be
held in the name of the president and trustees and no fraction of a share
was valid. Control of the Real Estate, rents and expenditures was handled
by the Trustees who also made public notification of annual meetings.
Finally the Articles of Governance set forth the criteria for the
positions of President and Trustees. Agreeing upon the terms of the nine
Articles the following men formed the Pacific Club of Nantucket: G. Palmer,
G.S. Ogal Swain, J. Myer, W. Chadwick, Prince MeEwen, Fred Chase, David
Baker, C. Adams, T.M. Gardner, William Cash, Robert McCleave, Benjamine
Field, John Gardner, J.A.Gibbs, James Codd, Samuel Wyer, Sanford Wilber,
Edward Haist, H.R.Plaskett, Joseph Chase, Edward MoCleave, J. Mitchell."8
Selected as trustees, Mr. Codd and Mr. Wyer were responsible for
securing real estate for the club's headquarters. Logically, they were
interested in purchasing the building in which their Reading Room had existed
for the seven previous years, which was under the ownership of the
Commercial Insurance Company. With the whaling industry on the decline,
the insurance company was no longer thriving and accordingly the








directors of the Commercial Insurance Company voted to authorize and execute
a deed transferring the land and brick building thereon to the Pacific Club
via Mr. Codd and Mr. Wyer. A payment of $1,205.00 was paid to the Commercial
Insurance Company,which then became defunct, transferring their insurance
policies to Boston and New Bedford firm.
The purchase of the William Botch building proved to be a good
investment for the Pacific Club, The building was actually an
income producing source for the Club, as they collected rents from the
other occupants. The United States Government Customs House still
maintained the second floor and the Weather Bureau station moved into the
back room on the lower floor in October 1886. The Weather Bureau
occupied this space until 1904 when they moved to Orange Street, allowing
the Pacific Club to expand to the entire first floor. The United
States War Department Signal Service was installed in 1886 and telegrams
dating form 1887 were pulled form between the floors in the Botch build-
ing.
The upper hall of the building was used by the Masonic Fraternity for
meetings, as stated in the Nanthlket Journal April 9, 1891. From 1904 to
1918 the third floor was vacant. In 1913, the United States Customs House
was abolished leaving the second floor vacant also. "Last duty
of the Customs House was to clear the whaling "Oak" for the South Pacific
in 1869, but because the busy government has forgotten its existence a
venerable deputy collector has hoisted its flag and taken station behind
the desk every morning ever since...A few years ago, an enterprising
treasury department official was shocked to discover that it still continued
with an annual expense of $600.00."9 In 1913 when the Customs House was
finally abolished, the records were transferred to Boston and due to
carelessness they were destroyed by flooding. The remains of the old
Customs House lingered in the second floor until the 1930's.
Having passed approval 'of the Pacific Club Trustees, the first United
States District Court on Nantucket was established on July 1, 1918 and
located on the third floor of the William Botch building, now known as the







Pacific Club. Judge Fits-Randolph located and occupied the Judge's Boom
on the third floor from 1921-1934. The District CourtCmaintained-
functioning courtroom until 1964.
According to the Pacific Club record the second floor of the Botch
building, having been vacant since 1913, received the law office
of Grace Henry in the East room in 1955. She has maintained her legal
practice in that space from then to the present. The third floor re-
mained empty from the removal of the District until 1978 when Channel 5
television studio moved in, and still occupies the space today.
The Pacific Club today is more nominal than functional,
however it still maintains the Botch building at the base of Main Street.
The all men's club passes membership shares through wills, with only
a few being sold. The honor of being a member has somewhat subsided,
however a local prestige still exists. Members still gather for an
early morning chat around the old stove or an intense cribbage game in
the front or Cap N's Boom.











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Members of the Pacific Club Grouped in front of Their Building


Photo by Boyer.
From left to right: Standing-Clinton Parker, Frederick C. Ayers, CIpt B. Whitford Joy, J. E. T. Rutie-, Millard F. Freeborn, Frank
A. Daly, Albert G. Brock, Alexander M. Myrick, Clinton Gardner, Capt. John P. Conway, Judge William E. Solly, Alanson S. Barney, G. How-
ard Winslow, George W. Edwards, Alexander C. Milne, C. Whitney Riddell. Seated--Frederick W. Folger, Franklin Folger, John B. Folger,
Dr. Ellenwood B. Coleman, Joseph C. Brock, Horace R. Coleman, George H. Lally, David Parker, Capt. John Killen, John M. Winslow.


1915 view of the gentlemen of the Pacific Club






Footnotes

Land Deed, Nantucket Historical Association 1765.

2enry Barnard Worth, Nantucket Lands ahd Land Owners, Nantucket
Historical Association, Vol. 2, Bulletion #5, 1928, page 256.

1Mi=ror, February 2, 1861

4Edouard Stackpole and Melvin Summerfield, Nantucket Doorways:
Thresholds to the Past, page 120.

5Edouard Stackpole, The Great Fire of 1846, Proceedings of the
Nantucket Historical Association, 1946-1951, pages 35-45.

6Inquirer and Mirrr., Saturday Morning, August 28, 1915, The Real
Story of the Pacific Club of Nantucket and the Historic William
Rotch Building.

7Registry of Deeds, Book 56, page 115.

8Inquirer Mand Mirror, August 28, 1915.

9Inguirer and Mirror, May 8, 1909.







BIBLIOGRAPHY



Grace Brown Gardner Scrapbook #53, Nantucket Historical Association,
"86 Year Old Pacific Club Remains Social Center for Men on Island."

Inquirer & Mirror, February 16, 1935, August 28, 1915, December 5, 1947.

Lancaster, Clay, The Architecture of Historic Nantucket, New York,
McGraw Hill, 1972, p.52-56.

Mirror, "Sale of Brick Office, February 2, 1861.

Nantucket Journal, April 9, 1891.

Nantucket Lands and Land Owners Henry Barnard Worth, Nantucket Historical
Association, Volume 2, Bulletin #5, 1928, p.228.

Records of the Pacific Club, 1904 -1942.

Registry of Deeds Book 31, p.565.,Book 56,p.115., Book l,p.11-15.

Stackpole, Edouard, Proceeding* of the Nantucket' Historical Association,
1946 1951, p.35-45.

Stackpole, Edouard,Rambling Through the Streets of' Nantu~ket, New
Bedford, 1947, p.10-12.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

To Mr. Paul Buchanan, Mr. Herschel Shepard and Mr. Edouard Stackpole
for their aide in ,researching this building.



















MAINTENANCE_







SUMMARY


The purpose of this maintenance assay is to record observations of the gen-
eral condition of the building. The primary emphasis is placed on the con-
ditions of the basement and attic areas. The interiors of the occupied
spaces were not available for a detailed survey.


INPTlOR


The interior spaces are comprised of three floors of private and commerical
areas and the attic which are in generally good condition. The Pacific
Club rooms on the first floor are painted and maintained frequently. The
commerical spaces on the second level appear to be in good repair. The
third floor has been altered by the addition of partition walls, drop ceil-
ing and electrical wiring which is necessary for the operation of the tele-
vision studio.





