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 Cover
 Acknowledgement
 History
 Interpretation
 Maintenance
 Drawings






Parliament House, Nantucket, Massachusetts
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00000331/00001
 Material Information
Title: Parliament House, Nantucket, Massachusetts
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Barkman, Gar
Beale, Margie
Davenport, David
Finkbeiner, Catherine
Murphy, Karen
Roberts, Thomas
Publisher: Preservation Institute: Nantucket
Department of Architecture, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Nantucket, MA
Publication Date: 1982
 Subjects
Coordinates: 41.281103 x -70.100973
 Notes
General Note: AFA HP document 946
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00000331:00001

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Acknowledgement
        Page 3
    History
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Interpretation
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Maintenance
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Drawings
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
Full Text


THE PARLIAMENT HOUSE 10 PINE. STREET NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS
Gar Barkman Margie Beale David Davenport Catherine Pinkbeiner Karen Murphy Thomas Roberts


X
We would like to give special thanks to:
Mildred Geig
Mrs. Henry Koch
Paul Buchanan
Herschel Shepard Por their cooperation and guidance throughout this project


Christopher Hussey
Edward Starbuck
Stephen)Hussey m. Martha Bunker
George
Eunice
m. Elizabeth Starbuck
m. Peleg Easton
Nathaniel Starbuck |ro. Mary Coffin
Silvannus m. Hepzibah Starbuck Nathaniel Starbuck, Jr.
m. Dinah Coffin
George G. ra. Lydia Chase_Deborah m. Robert Brayton Rachel m. Joseph Austin
James m. Mary Folger d. of
John Folffer
\
Abreviated geneaology of the families that owned the Cambridge lot, including "Parliament House" and the 23rd share in the Fish Lots.


The principal goal of this study is to determine if a correlation exists between #10 Pine Street and "Parliament House", the home of Nathaniel and Mary Starbuck which was located in the Cambridge section of Sherburne as early as 1667. According to Nantucket lore, John Folger, a Quaker carpenter, told his grandson Joseph Austin that he had incorporated into the house on the corner of Pine and School Street materials salvaged from"Parliament House".'' Building materials have been recycled ever since the town of Sherburne relocated to Wesco Acres in the 1720's. Accompanying the name "Parliament House", however is the important historical illusion to the Starbuck family and the first Quaker meetings conducted on the island, Nanthaniel and Mary Starbuck's home, "Parliament House", was an integral part of Nantucket's early history as the locus of governmental, business, and religious activity.




The Starbuck Family and the 'Tarliament House"
The first three Starbuck generations provided the early Nantucket settlers with community and spiritual leadership. Edward Starbuck, one of the First Purchasers, conducted transactions between the settlers and the Indians: "He was a man of great firmness and his influence among the Indians was so great that if at any time suspicion or alarm arose among the early settlers he was always in requisition to explain the apparent causes thereof and suggest a palliation for their rude and
inexplicable action, which served to allay the
2
fears of the more timid." Nathaniel Starbuck, Edward's eldest child, was also greatly respected. Nathaniel's reputation in the settlement, however, was overshadowed by that of his wife's. John Richardson characterized Nathaniel in his journal: "he appeared not alfen of mean Parts,
but she (Mary) so far exceeded him in soundness of Judgment, clearness of Understanding, and an elegant way of expressing herself... that it tended t) lessen the Qualifications of her Husband."
In 1701, Mary Starbuck was fifty-six years old when she was introduced to John Richardson, the first influential Quaker minister to visit Nantucket. Accredited with the conversion of Mary to Quakerism, Richardson wrote in his journal: "At the first Sight of her it sprang in my Heart, To this Woman is the everlasting Love of God.Of her character and community standing, Richardson noted: "The islanders esteemed her as a Judge among them, for little
5
of Moment was done without her..."
John Richardson held his first meeting at Nathaniel and Mary's home and in such an impressive Tovm that he described it in his journal: "the large and bright rubbed Room was set with suitable Seats of Chairs, the Glass Windows taken out


