Statewide socio-economic role of Florida fairs

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Title:
Statewide socio-economic role of Florida fairs
Series Title:
FAMRC Industry Report 00-1
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Mulkey, David
Degner, Robert L.
Hodges, Alan W.
Philippakos, Effie
Publisher:
Florida Agricultural Market Research Center
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005

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Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
System ID:
AA00000284:00001


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UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


The Statewide Socio-Economic Role of Florida Fairs


FAMRC Industry Report 00-1
September 2000




By
David Mulkey
Robert L. Degner
Alan W. Hodges
Etffie Philippakos




Florida Agricultural Market Research Center
Food and Resource Economics Department
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611


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Table of Contents

Executive Sum m ary ............................................... ......................... 1
Introduction ......................................... ................. ........................... 3
Procedures ........................................ ................. ............................ 3
Questionnaire
Response Rate .................................... ............................... 4
Inform ation Obtained............................................. .............. 4
Survey Results........................................ ............... ......................... 5
Fairgrounds and Facilities.................................................. 5
Attendance and Participation................................. ............. 7
Fair Attendance ............................................ ............. 7
Exhibitors..................................... ............... .............. 9
Prem ium s Aw arded................................................................. 12
Scholarships Awarded............................. ............................... 16
Volunteers............................................... ............................ 18
Assistance to Civic, Charitable and Educational Groups...... 20
Special Event Days at Florida Fairs..................................... 21
Community Service Events ..................................... ......... 23
Off-Season Events Held at the Fairgrounds......................... 25
Employment, Revenues, Expenditures, and Midway
And Concession Sales......................................... ........... 27
Employment and Salaries............................ .......... 27
Revenues .................................................. ........ ..... 29
Expenditures..................................... ....................... 31
Gross Sales for Concessions and Midway Operators 35
Total Values Projected for All Fairs for Selected Variables ............. 37
Revenues and Expenditures............................................... 37
Projections to All Fairs.......................................... ......... ... 37
A ppendix ........................................................... ............................ 42













LIST OF APPENDIX TABLES


A A
Appendix A.
Appendix B.
Appendix C.


CBreakdown of Special Events CategorizationL....................... 44
Breakdown of Community service Events Categorization ... 46
Questionnaire of Florida Fair Managers. ............................48


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THE STATEWIDE SOCIO-ECONOMIC ROLE OF FLORIDA FAIRS


(Executive Summary)

Almost fifty fairs take place in Florida each year representing a combination of educational,
entertainment, and promotional events. Fairs promote the state's agricultural and livestock
industries and provide youth development opportunities. Fairs range in size from relatively small
local activities attended by a few thousand people to regional or statewide fairs with more than
500 thousand visitors each.

Clearly, the fair industry represents a significant component of the state's social fabric, and
collectively, the fair industry involves significant statewide economic activity. Forty-eight fairs took
place in Florida during 1998-99 with an estimated attendance of 6.7 million people. As part of an
effort to quantify the social and economic impacts of the fair industry, this paper reports the
results of a survey of fair managers in Florida to solicit information on fairgrounds and facilities,
attendance, revenues and expenditures, participation, and non-fair community events that take
place at the fairgrounds.

DtailIed sIurvelay IresOults are pIovided for aIll firsI, r salllll fIairs (atdtenIUdanc of less than uI50,0),
medium-sized fairs (attendance of 50,000 or more but less than 200,000), and large fairs
(attendance of 200,000 or more). Final sections of the paper provide financial information for all
fairs in the state with financial statements on file with the Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services (46 fairs). Total values are projected for 48 fairs covered by the survey for
selected variables.

Usable surveys were obtained for 37 fairs representing 72 percent of the estimated fair
attendance for 1998-99 or 4.8 million visitors. Together, the 37 responding fairs had 2,185 acres
of fairground pace, over a million square feet of exhibit space with air conditioning, an additional
million square feet of exhibit space with out air conditioning, and land and buildings with an
estimated market value of $197 million.

Survey results confirmed that fairs are important events for Florida youth, that fairs are strongly
supported by community volunteers, that fairs provide significant financial assistance to
educational and non-profit community groups, and that fairgrounds and facilities provide an
important location for a number of non-fair events in the Florida communities.

The 1998-99 financial statements were used to determine revenues and expenditures for 46
reporting fairs. In 1998-99 Florida fairs had:

Revenues of $57.7 million.
Expenditures of $50.6 million

Survey results were used to estimate total values for 48 fairs included in the survey. Statewide
the 48 fairs provide a number of full-time jobs and benefit from a large number of persons who
provide volunteer services. Fairs represent:

Full-time employment of 336 jobs
Part-time (year round) employment of 288 jobs
Part-time employment during the fair of 3312 jobs
Over 2,000 volunteers on a year round basis
Almost 25,000 additional volunteers during fairs
Over 400,000 hours of volunteer time worth $$2.2 million if valued at only $5.25 per hour






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Fairs provide assistance to a number of educational, civic and charitable groups in Florida
communities. Total assistance is estimated to include:

About $486,400 as cash payments to groups in return for services to the fair
A total of $185,000 as cash donations to community groups
Monetary assistance of $294,000 assist groups with preparing exhibits for the fair
In-kind donations of booth space worth $370,000 and other in-kind donations valued at
about $206,000

Fairs award both cash and non-cash premiums to adult and youth exhibitors and scholarships to
youth for college attendance. Total scholarships and cash awards were estimated to be:

432 scholarships worth $607,190
Cash premiums to adults worth $453,312
Cash premiums to youth worth $1,642,128

Financial reports and survey results were used to estimate the total economic activity associated
with fairs in Florida (estimates were based on 46 fairs). Total economic activity at all fairs
includes:

Fair revenues of $38.4 million exclusive of income from midway and concession sales
Gross sales by midway and show operators of $37.6 million
Gross sales of food concessions of $38.5 million
Gross sales of non-food concessions of $17.3 million
Total gross sales at all 46 fairs of $131.9 million

When the gross sales figure above is expanded to include an estimate of direct (first-round)
spending in Florida of more than $83 million, the total economic activity associated with Florida
Fairs is $215 million.



























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* THE STATEWIDE SOCIO-ECONOMIC ROLE OF FLORIDA FAIRS


By

David Mulkey, Robert L. Degner, Alan W. Hodges and Effie Philippakos1

INTRODUCTION

Almost fifty fairs are held each year around the state of Florida representing a combination of
entertainment, promotional and educational events. Fair activities promote the state's agricultural
and livestock industries, provide youth development opportunities, and fairgrounds and facilities
provide a venue for numerous community events. Fair associations are generally organized as
non-profit corporations, and most are self-supporting with revenues from admission fees, vendor
payments, rental income and sponsorships. Fairs range in size from small, local events attended
by a few thousand people each year to larger regional or statewide fairs with an annual
attendance of more than 500 thousand visitors. In the words of fair managers, fairs in the state of
Florida represent:

affordable family entertainment in a safe, clean environment
a showcase for community arts, crafts, hobbies and service activities
support for civic and charitable groups
a showcase for agriculture and related activities
educational, cultural and competitive events
a focus on youth activities and scholarships for local youth
a cross section of the community
multi-purpose facilities for educational, commercial, government and community events
facilities for use in emergencies and in disaster relief efforts

Clearly, fairs are an important component of community life in Florida, and their economic and
social impact is a relevant question for fair organizers and supporters. To that end, this report
provides the results of a survey of fair managers around the state designed to provide a detailed
description of the fair industry in Florida. The survey was conducted as part of a contract between
the University of Florida and the Florida Federation of Fairs. To complete the economic picture of
fairs in Florida, survey results were supplemented with financial data from reports filed with the
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS).

The general objective of the research reported here was a detailed description of the fair industry
in Florida. Specific objectives include the collection and organization of existing data to describe
various facets of the fair industry. The following section of the report describes the methodology
employed in the study followed by the reporting of results.

PROCEDURES

Questionnaire: The primary source of data for this report a survey of fair managers conducted
during January-June, 2000 and covering fairs that took place during the 1998-99 fair season. The
design of the survey was based on a review of annual financial data reported by fairs, a review of
annual reports prepared by several fairs, and intensive interviews with a sample of fair managers
oIselecteUd to pLJov reprIJleslentatioI IIU III UIII II L IpaJIt Uf tLIe tate and from airs olf different sizes.
The questionnaire was designed to solicit information on fairground facilities, attendance,
participation, and revenues and expenditures associated with the fair. Additional questions asked
for information on the number, type and attendance for other community events held at

' David Mulkey is Professor, Robert L. Degner is Professor and Director of the Florida Market Research
Center, Alan W. Hodges is Coordinator of Economic Analysis and Effie Philippakos is a Research
Assistant, Department of Food and Resource Economics, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.


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fairgrounds throughout the year, and an additional letter was sent to all managers in May 2000
asking for estimates of gross sales for the fair midway operator and for food and non-food
concession operators.

For purposes of administering the survey, a mailing list of fair managers was compiled from a
directory provided by the Florida Federation of Fairs. The initial questionnaire was mailed to all
managers in early January 2000 with a reminder sent two weeks later, and non-respondents were
contacted by phone in mid-February. Representatives of the Florida Fairs Association faxed
additional reminders in mid-March, and made personal telephone calls in late May and early
June. Results reported here are based on all completed questionnaires received by June 15,
2000. Annual financial reports for all fairs in the state as filed with the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services were collected and analyzed during July-August, 2000.

Response Rate: Table 1 provides information on the number of fairs responding to the
questionnaire and the number and percentage of total fair attendance represented by
respondents based on estimated attendance for 1998-99 reported in the Directory of Florida Fairs
(Florida Federation of Fairs). Questionnaires were mailed to forty-eight fairs with usable returns
received from 37 (77 percent) of the fairs in the state. Usable responses represented 4.8 million
fair visitors or 72 percent of total statewide fair attendance. It is significant to note that the two
"11, V. v WO FI I F.. 4rIU IS .I lJ.tal o0avrTVIU 1"11 C.LII I, IISa ,. I. I L 1 a111110,CI II Ll I IULC LI I51 U It LVVU
unusable responses represented 21 percent of total fair visitors in the state.


Table 1: Response rate by number of fairs and attendance.
Fairs Attendance
Number Percent Total Percent

Total Mailed 48 100 6.7(million) 100
Total Usable 37 77 4.8 72
Total Unusable 2 4 1.4 21

Non-respondents 9 19 0.5 7
TOTAL RETURNS 39 81 6.2 92*
Total usable and unusable do not sum to 92 percent due to rounding.


Table 2 reports the usable response rate by size of fair based on number of fairs and fair
attendance by size classification of fair. Fairs were classified as small (attendance of less than
50,000), medium (between 50,000 and 200,000) and large (attendance of 200,000 or more). For
fairs in the smaller group, respondents represented 81 percent of total fairs and 89 percent of
attendance for all fairs in the group. For the medium-sized fairs, respondents represented 79
percent of total fairs and 73 percent of attendance. Respondents in the "large" category
represented 71 percent of total fairs and 69 percent of attendance.

Table 2: Response rate by number of fairs and attendance, by size category of fair.
Fairs Attendance
Fair Size Total Responses Percent Total Responses Percent

Under 50,000 26 21 81 0.65 (million) 0.57 89
,50-200,000 14 I, ,,C 1.7 1.2 ,73
Above 200,000 7 5 71 4.4 3.0 69


Information Obtained: The survey of fair managers solicited information on a number of aspects
of fair operation, attendance and participation. General categories of information include:

SFairgrounds and facilities



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Attendance
Participation by volunteers, exhibitors, sponsors, etc.
Community service activities and events
SNon-fair, off-season events
Revenues, expenditures and gross sales

Detailed survey results are reported in the following sections.

SURVEY RESULTS

Survey results are reported here in the same general order as the listing above. Results are
reported separately for each size category of fairs (small, medium and large) noted above. Since
not all fairs responded to each question, the number and percentage of fairs responding to each
question is also reported. It is important to note that results reported in this section are only for
the fairs that responded to the survey unless otherwise noted. For each question, the
statistical analysis is based on those fairs responding positively to each question. Thus,
figures in this section understate the true size of the fair industry in the state. Data reported
represent only those fairs with a positive response to a question. Fairs that indicated a zero value
for a particular question or those that did not respond are not included in the analysis for that
question. A later section of the paper will provide projections for all fairs in the state where
response rates allow. Further, financial impact data (revenues and expenditures) will be
developed based on published financial statements for 46 fairs that had filed financial statements
for the 1998-99 with FDACS by August 1, 2000.