Extensive documentation was performed in this area for the purpose to assay
the extent of water damage, changes in the structural members and the build-
evolution. The general condition is poor due to the extensive water and
moisture problems which appear to be caused in part by the fluctuating wa
ter table. The addition of new fill and the replacement of some structural
members are a few attempts that have been made to alter the damage that was
caused by the moisture. The most critical area for concern seems to be the
northwest quadrant, extending from the west wall to the vault (fig.A, photo
I and3). This area has had new structural members added, the north wall is
covered with mold, the fill is saturated, the wood piers have rotted off at
the bottom and evidence of new mold has been observed during the perior of
this survey (fig. A for location).


The roots from the tree on South Water street have penetrated the founda-
tion wall and are growing in the basement (fig. A and photo 2). The vents
in the foundation walls on the north and south sides are filled with debris
(photo4). The floor boards are in good condition except for areas which
have been pierced by electrical wires or conduit and several rotten boards
that are located along the east wall. The bottom tread of the basement









stair is broken and the bottom of the stringer is rotted (photo 5 ). Evi-
dence of frass and flight holes are prevalent throughout the structural
members of the basement and first floor framing.


ATTIC


The observation of the attic were conducted primarily for noting the evou-
tion of the building (see ARCHITECTURAL EVOLUTION). The general condition
is good. There are no signs of water damage or vet rot, as a matter of
fact this space is extremely dry. Some of the floor boards of the plat-
form area are loose and brittle. The bracing for the king post truss has
broken loose and is hanging down on the third floor level (hoto 10 ).
There are random articles being stored in the attic that should be checked
for potential fire saftey.


iCsIIOR


The exterior of the building is in generally good repair. The brick has
been sandblasted and the protective surface is gone leaving the surface
pourous and susceptible to deterioration. The brownstone around the Main
Street entry, south elevation, is spelling. The east side has been stuc-
coed and painted. The fire-escape on the north elevation is rusted,
some treads are broken and loose. All the wood surfaces are painted and
in generally good condition with no signs of rot.


CONCLUSION


The extensive damage in the basement is potentially hazardous to the build-
ing and its occupants. Therefore, it is recommended that a professional
assay be performed to determine what course of immediate action should be
taken to correct the water problems.


Before any work is performed in the basement, it is strongly recommended th
that a professional and thorough archaeological survey be conducted.








PHOTOS


FIG. A




SKETCH OF BASEMENT


MOT TO SCAL-


A5 EE




























NORTHWEST QUADRANT 1


TREE ROOTS 2


43




























SEVERE WATER DAMAGE 3


DEBRIS IN VENTS


44


























BASEMENT STAIR 5


GENERAL CONDITION


6


45



































GENERAL CONDITION 7


DOCUMENTATION


46


-~-;k-_~F.~.-1~4~i~C~C I c,,
I.*P~n~nl


8







S- DOCU"MENTATION


S9


KING POST TRUSS























t 10


47







,. PRESERVATION INSTITUTE: NANTUCKET
ISUMMEi 8lvr 1I qTATSYN MONELL
7i U LOUISe PARRISH
PACIFIC CLUD PONNA CAMPPrLL
c KV JOIST pANPY SEMPER


'NANTUCKET, MA MAINTENANCE ASSAY :CELLAR

LADEL SIZE DEs CRIPTION CONDITION REMAtRfS


2@ Ditt

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

10*" I 1*1"




2*" x 4"

3" z 4"1
Ditto.

2*" x 41"

53" x 4+"
5PI x 4-"


I if- .a


Plane vertical sawn composite
joist nailed together. Bears on
beams.
Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Hand hewn, notched on the east
end and bearing on vest end.
Vertical sawn, notched on both
ends.

Ditto.

Ditto.
Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.
Ditto.


Damp.











Wet rot.

Dry rot.



Dry rot.


Dry rot.

Partial decay.


7n-A-9

7n-B-9

7n-C-9

7n-D-9

7n-E-9

7n-F-9

7s-A-8

7s-B-8

7s-C-8

7.-D-8

7s-E-8

7s-F-8

7a-G-8
7s-H-8







__ PRESERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET
,-- SUMMER Il61 TARYN MONELL
LOUISE FARRISH
B PACIFIC, CLUB pONNA CAMPBeLL
--. KEY : Jols RANPY SENPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANTU S. MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELLAR

LABEL s1ZE PE5CRIPTION CONDITION I E MAR S5S
Vetclswnoce nbt


51" x 4i"

2i X 4i"

3" x 5"

x 5"


3@11-" x 7-


31" x 5"

3@1+" z 71

3f" x 41"
3@1jz 71"

3In x 5"

5@1f'x 7Tl

2" x 5"

3" x 5"


Vertical sawn, notched on both
ends.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Plan sawn, west end wedged and
east end bearing.

Floating, vertical sawn.

Same as 8-A-9.

Same as 8-B-9.

Same as 8-A-9.

Same as 8-B-9.

Same as 8-A-9.

Vertical sawn, notched on both
ends.
Vertical sawn, west end notched
east end floats.


7s-J-8

7s-K-8

7s-L-8

7a-M-8

8-A-9


8-B-9

8-C-9

8-D-9

8-E-9

8-F-9

8-G-9

8-H-Wall

8-J-Wall


Composite joist, nailed to-
gether.

Rotten and replaced by compo-
site joist.


Wet rot.


Wet rot.


-







PRESERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET
_. SUMM FR Icl81 TAKYN MONELL

PACIFICCLU LONNA CAMPDILLH
-- KE : JOIST RANPY SEMPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANTUE MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELL
LAEL SIZE DPESRIPTION CONPIT ION KRE.M ARi 5


8-K-Wall
8-L-Wall
8-M-Wall
8-N-Wall


2" x 4"

3" x 41P
3' x 4"
5" z 4'


Vertical sawn, both ends notched.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Ditto.


Wet rot.
Ditto.


___________ 1 4







P' PRESERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET
SUMMER 181 TAFYN MONELL
. LOUISE PFARiR1SH
'PACIFIC CLUB 1ONNA CAIMPDLL
KEY : PIaS FRANPY SENPEFi
PACIFIC CLUB
NTUCKT MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELLAR
LANT CKE RASS PTION CONP MA
LAI5FEL SIZE PF -CRIPTION CONDITION REMAi I


51 x 5*
HT. 35x10"


5*" x 5*"
HT. 35x9*
10 x 10w
HT. 4zx3"

41" dia.
HT. 3'x7tj

4t"dia.
HT.3'z 6"'

10" x ill"
HT. 3 xz8"


11iJ"xio"



n1"zx lo0"
HT. 3'6*"

I' 'f3"xS"
HT. 35'3"


Smooth sawn, top supports beam
1, bottom sets on concrete
block.

Ditto.


Bottom is rotted away.



Ditto.


Brick pier. 'Brick is 6"153"zi"1 Stable.


1-A


1-B

2-A

2-B

2-C


3-A


3-B

4-A

4-B

4-C


Bottom rotted away.


Bottom rotted away.


Post is hanging from beam. Not
supporting.

Ditto.










Bricks are shimmed to support
beam.

Shimmed on top.


.1 ~~ ~~.1 _ _


Wood post, nailed to beam.,
concrete block supported bottom.

Ditto.

Brick pier with shim at top and
on grade fill. Bricks are
8"x 53"x 2".

Brick pier with shim at top and
on fill. Bricks are 6"zj1"x11i"

Ditto.

Ditto.

Concrete block pier. Rest on
fill.Corner blocks.