of the Frames, and many Chairs placed without very comfortably, so that I did not see anything a wanting, according to the Place, but something to stand on, for I was not free to set my Feet upon the fine Cane Chair, lest I should break it,"^ Thomas Story, who traveled to Nantucket in 1704� described the meeting
room in Nathaniel's house to be "pretty large 7
and open."' As a result of these recorded events and accounts, "Parliament House" has been absorbed into the Island's history.
In 1708, Patrick Henderson, who organized the weekly meeting for worship, was received by fifty fellow Quakers, and by 1711, the meetings had outgrown the private residence. Nathaniel Starbuck, Jr., who held the post of Clerk for the Men's Monthly Meeting until 1733� donated a piece of land north of Elihu Coleman's house. At the time of Mary Starbuck's death in 1717, seventy-five islanders had been converted to Quakerism, her son, Nathaniel, Jr., had assum-
ed some religious leadership and was to become one of the principal financiers of the whaling industry, and the area bordering the new harbor, called Vesco Acres was being developed.
Nathaniel and Mary Starbuck�� home was called "Parliament House" as early as 166"?, a fact documented by the following quote from Book 1 of the Book of Deeds: "the one half of the accomodation to Tristram Coffin (word?) being assigned to Mary Starbuck and Nathaniel Starbuck her Husband as by deed appears the House Lot was laid out by Peter Folger, Edward Starbuck, and Thomas Macy, Tristram also being present - at the place commonly called the Parliament House 60 square rods bounded with the land of Thomas Mayhew on the South and with the land of James Coffin on the North and on the East with the land of Stephen Greanleaf on the West by the commons (word?) land allowed at the East
8
End with reference to Rubbage Land more or less." This title was recorded only five years after Nathaniel and Mary's marriage and eight years


after the island had been settled. The Star-buck home became the site of town meetings and a trading post.
Nathaniel Starbuck, who survived his wife, Mary, died in 1719; his estate passed to his three sons, Nathaniel, Jethro, and Barnabus. The Cambridge property remained in the Starbuck family until 1737� when Nathaniel Starbuck (blacksmith), Paul Starbuck (glazier), William Starbuck and Thomas Starbuck (yeoman) sold to George Hussey "all those tracts and parcels of lands and accomodations on so Island of Nantucket which Nathaniel Starbuck, late of Sherbom aforesaid Deceased, gave unto his three sons..
The Hussey family, which by the mid-1700 "s had married into the Starbuck family, kept the "Parliament lot" until 1810, when Joseph Austin, who married George Hussey's youngest child, Rachel, began to buy up the Hussey's interests.
Dying in 1817� Joseph Austin had coiLleated. " 6/8 of the Cambridge property, with all the fence, stock hay and farming utensils; 350 rods of land adjoining Cambridge to the eastward, the house and homestead."^ After the death of her husband, Rachel Austin sold to Paul Gardner in 1821 "a certain tract, piece, or parcel of land...Known by the name of Cambridge...Also a certain piece or tract of land... before described called and known by the name of the Parliament Lot containing ateout 3 acres...with all the fences which are standing and laying on the said land
which George Hussey purchased of the heirs of William 11
Starbuck." In 1835* Robert Rogers filed a court suit against Paul Gardner and his business partner, Seth Swain; Rogers received Paul Gardner's Cambridge property as payment of debts. Following 1835, the Cambridge property has had several owners and is preser included in the estate of Ann Sanford.