Fairgrounds and Facilities: Fair managers were asked to indicate the size of the fairgrounds in
acres, the square footage of exhibit space with and without air conditioning, and the market value
of land and buildings. Results are reported in Tabie 3. Fairgrounds and facilities provide a
location for the fair, they provide facilities and space for a number of other community events and
entertainment activities, and they represent a substantial community investment as evidenced by
the estimated market value of land and buildings.

Again, it is important to note that the analysis of data reported in this and subsequent tables
refers only to those fairs that provide a positive answer to each question. For example, in column
2 of Table 3, the question asked for the square footage of exhibit space with air conditioning. For
the small fair group, ten fairs reported a number, seven fairs reported a value of zero, and four
fairs did not respond. Hence, the calculated values that follow (minimum, maximum, mean,
median and sum) are based on the ten fairs that provided numbers.

Fairground size in acres for small fairs ranges from 4 acres to 103 acres, for medium fairs the
range is from 13 to 105 acres, and for the large fairs, the size of the fairgrounds ranges from 26
acres to 319 acres. The average fairground size is 33 acres for the smaller fairs, 63 acres for the
medium-sized fair and 119 acres for large fairs.

Exhibit space shows the same variability evident in fairground size. Most fairs report exhibit space
both with and without air conditioning. The maximum space with air conditioning for small fairs
was 60,000 square feet, 80,000 for the medium-sized fairs, and 200,000 square feet for the large
fairs. The average exhibit space with air conditioning was 16,373 square feet for small fairs,
28,914 square feet for medium-sized fairs and 118,415 square feet for large fairs. Overall, eleven
fairs reported having no exhibit space with air conditioning, and three fairs reported having no
permanent exhibit space.

I I gnificc l IL,e U, LIf tI Ir1 a a JI coi UIt ly investmenLI It I IIIs reflect in the estimated mLu market value
of land and buildings. The 26 fairs responding to the market value question represent 2,185 acres
of land in fairgrounds with an estimated market value of land and buildings in excess of $197
million. For smaller size fairs, the average fairground contains 33 acres of land and represents a
total investment of $1.7 million. For medium-sized fairs, the average is 61 acres with a total


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investment of more than $4.5 million. The larger fairs reflect an average fairground size of 59
acres with an estimated market value for land and buildings of $7.6 million.

Further, when asked in a separate question to note the contributions of the fair to the local
community, several fair managers mentioned the importance of the fairgrounds and facilities to
the community. Fairgrounds are generally used for a number of community service events, a
variety of trade, hobby and craft shows, and they provide a location for concerts and a number of
other community events. Some fairgrounds also provide designated facilities for use by
emergency and disaster relief operations. A later section will provide more details on the types of
events that take place at fairgrounds around the state.


Table 3: Fairgrounds, exhibit space and market value of land and buildings.
Fairgrounds Exhibit Exhibit Temporary Market Value
Fair Category rounds Space AC Space no AC Exhibit Space
(Acres) (Square Feet) (Square Feet) (Square Feet) ($1 )
Small Fairs
Number with activity 20(95%) 10 (48%) 16(76%) 14(67%) 15(71%)
Number without activity 0 (0%) 7 (33%)2 (10% 1 (5% 0 (0%)
Number not reporting* 1 (5%) 4(19%) _6 (29%R 6(29%)X 6 (29%)
Minimum 4 3,000 1.200 1,000 79
Maximum 103 60,000 66,000 420,000 10,000
Mean 33 16,373 26,953 40,014 1,700
Median 27 12,025 20,000 9,050 1,000
Sum 668 163,730 431,240 560,200 25,503
Medium Fairs
Number with activity* 11 (100%) 7 (64%) 10 (91%)5 (45%) 6(55%)
Number without activity 0 (0%) 4 (36%) 1 (9%) 2 (18%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting** 0 (0%) 0 (0% 0 (0%) 4(36%) 5 (45%)

Minimum 13 400 15,000 5,400 616
Maximum 105 80,000 96,Q0 75,000 16,000
Mean 61 28,914 39,860 32,440 .4586
Median 63 24,000 32,000 24,800 1,500
Sum 676 202,400 398,600 162,200 27,516
Large Fairs
Number with activity* 6 (86%) 6(86%) 6 (86% 6 (86%) 5(71%)
Number without activity" 0 (0%) 0 0%) 0(0% 0(0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting* 1 (14%) 1 (14%) 1 14%) 1 (14%) 2 (29%)

Minimum 26 22,700 40,000 3,000 4,000
Maximum 319 200,000 111,000 400,000 50,000
Mean 140 118,415 60,522 84,895 28,800
Median 119 127,500 48,880 18,750 25,000
Sum 841 710,488 363,133 509,371 144,000
All Fairs
Number with activity* 37 (95%) 23(59%) 32 (82%) 25 (64%) 26(67%)
Number without activity* 0 (0%) 11 (28%) 3(8% 3 (8%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting 2 (5%) 5 (13%) 4 (10%) 11 (28%) 13(33%)

Minimum 4 400 1,200 1,000 79
Maximum 319 200,000 111,000 420,000 50,000
Mean 59 46,809 37,280 49,271 7,578
Median 30 22,700 32,000 17,024 1,450
SSum 2.185 1 07 R618 1,192,973 1,231,771 197,019
*Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
**Refers to number of fairs that returned a questionnaire but did not answer this question.
*""Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.








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Attendance and Participation: As noted earlier, almost 6.7 million persons attend Florida fairs
each year. However, beyond simply attending and enjoying the fairs' educational and
entertainment activities, large numbers of individuals and community groups participate in fairs in
various ways. Individuals or groups may enter exhibits in competition for premiums, and various
educational, charitable, and community groups host booths at the fair to support their programs,
and individuals and groups provide volunteer services to support the fair as a community event.
As a part of this participation, fairs award cash premiums, a variety of non-cash premiums,
scholarships to students, and fairs often assist civic, charitable and educational groups with fund
raising efforts. This section captures a number of the aspects of fair participation by individuals,
and it reflects a number of ways in which fairs contribute to their community.

Fair Attendance

As noted, more than 6.7 million people attend Florida Fairs each year and more than 4.8 million
people attend the fairs responding to this survey. These are estimates of total attendance at the
fair as reported in the Directory of Florida Fairs whether the admission was paid or the individual
was admitted without paying for a number or reasons (courtesy passes, exhibitors, vendors, etc.).
To provide more detail and to provide consistency across fairs, the survey asked fair managers to
report only actual turnstile attendance (formal counts) that would not include individuals admitted
in other ways. Results are reported in Table 4. Total turnstile attendance reported by the 33 fairs
responding to this question amounted to more than 3.6 million individuals. The 20 reporting small
fairs had a total turnstile attendance of 507,706, an average attendance of 25,385 per fair. Nine
fairs reporting in the medium size fair category had a total attendance of 952,804 with an average
turnstile attendance of 105,867 people. The 4 large fairs reporting turnstile attendance had a total
attendance of 2.2 million for an average attendance of 543,558 people.

Fair managers were also asked to report attendance by special admission groups (adults,
id..... ;Z.- - --- -----e-..-Y-- --~ kW-F %"U
children, seniors, etc.) where possible. These data are also reported in Table 4. Thirty-three fairs
responded to the question on tumstile admissions while 25 fairs could provide separate tumstile
admissions figures for adults, 23 could provide admissions figures for children, and 16 fairs could
provide admissions figures for students and chaperones admitted on special school fair days. Of
note is the relatively large numbers of children compared to the number of adults. The 23 fairs
reporting separately for children and the 16 reporting for students, together, admitted over
870,549 young people to the fairs. For the combined children's admission category and students
and chaperones, the average small fair admitted almost 17,000 individuals, the average medium-
sized fair had youth admissions of almost 24,000, and the average large fair had youth
admissions of over 161,000.

A number of fairs also reported having special admission days or categories for other groups.
Groups included senior citizens, handicapped individuals and disadvantaged children, and some
fairs maintain separate admissions categories for volunteers, exhibitors, and vendors at the fair.
These data are also reported in Table 4.















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Table 4: Fair attendance by admissions category.
Admissions Category
Regular Regular Students/ Total
Admissions Admissions Hd Chaperon Senir Volunteers Exhibitors Vendors Tunsile
Disadvan Citizens AdmissIons
Adults Children es

Small Fairs

Number with activity* 14(67%) 13(62%) 5(24%) 7(33%) 10(48%) 12(57%) 12(57%) 12 20(9%)

Number without activity** 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 2(10%) 1(5%) 0 (0%) 1 (5%) 1(5%) 1(5%) 0(0%)

Number not reporting*" 7 (33%) 8 (38%) 14 (67%) 13(62%) 11(52%) 8 (38%) 8 (38%) 8 (38%) 1(5%)

Minimum 5,000 400 150 100 177 10 20 10 5,796
Maximum 30,000 20,000 500 30,000 10,000 280 2,253 5,400 49,114
Mean 17,650.9 7,396.2 360.0 9,449.4 1,983.6 129.6 444.8 523.3 25,385
Median 17,260.5 5,840 450 3,000 1,150 150 250 78 22,010
Sum 247,112 96,150 1,800 66,146 19,836 1,555 5,337 6,280 507,706


Number with activity* 7(64%) 6 (55%) 2(18%) 6(55%) 4(36%) 6(55%) 5(45%) 8(73%) 9(82%)
Number without activity* 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0(0%) 0 (0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting*** 4 (36%) 5 (45%) 9(82%) 5(45%) 7 (64%) 5 (45%) 6(55%) 3(27%) 2(18%)

Minimum 22,100 4,000 1,000 1,400 200 30 140 50 37,800
Maximum 157,000 29,000 1,500 22,400 15,000 2,000 5,000 4,754 206,000
Mean 62,997.1 17,230.2 1,250 6,633.3 4,333 636.7 1,356 1,081.4 105,867
Median 59,000 19,890.5 1,250 4,000 1,066 360 400 293.5 102,420
Sum 440,980 103,381 2,500 39,800 17,332 3,820 6,780 8,651 952,804
Large Fairs
Number with activity" 4(57%) 4(57%) 0(0%) 3(43%) 4(57%) 4(57%) 4(57%) 2(29%) 4(57%)
Number without activity" 0(0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting'* 3 (43%) 3 (43%) 7(100%) 4 (57%) 3 (43%) 3(43%) 3(43%) 5(71%) 3(43%)

Minimum 176,000 49,363 0 6,979 9,959 780 1,741 360 259,441
Maximum 413,909 105,802 0 215,836 37,928 10,000 47,318 6,000 873,964
Mean 280,305.5 81,875.0 0 79,190.7 19,221.8 4,257 24,427 3,180 543,558
Median 265,656.5 86,167.5 0 14,757 14,500 3,124 24,324.5 3,180 520,414
Sum 1,121,222 327,500 0 237,572 76,887 17,028 97,708 6,360 2,174,232
AlI Fairs
Number with activity* 25(64%) 23(59%) 7(18%) 16(41%) 18(46%) 22(56%) 21 (54%) 22(56%) 33(85%)
Number without activity** 0(0%) 0 (0%) 2 (5%) 1(3%) 0 (0%) 1(3%) 1(3%) 1(3%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting*"" 14(36%) 16(41%) 30 (77%) 22 (56%) 21(54%) 16(41%) 17(44%) 16(41%) 6(15%)

Minimum 5,000 400 150 100 177 10 20 10 5,796
Maximum 413,909 105,802 1,500 215,836 37,928 10,000 47,318 6,000 873,964
Mean 72,372.6 22,914.4 614.3 21,469.9 6,336.4 1,018 5,230 967.8 110,144
Median 22,100 10,000 500 4,500 1,458 161 400 100 40,000
Sum 1,809,314 527,031 4,300 343,518 114,055 22,403 109,825 21,291 3,634,742
Some fairs did not report admissions by admissions category. As a result, the sum of all categories (2,951,737) is less than total
umstile admissions (3,634,742).
Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
**Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
""Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.

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Exhibitors


Both adults and youth participate in fairs through a variety of exhibit categories including youth
and adult livestock exhibits, horticultural exhibits, and a variety of family and consumer oriented
exhibits. Fair exhibits also include a number of groups and commercial exhibitors representing
community groups and businesses. Table 5 provides detail on the number of exhibits by adults
and youth for the livestock and horticultural categories for reporting fairs. Table 6 provides similar
detail for exhibits in the family and consumer categories.

Eighteen fairs reported livestock exhibits for adults and 35 fairs reported livestock exhibits for
youth. Total participation for the reporting fairs included 2,717 adults and more than 9,500 youth
as participants in livestock exhibits. Horticultural exhibits for adults reported by 25 fairs attracted
over 1400 adult participants, and 28 fairs reported more than 4,250 youth participants in
horticultural exhibits.