PRESERVATION INSTITUTE: NANTUCKET
-SUMMER 1981 TAWYN MON-LL
U PLOUISE PARRISH
FRiiB PACIFIC CLUB ONNA CAMI'PLL
;-,. --. KEY : PIERS RANP SENPER
PACIFIC CLUB
E RTED 72 MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELLAR
NANTUCKET, MASS. sI z
LADEL 5ZE P-S5CRIPTION CONDITION RE AMAf~S


10J'" 11"
T., 2'4"


HT. 3'71S"
12"i It"
HT. 5*7i"

Ditto.
HT. 2'11"
6+n dia.
HT. 2'7"

1"x1ll"
HT. 1'8"

1' 5"x8"
HT. 2'11"

1 4"xl '4"
HT.*3'2"
6" dia.
HT.3'0"

I 1i"xi'O"
HT. 3'2 "
12"x1 14
HT.5 4"


Brick pier of 7r'x3"x2i' bricks

Brick pier of 7"'xr3 'xIf"
bricks.

Brick pier of 8"zz"x2~" bricks.
Rest on fill.

Ditto.

Exposed bark, wood pier.

Brick pier of 6Wzx2n"x1z"
bricks.Rest on fill.

Concrete block pier. Rest on .;i.l
fill.

Concrete blocks of 16"x18".

Wood post rest on fill.

Brick pier, rest on concrete
block. Bricks are 7 "zx"x2".
Brick pier of 7n"xz x'r2* brick
sitting on a concrete block.


Wet rot.


Shimmed with decayed wood
pieces.
Ditto.







Shimmed at top.

Ditto.

Ditto,







Shimmed at top.


1 1 __.__


5a-A

5s-B

6n-A

6n-B



6s-C
69-fl


6a-F

7r*-A

7n-B

7n-C







.2 PRESERVATION INSTITUTE: NANTUCKET
r SUMMER Ic81 TAlYN MONELL
SPLOUISE FAARRI SH
PACIFIC CLUB VONNA CAMPCE>LL
-- KE- : PIERS EKANPY SENPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANTI AS. MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELLAR

LAEL 5I1ZE PESCRIPTION CONDITION I REMARISS


11""x1' 35"
H. 539"

11*" X1'0 "
HT, 2'6"

8"x16"
HT. 310"

1 !1"x1 i 3rZ,
HT. 3'7"
11"x11i"
HT. 3'8"
8"z1 4"
HT. 3'10"
5i"x1i5" 7
HT. 55"

HT. 3'3"

1.3 *x5f"

1' 3ix 51"
HT. '31l'


Concrete block.

Brick pier of 6"x3I*x2".

Concrete block resting on fill.

Ditto.

Brick pier of 7"x3"x2" bricks,
resting on fill.

Concrete block resting on fill.

Concrete block resting on fill.

Wood post, shimmed on top and
resting on fill.

Concrete block resting on fill.

Ditto.


Shimmed with bricks on top.

Shimmed on top.

Decayed beam sitting on top.


_________I1A-______


79-D

7s-E

7a-F


8-A

8-B

8-C

9-A

9-B

9-C

9-D







PRESERVATION INSTITUTE: NANTUCKET

1 SUMMER 1981 TAKYN MONELL
W r pFi. pa rLOUISE FARRISH
-'fT PACIFIC CLUB PONNA CAMPIB-LL
-KEY : BEAMS RANPY SEMPIER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANU Ei MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELLAR

LABEL SIZE PSCRIPTION CONDITION REMARIrS


5' Ix 51"


10" x 10"


11 "x 12"


10" x 9"'


5i" x 5?"


lot" x 11


5?" x 8"


6" x 6"

10"x 1I"



5x"z 71"


Smooth sawn, notched on north
end and cantilevered on south
end,

Hand hewned, butting on south
end and cantilevered north end.

Hand hewved,bearing on north end
notched on south end.

Hand hewned, butting on north
end and notched on south end.

Smooth sawn, north end butting
south end bearing on a scabbed
on board.

Hand hewned, north end notched
south end bearing.

Vertical sawn, bearing on both
ends.

Ditto,

Hand hewned, north end bears on
a wood post and south end bears
on a concrete pier.

Circular saw marks, north end
bears on brick pier and south
end floats.


South portion is dry rotted,
north end is wet rotted.

Exterior wet.


Ditto.





North end decayed.


Wet rot.



Ditto.



Wet rot


Board scabbed on.





Scabbed.














Shimmed at north end.





Moment crack.


I I ~-. ______________________


1


2


3


4

5n



5s

6n-1


6n-2

68







PRESERVATIOh INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET

4 SUMM ER 1981 TAyN WONEL
..... i B .... ,LOUISE FARRISH
-i3- PACIFIC CLUB PONNA CAMPbELL
KEY : BEAMS RANPY SEMPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANCET MASS MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELLAR
LABEL SiZ.E 1 P SCRIPTION CONDITION R E.MAF RtS


5j"x 50i

99'"x 91"

91" x 1O'

41" x 8i"


Smooth sawn, north end bears on
brick pier, south end bearing.
Hand hewned, north end floating
south end bearing and notched.
Hand hewned, north end bearing
south end botched and bearing.


Steel "I"
ing.


beam, both ends bear-


Wet rot.

Ditto.

Rusted.


Both ends shimmed.


7n-2

78

8

9


" ----~'--I` I--;;' -~-~-~~~~----~ --~----P~-







.: PRE ERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET
r SUMMER 1981 TAlYN MONELL

i7; i rT- l PACIFIC CLUB I2ONNA CAMPpeLL
KE Y: JoT RANPY SEMPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANTUL SCKET E CMASSf COfAIO ' RA MA CE<

LAEL SIZ Pt5RIPTION COMPITION FEMAFtFtS


IW 7-P


Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

51" x 4"


3v x 4""


3" x 4"

2j" x 3f"

3" x 4i


3" x 4"


3*" x 5"


Wdifi aawn, vest end pierces
masonry wall and is notched into
pocket also is supported by beam.
East end bears on pier 5-A and
butts beam 3.

Smooth sawn, bears on both ends.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Vertical sawn, vest end bears
and east end floats.

Vertical sawn, vest end bears
east end notches.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Vertical sawn, west end bears
on beam and east end is notched.

Vertical sawn, west end cut and
cantilevers, east end notched.
Vertical sawn, both ends notched.


Wet.












Wet rot.














Fungus coikred.


Joist is shimmed at column.




East end bears on scabbed 2x4".

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Column missing.






East end shimmed,

Joist is scabbed total length.




Joist scabbed.


1-B-3

1-0-3

1-D-3

1-E-3

1-F-2


I-G-2


1-H-2

1-J-2

1-K-2


W-L-2


W-M-2


- --~-~-= I~ ~ ~ -- -----------------E"


I







PRE5ERVATIOh INSTITUTE: NANTUCKET
SSUMME1R 1981 TARYN MONELL
I '"i PLOUISE FARRISH
FiACIFIC CLUB IONNA CAMPCeLL
I-KEY- : Joist RANPY SEMPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANUCKE MAINTENANCE ASSAY CELLAR
LABEL SiZE PESCRIPTION CONDITION R E. MAitISS


W-N-2
W-0-2
W-P-2
W-Q-2Ditt
W-R-2


3" z 434"
5*" x 4V"
2j'" x 4i"
Ditto.