The Fish Lots and #10 Pine Street
The origins of #10 Pine Street can he traced back to the division of the Fish Lots in 1717* Originally included in the area called Vesco and laid out as agricultural land, the Fish Lots were divided into twenty-seven shares and were allocated for fishing and dwellings. The development of this land coincided with the beginning of the whaling, industry and the demand that followed for wharfs and beach front property. Similar to the New England fish-flake and maritime storage lots, these shares measured 8 rods wide, tapering 7 46/100 of a rod in the south. Running north-south through the middle of the lots was the public street or way, which is today Hair Street. The western boundary was defined by Pine Street. Union Street, which was known as Quanaty Bank, marked the eastern bounds. The Pine and Fair Street insulae
represents the residential rear lots; the high contours between Union and Orange Street explain why these lots were unsuitable for fishing purposes.^
In 1722, due to confusion over the proper boundaries of the lots, the town decided to re-survey "certain tracts of lands called house lots 14
or dividends." The failure of George Hussey's name to appear among the owners of lot # 23 could have been the result of this confusion. Rerecordings, surrenders and reallocations followed a series of town meetings; plots were adjusted to incorporate ninety new plans which so modified the earlier divisions that they virtually disappeared.
The present day house is situated on property once belonging to Stephen Coffin, Richard Gardner and William Worth: the first owners of the 23rd share in the Fish Lots. George Hussey's name was excluded from the original document, a fact which was acknowledged in the transfer of 1/6 part of his share to William Hay in 1735* "nevertheless


my name is omitted as a partisan in so lot upon 16
record." William Hay kept the land for ten years, selling it in 1745 to George's brother, Silvannus Hussey. In 1765* Charles's Bunker purchased from Silvannus Hussey " a certain piece of land called the 23rd shard of the fish lot
division containing 22 1/2 rods and it ask to be
17
at the west end of so share..." The word �house' had not been mentioned in any of the transactions taking place between 1717 and 1765* No historical accounts exist that describe the Charles Bunker "settlement" which evolved on the corner of Pine and School Street between 1765 and 1813* Charles Bunker, a blacksmith, died in debt in 1813* His estate consisting of a house, shop, barn, bakehouse and outbuildings was appraised at $900.00 by the Nantucket Marine Insurance Company. In lieu of payment, the Nantucket Marine Insurance Company gained title to Bunker's land and build-
ings, selling part interest to John Folger in 1819 and Frederick Jones in 1820. The deed of ownership drawn up by the Nantucket Marine Insurance Company spanifically describes how the house and property was to be divided between Folger and Jones:
"John Folger shall have the south part of the house and land...beginning at the southwest corner of said land and measuring to the Northward as the West line of the land runs 16 ft. thence on a line with the partition that separates the front entry from the south front room until it meets the west jam of the fireplace in the south room thence as the fireplace runs until it comes to the head of the east jam of said fireplace thence on a right angle line to the East side of the room thence� on thej&ifie with the middle of the partition wall of the said east side of the room 1 ft. and 6", thence on a right angle line through into the kitchen extending across the kitchen to to the North side of the south dour post of the kitchen which is fourteen


feet six inches from the south side of the land, thence extending from said door post to the eastward on a line parallel with the south line of the premises until it comes so as to leave 12 feet to the westward of Lydia Swain's land for a pass-way in from the street for the owners of the north part of the terrirory from thence a right angle out to the south side of the premises leaving the aforesaid, pasdway of 12 feet in width from the west line of Lydia Swain's land to the east end of the aforesaid John Folger's land... " �
In 1824, John Folger purchased from Frederick Jones the remaining interest in the house.
In drawing any conclusions as to whether John Folger incorporated material from "Parliament House", one must take into consideration that 152 years had passed since Nathaniel and Mary's home had been built. The first men-
tion of "Parliament House" following 1667 appears in 1809: George Hussey sold the Cambridge property, including the "Parliament Lot" to his son-in-law, Robert Brayton. From this description, the condition of the house or if the house is still standing, cannot be determined. More than likely, only the foundation jsf the house remained and any salvagable material had already been removed from the property. An interesting relationship, however, exists between John Folger and the Joseph Austin family, who owned the "Parliament Lot" in Cambridge from 1810 - 1821. Mary Folger, John's daughter, married. Joseph's son, James Austin in 1833. The supposition that John Folger purchased "Parliament House" material from the Austin family lacks substantial ey-idence and sound documentation.
Following the death of John Folger in 1864, one-half the interest in #10 Pine Street passed to his daughter, Mary F. Austin and to his grandchildren, Laban Swain, Thruston Swain, and Ariston