A number of fairs also reported separate exhibit competitions for youth and adults in the family
and consumer exhibit categories. Exhibits types include canning, sewing, quilting, hobbies and
crafts and other. Detail on participation by category and the number of fairs reporting is provided
in Table 6. In all exhibit categories combined, the reporting fairs had around 36,000 individuals
who participated as exhibitors, about evenly spiit between adgricUuural adln family-consumer
categories.


fable 5: Number of adult and youth exhibitors in the livestock and horticultural categories
Livestock Horticulture Total Exhibitors
Adult Youth Adult Youth

Small Fairs
Number with activity* 11 (52%) 20 (95%) 12 (57%) 15 (71%)
Number without activity" 2 (10%) 0(0%) 3(14) 1(5%)
Number not reporting*" 8(38%) 1(5%) 6 (29%) 5 (24%)

Minimum 4 15 5 4
Maximum 75 372 90 107
Mean 18 166 30 28
Median 14 160 26 20
Sum 197 3,314 358 417 4,286

Medium Fairs
Number with activity* 3 (27%) 9(82%) 9 (82%) 8 (73%)
Number without activity* 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting* 8 (73%) 2 (18%) 2 (18%) 3 (27%)

Minimum 25 60 3 3
Maximum 381 1167 143 75
Mean 235 379 38 33
Median 300 326 20 26
Sum, 7 0o 3409 340 267 4,722
Continued on page 10









9


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Table 5: (Contd.)Number of adult and youth exhibitors in the livestock and horticultural categories
Livestock Horticulture Total Exhior
Adult Youth Adult Youth

Large Fairs
Number with activity* 4(57%) 6(86%) 4 (57%) 5(71%)
Number without activity* 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting*" 3(43%) 1(14%) 3(43%) 2(29%)

Minimum 35 91 16 20
Maximum 1,211 899 495 3,363
Mean 454 464 186 714
Median 284 421 116 50
Sum 1,814 2,783 743 3,570 8,910

Al Fairs
Number with activity* 18(46%) 35(90%) 25(64%) 28(72%)
Number without activity" 2(5%) 0(0%) 3(8%) 1(3%)
umber not reporting- 19(49%) 4(10%) 11(28%) 10(26%)
4 15 3 3
Minimum
Maximum 1,211 1,167 495 3,363
Mean 151 272 58 152
Median 25 220 26 21
Sum 2,717 9,506 1,441 4,254 17,918
Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
*Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
""Stattical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.



able 6: Adult and youth exhibitors in the family and consumer categories.
Canning Quilting Sewing HobbylCraft Other
Total
Small Fairs Adults Youth Adults Youth Adults Youth Adults Youth Adults Youth Exhibitors
17 10 16 16 12 17 12
Number with activity* (81%) (48%) (76%6%) (57%) 81% 57%) 838%)6 29%)
0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0
Number without activity (0%) 2 (10%) (0%) 2 (10%) (0%) (5%) (0%) (5%) (0%) (0%)
12 13 15
Number not reporting** 4 (19%)9 (43%)5 (24%) (57%) 5 (24%)8 (38%)4 (19%)8 (38%) (62%) (71%)


Minimum 8 2 2 1 6 1 22 8 1 5
Maximum 120 80 60 10 75 35 370 250 47 200
Mean 31 14 17 3 23 15 78 63 12 44
Median 18 7 11 2 18 10 50 43 9 11
Sum 529 140 274 24 371 181 1.317 759 149 305 4,409
Continued on page 11









10


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Table 6: (Contd.) Adult and youth exhibitors in the family and consumer categories.
Canning Quilting Sewing Hobby/Craft Other
Total
Exhibitor
Adults Youth Adults Youth Adults Youth Adults Youth Adults Youth a
Medium Fairs
3 2 8 9 5 6
Number with activity 10 (91%) (27%) 7(64%) (18%) (73%) 5(45%) (82%) 8(73%) (45%) (55%)
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Number without activity (0%) 0% (0%) (0% (0%) (0%) 0% (0%) (0% (0%
1 8 9 3 2 6 5
Number not reporting* (9) (73%) 4 (36%) (18%) (27%) 6(55%) (18%) 3(27%) (55%) (45%)


Minimum 3 20 4 6 7 4 6 11 6 2
Maximum 280 67 72 8 145 55 305 316 336 800
Mean 47 37 18 7 32 19 103 83 89 117
Median 14 25 9 7 12 10 70 49 62 31
Sum 471 112 125 14 252 95 923 665 889 1,288 4,834

Large Fairs
3 1 5 4 1 1
Number with activity* 3(43%) (43%) 5(71%) (14%) (71%) 5(71%) (57%) 3(43%) (14%) (14%)
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Number without activity (0%) 0% 0%) 0%) (0%) (0%) (0%) (0%} (0%) (0%)
4 6 2 3 6 6
Number not reporting" 4 (57%) (57%) 2 (29%) (86%) (29%) 2 (29%) (43%) 4 (57%) (86%) (86%)


Minimum 32 13 10 515 12 8 52 30 536 249
Maximum 515 515 515 515 515 704 515 515 2,500 249
Mean 202 186 119 515 164 272 213 207 1,518 249
Median 60 30 19 515 60 102 143 75 1,518 249
Sum 607 558 593 515 820 1,359 852 620 3,036 249 9,209
All Fairs
16 28 10 29 22 30 23 14 13
Number with activity 30(77%) (41%) (72%) (26%) (74%) (56%) (77%) (59%) (36%) (33%)
Sw 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0
Number without activity" (0%) (5%) (0%) (5%) (0%) (3%) (0%) (3%) (0%) (0%)
21 11 27 10 16 15 25 26
Number not reporting" 9 (23%) (54%) (28%) (69%) 26%) (41%) 9(23%) (38%) (64%) (67%)

Minimum 3 2 2 1 6 1 6 8 1 2
Maximum 515 515 515 515 515 704 515 515 2,500 800
Mean 54 51 35 55 50 74 103 89 170 97
Median 19 12 11 5 15 13 65 45 24 28
Sum 1.607 810 992 553 1.443 1,635 3,092 2,044 4,074 1.842 18,092
Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
"*Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
""Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with a.ctiviy.












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Premiums Awarded: Exhibits at fairs result in the award of a number of cash and non-cash
premiums (ribbons, trophies, etc.) designed to recognize winners in exhibit competitions. The
number of cash and non-cash awards are detailed for reporting fairs in Table 7, and Table 8
provides detail on the value of cash premiums awarded by the reporting fairs.

For cash awards, 13 fairs reported data for adult premiums and 15 fairs reported the number of
cash awards for youth. The reporting fairs awarded 2,573 adult cash premiums and over 50,000
youth cash awards. For non-cash premiums, there were 6,675 adult awards and 10,158 youth
awards with eleven fairs and ten fairs, respectively, responding to this question. In total, the
reporting fairs made more than 70,000 cash and non-cash premium awards to fair participants.
Over 60,000 of the awards (86 percent) were in the youth categories of fair exhibits.

The value of cash premium awards is reported in Table 8. The average across reporting fairs was
awards valued at more than $9,444 for adults and cash awards to youth of $34,211 per reporting
fair. In total, twenty-one fairs reported awarding almost $200,000 in cash to adults. For youth
awards, the twenty-four reporting fairs awarded more than $820,000 in cash premiums to youth
participants in the fair. Together, the reporting fairs awarded more than $1 million to over 53,000
youth and adult exhibitors with an average award of around $19.

Although strict comparisons are impossible because of differences in the number of fairs
responding to each question reported in Tables 5-6 and Tables 7-8, it is clear that fairs are
heavily oriented towards participation by youth. The number of adult exhibitors exceeds the
number of youth exhibitors in some of the family and consumer categories, but for the livestock
and horticultural exhibits, 77 percent of the exhibitors are youth. Further, as noted above, both
cash and non-cash premium awards are made to larger numbers of youth participants than to
adult exhibitors.






























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Table 7. Number of cash and non-cash premiums awarded to adult and youth
exhibitors.
Cash Non-Cash
Adult Youth Adult Youth
Small Fairs
Number with activity* 8 (38%) 9 (43%) 6(29%) 6(29%
Number without activity 0(0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0(0%
Number not reporting-" 13(62%) 12(57%) 15(71%) 15(71%


Minimum 131 14 12 14
Maximum 150 598 436 5,080
Mean 76 187.7 135 984
Median 72 178 67 121
Sum 608 1689 807 5,90


Medium Fairs
Number with activity* 3 (27%) 4 (36%) 3(27%) 2 (18%)
Number without activity" 0( 0 O 0(0%) 00%) 0(0%(0%
Number not reporting*** 8 (73%) 7 (64%) 8(73%) 9(82%


Minimum 80 166 350 700
Maximum 1,061 963 2,880 1,612
Mean 442 507 1,407 1,156
Median 185 450 990 1,15
Sum 1326 2.029 4,220 2,312


Large Fairs
Number with activity* 2 (29% 2 (29%) 2(29%) 2 (29%
Number without activity* 0(0%) 0 0L%) 0(0%) 0 (0%
Number not reporting' 7 (71%) 7(71%) 7(71%) 7(71%


Minimum 143 563 648 943
Maximum 496 46,326 1,000 1,00
Mean 320 23,445 824 972
Median 320 23,445 824 97
Sum 639 46,889 1,648 1,94
Continued on page 14


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Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max


Table 7. (Contd.) Number of cash and non-cash premiums awarded to adult and youth exhibitors

Cash Non-Cash
Adult Youth Adult Youth


All Fairs
Number with activity* 13(33%) 15 (38%) 11(28%) 10 (26%
Number without activity" 0 (0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0 (0%
Number not reporting"* 26(67%) 24(62%) 28 (72%) 29 (74%


Minimum 2 14 12 1
Maximum 496 46,326 2,880 5,08
Mean 320 3,374 607 1,01f
Median 320 200 350 61
Sum 2.573 50,607 6,675 10,15f

*Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
*Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
**Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
"Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.













fable 8. Value of cash premiums awarded to adult and youth exhibitors.
Cash
Adult Youth
Small Fairs
Number with activity* 14 (67%) 14 (67%)
Number without activity 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting* 7 (33%) 7(33%)

Minimum $4,500 $160
Maximum $6,787 $22.969
Mean $2,515 $5,157
Median $1,055 $3,000
Sum $35,204 $72,198

Medium Fairs
Number with activity 5 (45%) 6(55%)
Number without activity*" 0(0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting' 6 (55%) 5(45%)

Minimum $1,115 $7,000
Maximum $400 $125,000
Mean $13,730 $33,064
Median $7,250 $13,887
Sum $68,650 $198 386

Large Fairs
Number with activity* 2 (29%)4 (57%)
Number without activity" 0(0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting" 5 (71%) 3 (43%)

Minimum $35,473 $25,620
Maximum $59,000 $351 694
Mean $47,237 $137,622
Median $47,237 $86,588
Sum $94,473 $550,490

I Fairs
Number with activity 21 (54%) 24 (62%)
Number without activity" 0 (0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting"* 18(46%) 15 (38%

Minimum $400 $160
Maximum $59,000 $351,694
Mean $9.444 $34,211
Median $2,124 $7,500
Sum $198,327 $821,074
*Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
***Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
*"Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.
***Includes both adult and senior premium expenditures.




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Scholarships Awarded: As indicated in the previous section, large numbers of young people
participate in fair competitions and are awarded cash and non-cash premiums for that
participation. In addition, fairs also provide a number of scholarships to youth participants in fair
competitions. Table 9 provides details on the scholarships awarded by 25 responding fairs. Over
$341,000 was awarded to 272 student participants. An average fair awarded 11 scholarships with
a total value of $13,661. The average value of a scholarship award over all reporting fairs was
$1,256.

The 11 small fairs reporting awarded scholarships to 43 students for a total award of $33,700, an
average of 3.9 awards and $3,062 per fair. Within this group the maximum amount awarded by
one fair was $10,000, and the average scholarship awarded by a small fair was $783.

Medium-sized fairs, with eight fairs reporting, awarded a total of 31 scholarships for a total award
of $34,395 and an average individual award of $1,110. The average fair awarded $4,299 in 3.9
awards. The maximum total amount awarded by one fair in the medium-sized group was
$12,000.