3" z 41"


Vertical sawn, both ends notched.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Ditto.


Mold covering exterior.
T, f

Dry rot.
Ditto.
Ditto.


________ A ,--







PRESERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET

SUMMER IqA81 TAMYN MONELL





A MAIFINCUENANE ASSAY CELLAR

LABEL SIZE PD5CRIPTION ICONPITION RE- MARiKS


Hand hewn, both ends notched.

Hand hewn, bothe ends notched.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.


Wet rot, west end support missing




Compression split.


Copper tubing penetrates joist.


I _______________ a i


2-F-3

2-G-5


lo0f x 9"

2" x 4"


2-H-53

2-J-3

2-K-3

2-L-3

2--X-3
2-N-3

2-0-53

2-P-3

2-Q-3

2-R- 3


x 5"

x 5"

x 5"

x 5"

x 4"'

x 5"

x 5"

x 4"

x 4"

x 5"







PRESERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET
.SUMMER I81 TA'YN MONELL
it.-- ALOUISE FARRISH
IT:B I PACIFIC CLUB ONNA CAIMP LL
-J KEY : JOIST RANPY SEMPE.F
PACIFIC CLUB
NANRUCKET, M MAINTENANCE ASS5AY CELLAR
NANEL ASZES 5CPTION:COPT 10N MA R
LA[EL Si1E DESCRIPTION CONDITION REMA__5 _


3-A-4

3-B-4

3-C-4

3-D-4E

3-E-4

3-F-4

5-G-4

3-H-4
5-J-4

5-K-4

3-L-4

3-M-4

5-N-4

5-0-4

3-P-4

3-Q-4
3-R-4


Smooth saw. Notched on both ends,
Smooth sawn. Both ends butt.
Smooth sawn. Both ends notched.

Ditto.

Ditto.
Hand hewned. Both ends notched.

Vertical sawn. Both ends notched.
Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto,

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.
Ditto.


Soggy
Wet rot.


Wet rot.


Severe wet rot.



Dry rot.


Shimmed.
Scabbed.








Telephone line pierces joist.

Electrical wire pierces.


1 1 I _______ -


23/4 x 53/L
13/4 x 3

33/4 x 53/4
Ditto.

Ditto.

10ox113/4"

1it" 4"

2 z x 5'"

*" x 4O"

3" x 5"

3P, i 4+",




2i" x 5"

4" x 5"

4+ x 54"
2" x 4"







;. PRE ERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET

S- SUMMERR I81 TAMYN MONELL
SI F5 U M I E 11 LOUISE PARRISH
rI :- PACIFIC CLUB 1ONNA CAMPPC-LL
KE: JOIST FANPY SENPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NANTUCKETI MS MAINTENANCE ASSAY :CELLAR

LABEL 551Z E PRESCRIPTION CONDITION IEfE.MAF S1

4-A-5n

4-B-5n

4-C-5n

4-D-5n

4-E-5n

4-F-5s

4-G-5s

4-H-5s

4-J-5s

4-K-5a

4-L-5s

4-M-58

4-N-5s

4-0-5a

4-P-5s

4-Q-58
4-R-5s


Smooth sawn. Both ends notched.

Vertical sawn. Both ends notched.

Ditto.

Smooth sawn. Both ends notched.

Ditto.

Hand hewned. Both ends notched.

Vertical sawn. Both ends notched.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.
Ditto.

Smooth sawn. Both ends notched.


35" z 4"

Ditto.

2" x 4"


82" x 11"
21 x 6"

2" x 6"



2" x 6"


5" x 5"
g* x 6"

25 x 65"


4" x 5"

4" x 51"

14" x 5t*
3J*"z 3*


I


Wet rot.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Wet rot

Dry rot.

Ditto.

Dry rot.

Wet rot.

Dry rot.

Ditto.


Dry rot,


Decade scab on side,

Ledger reinforced.


Joist scabbed. Ledger reinforced.

Ditto.

West ledger reinforced,










4-S-5s same.


.1 1 ~-.---- 4


I







:," PRESERVATION INSTITUTE: NANTUCKET
SU|13 U1MMNE IR I81 TARYN MONELL
LOUISE FARRISH
'' PACIFIC CLUB pONNA CAMPBeLL
.K.Y: JOIST RANPY SEMPER
PACIFIC CLUB
NAN~CKE, MAS. MAINTAIN C ASSAY ELLA

LADEL SIZE IPE-SCRIPTION CONDITION REMA RS


The joist notches into the-
beam on the west end and floats
the east end. Vertical sawn.

Hand hewned, joist is notched on
west end and butting on the east
end.

Bearing on both ends. Vertical
saw marks.

Both ends notch into leams.
Joist is hand hewned.

Joist butts into beams. Hand
hewned.

Joist notched o0 both ends, Ver-
tical saw marks.

Ditto

Both ends notched. Smooth sawn.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Both ends notch into beams. Ver-
tical sawn.


Wet rot.



Wet rot.


Exterior soft.


Soft.


5s-A-6-



5s-B-6s



5s-C-6s


5s-D-6s


5s-E-6s


5s-F-6s


5s-G-6s

5s-H-6s

5s-J-6s

5s-K-6s

5s-L-6s


Signs of compression split.


Scabbed with a 21" x 3z" board.

Ledger reinforced on #6 beam.

Ditto.

Ditto.


1 _____


Dry rot.


3v x 4"


8" x 8"



3" x 5"


6j" x 6 "

10" x 9."


41" x 4"


4" x 4 "



23" x 3i"

3i" x 51"

35" I 5i"







P: : PRESERVATION INSTITUTE: NANTUCKET
SUiIMM R Ic81 TAKPYN MONELL
1 UMM1 1981. LOUISE FARRISH

Ii--r PACIFIC CLUB PONNA CAMPPILL
SKE' : JOIST RKAPY SENPER

ACKET MAINTENANCE ASSAY : CELLAiR

LABEL |51ZE PE5CRIPTION CONDITION REMARKS


Vertical sawn joist which bears
on beams at both ends.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Hand hewned joist which is bear-
ing on beam oni the west end and
floats on the east end.

Vertical sawn joist which is
notched on both ends.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

;.itto.

Vertical sawn joist which is
notched on both ends.


Wet rot and fungus.


Wet rot.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Wet rot.



Dry rot.


Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Dry rot.

Wet rot.


SScabbed.


6-,-A-7n


6n-B-7n

6n-C-7n

6nT-D-7n

6n-E-7n

6n-F-7n

6s-G-7s


6s-H-78


6s-J-7s

6s-K-7s

6s-L-7s

6s-M-7s

6s-N-7s


13" x 7-"


Middle section of joist missing,


.5.


I .- -







PRE5bERVATION INSTITUTE : NANTUCKET
,- SUMMER 18,1 TARIYN MONELL
LOUISE PARRISH
;,?i:, PACIFIC CLUB 1IONNA CAMP~PLL
.:-_ -- KEY: JOIST RANPY SEMPEF
PACIFIC CLUB
NANUCKEI. MAINTENANCE ASSAY :CELLAR
LABEL _SiZE PE-5 CRIPTION CONDITION fREMARMISS


3i" x 5"?

2-" x 4 "
3" x 4i"
Ditto.
3" x 4T"


Vertical sawn joist which is
notched on both' ends.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Vertical sawn joist.which is
notched on both ends.


