Exhibit Signage

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Exhibit Signage
Physical Description:
Artifact
Creator:
unknown

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00000317:00002


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Today, Sarasota is well known for its natural beauty and as a place to live "the good life."
This optimistic spirit is perhaps best expressed through the world renowned modern
architecture that developed there during World War II. The open interiors, floating
staircases, and jalousie windows created to take advantage of Florida's Gulf Coast
environment all became part of an architectural movement known as the Sarasota School
of Architecture. From the 1940s through the 1960s, this "Sarasota Modern" style was
popularized by talented architects like Ralph Twitchell, Paul Rudolph, Victor Lundy, Gene
Leedy, Mark Hampton, Tim Seibert and others.

Many of their works during this period can be summed up by Paul Rudolph's 1947
philosophy: dedication to clarity of construction, maximum economy of means, clear
geometry floating above the Florida landscape, honesty in details, and simple overall
volumes penetrating vertically and horizontally. Over two decades, these and other
modern principles were practiced in a way that created beautiful churches, schools,
commercial spaces, and homes in Florida and across the country. This exhibition provides
a snapshot of these indigenous architectural wonders and the development of Florida's
modern architectural identity.


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Full Text

PAGE 1

SARASOTA MODERN:The Sarasota School of Architecture 1941 1966 Today, Sarasota is well known for its natural beauty and as a place to live “the good life.” This optimistic spirit is perhaps best expressed through the world renowned modern architecture that developed there during World War II. The open interiors, oating staircases, and jalousie windows created to take advantage of Florida’s Gulf Coast environment all became part of an architectural movement known as the Sarasota School of Architecture. From the 1940s through the 1960s, this “Sarasota Modern” style was popularized by talented architects like Ralph Twitchell, Paul Rudolph, Victor Lundy, Gene Leedy, Mark Hampton, Tim Seibert and others. Many of their works during this period can be summed up by Paul Rudolph’s 1947 philosophy: dedication to clarity of construction, maximum economy of means, clear geometry oating above the Florida landscape, honesty in details, and simple overall volumes penetrating vertically and horizontally. Over two decades, these and other modern principles were practiced in a way that created beautiful churches, schools, commercial spaces, and homes in Florida and across the country. This exhibition provides a snapshot of these indigenous architectural wonders and the development of Florida’s modern architectural identity.