Trip 13: April, 1922.

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Material Information

Title:
Trip 13: April, 1922.
Series Title:
Correspondence and Subject Files 1921-1943
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Physical Location:
Box: 6
Divider: Subject Files
Folder: Trip 13: April, 1922.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000207:00108

Full Text





tORTO FLORrqTAL
April ,P, .P?2.
Took cerriage out to the rounds *nd found Tomouldo
GuimIrases near head quarters. Cot a nhoto.rf-nh of flats ir which
......... nt v.,tiet*.s of (forest trees snd

I species of eucalyptus, elanea,
,or recogiiise.








regularity. In Florida these seed, ire sown in drills, mailing it Dos-
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', l'L beds rirng the soriodnt of growth om the


l m qor e ue muchait ethtuce no iunlt
'I ,:>, s. A heavy crust v','s formed on the




f be of different varieties of

the most vigorous r nd s~urdy seedlings.
vidor. snhe seedlings of the Cocos
were smaller and the least vigorous of t.ose that were rphnted out. This

latter variety is doubtless a favorite boiei"rdcsa bnac

of seed.
From appoerences it seemed nrobhbly that orange and ,tamo seed-

lings are susceptible of a great deal of misuse in this poil and climate.
Seedlings three quarters of a ,eter to a meter tall vre standing around
in taquara bsk-ets holhing about three liters of soil. rey were making


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.-.OFO FLOPT?,,ALT
April 2P, ?2 ,,

Took carriage out to the rounds pnd found Eomouldo I
Guimaraes near head quarters. oot a nhotoprah of .flat.s in which
were growing seedlings of different I.,fiet-HS of/ forest trees rnd '
shade trees. These included several Fpecies of eucalyptus, Telanea,
and several species I did not know or recogiise.
Got a picture of the secd beds gorwnin the open for germina-
tion of eucalyptus seed. These are sown very much like lettuce beds 'in
Florida. Also got a view of the beds in the slat house, or rinado.
Un. going to the orchard proper I found several beds sown to
seed of oranges. These were sown bhorad cast and ncanme up without any
regular rity. In Florida these seeds are sown in drills, mtnaing it -Dos-
sible to Oive sufficient cultivation dring the period of growth of the
seedling. From the looks of the bed I am quite vettain that no culti-
vation is given after the seed is sown. A heavy crust v,.s forced on the
soil and this .rwas augmented by w.tcrin p with a s.nrinklinp not from time
to time.
There were quite a number of beds of different varieties of

mangoes. The Esnadas seemed to give the most vigorous and sturdy seedling.
The Sapotinhos seemed to be next i1 vip-or. The seedlings of the Cocos
were smaller and the least vigorous of t1iose ti-at were r !nted out. .his
latter variety is doubtless a favorite because it produces an abundance
of seed.
From appearences it seemed nrobably that orange and ,imgo seed-
lings arce sfisceptible of a great deal of misuse in thi. soil and climate.
Seedlings three quarters of a meter to a meter tall ,.ere sta-ndling around
in taquara baskets holhing about three liters of soil. "hey were -il:inp





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-------------------be able to maintain a living.

,or inarching on favorite varieties.
I.'ening has its eva@ntage in ma ci n p, the

,se Conditions during the process of
tho t i~t would be futile 'tot~ attern-ot


)Urper found severel varieties of
parertly the names of the varieties
had-jIittle meaning since all of 4hem seemed to be seedlings.
Oe variety spoken of as "Branca"' ripens with a white flesh,
already sweet but far foi ripe. The skin isvery thin, fruit is small
about 176 or snt- ler. The odor of the peel is like that of orange.
Guimaraes said it would ripen in about a month.
Another variety that looked quite promisi-,g from the single
tree was designated angering. Cot a photorrah of thiP tree
showing 'ome of the fruit. Fn.it rather small probably running about
154's at best. It is also quite probable if the soil vaF cultivated
and cover crop plowed in the fruit .vould be larger. All of the trees
of the orchard. show a rather stunted condition. The peel is rather
thin; juice pood and abundi'nt. This "Tangerino" looks like 'nerimon
iound orange. The odor of the peel reminds one of the tangerine ground
but adheres closely to the meat. 'he foliage is rather peculair, being
neither tangerine or sweet orange, being exceedingly vari able. Some
leaves were six inches long and rather narrow for the length and otl'ers
rather short and broad. 'he branches are very similar to the round
orange, see photograph.
The meat is very deep yellow and something of a tangerine
flavor and color.
Seed round, plump and somewhat green.






V- : -: -2- .
practically no growth but seemed fr be able to maintain a living.
A number of these were to be used for inarching on favorite varieties.
It is quite probable that this hardening has its advantape in making the
tree :'ble to exist under very dvere conditions during e process of
V ndvers doon i oP_1e process of

inarching. It is likewise certain that it would b futile to) attemnt
inarch
to bud into such stock. ,/
Un reaching the orchard pumper found several varieties of
oranges turning/ toward rbening. Apparently the names of the varieties
had little meaning since all of them seemed to be ,ecdlings.
One variety spoken of as "Fraca" rinens with a white flesh,

already sweet but far fo6 ripe. he skin isvery thin, fruit is snall
about 176 or smaller. The odor of the peel is like that of orange.
Guimaraes said it would ripen in about a month.
Another variety that looked quite promisilng from the single
tree was designated "'canperino". Got a nhoto-ranh of this tree
showing some of the fruit. Fruit rather small probably running about
154's at best. It is alIso quite probable if the soil waIS cultivated
and cover crop plowed in the fruit -,ould be larger. All of the trees
of t he orchard show a rather stunted condition. "he neel is rather
thinT juice pood and abundant. This "Tan.gerino" looks like acreo-ion
tound orange. T7he odor of the peel reminds one of the tangerine groun
but adheres closely to the meat. 'he foliage is rather uneculair, beinR
neither tangerine or sweet orange, being exceedingly variable. -,ie
leaves were .ix inches long and rather narrow for the length and ot].ers
rath r short anrd bwnad. 'he branches are very similar to the round
orange, see photograph.
The meat is very deep yellow and something of a tan-perine
flavor and color.
Seed round, plump ,nd somewhat .5reen













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Season too early to study the fruit to gnod advantagee
The trunk of the tree and larger limbs hrd bee-n Fstri-pped
and white washed. This is undoubtedly a good practice since borers
!. I w sters are mo ore or less destructive in this -nFc1 '"he borers
usually affect some of the larger limbs, work inward and downward.
The lrvxae and burrows of this insect look sormethinp, like the borers
we had in the unitedd States.
TPhe Inext view sh haigbe
Thnext view shows the rows of the orange trees baving been
white ..ashed together with the barrel vnrl white wsh can,.
A considerable nu mber of long scale or pur-nie scale were
present on the tree. The small white Coccinelliad that I saw at Vi-
o908s was also Present in a few intE-nces! Some of there trees had the
white headed fungus -Fgrowing on the sC ales.





















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