Wet rot.

Ditto.
Decade.
Ditto.
Decade.


a~~~~I i-~- ~- ___________


6s-0-7s

6s-P-7s
6s-Q-7s
6s-R-7s
6s-S-7s


















DOCUMENTATION_


























The following log-journal-diary is intended to
provide a record of the process of documenting the
William Rotch Building, Nantucket, Massachusetts. This
documentation effort is an expansion of the information
recorded by the Historic American Building Survey in
1969. The greatest part of the data was collected in
the cellar and attic spaces. The author is writing from
the perspective of a teaching assistant/team captain who
is seeking a Masters degree in architecture, specializing
in historic preservation, There are three other team
members with various backgrounds,
This record was kept on a day to day basis as the
work progressed and is therefore presented in an informal
manner and in the present tense.
It is hoped that this record may in some way provide
insight into a documentation process. It has done so for
the author.


65








MONDAY JUNE 22


3:00 pm Blair Reeves & Herschel Shepard give a quick once
over lightly walk-thru the Pacific Club. General
points of interest are noted (i.e., possibility of
roof originally being gambrel, possibility of
wharf existing along north elevation, examination
of vaulted ceiling over courtroom.)








TUESDAY JUNE 23


1:50 pm Herschel Shepard leads documentation team com-
prised of Taryn Monell (Art History background),
Donna Campbell (Architecture), Louise Parrish
(Architecture), Randy Sender (Architecture). Mr.
Shepard begins with a general overview suggesting
how to begin our examination: what to observe
first, organizational criteria, etc. Emphasis is
made on beginning with general and moving towards
specifics.
Initially the team walks around the exterior.
Herschel points out various clues as well as items
to look for (i.e., signs of later masonry work
around the northeast corner basement vent, changes
to high maintenance items such as windows & exterior
doors, vertical joists on north elevation indicat-
ing modifications to the original.)
Next the team moves inside observing a multitude of
details. The second level is passed over lightly as
it has received extensive modification to serve the
Chamber of Commerce and law offices. Lights in the
stair risers are noted which are later confirmed as
the basement. At the third level, attention is focu-
sed on the vaulted ceiling which previously served the
courtroom (and presently is used by the local television
station: Channel 3.) Moving into the attic, Herschel
points out the mortice and tenon connections at the
ridge, the newly added cross wind bracing, and the
remains of iron "h" sections which may have served to
support hoists for unloading schooners. Evidence of the
purported existence of a fourth level as well as a
gambrel roof is sought out but not discernable. A
brief trip onto the Captain's walk offers a picturesque
vantage of the town and harbor. Upon descension Herschel
offers a quick explanation and dating system for nails.








TUESDAY JUNE 25 COUNT.


Next the team is led into the Pacific Club itself
which occupies the first level. Herschel exchanges
pleasantries with a few of the members and gets their
approval for our visit. The absence of a masonry fire-
place on the south side is noted. The tongue and groove
floor system is examined and an explanation of face
nailing and blind nailing is offered. Herschel explains
the aesthetic and practical reasons for chamfering the
exposed beams. The hidden wiring to the electric ceiling
light fixtures reveals a fairly recent ceiling finish.
A point around a window jamb is suggested as a convenient
spot for measuring the exterior wall thickness. The random
relation between the windows and beams is noted as being
typical of the times. A beam falling above a window is
pointed out as being atypical however, and therefore some-
thing to watch out for. The door frames are noted as being
Greek Revival due to their trianglated pediments. The doors
themselves are suggested as originals due to their exposed
tenons. The crystal knob hardware and locksets are also
suggested as being originals. A brief explanation of the
door construction is offered. Next Herschel lunges into
the basement with only a small flashlight. His spontaneous
lack of hesitation leaves no time for anyone to question
whether or not they want to go down into this dark and musty
space. The inadequate level of light afforded by the flash-
light leaves much to the imagination. Herschel hypothesizes
the earlier existence of a coal bin from evidence of infill
noted earlier on the exterior (which would have been a chute)
and the remainder of fin walls (which would have defined the
bin itself.) A closed in arch on the west wall suggests an
earlier entry at that location. An indication which supports








TUESDAY CO'TT.


the supposition of a wharf originally existing at that
side of the structure. The brick vault is determined
to be relatively modern by its bricks. The remains of
a chimney foundation at the south end suggests modifica-
tions. A brief discussion of saw marks and their value
as a dating device is offered by Herschel. A multitude
of maintenance problems are pointed out ranging from
soggy beams to root intrusion to missing supports. The
spontaneity and exuberance with which Herschel addresses
the building is noted as serving to peak the interest
and enthusiasm of the entire team.








WEDNESDAY JUNE 24


Blair Reeves leads the team to the site. His
methods and observations are remarkably similar
to those of Herschel Shepard's on the previous
day. This not only adds credence to Herschel's
observations, but also reinforces the attitude
with which such a project should be addressed.
Like Herschel, Blair begins by meeting outside
the building (interestingly choosing the same spot
as Herschel did to gather). At this juncture, Blair
introduces me as a quasi teaching assistant and
team captain. He also attempts to define the
general scope and impetus of our documentation.
Aware of our previous day's observations with
Herschel and a bit pressed for time, Blair abbrev-
iates his discussion to avoid redundancy. He does
point out the regretable sandblasting which has
occurred. Unhesistantingly, Blair ventures into the
depths of the basement. This time we are well equipped
with clip on lights and 30 foot extension cords.
Fortunately, what the semi-darkness of the day before
had left to our imaginations was merely figments of
our mind's eyes. Here again Blair's comments and
observations bear an uncanny parallel to those of
Herschel. Having established a direction and point
of departure, Blair left the team to its task.
Measurement begins with Louise volunteering to record,
Taryn holding the "dummy" end of the tape, and Donna
reading dimensions. The north west corner is established
as the reference point. It is necessary to encourage
everyone not to rush the recorder as her's is the most
lengthy task.








WEDNESDAY JUNE 24 COUNT.


Also, it is necessary to instruct the team on the
proper method for calling out dimensions: "'z
feet "x" inches / always calling out "feet"
and "inches" and having the recorder repeat the
dimension so as to assure no misunderstanding. On
this first session we are able to record all of the
brick piers.








THURSDAY JUNE 25


9:45 am Louise has assembled her field notes and is pre-
pared to complete the recording of the piers and
chimney foundations. Donna has prepared an out-
line for recording the first floor framing. At
this juncture, I suggest that each team member refer
to Harley McKee's book Recording Historic Buildings
as a guide. In addition, I attempt to relate various
conventions which Blair adheres to regarding arrowheads,
dimension strings, orientation, etc.
1:00 pm The team once again descends into the basement. I
am attempting to remove myself from the documentation
process little by little so as to give the team the
opportunity of experiencing the process more autonomously.
The group works diligently and is able to complete the
foundation plan as well as most of the framing plan.
The random nature of the framing presents some organ-
izational problems which the team decides to work out
with Blain








MONDAY JUNE 29


10:30 am The team assembles with Blair and Jeff Fuller
(teaching assistant) to redefine the scope and
direction of our efforts. I run through a list
of potential drawings and additions to the existing
HABS drawings. After some discussion, the group
decides to prepare: (1) foundation plans, (2)
first floor framing plans, (3) pier, beam, and joist
schedules to cover maintenance and complete description,
(4) a finish schedule including door and accompanying
hardware, (5) east elevation, (6) basement wall
elevations especially the blind arch, and (7) roof
framing if possible. Next the team meets by itself
and I devise a system for organizing the beam, pier,
and joist schedules. The team disperses to put on
the thrift shop grubbies.
12:50 pm The team once again descends into the depths of the
Pacific Club basement. Today I decide to remain above
to begin my inventory work and allow the team to function
on its own. There is some resentment, but the team
quickly completes the recording of the joists and
emerges to begin the beam, pier, and joist schedule.
I run through the schedule system again and everyone
prepares their own sheets. This time I go down with
the team to share my limited knowledge of saw marks,
rots, fungus, mold, frass, ete.
Hopefully, Paul Buchanan and other experts will fill
in the gaps and rectify any discrepancies which I
might have created. Again the team works with zealous
energy and completes a large part of the schedules.