The 6 largerr fairs reporting awarded 198 scholarships worth in excess of $273,000. The average
I Ila o I alIiy*;1J Ill I uiC IIII j aVIVCa I I 1U Ol wI IVICQI 111JO VVJILII I II C UKO N C Il JIJ ,/R I I I~ VWQlV%
large fair awarded 33 scholarships valued at a total of $45,576. The minimum number of awards
reported by a large fair was 2 scholarships for a total of $2,500 and the maximum of number of
awards was 126 scholarships for a total value of $187,754. The average value of an individual
scholarship awarded by a large fair was $1,381.



































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Table 9: Number of scholarships awarded and cash value.

Total Average
Number of Dolla Value of
Scholarships Awarded Scholarship
Awarded

Small Fairs
Number with activity* 11 (52%) 11(52%)
Number without activity 2 (10%) 1 (5%)
Number not reporting" 8 (38%) 9(43%)

Minimum 1 $600
Maximum 15 $10,000
Mean 3.9 $3,062
Median 3 $2,000
Sum 43 $33,680 $783

Medium Fairs
Number with activity 8 (73%) 8(73%)
Number without activity" 1 (9%) 1(9%)
Number not reporting* 2 (18%) 2 (18%)

Minimum 1 $895
Maximum 6 $12,000
Mean 3.9 $4,299
Median 4 $4,000
Sum 31 $34,395 $1,110

Large Fairs
Number ith activity*. 6 (86%) 6(/ 86%)
Number without activity* 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting*" 1 (14%) 1 (14%)

Minimum 2 $2,500
Maximum 126 $187,754
Mean 33 $45,576
Median 14.5 $15,475
Sum 198 $273,454 $1,381

Ai Fairs
Number with activity* 25 (64%) 25(64%)
Number without activity" 3 (8%) 2 (5%)
Number not reporting** 11(28%) 12 (31%)
Minimum 1 $600
Maximum 126 $187,754
Mean 11 $13,661
Median 4 $3,300
Sum 272 $341,529 $1,256
*Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs thai reported zero values in this category.
**Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
""Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.















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Volunteers: In addition to attending the fair or participating in various exhibits, many individuals
participate by providing services to their local fair on a volunteer basis. Table 10 provides
summary data for the number of volunteers and hours worked by size of fair. The 19 small fairs
reporting had a total of 413 volunteers who provided services on a year round basis. An
additional 1,908 people provided volunteer assistance during the time of the fair. These
individuals expended more than 111,000 hours assisting with the fair. These services, if valued at
a rate close to the minimum wage ($5.25 per hour), are worth over $583,000.

For medium-sized fairs, the 10 reporting fairs had 620 volunteers who worked on a year round
basis, an average of 62 year round volunteers per fair. An additional 1,782 individuals
volunteered during the fair, and total hours worked exceeded 64,000. On the same basis as
before, this volunteer service to medium-sized fairs is valued at almost $337,000.

The 5 large fairs reported a total of 598 volunteers on a year round basis, an average of 120
individual volunteers per fair. More than 15,000 additional people provided volunteer services
during the fair. Total hours worked by volunteers at the large fairs exceeded 100,000 hours, and
this time is worth almost $528,000 using the $5.25 per hour wage as a guide.
In tntl, 1 ,Rq1 inrdivirblilnk vnh intparpri nt tha _'L rannrfinn fnim nn Q var rl nri hqciQ Anrl nvnr
n total, 1,631 individuals volunteered at the 34 reporting fairs on a year round basis, and over
19,000 additional people volunteered during the fair. Volunteers expended more than 275,000
hours worth over $1.4 million dollars at the $5.25 per hour wage rate. Using the same guide to
establish values, the average small fair generated volunteer services worth $32,390, the average
medium-sized fair had $37,427 in volunteer services, and the average large fair had $87,938 in
volunteer services. Over all reporting fairs, the average value of volunteer services was $45,234
per fair.
































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Table 10: Fair volunteers, total volunteer hours and value at $5.25 per hour.

Volunteers Volunteers Volunteers Value 0
(All-Year) (Fair) (Hours $5.25/hour
Worked)

Small Fairs
Number with activity 19(90%) 21 (100%) 18(86%)
Number without activity 1 (5%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting** 1 (5%) 0 (0%) 3 (14%)

Minimum 4 4 200
Maximum 50 350 50,000
Mean 22 95 6170
Median 25 60 2,500
Sum 413 1.908 111,052 $583,023
Average value per reporting fair $32,390

Medium Fairs
Number with activity* 10(91%) 10(91%) 9(82%)
Number without activity" 1 (9%) 0(0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting* 0 (0%) (1 (9%) 2 (18%)

Minimum 7 12 500
Maximum 325 400 20,320
Mean 62 178 7129 $37,427
Median 33 175 4800
Sum 620 1,782 64,160 $336,840
Average value per reporting fair $37,427

Large Fairs
Number with activity* 5(71%) 7(100%) 6(86%)
Number without activity* O (29%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting* 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 1 (14%)

Minimum 30 250 2,500
Maximum 240 10,000 84,000
Mean 120 2,217 20,100 $105,525
Median 100 600 4,500
Sum 598 15,519 100,500 $527,625
Average value per reporting fair $87,938

All Fairs
Number with activity* 34 (87%) 38 (97%) 33 (85%)
Number without activity"* 4 (10%) 0(0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting* 1(3%) 1 (3%) 6 (15%)

Minimum 4 4 200
Maximum 325 10,000 84,000
Mean 48 519 8,616 $45.234
Median 25 129 3,250
Sum 1,631 19,209 275,712 $1,447,488
Average value per reporting fair $45,234

*Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
**Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
""Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.









19


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Assistance to Civic, Charitable and Educational Groups: Many civic, charitable and
educational groups participate in fairs as a way of supporting their programs in the community
through fund raising activities or through publicity generated by fair booths and exhibits. A
number of fairs provide monetary support to these groups as a payment in return for services the
groups provide to the fair such as assistance with traffic control, parking, security or admissions.
Some fairs also provide cash donations for groups, and other fairs provide cash for assistance in
preparing exhibits at the fair. In addition, a number of fairs donate booth space to civic and
charitable groups and provide other types of in-kind assistance to help local groups with fair
participation. Fair managers were asked to report the dollar amount of cash assistance and to
estimate the dollar value of in-kind assistance provided.

Table 11 provides summary statistics for reporting fairs regarding both monetary and in-kind
assistance to community groups. Eleven small fairs reported either cash or in-kind assistance
valued at more than $131,000. Medium-sized fairs provided assistance valued at more than
$360,000, and the larger fairs provided almost $318,000 in assistance. The total value of
assistance to all groups by the 31 fairs who reported providing some type of assistance was
slightly more than $808,000. More than $480,000 represented cash assistance in the form of
payment for services, donations, or assistance with booths or exhibits at the fair





































20


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a be onetry an in-iSsisnce o civic, cartable, and educational groups.
Monetary Assistance In-kind Donations
ay Donatio Assistance Boo Other Total Value
Services Donations w Displays Space

Number wit activi- 1 52% 10 48%) 10 48%) 15(71%) 8(38%)
Number rwnou& ac0v 1- 1% 000%% 1(0%) 1(5%)
NumDer not repoing- 4) 1 (52%) 10 48%) 6 29% 12 57%

Minimum $200 $200 $180 $80 $300
Maximum $,700 700 0 2 $ 810 0000 $7006
Mean $3,004 1,947 $2,035 $2,545 $2.515
Median ,600 1 .550 $1,213 $1,600 $2.515
Sum $33,052 19 470 $20,350 $38,168 $20,123 $131.163

Medium Fairs
Number with activityU 10 191% 5 45%r 2 18%) 10(91%) 3(27%)
Numer without acivity'" 00%1 2 18%) 3 27% 1(9%) 3(27%)
Number not reporting" i4 9 36% 6(55%) 0 (0%) 5 45%)

minimum $1,400 3500 2500 $1 050 $3.000
Maximum $95.000 $17.000 80.000 $18.240 $7650
Mean $18174 4450 41,250 $5,869 $5,150
Median 5 53 $1.000 $41 250 $3,750 $4.800
Sum $181,742 $22,250 $82,500 $58,690 $15,450 $360,632


NSumer wita acna iv b86%) 4r 57% 3(43%0 6(86%1 4 (7%
pNumberwitount Dac at 0(0%0 0(%) o0 %) 0(0%
r M-cerds no w re b t -i a14s% a- -eo 1s3

Minimum $20 $950 2,000 $5000 $7,680
maximum 0 25755 7600 $55000 $15000
Mean $11486 -9801 533 $24,992 $11.486
Median W0I i5 25 g.000 $18,500 $1132
bum $5,915 $39,205 $13,600 $149.950 $45944 $317614
All Fairs
Number wi act 27 %) 199%) 15(38%) 31 (79%) 15(38%)
I. .' /01 .1,t l u-/Ol I t07-6 t I U70)
Number not repub in 18 46%f 20 51%) 7118%) 20 51%)

Minimum 200 200 180 80 300
Maximum $95,000 $25.755 $80,000 $55,000 $15,000
Mean $10 508 4,259! $7,7763 $7,962 $5.434
Median I$51 u iX1,600 $2.500 $3,000 $4.000
Sum $283,709 $80,925 $116,450 $246,808 $81.517 $808,409

Refers to number of fairs that reponded with non-zero values In this category.

"Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
""Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.



Special Event Days at Florida Fairs: As reported earlier in Table 4, a number of fairs maintain
records and were able to report attendance in a number of special admissions categories
(children, school groups, senior citizens, etc.). To capture the full range of such events offered by
various fairs, fair managers were asked to list the types of special event days for their fair. Their
answers for the three categories of fairs based on size of attendance are reported in Table 12. An
appendix table provides a detailed listing of the types of events within each of the categories
reported in Table 12.



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By far the most popular type of event was special fair days or times for senior citizens, school
groups or youth. Out of the thirty-three fairs that responded to this question, there were twenty-
two special days or events for senior citizens. There were twenty-five special school days and
twelve special days for youth, a total of thirty-seven special events designed to encourage youth
participation. Other special fair events reported in smaller numbers included special events for
handicapped and special-needs individuals and special fair days for families, military personnel,
and government employees.

Table 12: Number of fairs participating in special events
Number of
Special Event Participating
Fairs
Small Fairs (19 Respondents)
Senior Citizen Days 13
School Days 12
Youth Days 4
Handicapped/Special Needs Days 6
Military Days 1
Family Days 3
Government Days 1
Other Days 8
Medium Fairs (8 Respondents)
Senior Citizen Days 3
School Days 7
Youth Days 4
Handicapped/Special Needs Days 3
Military Days 0
Family Days 1
Government Days 1
Other Days 4
Large Fairs (6 Respondents)
Senior Citizen Days 6
School Days 6
Youth Days 4
Handicapped/Special Needs Days 2
Military Days 2
Family Days 0
Government Days 1
Other Days 6
ll Fairs (33 Respondents)
Senior Citizen Days 22
School Days 25
Youth Days 12
Handicapped/Special Needs Days 11
Military Days 3
Family Days 4
Government Days 3
Other Days 18






22


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Community Service Events: As noted in the introduction, fairgrounds often provide facilities for
a number of community service events that take place throughout the year. Table 13 summarizes
fair managers' responses to questions designed to capture the number and nature of such
events. The table reports the number of fairs participating in different types of community service
events and the total number of reported events. An appendix table provides a detailed listing of
LIthle eVlll. IIInIUUdu IIIeach of thIe groupingLIIr in T abeI 13.

For example, the first line of Table 13 reports that for the twelve small fairs responding to the
survey, six fairs reported fairgrounds use by government or non-profit groups for non-fair
functions. For these six fairs, a total of 115 separate events were reported that constitute use by
government or non-profit organizations. For all fairs responding to this question (twenty-four),
thirteen reported 153 events where the fairgrounds and facilities were used by government and
non-profit groups. Additional users of fairgrounds and facilities included community clubs and a
number of groups with a focus on youth, agriculture, culture, religion, and senior citizens.

In total the numbers reported in Table 13 bear out the impression of fair managers that
fairgrounds provide an important setting for a range of community service events. The most
popular usages appear to be those by government and non-profit groups, school and youth
activities, and community clubs.





































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Table 13: Community service events by number of participating fairs and number of events.