Swain. Mary's husband, James bought the grandchildren's interests in 1869 and lived in the house until his death in 1892. In his later years, James Austin, a tinsmith, was characterized as a "well-known member of the Society of
19
Friends who lived in the north chambers."
Between 1924 and 1945, Julie B. Farrington
and Mary E. Crosby advertised in the Inquirer
and Mirror their home as a boarding houses
"Old Parliament House...Spacious rooms...
Excellent table...Meals served singly or by 20
the week." The present owner, Mildred Gieg, resides in the south side of the house, renting the remaining portion.
Conclusion
The evolution of #10 Pine Street has successfully been traced from its beginning as a late 17th century/early 18th century dwelling, to its present structure that looks probably
as it did by 1864, with the exception of one addition (G). The lack of evidence to "support John Folger's incorporation of material from "Parliament House" in Cambridge into #10 Pine Street does not totally negate the story's credibility. Oral tradition composes an essential part of a small community's history and should be explored and utilized in the research porcess. In the case of #10 Pine Street, Island lore has overshadowed the house*s early architectural and social history - a fascinating and significant story in itself.


ENDNOTES
Henry Barnard Worth, "Early Houses at Nantucket", Proceedings of the Nantucket Historical Association. 1904, p. 19-24. 2
Alexander Starbuck, The History of Nantucket: County, Island, and Town; Including Geneaologies of the First Settlers, Rutland, Vermaont, 1969, p. 802,
Ibid., p. 520.
4 IMd.
Ibid.
6 Ibid.
7 Ibid., p. 526. Nantucket County Deeds Records, Book 1, p. 12. Ibid.. Book 4� P. I64.
Nantucket County Probate Court Records. #504.
Nantucket County Deeds Records. Book 26, p. 2^0.
8
9 10
11
12
Michael Hugo-Brunt, et al, under the direction of Barclay G. Jones, In Historical Survey of the Physical Development of Nantucket: A Brief Narrative History and Documentary Source Material, sponsored by the Division of Urban Studies Center for Housing and
Environmental Studies, published at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 1969f P. 24.
15 Ibid.
14 Ibid., p. 25.
15 16
17 18
19
Ibid.
Nantucket County Deeds Records, Book 4� P� 126. Ibid.. Book 7, p. 74. Ibid., Book 25, p. 330.
Grace Gardner Brown, Folders of Streets and
Places. #24.


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Coffin, Louis, ed. The Coffin Family. Nantucket, Mass.: Nantucket Historical Association, 1962.
Douglas-Lithgow, R. A, Nantucket: A History. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons,"~1914.
Gardner, Grace Brown. Folders of Streets and Places. #24, Peter Foulger Museum.
Hinchman, Lydia S. Early Settlers of Nantucket. Philadelphia, 1901.
Hugo-Brunt, Michael, et al, under the direction of Barclay G. Jones, An Historical Survey of the Physical Development of Nantucket: A Brief Narrative History and Documentary Source Material, sponsored by the Division of Urban Studies Center for Housing and Environmental Studies, published at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, April 1969.
Hussey, Roland Fountain, and Lenora Hussey Griffin and Grace Griffin Hubbell. A Branch of the Hussey Family in America, published privately, date unknown.
Lancaster, Clay. The Architecture of Historic Nantucket. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1972.
Lancaster, Clay. Nantucket in the Nineteenth
Century. New York: Dover Publishing, Inc., 1979.
Leach, Robert. "The First Two Quaker Meeting-Houses. " Proceedings of the Nantucket Historical Association. 1950.
Leach, Robert. "Why Nantucket Quakers?" unpublished manuscript, 1976.
Leach, Robert. "Nantucket's First Man of Wealth." Inquirer and Mirror. Nov. 10, I966.
Leach, Robert. "Nantucket"s First Man of Wealth." Inquirer and Mirror. Nov. 23, 1966.
Nantucket County Deeds Records.
Nantucket County Probate Court Records.
Stackpole, Edouard. Rambling through the Streets and Lanes of Nantucket. New Bedford, Mass., 196*9.
Starbuck, Alexander. The History of Nantucket: County. Island, and Town; Including Geneaologies of the First Settlers. Rutland, Vt, Charles E. Tuttle Company, I969.
Worth, Henry Barnard. "Early Houses at Nantucket." Proceedings of the Nantucket Historical Association. 1906.
Worth, Henry Barnard. Nantucket Lands and Landowners. Nantucket, 1906. """""