TUESDAY JUKE 50


10:30 am The team spends a few hours completing the joist
framing schedule in the basement. We assemble
upstairs to varify any discrepancies which might
exist between our drawings and schedules. Fortun-
ately, everything seems to collaborate and the
team decides to work through lunch and measure the
roof framing.
Proceding into the attic we find an even filthier
space than the basement. As the structural integ-
rity of the framing appears questionable at best,
I feel the necessity of doing as much of the physical
measurement as possible. Having moved to the back
of the attic and examined the framing system, it
appears that the measurement of the rafter center-
lines is not pertinent. Shortly after completing
this string of dimensions, our fearless leader
appears (Blair) and suggests what other items we
should record. The necessity of developing a
schedule as we had done for the first floor framing
is obviated because of the similar condition and
materials of the members. As per Blair's recommen-
dation, we do record the sises of each member and
the location of centerposts and some ad hoc additions.
Upon reaching the floored section of the attic, I
turn the process back over to the team which quickly
completes the task.








WEDNESDAY JULY 1


1:30 pm The team meets with Blair and Jeff to review our
progress and redetermine a list of required draw-
ings. The value of compiling a finished schedule
is questioned and found to be of little value.
Blair and Jeff review the preliminary drawings
which have been initiated. Problems of line
weight and proper symbols are discussed. Every-
thing appears to be moving along on schedule. To
assure that no scheduling conflicts arise, Blair
distributes a blank calendar.
I inform the group that it is their responsibility
to determine their own schedule, not mine. During
the evenings, I try to suggest methods of clarifying
drawings by careful placement of notes and control
of line weights and designations. For the most
part the team is self reliant and capable of comp-
leting their drawings with only slight input required
on my part.








TUESDAY JULY 2


3:30 pm As a result of the brevity of Dick's visit, time
allows only a cursory investigation of the build-
ing. Hence, most of his observations are not in-
cluded here as they have been covered by previous
consultants. He encourages us to investigate the
unusual nature of some of the brickwork around
window openings. Also, he points out the suspicious
looking nature of the west elevation wooden consoles
and cornice.
It becomes evident that Dick's expertise is not
centered around specifics of maintenance. Therefore,
we curtail these types of questions and talk more in
generalities. Regarding the inventory of Pacific Club
memorabilia, Dick suggests a photographic and written
record as opposed to drawings. He also suggests
limiting any research to those objects which appear
to have definite significance.







MONDAY JULY 6


1:30 pm The team meets with Blair to organize the inter-
pretation effort. Blair clearly and simply explains
the scope of what is involved. By individual consent
and interest, each member is apportioned a specific
aspect of the building. Taryn selects to zero in
on the social history, Donna the maintenance, and
Louise the physical evolution. Blair is prudent in
pointing out the overlapping nature of all aspects
of the building's history and thereby encouraging
the co-operation of individual efforts.


2:00 Having resolved the interpretation issue, the team
sets about introducing the building to Paul Buchanan.
We briefly go through our photographs, HABS drawings,
and all work having been completed to date. We then
precede to the building itself for a "hands-on"
examination. Unlike our previous consultants, Paul
wastes no time before entering the basement. He spends
most of his time examining the masonry and the remainder
on the framing. As predicted by Blair, Paul fields
off as many of our questions as possible withholding
judgements until his inspection is more complete. He
does confirm that the blind arch had previously served
a bulwark. He also verified the fact that the first
floor framing was a later addition: identifying
broad ax marks on the beams and vertical mill saw marks
on the joists and flooring. Paul spot checks some of
the framing for rot using an awl. He also points out
wet verses dry rot. The existing floor level of the
basement is explained to be fill material as a result of
water intrusion from high tidal water. Originally, the
basement is said to have been utilized for wet storage
(i.e., liquor kegs, whale oil, etc.)








MONDAY JULY 6 COUNT.


Having covered the entire basement lightly, Paul
wastes no time in preceding to the attic. His
trained eye is quick to pick up joists pockets
and other elements which others had missed or at
least taken some time to discover. He explains
the mysterious iron sections imbedded in the gable
ends as being brackets which at one time carried
a beam which skirted the chimney. The "v" grooved
board at the ridge is explained as being a cap board
not a ridge board as had been previously assumed.
The rafters and roof boards are identified as vert-
ical mill sawn white pine similar to that found in
the basement. Paul determines that the structure is
in good shape with the exception of one king post
truss whose braces have fallen off. Looking down on
the cornice, Paul determines it to be a later addition
due to the larger size of the bricks. Mortar samples
are extracted from the chimney and the window infill
and compared under a magnifying glass as a means of
relative dating. Paul determines that another trip
is in order and decides to break off for the day at
4:30.
My observation is one of impression at the wealth of
knowledge held by Paul Buchanan, He is by far the most
impressive of all of our consultants to date. Moreover,
I must confess awe at the speed and agility with which
he climbed about the Pacific Club, often leaving myself
and the rest of the group hard pressed to keep up with
him. The net effect of this first visit has been to arouse
renewed interest in our search for solving the many un-
answered questions of the Pacific Club.







WEDNESDAY JULY 8


11:00 am Concerned over a possible ebb i- enthusiasm, I
call a little private caucus with the group.
Everyone in the group has caught a cold which has
been getting around a-d we have kept a rather brisk
and demanding pace in order to be prepared for Paul
Buchanan. I encourage everyone to voice any sugg-
estions, grievances, etc. which might improve my
input into the documentation effort. This should
help me to improve my skills, as well as serve to,
clear the air should any problems exist. I assure
everyone that nothing will be taken personally and
suggest that they might speak with me individually
if they are hesitant to talk within the group. The
only feedback which I am able to conjure up is that
I may not be offering enough criticism in critiquing
the group's work. My response to this is to explain
to the group that I felt generally comfortable with
what they were producing and that I had a phobia of
talking down to people. Being able to relate at the
proper level is of paramount importance in teaching:
talking above students' heads is a danger as is being
condescending.