Community Service Event PartNubgairs Number of Events
Participating Fairs

Small Fairs (12 respondents)
Govemment/Non Profit 6 115
School 5 13
Clubs/Groups 3 78
Youth 6 26
Agricultural 3 6
Cultural 1 1
Religious 1 1
Senior Citizens 3 2
Other 9 62*
Medium Fairs (8 respondents)
Govemment/Non Profit 4 30
School 2 2*
Clubs/Groups 0 0
Youth 3 3
Agricultural 0 0
Cultural 3 5*
Religious 1 21
Senior Citizens 0 0
Other 3 4*
largee Fairs (4 respondents)
Govemment/Non Profit 3 8
School 2 3
Clubs/Groups 1 1
Youth 0 0
Agricultural 1 5
Cultural 1 1
Religious 0 0
Senior Citizens 1 1
Other 2 2*
All Fairs (24 fairs)
Govemment/Non Profit 13 153
School 9 18*
Clubs/Groups 4 79
Youth 9 29
Agricultural 4 11
Cultural 5 6*
Religious 2 22
Senior Citizens 4 3
Other 12 68*









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Off-Season Events Held at the Fairgrounds: Beyond the community service events noted in the
previous section, most community fairgrounds host a number of other off-season events. Details
are reported in Table 14. The events here are not sponsored by the fair. The fair usually charges
a rental fee to the organizing group and provides the facility. The table reports the type of events,
the number of annual events indicated by the responding fairs, revenue generated by the fairs
from the events and estimates of attendance. Although the attendance figures are reported, the
numbers are somewhat suspect and should be interpreted as conservative estimates. The
conservative nature of the attendance estimates is due to the fact that some fairs did not keep
records of attendance at non-fair events.

Overall, twenty-two fairs provided lists of off-season events that take place in fairground facilities.
The range of events included concerts, hobby and craft shows, trade shows, antique shows, flea
markets, and a number of animal, garden and plant shows that were not associated with the fair.
Again, these numbers reinforce the perception of fair managers that fairgrounds are important
locations for numerous community events. The twenty-two fairs responding to the question
reported a total of 252 flea markets, 149 animal shows, over 100 trade shows, 91 hobby and craft
shows and 73 concerts. When attendance and revenues reported by the 22 fairs in the last
section of the table where summed, the totals indicated off-season revenues of $5.8 million, and
as noted above, a conservative attendance estimate of 2.9 million persons.
























































































Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max


Table 14:
Annual events revenues and atte t


Non-Sponsored Event Number of Gross Revenue Annual
on-SponAnnual Events to the Fair Attendance
mall Fairs (11 respondents)
Concerts 7 $2,850 2,500
Hobby/Craft Shows 4 $2,500 2,900
Trade Shows 37 $54,970 90,025
Antiques/Collectibles 2 $4,500 4,500
Garden/Flowers/Plants 0 $0 0
Animal Shows 23 $20,220 15,000
Flea Markets 100 $90,600 52,000
Other )211 $126, 163, 900
Medium Fairs (7 respondents)
Concerts 16 $150,088 29,000
Hobby/Craft Shows 15 $156,865 50,200
Trade Shows 29 $286,477 95,300
Antiques/Collectibles 8 $23,331 1,000
Garden/Flowers/Plants 2 $4,061 2,000
Animal Shows 70 $115,322 83,225
Flea Markets 152 $329,800 301,000
Other 104 $208,315 612,895
Large Fairs (4 respondents)
Concerts 50 $725,416 514,308
Hobby/Craft Shows 72 $504,780 162,000
Trade Shows 35 $640,985 125,000
Antiques/Collectibles 21 $291,841 73,800
Garden/Flowers/Plants 6 $29,190 3,600
Animal Shows 56 $910,509 7,200
Flea Markets 0 $0 0
Other 214 $1,141,043 464,000
All Fairs (22 respondents)
Concerts 73 $878,354 545,808
Hobby/Craft Shows 91 $664,145 215,100
Trade Shows 101 $982,432 310,325
Antiques/Collectibles 31 $319,672 79,300
Garden/Flowers/Plants 8 $33,251 5,600
Animal Shows 149 $1,046,051 105,425
Flea Markets 252 $420,400 353,000
Other 529 $1,476,356 1,240,795


I












Employment, Revenues, Expenditures, And Midway and Concession Sales: Whereas
previous sections focused on measuring and describing Florida fairs in terms of attendance,
participation, and community service activities, this section focuses on economic measures of the
size of fairs and fair activity. The survey of fair managers is used to establish employment levels
at Florida fairs and revenue and expenditure data are taken from financial reports prepared by
each fair.

Employment and Salaries

Employment data provided by Florida fair managers in the survey are presented in Table 15. The
24 fairs responding to the employment question employ a total of 240 individuals on a full-time
basis and an additional 188 people are employed part-time on a year-round basis. Part-time
employment increases during the time of the fair with 2,535 people employed to work part-time
during fair times.

As might be expected, most of the full-time employment is with the larger fairs. The 7 fairs
reporting in this category employ 181 individuals or 75 percent of full-time employment reported.
Average full-time employment for the large fair category is 26 individuals per fair compared to an
average employment of 2 and 5 for the small and medium-sized fair groups, respectively.



































27


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max

























































































Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max


lale 1s: -u-l-uime and part employment by Florida fairs.

Full-time Part-time Part-time
t all year) (fair)


Number with activ 10 48%) 14(67%) 17(81%)
Number without activity 9(43%) 5(24%) 3 (14%)
umber not reporting" 2 (10%) 2(10%) 1(5%)

Minimum 1 i 1
Maximum 4 3 60
Mean 2 2 13
Median 2 1 10
Sum 21 21 222

Medium airs
Number with activity* 7(64%) 6(55%) 7(64%)
Number without activity** 3(27%) 2(18%) 3(27%)
Number not reporting* 1(9%) 3(27%) 1(9%)

Minimum 1 1 3
Maximum 16 12 250
Mean 5 4 66
Median 3 3 24
Sum 38 23 463

Large Fairs
Number with activity 7 (100%) 6 (86%) 7(100%)
Number without activity* 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting"* 0(0%) 1 (14%) 0(0%)

Minimum 5 1 10
Maximum 56 100 560
Mean 26 24 264
Median 18 14 300
Sum 181 144 1,850

All Fairs
Number with activity* 24(62%) 26 (67%) 31 (79%)
Number without activity** 12 (31%) 7 (18%) 6 (15%)
Number not reporting*** 3 (8%) 6 (15%) 2 (5%)

Minimum 1 1 1
Maximum 56 100 560
Mean 10 7 82
Median 3 2 15
Sum 240 188 2,535










Revenues


A measure of the economic size of fairs is offered by the level of revenues generated by fairs in
the state through admission fees, shares of midway and concession sales, rental income, and
other sources. Revenue data for all fairs were compiled from financial statements which fairs are
required to file with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Data are
reported for small, medium-sized and large fairs and for all fairs combined in a format similar to
that used in previous tables. Financial reports were available for 46 fairs for the 1998-99 year
including the two large fairs that did not respond to the survey mailing. Financial reports were not
available for two smaller fairs that were included on the original list of 48 fairs surveyed for data in
the previous sections. Since both fairs omitted here are in the small fair group, the omission will
make only a small difference in revenue totals. Revenue data are reported in Table 16.

The 46 fairs for which financial reports were available, collectively, had total revenues of slightly
more than $57.7 million. As expected, based on attendance figures, there was a wide range
across all fairs. Reported revenues range from around $13,000 for the smallest fair to upwards of
$11 million for the largest with an average of slightly more than 1.2 million per fair.

The small fair category had average revenues of $196,270 with a range from around $21
thousand to a maximum value of $451,170. Total revenues from the 25 small fairs exceed $4.9
million. Revenues for medium-sized fairs ranged from around $12,000 upwards to more than $3.2
million with an nvarann value for the 14 rennrtinn fairs nf narond $1 million Tntal reported
revenue for the medium-sized group of fairs was just above $14 million. For the larger fairs,
reported total revenue ranged from $1.5 million to almost $11.8 million. The average revenue for
the 7 reporting fairs was almost $5.5 million, and total reported revenue was $38.7 million.

The financial statements did not provide sufficient detail in all cases to allow all fair revenues to
be allocated to categories by revenue source (admissions, concessions, midway, sponsors, etc.).
Only about fifty percent of total revenue could be allocated to the various categories. The
remaining revenues do not necessarily represent revenues from other sources than those
suggested by the various categories. Rather, it is simply a lack of consistency across fairs in the
level of detail reported. Still, the data that was reported by category suggests that admissions,
sponsorships, and income from the midway and from concession sales represent major sources
of fair revenue.























29


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max















able 16. Fair revenue sources as reported in fair financial statements, 1998-99.


intPert dI Unalocated Total
Adrmiss Concessions come Midway Sponsors Pardng Off-Season Other-* Unaocated l
Revenuer Revenues
Smil, Fe.
umber ithc 18i s16 13 13 16 2 11 15 19 25
number without Activity" 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 D
umber not responding" 8 10 13 13 10 24 15 11 1 1
minimum 14,285 2,000 84 8,660 1,000 600 1,048 149 0 21,147
alnmum 162,104 30.841 7.418 119,082 458.009 23.391 88,606 60.528 390.642 451.170
ean $60,624 $14,429 $2,935 $38,956 $21,674 $11,996 $31,096 $8,491 $84,611 $196.270
tedan $48,870 $13,401 $2,006 $36,664 $5,695 $11,996 $16,425 $3,230 $33,042 $184,734
Sum $1,091,231 $230,866 $38,150 $506,426 $346,787 $23,991 $342,054 $127,368 $2,199,883 $4.906.756


medium Fairs
umber with Activity 7 13 10 7 11 1 7 12 13 14
Number without Acti 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
umber not responding" 7 1 4 7 3 13 7 2 0 0
Minimum $117,367 $1,450 $56 $70,359 $3.500 $5,754 $29,828 $811 $0 $12,938
Maximum $431,093 $217,318 $66,007 $1,254,914 $1,232,558 $5,754 $361,697 $36,410 $1,364,773 $3206,376
Mean $245,419 $86,254 $12,806 $345,059 $194,884 $5,754 $145704 $12,012 $386,317 $1,007,479
Medan $270,058 $55,040 $3,161 $209,223 $30,818 $5,754 $156,804 $9,147 $216,143 $866,906
um $1,717,934 $1,121,301 $128,062 $2415415 $2,143.728 $56754 $1.019,929 $144,147 $5.408,434 $14,104703


large Fairs
untmer with Activity 4 3 6 4 6 2 3 6 7 7
Summer without Actvty 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
lumber not responding" 3 4 1 3 1 5 4 1 0 0
Mnilmum $568,523 $130,121 $1,935 $383,200 $1,150 $120,340 $123;992 $2,164 $438,066 $1,531,609
aximuadnm $3,424,059 $1,571,370 $204,251 $2,996,902 $825,000 $135,732 $339,831 $525,89 $11,377,941 $11,705,548
a$1,762,886 $718,619 $103,823 $1,130,242 $296,927 $128,036 $261,713 $136,085 $2,958,486 $5,528,570
median $1,529,482 $454,365 $90543 $570,434 $192,190 $128,036 $321,316 $35293 $1,266380 $5,49195
m $7,051,546 $2,155,856 $622,935 $4,520r969 $1,781,563 $256,072 $785,139 $816,508 $20,709,405 $38,699,993


Il Fairs
urmber with Activity' 29 32 29 24 33 5 21 33 39 46
umber without Activity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
mjes rnespcondn' 18 s s5 18 23 14 42 26 14 1 1
minimum $14,285 $1,450 $56 $8,660 $1,000 $600 $1,048 $149 $0 $12,938
rMimum $3,424,059 $1,571,370 $204,251 $2,996,902 $1,232558 $135,732 $361,697 $525,889 $11,377,941 $11,765,548
Mean $340,024 $109,626 $27,212 $310,117 $129,457 $57,163 $102,244 $32,970 $602,505 $1,254,507
edian $88,045 $23,585 $3,486 $63,833 $22,445 $23,391 $46,508 $7,545 $135,912 $313,223
Sum 9,860,710 3,508,023 789,147 7,442,810 4,272,079 285,817 2.147,123 1,088,022 28,317,722 57,711,452


efers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Rater to nurmer of fairs that reported ro values in this category.
-Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
The category other' consists of items classifies as miscellaneous income in the fair financial statements.
"The category 'unallocated revenues' refers to the portion of reported revenue that was not classified according to the revenue categorizaton of this table.













30


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max










Expenditures


In a manner similar to that for revenues, data on expenditures were compiled from fairs' financial
reports and are reported by category in Table 17. Expenditure data provides details on the
operation of the fairs and also serves as another measure of interaction between fairs and local
communities in Florida. A total of 23 categories of expenditures are featured in Table 17
including such categories as interest, advertising, parking and tax expenses.