CAMBRIDGE AND
DATE_GRANTOR_GRANTEE_
1817 Joseph Austin Rachael Austin
1816 Zenas Gardner Joseph Austin
Susanna Gardner
1816 Lydia Folger Joseph Austin
1816 Peleg Coggeshall Joseph Austin
Deborah Coggeshall
181J Lydia Hussey Joseph Austin
1813 Robert Brayton Joseph Austin
Deborah Brayton
1813 Eunice Easton Joseph Austin
1813 John Doane Joseph Austin
1 �PARLIAMENT LOT"
LOCATION OF REFERENCE
NOTES
Nantucket County Deeds B 6
Doc. Austin File Folger Museum
Doc. Austin File Folger � Museum
Doc. Austin File Folger Museum
Doc. Austin File, b 23, p. 139
Doc. Austin File Folger Museum
Doc. Austin File, Folger Museum
Doc. Austin File Folger Museum
Died intestate
6/8 Cambridge
�g- house and homestead
$100 1/8 Cambridge
1/8 Parliament lot from
George Hussey, father
11 acres, Parliament lot, $34.25
11 acres, Parliament lot, $34.25
$66 1/8 Cambridge 1/8 Parliament lot
$221 i Cambridge �J Parliament lot
$100 1/8 Cambridge including Parliament lot
$25 11 acres \ of 1/8


CAMBRIDGE AMD PARLIAMENT LOT"
DATE
GRANTOR
GRANTEE
LOCATION OP REFERENCE
NOTES
1809
George Hussey
Robert Brayton
Nantucket County Deeds B 20, p. 488
1/8 property included Parliament lot, descended to him through father's will (George Hussey)
1737
Nathaniel Starbuck George Hussey
(Blacksmith)
Paul Starbuck
(Glazier)
William S. Starbuck and Thomas Star-buck (yeoman)
Nantucket County Deeds B 4, p. 164
$3,500 pounds
February 1667
Nathaniel, Mary Nantucket County Deeds 60 square rods
Starbuck B 1, p. 12


#10 PINE STREET
DATE
GRANTOR
GRANTEE
LOCATION OF REFERENCE
NOTES
November 12, Rebecca E. 1980 Whitehall
Mildred W. Gieg William F. Gieg
Nantucket County Deeds B 1?8, p. 311
$180,000
November 12, Alice W. Lyman 1954
Albert E. Whitehall Nantucket County Deeds Rebecca E. Whitehall B 115� P. 314
November 2, 1945
Julie B. Farrington
Alice W. Lyman
Nantucket County Deeds B 110, p. 551
January 5� 1924
Minnie R. Sickles
Julie B. Farrington Mary E. Crosby
Nantucket County Deeds B 101, p. 174
June 14, 1923 Charles W. Austin Minnie R. Sickels June 12, 1923 Caroline F. Austin
Nantucket County Deeds B 100, p. 542, 571
$ 1,200
1892
James Austin
sons: Joseph Austin Charles G,S. Austin
Nantucket County Probate Records #504
by will $950 house, barn and land
1869
Laban W. Swain
James Austin
Nantucket County Deeds B 60, p. 374
1/6 part from grandfather
1864
John Folger
% Mary F. Austin Nantucket County Probate
% Laban Swain, Thurstan , �11$.* Book 20 Swain, Ariston Swain
by will