FRIDAY JULY 10


1:30 pm Paul Buchanan returns with us to the Pacific Club.
He begins by studying the tooling of mortar joists
(with binoculars) as a means of assisting in deter-
mining sequences of alterations. He explains to the
group what to look for and passes the binoculars
around. Unfortunately nothing definite is discernable
by this investigation.
Next we proceed into the attic for a move in depth
inspection where we left off Monday. Shadows of an ear-
lier chimney are discovered on the east wall. Also
shadows of an earlier lower slope is found, but still
no evidence of the gambrel roof which Clay Lancaster
and others have referred to. Dropping down onto the
ceiling framing of the third level's west end, we
discover evidence of two fires. Paul dates the major
one by the dimension of the framing members used to
replace the burnt members.
As per Paul's suggestion, Louise and I begin to locate
the beam brackets and bricked-in windows on the west
gable end. Because of limited time, we decide to
break off and complete the drawing during our next visit.







TUESDAY JULY 14

Today we return to investigate the joist pockets
on the east gable end. Under Paul Buchanan's sup-
ervision, we measure them, as well as the earlier
chimney s shadow a-d the beam brackets. I climb
down into the narrow space between the east end of
the courtroom and east gable end to take the measure-
ments and inspect this heretofore not reached space.
In between the floor joists I find some old US Army
telegraph forms with what appear to be non-military
messages inked or penciled dating "'87". I ask Paul
if I should take them and he says yes. At the floor
level (8'-8" below the cornice), I note an additional
single wythe of brick on both walls. There is no
evidence of any fires, ghosts, or shadows. From what
I can tell, there is no change in masonry in this area;
nor are there any closed in openings. After shinnying
out, I make a complete photographic inventory of the
attic end to end, while Paul assists the team in a few
more east gable end dimensions. Today I began to under-
stand some of the subtle ways by which Paul forces people
to be more observant. It is uncanny how he is able to
manipulate his audience to lead them into his next slide.
His technique is similar in his investigation of buildings
and obviously is the result of many years of experience.











FRIDAY JULY 31


Work having reached "substantial completion", it
now remains for me to somehow attempt to assess what
has been accomplished. It is difficult to calculate
conventional measures such as man/woman hours, the
number of drawings, the number of pages, etc. More-
over, it is of questionable value as a means of com-
prehending that which has been accomplished.
I have attempted to enumerate the average number of
man/woman hours and how they were spent. Of course
each individual's time varies considerably according
to his/her expertise and direction of effort.







NUMBER OF HOURS TASK
PER PERSON

100 SITE INVESTIGATION
50 RESEARCH
40 DRAWING
20 WRITING/TYPING
8 PHOTOGRAPHY
5 ORGANIZATION



223 TOTAL



I am not certain whether these hours are high or
low. Intuitively they appear to be somewhat high unless
one remembers that this was an academic exercise as opposed
to a professional job. Adding those hours spent by our
many consultants and teachers a total of some 1000 man/
woman hours is realized.



















INVENTORY_

















0I ,





EASY ST.

13

D F








O 10FT


L ATs WASHN IMAP


The following information is in
tended to serve as an inventory
of the meumorabilia paintings,
photograph, models, etc. of
the Pacific Club. The purpose of
this inventory lt to serve as a a ..
documentation of the Club's col-
lection, to indicate serious main-
tenance problems where they exist,
and to provide a starting point
for future research.
Where an object appears to merit
special attention, as much detail
as possible is given. However, as
the great majority of the colleo-
tion is of museum quality, at least
in regard to age and history, the
necessary e ipertise was not avai-
lable for distinguishing value.
This inventory is part of a study
of the William Rotch Building of
Nantucket, Massachusetta.




This work was conducted under the aegis of the Preservation
Institute: Nantucket, Summer 1981 by students Randy Sender
and Stephanie Norris. Special thanks to Katherine Oxnard,


PACIFIC CLUB


I .






































1 3 5

0 10 FT



WM. ROTCH BUILDING


PACIFIC CLUB


2


I


11
e~l inF


NORTH ELEVATION


CAPTAIN'S ROOM


-- -_-L_ Ir-_- L-l=_T II =~su t L~CIL-PLL- Isp


c --
--~ c-: I e r -I Ip- rp


t:









ITEM


DATE


SIZE


DESCRIPTION


C ___ ______________________ -_ ~_
*i _. & .....- - --S--^ .. *
-~ ---- ;^ ^ ^,-. ,,,., ,. I .


Measuring Stick


Oil painting






Black & White
Photo

Telescope


Oil painting


Oil painting



Black & White
Photo

Cribbage Board


Black & White
Photo


Bulletin Board


1894






Aug. 12, 196







After 1885









After 1900


L 4' 1" (bottom)
W 3/4" (top)

H 2'3 5/8"
W 3' I-"





H 10 "
W 1' 2 5/8"

L 2' 9 3/4"
W 2--"

H 2' 10 5/8"
W 1' 11 3/4"

H 2' 2"
W 2' 10 3/4"


H9 9/4"
W li-"

H 2' 4 1/8"
W 6"1,

H 74"
W 2' 1 3/4"


H 2' 6"
W 2' 4 1/8"


A. _______________J _________________________


Supported on wall; made of wood; tapers towards bottom



Has title: "Richard Parsons, Entering, Hong Kong,
June.22. 1890 Capt. B.W. Joy 1894"
Oil painting; wood frame, part gilt; of ship under
full sail. Hairline cracks in oil; has been torn &
repaired.

"Island service Wharf" written on back;


Made of brass (tarnished) with cloth band; "Mathew
Starbuck" written on cloth. Cloth is mildewing.

T. Bailey artist; of a ship; loose technique
paint is scraped off in places

title: "Ship St. Nicholas entering Hong Kong. May.
31st 1885 W.P. Joy. Master"; This and painting #2
may be a pair. Hairline cracks in paint

photo of two ships, one docked ("Carl Henry"'); other
"Mary Tapper"




photos of Cptn's room in Pacific Club; 3 sections;
1st one 8 men; Second one of east wall, third one
of North & west walls

contains: old postcard entitled "Pacific Club &
Guest; Nantucket" newspaper clipping (16-12-81),
"Fearless Foursome to seek Andrea Doria", treasure
hunters article; 2 assoc. member ship cards for the
yr. ending June 30, 1982; paper with typed distance
from Pacific Club to various locations on Main St.


_ ____ ~__~ I_













Black & White
Photo

Ink wash (pencil?)


H 15i'
W i' 6"

H 1' 5 5/8"
W 1' li~"


_________ H- _________________________.'_________________I _____________________________


.1


DESCRIPTION


Photo of Pacific Club; title:
Louis S. Davidson".


"Pacific on left,


Picture of sailboat being towed in a camel over the
sandbar in Nantucket harbor "James Walter Folger-
artist.


NO ITEM


11


12


- --


- --
" "











13







CAPTAIN'S
ROOM
ROOM EAST ELEVATII




1 3 5
0 10 FT

WM. ROTC BUILDING PACIFIC CLUB CAPTAIN'S RO


OM








OM


-I to ^ .








NO ITEM DATE SIZE DESCRIPTION


13

14

15


16

17



18

19



20

21


Thermometer

Ink & watercolor

Ink (Sepia?)