Upwards of $50.5 million were reported as expenditures by 46 fairs in their annual financial
statements. Total expenditures varied from around $11,000 to more than $12.6 million.
Approximately $20 million (39%) of total expenditures could not be allocated to the expenditure
categories in Table 17 and are included in the "unallocated expenditures" category. Again, as
with revenues, this does not necessarily mean that the expenditures were in other categories of
expenses. Rather, the inconsistency in the level of detail provided in the financial statements did
not allow the assignment of all expenditures to categories. Among the classifiable expenditure
categories, the dominant categories include labor (19%), and to a lesser extent, entertainment
expenditures (7%), advertising (5%), repair and maintenance (5%), and utilities (5%).
Torta evnenrlih ir a fnr thf 9r% ammll fnire fne-lOnl nlm i t ItA A million tuHh an nwarane nvnnnAli ir
Total expenditures for the 25 small fairs totaled almost $4.6 million with an average expenditure
per small fair of $183,721. Expenditures for small-sized fairs ranged from a low of around
$20,000 thousand to a high of $458,000. The medium-sized category of fairs has average
expenditures of $731,685 with a range of around $11 thousand to more than $2.9 million. Total
expenditures for medium-sized fairs equaled $10.2 million. For large-sized fairs, total
expenditures were more than $35.7 million with expenditure ranges from almost $1.5 million to
more than $12.6 million. Average expenditures for the large fair group was slightly more than $5.1
million.































31


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max

















Fable 17. Expenditures by source and fair size category.


ite Adv tisinVg at L & Rent In r Tax Supplie Parkig
Mvestisin Reel AcIag Fns

SmuaI Fairs

mber with Activity 10 22 18 3 9 14 21 7 10 18 4

,umber without Activity D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
umnberun. o r d 16 4 S 23 17 12 5 19 16 a 22

imnsmun $67 $825 $515 $28 $325 $300 $750 $989 $352 $373 $200
4.e m $17,270 $31,073 $68,297 $1,020 $5,214 $40,075 $22,820 $15,000 $7,919 $37,236 $7,602
$4,906 $9,648 $23,791 $486 $1.632 $9,912 $8,731 $6,017 $3,231 $9,485 $2,706

dian $2,628 $7,462 $18,435 $410 $744 $7,994 $7,572 $4,780 $2,649 $6,395 $1,511
$49,060 $212,254 $428,243 S1,458 $14,688 $138,765 $183357 $42,118 $32309 $170,734 $10,824
Sur


.dat. Fairs

number with Actvity 4 11 12 1 6 8 10 5 4 9 1

lumber without Actvity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
umboern D responding 10 3 2 13 8 6 4 9 10 5 13

inimu $5,245 $30.612 $2578 $2,855 $2,015 $9,672 $7,711 $7,004 $740 $539 $3,750

aximnmm $34,668 $121,766 $167,861 $2,855 $13,268 $261,559 $122,911 $26,548 $26050 $74,439 $3,750

lean $18,123 $65,453 $71,991 $2,855 $5,861 $58,443 $40,240 $13,330 $9,393 $22,064 $3,750
Median $16,290 $54,167 $78,090 $2,855 $4,963 $33,926 $19,370 $10,976 $5,391 $9,272 $3,750
Sum $72,493 $719,987 $863.887 $2.855 $35,166 $467,540 $402,401 $66,648 $37,571 $198,573 $3,750


Large Fairs

umber with Activity 4 5 5 1 0 4 5 4 2 3 2
,umber without Activity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

number not reponding 3 2 2 6 7 3 2 3 5 4 5

minimum $1,543 $114,347 $38,880 $10,475 NA $28,825 $18,816 *15,117 $29,419 $10,696 $24,766

lMaxinsun 365,703 $652,714 $771,911 $10,475 NA $305,165 $466,655 $402.166 $72,904 $480,192 $34,560
ean $157.104 $297,602 $479.898 $10,475 NA $146.990 $246,732 135,706 $51.161 $187,591 $29,658

cdian $130,585 $264,653 $631,513 $10,475 NA $126,986 $159,570 $62,770 $51,161 $71,885 $29,658

S8628.415 $1,488,012 $2.399,490 $10,475 NA $587.961 $1,233,658 $542,823 $102,323 $562,773 $59,315


l Fainrs
umber with Activky 18 38 35 5 15 26 36 16 16 30 7

utber, without Activity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
ubwt not responding 29 9 12 42 32 21 11 31 31 17 40
ininmn, $1.543 $114.347 $38.880 $10,475 $0 $28,825 $18.816 $15,117 $29,419 $10,696 $24,755

$xinnmn $365.703 $652.714 $771,911 $10,475 $13,268 $305,165 $466,655 $402,166 $72.904 $480192 $34,560

L157.104 $297.02 $479..898 $10,475 $3,324 $46.990 "A46732 $135.706 $51.161 $187,591 52.5658
$idian $13(0585 $264,653 $631,513 $10,475 $2,015 S126.986 $159570 $62,770 $51,161 $71,885 $29.658

urn $749,968 $2,420,252 $3,691.620 $14,788 $49,854 $1,194,266 $1,819,415 $651,588 $172,203 $932,080 $73.889
Continued on page 33.


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max



















Table 17. (Contd.) Expenditures by source and fair size category



aor Repairl UUtiki Tra Subsrip. & rs nd Sco Sser PoWy Oter
o mprove-a Dues e;y f mo Dontom hw~t*

Small Fairs
ambe wih Activky 21 20 22 9 13 12 19 14 14 11

umber without Activity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

lumber not respondinga 5 6 4 17 13 14 7 12 1 15
minimum $800 $165 $914 $151 $100 $2.025 $634 $100 $131 $1,019
axmm $81.101 $25,103 $33,019 $9,362 $805 $27,102 $23,113 $11,593 *3,991 S13.834
eean $25,246 $9,263 $12,465 $2,626 $386 $7,229 $7,939 $2,836 $1,125 $5,745
edi $16,640 $7,907 $12,017 $886 $494 $4,857 $6,926 $1,825 $454 $5,787
m$530,167 $185,255 $274,220 $23,632 $5,021 $86,747 $150,846 $39,702 $15,746 $63,191


eddhm Fairs
mtber with Activity 8 10 12 4 9 6 9 6 8 8
number without Acvity 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
number not respoDdng 6 4 2 9 5 8 5 8 0 6
minimum $4,824 $2,193 $403 $0 $150 $10,543 $0 $895 $511 $293
$ammum $340,655 $125,519 $233,476 $13,866 $4.000 $120,273 $176,731 $114,322 $24,426 $508141
ean $153,010 $42,182 $61,812 $5,626 $1.451 $44,801 $37,516 $27,717 $61143 $9,650
median $101,590 $21,367 $23,587 $750 $803 $33,344 $16191 $5,398 $2,808 $4,991
Sum $1,224,076 $421.818 $741,739 $28,128 $13,055 $268,806 $337,647 $166K299 $49,144 $7702


Larle Fais
Summer with Activity 5 5 4 1 2 3 3 3 3 6
umber without Activity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 D 0 0
lumber not respondi i 2 2 3 6 5 4 4 4 0 1
inmimmn $21,333 $31,337 $45,214 $112$910 $4,149 $69,832 $10,850 $29,715 $28,410 $5,038

aximnum $3,633,409 $1,417,689 $765,036 $112,910 $7,691 $100,017 $351,694 $1036110 $209,081 $693,088
ean $1.540,963 $410,138 $335,047 $112,910 $5,920 $87,595 $127,260 $392,205 $113,493 $153,459
edia $969,589 $161,699 $264,969 $112,910 $5,920 $92,936 $19,236 $110.790 $102,988 $22,669
unm $7,704,814 $2.050,690 $1,340,188 $112,910 $11,840 $262,785 $381,780 $1,176.615 $340.479 $920.753


Ull Fairs
lumber with Activity 34 35 38 14 24 21 31 23 25 25
umber without Activity 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
number not responding 13 12 9 32 23 26 16 24 22 22
$inanin_ $800 $165 $403 $0 $100 $2,025 $0 $100 $28,410 $293
.ximm $3,633409 $1,417,689 $765,036 $112,910 $7,691 $120,273 $351.694 $1,036,110 $209.081 $693.088
n$278208 $75,936 $62,004 $10,978 $1.246 $29,445 $28073 $60,114 $113,493 $42,446
median $31.051 $12,953 $16,236 $886 $569 $10,543 $9,347 $3.300 $102,988 $5,986
$9,459,057 $2,657,763 $2,356,147 $164,670 $29,916 $618,338 $870,273 $1,382.616 $405,369 $1,061,146
Continued on Page 34.







33


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max















'able 17. (Contd.)Expenditures by source and fair
ize category

SUNlocamed Tota
-Expenditmur Expeadirs



Small Fairs

lumer with Activity 9 25 25

umber without Activity 0 1 0

mer not reponding 17 0 i

minimum $98 s0 $20,368

aximum $1,562 $437,830 $458,009

can $508 $74,235 $183,721

edian $200 $22,682 $180,422

nm $4.571 $1,930,113 $4,593,021


edium Fairs

umbe. with Activiy 5 14 14

umbwithout Activity 0 0 0

um*not responding 9 0 0

Minimum $275 $2.94 $11,184

exhmm!n $6.190 $1,735,942 $2,922,614


median $476 $145,539 $589.256

; _m -$9,692 $4,035,111 $10,243,587


Large Fain
umber with Activity 1 7 7

umbCer without Activity 0 0 0

imber not respoding 6 0 0
minimum $4,295 $585,306 $1,476,300

animum $4,295 $5,075,430 $12,626,259

ea $4,295 $2,000,986 $5,105,116

Cedimn 4,295 $1,279752 $4,277,903
munF $4,295 $14,006,901 $35,735,814


Fal Fais

umber with Activity 15 46 46

umber without Activity 0 1 0

umber not responding 32 0 1

inimurm $4,295 $0 $11,184

maximum $4,295 $5,075,430 $12,626,259
an $4,295 $424,939 $1,099,400
median $4,295 $77.619 $276,185

$um $18559 $19,972,125 $50,572,423












34


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max










Gross Sales for Concessions and Midway Operators


Data reported in the previous section on revenues included only that part of concession sales and
midway revenues that represented income to the fairs. In other words, the data reported in Table
16 is net income to the fair and does not capture the gross sales of midway and concession
operators. In an effort to determine the total amount of economic activity that takes place at all
fairs in Florida, fair managers were asked in a supplementary question to provide an estimate of
total sales by midway and show operators and by vendors of food and non-food concessions.
The responses represent only estimates by the managers since most fairs do not monitor sales or
maintain records that reflect non-fair revenues. However, some fair managers were able to
provide what they considered to be reasonable estimates. These data are reported in Table 18,
and the reported averages will be used in a later section to provide an estimate of gross
economic activity for all fairs in the state.

Overall, twenty-four fairs were able to provide estimates of sales by midway ride and show
operators. Total sales reported by the responding fairs exceed $19.6 million with an average of
more than $800,000 per fair. Sales ranged from $48,000 to $5.7 million across the fairs in the
state. Small fairs reported a midway sales average of $142,143, medium-sized fairs reported
average sales of $382,082, and large fairs had average sales of $2.5 million.

Seventeen fairs were able to provide estimates for food vendors at the fair. Total reported sales
by the responding fairs exceeded $14 million with an average of $837,630. The range of reported
food sales across all fairs was from slightly more than $4,400 to more than $5,200,000.
Responding small fairs had average food sales of $77,858, medium-sized fairs had average sales
of $238,100 and large fairs averaged sales of $3.1 million.

Sales of non-food concessions were reported by thirteen fairs and generally were a less
important source of sales than either midway rides and shows or food concessions. Total sales
reported by the thirteen fairs for non-food concession items were slightly less than $4.9 million.
Small fairs reported average sales of slightly less than $33,000, medium-sized fairs reported
average sales of about $126,000, and large fairs reported average sales of around $1.4 million.


























35


Friday, March 11, 2005 (2).max













Table 18: Estimated gross sales for midway rides, food and non-food concessions.