#10 PINE STREET
DATE_GRANTOR_GRANTEE_
1824 Frederick Jones John Folger
1820 Nantucket Marine Frederick Jones
Insurance Company
1819 Nantucket Marine John Folger
Insurance Company
May 17, Charles Bunker Nantucket Marine
181? Insurance Company
March 19� ' William Hussey, Charles Bunker 1796 Bachelor, George and David Hussey
1765 Silvanus Hussey Charles Bunker
1745 William Hay SMvanus Hussey
(physician)
1735 George Hussey William Hay
LOCATION OF REFERENCE _NOTES
Nantucket County Deeds B 28, p. 462
Nantucket County Defeds B 25, p. 389
Nantucket County Deeds B 25, p. 330
Nantucket County Deeds B 22, p. 270
Nantucket County Deeds B 14, P. 257
Nantucket County Deeds B 7, P. 74
Nantucket County Deeds B 5, P. 95
Nantucket County Deeds B 4, p. 126
$481 Hi rods $800 Hi rods owned 3/8
died in debt; house, shop, barn, bakehouse etc. = $900
l|r rods
3 lbs., 2sch./23 lot
22^ rods 23 lot
at West end 6 lbs. 8
1/6 part 4 lbs. 1/6 part 20 lbs.


#10 PINE STREET
DATE_GRANTOR_GRANTEE_LOCATION OF REFERENCE_NOTES
August 13, Division of Fish lot in Wesco Nantucket County Deeds Bookl, p. 4
1717 Lot #23 Stephen Coffin, Richard Bardner, William Worth






Charles Bunker erected the first dwelling on the property between 17&5 1813* The earliest house stood 2 1/2 stories high; the surviving rafters from the original roof, which are visible in the west gable, indicate the early saltbox form (i-l). Visible under the attic floorboards are cut roof members, once a part of the original roof structure (l-2). The full house was probably only one room deep (A) with a rear integral lean-to and a circular root cellar,constructed at a later time (A^. The initials "CB" carved into the first floor sill have been attributed to Charles Bunker,


Between 1819 and 1864, John Folger made extensive changes to #10 pine Street, doubling the size of the original house. A basement was excavated which extended to the present north wall (b). At some time a fireplace was constructed in the basement to facilitate the use of the ground level space as a summer kitchen.


The next phase of construction extended the basement area to its present dimensions (c). Evidence of remnant 17th century construction does exist in #10 Pine Street. Two important salvaged members were incorporated into the structural system; a salvaged beam rests on a reused Jacobean capital (1-.3). Atypical to Nantucket, the post is probably of 17th century origin. Intended to be used in first floor residential interiors because of its decorative character, a post of this style may have previously been utilized in the construction of the "Parliament House" in Cambridge.
Exposed structural members on the western half of the second floor include beams with chamfered edges, terminating in lamb's tongues and several gunstock posts (1-4). Ostensibly salvaged, these details provide a marked contrast with the later period beaded posts and beams located in the late 18th/early 19th section of the house.


The Coffin map shows #10 Pine Street to have included ell D-E by 1834. This addition was constructed sometime before a new roof over the main house was raised. The one layer of shingles that covered the roof section of this ell are visible in the attic (1-5). Also, under this addition a well was discovered.
Legible patches of newsprint cover boards located in the rafter area, possibly dating the addition P to the post CiVil War era.
As recently as 1950, a porch area (G) was added.