Carved Whale

Barometer



Oil Painting

Sepia ink wash



Harpoon

Harpoon


8' 3/4"L
2 2/8"
2' 3/4"
3' 4 3/4"
1' 91"
1' 3"

2' 10O-"
7"
3' li"
9 3/4"


6"
7-1"
4,"
8 3/4"


2' 9"
(tip) 4"
2' 31"
(tip) 2,"


- _________________________ .~ _________________ ii


wooden back & brass holder

by Carl Reefes (?- difficult to read signature)
title: "S.D. Carleton"
by Jas. Walter Folger; title: "The (4) Original
Grist Mills, on Mill Hills, in 1822." ; has typed
label of dates below

wood; carved & painted; black sperm whale; red mouth

plaque (brass): "Presented to the Pacific Club by
A.N. Myrick, Dec. 25th, 1923." ; wood, brass, other
metals.

by C.S. Raleigh; ship in full sail: the Horatio

title: "The Roundtop Grist Mill built in 1802,
taken down in 1875" ; has typed label; attributed to
Jas. Walter Folger because of other Mill drawing (#15)

wrought iron; arrow-shaped head; funnel-shaped end

wrought iron; catching device to secure harpoon in
whale flesh


1877








NO ITEM D


DESCRIPTION


22

23

24

25


26




27

28

29

30

31


2' 8 3/8"
(tip) 2 1/8"
3' 10o"
1 3/4"
1' 4k"

3'
2"

2' 7"
2' !"


Harpoon

Harpoon

Harpoon

Harpoon


Signal flag chart




Black & White
Photo
Black & White
Photo
Harpoon

Harpoon

Newspaper Clipping


wrought iron; streamlined design; funnel-shaped end

primitive; wrought iron; spatula-shaped head

tubular design; bullet-shaped end; rocket-shaped head

streamlined design; pivoting head to secure harpoon;
loop towards end for rope; wrought iron

Ink & watercolor; title: "Nantucket Whaleship Signals'
lists ships from 1788-1865; plaque underneath (partly
broken off) "Presented to the Pacific Club of Nantucket
by Sharp".

a man with a cat

a man in a horse drawn carriage

bronze; missile-shaped head; fins;

tilting head; wrought iron; loop or eye at end for
rope

Entitled "The Three Brothers", a painting by Jas.
G. Tyler of Greenwich Coun,. one of the greatest
living marine artists of America, on exhibition in the
Vose Galleries; pencilled inscription: "G.& M.
Starbuck & Co. Owners, 1837-1859, Nantucket."


- - ----- - -- --- 3


H 8"
W 10"
H 8u
W 10"
L 1' 6-"
7/8"0
L 3' 1"

W 8"
H 10'"


-- _ -~---1L --C---- i -C - -II~-~ 6~-- I
t- ------








NO ITEM DATE SIZE DESCRIPTION

I ,


Watercolor painting


Black & White
Photo


W 10 3/4"
H 8 3/4"'

W 8 3/41
H 10 3/4,"


title: "Ship Dauphin, Capt. Seth Pinkham, 1815." ;
on parchment paper; paper is buckled & torn

Entitled: "Commander James H. Wood of the G.A.R.
90 years old: November, 1936" ; water damage; moldy


32


33


-










































1 3 5

0 10 FT



WM. ROTCH BUILDING


PACIFIC CLUB


-- - = -- =L~C I_ I-- _pU~----- ~ ~-~ p~rp


SOUTH ELEVATION


CAPTAIN'S ROOM


I--- -~-~b
-- ---


_ I,- -- -- --
41111 -r I -I II Iql II~ I -- I -








NO ITEM


DESCRIPTION


S-- C -


34




35


36

37


38

39



40


41


42


Current


W 2' 7 3/4"
H 1' 10 3/4"


Old Lithograph




Old Lithograph


Calendar

Barometer


Cribbage board

Black & White
Photo


Black & White
Photo

Pinochle & Cribbagi
wood card holder

Oil painting


of Endicott & Co., New York; from drawings by A. Van
Best M/M R.S. Gifford; entitled "Sperm Whaling No.
2 The Capture" ; "Entered according to act of
Congress, A.D. 1862 by Charles Taber & Co. in the
Clerk's office of the District Court of Massachusetts."
same artist; entered by same act of Congress, except
is dated 1859; entitled "Sperm Whaling No. 1 The
Chase"

Marine lumber co.


Entitled: "Holosteric barometer; English make";
by B.M. Levoy, Optician, New York.

Initialed: "O.B.E."; carved in marble DI"

Inscribed on back; "Race Between the Bluenose &
Gertrude The beaud off Gloucester Last Race";
water damage; moldy

picture of old man w/cigar horse-drawn carts in
background

Wood. muddy blue-green colored box w/two compartments
labeled P & C for cards

Entitled: "Ship (Flying Cloud) presented to the
Pacific Club by Jules M. de R. The beaud"; artist:
T. Bailey; ship under full sail


W 9 3/4"
H 1' 4"

54"
D 2"

L 10 3/4"
W 4-"

W 9 3/4"
H 7 3/4"


W 11 3/4"
H 1' 2 3/4"

81)"
3 "
D 3 3/4"
W 36"
H 1'- 2 3/4"


- -- - - --- - ---~-b~ 1- 111-


- - --- --- - -- -








NO ITEM DATE SIZE DESCRIPTION


43 Oil & ink painting W 2'1 "
H 1' 9" Pencilled on back "Ship Midnight; Capt. George H.
Brock"; Ship at sea under full sail; ripped & torn
in several places-repaired.










































1 3 5

0 10 FT



WM. ROTCH BUILDING


PACIFIC CLUB


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CAPTAIN'S ROOM


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SOUTH ELEVATION












44

45


46


47

48



49


50


51

52


53


SIZE


It _____________________________________________________
I, II r- -s ~-


Current


Calender
Old Photo


Hanging Pamphlets
(2)

Current Calendar

Book



Chapter of Book


Paperback book


List of Fire
Aburm Boxes
Wood Sheath


Lithograph


8"
11"

11"
11-5"
6"
9"


Season
1901

1959,
1972-74,80




1915







1952


Recent

1866


DESCRIPTION


Al Brock Insurance Co.


Sepia-toned; seated portraiture
21 men; Mat has company title:
Cottage City, Mass.


in front of club;
Douglas season 1901


Nant. Argument Settlers (59) Chamb. of Comm (72)
Street lists by Registrar of Voters (Residents) 3

Harbor Fuel Oil Corp.

Tit: Wrecks Around Nant. compiled by Arthur H.
Gardner Ing. & Mirror Press. Nantucket; has been
charred, poor condition

Tit: The Loss of The Essex from Moby Dick
has been charred, poor condition


Tit. Yankee Ship Sailing Cards Vol III by:
Forbes State Str. Trust Co. Boston, Mass.


Allan


Brock Insurance Co.

Carved wood dowel inside wrapped in leather inscribed
in white ink "Bark Sea Queen 1866..

Currier & Ives N.Y. Entitled "The Whale Fishery
Attacking A Right Whale And Cutting In"


_____________ _____________________________________ A. ii Jt


NO ITEM


6"
9"

7"
11"1
5"
1 3"


2'- 311"
1'- 9i"


_ _ ~ L


b








NO ITEM DATE SIZE DESCRIPTION


Lithograph


Lithograph


2'- 3-"
1- 10"

1'- 21"
10 "


-' ____________________________________________ 6~ ______________________________ ______________________________________________________


Currier & Ives N.Y. Entitled "The Whale Fishery The
Sperm Whale In A Flurry"

Entitled "The Sperm Whale In A Flurry"
Probably Currier & Ives N.Y.


54


55





































1 3 5

0 10 FT



WM. ROTCH BUILDING


PACIFIC CLUB


WEST ELEVATION


CAPTAIN'S ROOM


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