Midway Rides & Shows Food Concessions Non-food
Concessions

Small Fairs
Number with activity* 10 (48%) 8(38%) 5 (24%)
Number without activity* 0 (0%) 0(0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting* 11 (52%) 13(62%) 16(76%)

Minimum $48,000 $4,425 $9,500
Maximum 350,000 280,000 100,000
Mean 142,143 77,858 32,968
Median 105,705 35,219 15,000
Sum $1,421,428 $622,862 $164,841

Medium Fairs
Number with activity* 8 (73%)5 6(45%) 5 (45%)
Number without activity" 0(0%) 0 (0%) 0(0%)
Number not reporting* 3 (27%) 6 (55%) 6(55%)

Minimum $69,452 $6,500 $2,572
Maximum 1,100,000 595,000 425,000
Mean 382,082 238,100 126,114
Median 271,500 100,000 96,000
Sum $3,056,652 $1,190,500 $630,572

Large Fairs
Number with activity* 6(86%) 4 (57%) 3(43%)
Number without actvty" 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting' 1 (14%) 3 (43%) 4 (57%)

Minimum $750,000 $1,800,000 $900,000
Maximum 5,700,000 5,200,000 200,000
Mean 2,523,909 3,106.d8W 1,366,667
Median 2,400,000 2,713,178 1,000,000
Sum $15,143,454 $12,426,356 $4,100,000

All Fairs
Number with activity* 24 (62%) 17 (44%) 13(33%)
Number without activity* 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Number not reporting' 15 (38%) 22 (56%) 26(67%)

Minimum $48,000 $4,425 $2,572
Maximum 5,700,000 5,200,000 2,200,000
Mean 817,564 837,630 376,570
Median 246,500 100,000 96,000
Sum $19,621,534 $14,239,718 $4,895,413
*Refers to number of fairs that responded with non-zero values in this category.
"Refers to number of fairs that reported zero values in this category.
**Refers to number of fairs that did not respond in this category.
""Statistical analysis is based on reports by fairs with activity.
















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Total Values Projected for All Fairs for Selected Variables:AII data reported to this point
consists of the actual revenue and expenditure data compiled from the fairs' financial statements
(Tables 16-17) or they represent data collected from the survey of fair managers. In the latter
case, data were reported here for each question on the survey and the statistical analysis
included only those fairs that provided a response to the question. This section goes further and
provides estimates of values for selected variables for all fairs in the state. Revenues and
expenditures reported in this section are the data for all fairs and other variables are estimated by
expanding average values obtained from the survey to the 48 fairs in the state.

Revenues and Expenditures

Table 19 provides actual reported revenues and expenditure data for all fairs in the state based
on fairs' financial reports covering the 1998-99 fair season. These data are simply the average
and total values taken from Tables 16-17 in the previous sections and do not require much in the
way of additional discussion. Note that for total revenues and expenditures, the financial
statements were obtained from 46 fairs. However, for each of the revenue and expenditure
categories, not all fairs were able to provide data. The number of fairs providing data in each
category is reported in the column headed "Number of Fairs Responding." For total revenues,
LIIna I aIIl statementsI L L IU IId not prvie detal onII tle I UUIrce of approximately $29.5 million o I
percent) of revenues. This amount is reported in the table as "unallocated" revenue. For
expenditures, almost $20 million (39 percent) could not be allocated to the various expenditure
categories. A further note of caution is in order when interpreting the data in Table 19 for revenue
and expenditures. While some of the revenue and expenditure categories seem obvious, there is
no guarantee that the various fairs used consistent definitions of expense categories. For
example, a figure reported as a security expense by one fair could be reported as an expenditure
on labor by another fair.

Total revenues for the reporting fairs exceeded $57.7 million for the 1998-99 fair year. Although
exact allocations were not possible, the data do suggest that major sources of revenue for Florida
fairs include admissions fees, income from midway and concession sales, and sponsorships. The
average revenue per fair was slightly over $1.25 million. Expenditures for the 46 fairs totaled
almost $50.6 million for the 1998-99 year. The largest category of expenditure was for labor.
Other major expense categories included advertising, entertainment, repairs and improvements,
and utilities.

Projections to All Fairs

The second part of Table 19 reports projected values for all fairs based on averages calculated
from surveys returned by the fairs. As noted earlier, the relatively small number of fairs and the
degree of variation across fairs reduces the ability to make accurate projections. Projected
values are based strictly on the assumption that the fairs that responded to a particular
question are representative of those that did not respond to that question. Further, prior to
making projections, averages based on the data reported in all earlier tables were recalculated to
include any fairs that reported a zero value on a question because there was the possibility that
some non-reporting fairs had zeros as well. The recalculated averages and the number of
responding fairs are reported in Table 19. Projected totals were calculated by multiplying the
average value by 48, the number of fairs covered by the survey. Results were reported in earlier
tables for all variables included in the questionnaire, but projections were not made for categories
were the number of respondents was small.

Table 19 provides projections for full-time and part-time employment and volunteer services at
fairs around the state. Projections are also made for the value of assistance to various groups
through cash donations and in-kind assistance and for cash awards through premiums and
scholarships. The table also provides projections for fair participation in exhibits by adult and
youth exhibitors.



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Based on the projections, fairs in Florida employ 336 people on a full-time basis, and an
additional 288 people are employed through out the year on a part-time basis. Fairs also employ
an additional 3,312 people who work during the time of the fair. Statewide, this amounts to a
significant payroll impact for all fairs combined. In the previous section of the table on
expenditures, a category of "labor expenditures" could be identified for 34 fairs from the
information reported in the financial statements. These 34 fairs spent almost $9.5 million on labor.
Note this is for only 34 of the 46 fairs for which financial statements were available, and that labor
expenditures may be underestimated due to the classification problems mentioned earlier.

Employee efforts at fairs are supplemented by a large number of volunteers who provide
assistance both through out the year and during the time of the fair. More than 2,000 individuals
are estimated to serve as fair volunteers through out the year. Almost 25,000 additional
individuals assist during the time of the fair on a volunteer basis. When these services are valued
at a value per hour that is near minimum wage ($5.25), the average fair received volunteer
services worth more than $45,000. For the 48 statewide fairs, this amounts to volunteer services
worth almost $2.2 million. More than 8,600 individuals spent in excess of 413,000 hours working
as fair volunteers.

Fairs provide assistance to community groups in a number of ways. Total statewide values for
this assistance were estimated for both cash and in-kind donations to local groups. Cash
assistance consisted of payments for services, donations, and monetary assistance with displays
at the fair. In-kind services consisted of donated booth space and other types of services. Total
assistance was estimated to be worth $1.5 million dollars and about 63 percent was in the form of
cash assistance. The average fair provided more than $10,000 in the form of payments to groups
for services, over $3,800 in cash donations to community groups, and over $6,000 in the form of
cash assistance with booth presentations at the fair. The value of donated booth space exceeded
$7,700 per fair and the value of other in-kind assistance was almost i $4,3U per fair.

Total number and value was also estimated for scholarships awarded by fairs in Florida. The
average across all fairs in the state was 9 awards per fair with an average total award of $12,650.
All fairs together are estimated to award a total of 432 scholarships statewide with a total value of
$607,190. In addition fairs were estimated to award more than $2 million in cash premiums to
adult and youth exhibitors. Of this amount, over $1.6 million (around 78 percent) was awarded to
youth participants in the fair.

Table 19 also provides estimates of the total number of individuals around the state who
participate as fair exhibitors by category of exhibit. The various categories sum to more than
73,000 exhibitors for all fairs in the state.

Finally, Table 19 provides an estimate of gross sales and total economic activity that takes place
at fairs around the state. As a first step in preparing this estimate, the total reported revenues for
the fairs ($57.7 million) is adjusted downward to remove the net income to the fair from midway
rides and shows and concession sales. This avoids double counting when gross sales of vendors
are estimated. This adjustment is made for the 46 fairs for which financial statements were
available. Next, total sales are estimated for midway rides and show vendors and vendors of food
and non-food concessions. These estimates are based on the average values estimated by the
fair managers in response to the survey, and averages are expanded to only 46 fairs rather than
to the 48 included in the survey. This provides a more conservative estimate and is consistent
with the number of fairs for which financial statements were available.

Thus, gross sales at Florida fairs consists of fair revenues from sources other than concessions
sales and midway rides and shos plus the total sales of midway operators and concessions
vendors. In total these categories sum to almost $131.9 million based on estimates for 46 fairs
around the state. Of the total, $37.6 million is midway sales, $38.5 million is food concession
sales and $17.3 million is sales of non-food concessions. The remainder is revenues generated
by the fair from other sources.


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To measure total economic activity associated with fairs and related activities; the gross sales
figure noted in the previous paragraph can be expanded to account for spending by the fairs and
midway and concession operators on goods and services in the state. Only first round
expenditures (direct spending by the fairs and vendors) are considered in these estimates. Thus,
resulting figures provide a conservative estimate of total economic activity.

Direct expenditures are estimated using a software package (IMPLAN) developed at the
University of Minnesota for modeling a regional economy, here the State of Florida.2 The resulting
model divides the state economy into more than 500 sectors and estimates local purchases for
each sector. Four of those sectors (Amusement and Recreation Services, Other Non-profit
Organizations, Eating and Drinking, and Miscellaneous Retail) were selected to correspond
closely to midway operations, fair organizations, food concessions and non-food concessions,
respectively. Estimated direct purchase coefficients range from 0.54 for food concessions to 0.69
for non-food concessions (Table 19). Again, these coefficients represent estimates of the
percentage of gross sales dollars that are initially spent in Florida by fair organizations and
related enterprises.

Direct purchases are estimated by taking a percentage of the gross sales figures reported in
rTable 19.- Total estimated purchases amount to s lightly more than $83 million of which $24
I dUM I V. I U Ii LllIl IaILOU IUUItL. W i C21 UIiU I IL LU l11 Il 11 IIUI: Lll IP0 IIIIIIIUI I U1 WI IluI;l %b-&
million is generated by the fair organizations, $26 million from midway operations and $33 million
comes from concession sales revenues.

The total economic activity associated with fairs in Florida is calculated by adding the gross sales
figures for the fairs and related activities (131.9 million) to the estimates of direct spending ($83
million). Thus, a total measure of the economic size of Florida fairs is $215 million.



























2 The IMPLAN Software is licensed to the Department of Food and Resource Economics at the University
of Florida. For more information, see: David Mulkey and Alan W. Hodges, "Using IMPLAN to Address
Economic Impacts." University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, EDIS Publication FE 168.
(http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/impact).


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Table 19. Revenues and expenditures and projections to all fairs for selected variables based on survey results.
Variable Number Responding Average per Fair Total

Revenues
Admissions 29 $340,024 $9,860,710
Concessions 32 $109,626 $3.508.023
Interest Income 28 $26,879 $752,603
Midway 24 $310,117 $7,442.810
Sponsors 32 $107,721 $3,447,079
Parking 5 $57,163 $285,817
Off-Season 20 $90,365 $1,807,292
Other 33 $32,970 $1,088,022
Unallocated Revenue 39 $628,066 $29,519,097
Total Revenue 46 $1,254,597 $57,711,452
Expenditures
Interest Expense 17 $154,303 $584,462
Advertising 38 $297,602 $2,420,252
Entertainment 35 $479,898 $3,691,620
Vehicle Expense 5 $10,475 $14,788
Legal and Accounting Fees 15 $3,324 $49,854
Rent 26 $146,990 $1,194,266
Insurance 36 $246,732 $1,819,415
Professional Fees 16 $135,706 $651,588
Taxes 16 $51,161 $172,203
Supplies 30 $187,591 $932,080
Parking 7 $29658 $73.889
Labor 34 $278,208 $9,459,057
Repair and Improvements 35 $75,936 $2,657,763
Utilities 38 $62,004 $2,356,147
Travel 14 $104978 $164,670
Subscription and Dues 24 $1,246 $29,916
Security 21 $29445 $618,338
Prizes and Premiums 31 $28,073 $870,273
Scholarships and Donations 23 $60,114 $1,382,616
Postage and Prnting 25 $16,215 $405.369
Licenses 15 $4.295 $18,559
Other 24 $43,049 $1,033,172
Unallocated Expenditures 46 $424,939 $19,972,125
Total Expenditures 46 $1,099,400 $50,572,423

Variable Number Responding Average per Fair Projected
Employment
Full-Time 36 7 336
Part-Time (Year Round) 33 6 288
Part-Time (Fair) 37 69 3312
Continued on page 40.





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fable 19. (Contd.)Fairs responding average values and projections to all fairs.