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INTERIOR MAINTEHANCE
The interior of the Parliament House has recently undergone extensive repairs during 1981-1982. Therefore the only interior spaces requiring mandatory maintenance are the "basement (1A) and the crawl space (1D).
1981-1982 Maintenance
Electrical rewiring
This involved rewiring the entire house and providing separate service to the two apartments within the house. Plumbing
A new bathroom (3R) was installed on the second floor. Plaster
The plaster has been replaced throughout the house where required.
Painting
The entire interior of the house has been repainted. Flooring
The wood floor in the guest bedroom (W) was replaced with boards from the attic (4A). 4' x 8' sheet of plywood were used to replace the boards from the attic.
Areas which require maintenance on the interior of the house are located in the crawl space (1A) and the basement (1D). A soil pipe is broken beneath the kitchen (2T) and should be replaced (Ml). A post located in the basement (1A) refered to as the 'Parliament Post' should be closely examined to determine if it is resting on a proper foundation. A new concrete foundation should be installed if the existing one is determined to be inadequate (M2).


The existing wood and brick floors located in the basement (ta) should be removed to allow for a new concrete floor slab to be installed. The wood and brick may be replaced on top of the concrete floor (M3)#


EXTERIOR MAIMEMMCE
The exterior of the Parliament House has also undergone recent maintenance during 1981-1982? Rotted shingles have been replaced and the exterior trim was repainted* The primary concern of future maintenance is to prevent
water intrusion into the building*


WEST ELEVATION
The west elevation was completely re-shingled during 1981-1982* A downspout located on the north comer presents problems by draining onto a stone sloped toward the foundation of the building. (M4) A favorable solution to this problem is to install a drainage pipe beneath the sidewalk to allow water to drain into the street*
The enclosure around the base of the entry porch should be reworked to provide larger openings such as a lattice grille (M5)* This would allow for positive ventilation underneath the structure to prevent rot from occuring by moisture trapped in this area*


SOUTH ELEVATION
A major maintenance concern exists along the south elevation at the intersection of the building and the grade line (M6). The asphalt paving of the sidewalk was placed directly against the wood shingles along the majority of this wall. This condition results in direct contact of water against wood which will lead to rot, at which time the shingles will need to be replaced. However, to prevent future rot from occuring, the sidewalk should be removed, lowered, then replaced below the shingle line and sloped away from the house toward the street.
The downspout from the main roof, which drains on the roof of the addition, is in need of being extended to drain into the gutter of the roof of the addition (M7). At the present time, it is allowing large
amounts of water to splash onto the corner boards which will result in rot occuring at the corner post of the house causing major structural problems.
The original wood shingle roof of the rear addition was replaced with asphalt shingles. However, the bottom row of wood shingles was left intact. Flashing should be installed under the remaining wood shingles to prevent moisture from being trapped against the roof sheathing (M8).
The chimney above the kitchen (2V) should be capped since it is no longer in use (M9). This condition exists in other areas of the house and should be taken care of in the same manner. The flashing should be checked around all chimneys to gue^d against moisture entering the structure.




EAST ELEVATION
Two maintenance problems exist on this part of the house that involve the ground surrounding the building. The ground slopes toward the house which results in water drainage running against the foundation wall (M 10). The grade at the rear of the hots e should be altered to slope toward a central point at which a catch basin should be installed. The use of cast iron pipes in the catch basin system will guard against root intrusion from nearby trees. The grade should be lowered to fall below the shingle line to prevent them from rotting.
The second maintenance problem relating to the surroundings of the house is the location of the tree at the south end of this elevation (M 11)? The tree is located directly against the house which could present a
problem with the roots growing under the foundation and causing uplift.
As with the rest of the house, the downspouts which are missing should be replaced to -insure proper water drainage.
M-11


NORTH ELEVATION
The downspout located at the aast end of the wall needs to be extended to the ground (M 12). The water draining from it falls against the foundation wall. Moisture which is retained in the wall provides an area for moss to grow. The moss is damaging the wall by eating the mortar. The ivy growth along the base of this wall presents no problems but should be examined periodically to ensure that it is not growing on the wall,in which case it will eat the lime in the mortar (M 13)#
There is evidence of putty acound the window panes rotting out on this side of the house (M14)# This condition should be checked around the entire house and the putty should be repointed where necessary.
M-13




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