Variable Number Responding Average per Fair roetedto
48 fairs
volunteerss
Year Ia Round 384320
During Fair 38 519 24,912
Volunteer Hours 33 8,616 413.568
Value at $5.25 per hour $45.234 $2,171 232
Monetary Assistance to Groups
Payment for Services 28 $10,132 $486,358
Donations 21 $3,854 $184.971
Assistance with Displays 19 $6,129 $294.189
n-Kind Donations to Groups
Booth Space 32 $7,713 $370,212
Other 19 $4,290 $205,938
Scholarships
Number 28 9 432
Value 27 $12,650 $607,190
Cash Premiums
Value (Adult) 36 $9,444 $453,312
Value (Youth) 33 $34,211 $1,642,128
Exhibitors
Livestocntk (Aidult) 20 136 6521
Livestock (Youth) 35 272 13,037
Horticulture (Adult) 28 51 2,470
Horticulture (Youth) 29 147 7,041
Canning (Adult) 30 54 2,571
Canning (Youth) 18 45 2,160
Quilting (Adult) 28 35 1,701
Quilting (Youth) 12 46 2,212
Sewing (Adult) 29 50 2,388
Sewing (Youth) 23 71 3,412
HobbylCraft (Adult) 30 103 4,947
HobbyCraft (Youth) 2485 4088
Other (Adult) 14 291 13,968
Other (Youth) 13 142 6,801
Estimated Gross Sales
Total Reported Fair Revenues 46 $1,254,597 $57.711.452
Less Estimated Fair Income From Concessions 32 $109,626 (5,042,796)
Less Estimated Fair Income From Midway Rides and Shows 24 $310,117 (14,265,382)
Estimated Total Sales Midway Rides and Shows 24 $$817,564 $37,607,944
Estimated Total Sales of Food Concessions 17 $837,630 $38,530,980
Estimated Total Sales of Non-food Concessions 13 $376,570 $17,322,220
Estimated Gross Sales (46 fairs) $131,864,418


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Table 19. (Contd.)
Estimated in-State Expenditures
Fair or Related Activity Direct (Local) Estimated (State)
Purchase Coefficient Purchases
Fair Operations 0.6358 $24,416,801
Midway Operators 0.6798 $25,565,880
Food Concussions 0.5448 $20,991,678
Non-food Concussions 0.6960 $12,056,265

Total estimated purchases $83,030,624

Total Economic Activity (Gross Sales + In-State Purchases) $214,894,948





















































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APPENDIX


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Appendix A. Breakdown of Special Events Categorization

Special Event Classification
Senior Days
Senior Citizens Days
School Days
School Days
3rd Grade Day
Head Start
Student Book Redemption Day
Youth Days
Children's Program
4H Tent
4H/FFA Days
Orphans
Kids Days
4H Club Day
Handicapped/Special Needs Days
Handicapped Day
Handicapped Children
Special Needs Children Day
Nursing Homes/mentally ill/cluster homes
Military Days
Military Day
Armed Forces Day
Family Days
Family Day
Family Nite
Government Days
County Employees Picnic
Yearly Dedication to Firefighters
Teacher Government Employees
Continued on Page 45


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Appendix A. Breakdown of special Events Categorization
Contd.)

Special Event Classification
2ther Days
Fair/Rodeo Day
Career Day
Talent Show
Artist Day
Free Admission Times
Various VIP and Guest Passes
Volunteers
Media
County Appreciation Nite
Everyone-Promos
Everyone-Fox
Character Counts Day
Church Bulletin
Pepsi Day
Awards Day
Shrine Day
McArthur Dairy Day
Intracoastal Health Day
PennySaver Day
County Day
Ladies Day
Mens Day
First Hour Arrivals
Premium Department Exhibitors

























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Appendix B. Breakdown of Community Service Events Categorization

Community Service Event Classification
Primarily Government/ Non-Profit Activities
Red Cross Blood Drive
Cooperative Extension Service
County Government Agencies
Other Non-Profits
Sheriff Training
Sherrifs Mounted Patrol
Training grounds, Fire Department
Hope for the Holidays
Non-Profit Groups Garage Sale
Rotary Club Fundraiser
United Way Dance
Frontier International
Junior League Sale
Sheriffs Office Driver Training
Veterans Service
Leukemia Society Chili Cook-Off
County 4H Foundation
Gigantic Garage Sale (United Way)
Florida Department of Education Meeting
Fire Rescue Training
Department of Agriculture Meeting
Food Distribution
Senior Citizens
Senior Activities
Youth Activities
Youth and Civic Banquets and BBQ's
Youth Concerts
Healthy Kids Day
County Youth Fair
4H Youth Programs
Boy and Girl Scouts
School Related Activities
School Reunions
District Schools
School Banquets
Graduations
School District Art Show
County Schools
School History Fair
County School Board
School Math Fair
School Science Fair


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Appendix B. (Contd.)Breakdown of Community Service Events Categorization


Community Service Event Classification
Farm Bureau
Agricultural Education Ventures
Farm Bureau Meetings
Cattleman's Association
Agribusiness Council
Agricultural Groups
Native American Pow-Wow
Cultural Arts Center Dinner
Historical Festival
Explorer Civil War
Heritage Festival
Religious Events
Prayer Rally
Church
Octoberfest-Churches
Group or Club Events
Homemakers Luncheon
Art League
Fair Association
Railroad Club
Math League
Other
Yarld Sales and Flea Market
Job Fairs
Recycle Days
Tool Show
Tourism Tax
Program Participation
Forestry Conservation
Regional Science Fair
Safety Day
YES Day
RSVP Showcase
Cross Country Invitational
Political Rallies
Dog Training
Springtime Tallahassee Crash Party
School Bus Driver Training
FOP Easter Egg Hunt






47


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Appendix C. Questionnaire of Florida Fair Managers. (Following 8 pages)


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Florida Federation of Fairs

SURVEY OF FAIR MANAGERS


Please Answer for the 1998/99 Fair Season


Counties Served

List the counties served by your fair


Fairgrounds and Facilities


Fairgrounds area
Enclosed exhibit space with A/C
Covered exhibit space without A/C
Temporary exhibit space
Estimated market value for land and buildings
Parking
Visitors
Vendors' Cars/Trucks
Vendors' RVs
Total parking revenues (non-fair events)


acres
square feet
square feet
square feet


Spaces Daily Fees


$
$
$
$


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Fair Attendance

Attendance for the 1998/99fair (please try to avoid double counting)

Admissions Fee


Admissions Category

Regular admissions adults
Regular admissions children
Handicapped/Disadvantaged
Students/Chaperones
Senior Citizens
Volunteers
Exhibitors
Vendors
Total Turnstile Admissions Count


Number Per Person


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$


Employment


Employment Category
Full-time employees
All-year part-time employees
Additional part-time employees during fair
Total hours worked by all part-time employees


Volunteers


Volunteer Category

Volunteers who assist throughout the year
Volunteers who assist only during fair
Total volunteer hours for the year


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Number of Employees





hours


Number of Volunteers




hours









Fair Participation

Indicate the number of exhibitors by category and age group

Adults Youth
Agricultural Exhibitors
Livestock includingg small animals and nniltry)

Horticulture
Family and Consumer Exhibitors
Canning
nii~ltine

Sewing
Hobbies and Crafts
Other (specify)


Group Exhibitors (extension, government, schools, non-profits, etc.)
Total Number of
Group Individuals Involved







Commercial Exhibits (farm machinery, home products, computers, etc.)
Total Number of
Group Individuals Involved









51


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Revenues and Expenditures to Fair


Revenues
Admissions
Concessions
Midway
Sponsorships
Off-season events
Parking


$
$
$
$
$
$
$


Other (specify)


Expenditures
Salaries and wages $
Non-salary repair and maintenance $
Utilities $
Security $
Premiums expenditures (cash and non-cash) $
Other (specify) $
To the best of your ability, please provide an estimate of total sales during the fair for all vendors in the
following categories:

Midway rides and shows $


Food concessions

Non-Food concessions


$

$


Premiums Awarded


Cash
Total Value
$
$
$


Number


Non-Monetary
Type (specify)


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Number


Adults
Youth
Seniors











Scholarships Awarded
Number Total Value $


Payments to CivicL/haritable/Educational Groups
For services provided $
Donations (not for services) $
Monetary assistance with booths, exhibits, etc. $


In-kind Contributions
Value of booth/exhibit space donated $
Value of food and non-premium awards donated $


Special Events

Indicate special fair days (senior days, school days, etc.) provided for specific
groups, the number of participants and benefits provided (food, t-shirts, free
admission, etc.). Attach extra sheet if needed.

Number of
Group Participants Benefits Provided














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Permanent Exhibits


Indicate any permanent educational exhibits maintained by your fair that are
accessible to students or the general public during the non-fair season. Attach
extra sheet if needed and provide a brochure with detailed description if available.


Type of Exhibit
(describe)


Adult Visitors
(annually)


Student Visitors
(annually)


Off-Season Events Sponsored by Fair

Indicate any off-season events sponsored by the fair (do not include events where
the fair only rents facilities and equipment). Indicate the number of times an event
is held each year, revenues to the fair and estimated total attendance. Attach extra
sheet if necessary.


Number
of Events
(annually)


Gross Revenues
to Fair
(dollars)


Attendance
(annually)


Concerts
Hobby/Craft Shows
Trade Shows (boats, etc)
Antiques/Collectibles
Garden/Flowers/Plants
Animal Shows
Flea Markets
Other


________ $________________
________ $________________
________ $________________
________ $________________
________ $________________
________ $________________
________ $________________
________ $________________


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Event









Off-Season Events Not Sponsored by Fair

Indicate any off-season events not sponsored by the fair that occur at
the fairground. Indicate the number of times an event is held each
year, revenues to the fair and estimated total attendance. Attach extra
sheet if necessary.


Event


Number
of Events
(annually)


Concerts
Hobby/Craft Shows
Trade Shows (boats, etc)
Antiques/Collectibles
Garden/Flowers/Plants
Animal Shows
Flea Markets
Other


Gross Revenues
to Fair
(dollars)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$_____


Community Service Events

Indicate any community service events that occur at the fairground.
Indicate the number of times an event is held each year, revenues to
the fair and estimated total attendance. Attach extra sheet if
necessary.


Number
of Events
(annually)


Gross Revenues
to Fair
(dollars)


Attendance
(annually)


$
$

$

$

$


55
______ $___________

______ $___________

______ $___________

______ $___________

______ $____________


55


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Attendance
(annually)


Event
(specify)










Community Contributions

Please describe below the three most impnrnt contrihbutions that you believe the
fair makes to the local community

1.









2.









3.










Thank you for completing the survey. Please return the completed survey in the
envelope provided along with a copy of financial reports covering the 1998-99 fair
season. Also, please provide, under a separate cover, copies of any marketing
studies or surveys completed within the past five years.



56


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Full Text

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Table of Contents Executive Su mmary...............................................................................1 Introducti on............................................................................................3 Procedur es.............................................................................................3 Questionnaire Response Rate............................................................................4 Information Obtained..................................................................4 Survey Results.......................................................................................5 Fairgrounds and Facilitie s..........................................................5 Attendance and Pa rticipation.....................................................7 Fair A ttendance................................................................7 Exhibi tors..........................................................................9 Premiums Awarde d...................................................................12 Scholarships Awarded..............................................................16 Volunt eers..................................................................................18 Assistance to Civic, Charit able and Educational Groups......20 Special Event Days at Florida Fairs.........................................21 Community Serv ice Even ts......................................................23 Off-Season Events Held at the Fa irgrounds ...........................25 Employment, Revenues, Ex penditures, and Midway And Concessi on Sale s..............................................................27 Employment and Sala ries..............................................27 Reven ues........................................................................29 Expendi tures...................................................................31 Gross Sales for Concessions and Midway Operators35 Total Values Projected for All Fa irs for Selected Variables.............37 Revenues and Ex penditur es....................................................37 Projections to All Fa irs.............................................................37 Appendi x..............................................................................................42

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Off-Season Events Held at the Fairgrounds: Beyond the community service events noted in the previous section, most community fairgrounds ho st a number of other off-season events. Details are reported in Table 14. The events here are not sponsored by the fair. T he fair usually charges a rental fee to the organizing group and provides t he facility. The table repo rts the type of events, the number of annual events indicated by the re sponding fairs, revenue generated by the fairs from the events and estimates of attendance. Al though the attendance figures are reported, the numbers are somewhat suspect and should be interpreted as conservative estimates. The conservative nature of the attendance estimates is due to the fact that some fairs did not keep records of attendance at non-fair events. Overall, twenty-two fairs provided lists of off-seas on events that take place in fairground facilities. The range of events included concerts, hobby and cr aft shows, trade shows, antique shows, flea markets, and a number of animal, garden and plant shows that were not associated with the fair. Again, these numbers reinforce the perception of fair managers that fairgrounds are important locations for numerous community events. The twenty-two fairs responding to the question reported a total of 252 flea markets, 149 animal shows, over 100 trade shows, 91 hobby and craft shows and 73 concerts. When attendance and reve nues reported by the 22 fairs in the last section of the table where summed, the totals i ndicated off-season revenues of $5.8 million, and as noted above, a conservative attendance estimate of 2.9 million persons.

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