Trip 10: Industria Pastoril, Pinheiro, Deodora.

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Title:
Trip 10: Industria Pastoril, Pinheiro, Deodora.
Series Title:
Correspondence and Subject Files 1921-1943
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Physical Location:
Box: 6
Divider: Subject Files
Folder: Trip 10: Industria Pastoril, Pinheiro, Deodora.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000207:00105


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Trip Ho. 10.
Visit to Industria epstoril, Pinheiro, Deodoro, cnr
-I Institute C.w91oo Cruz.

Left Bello Horizonte e(* 25,11, 4 in co:iny

with my family for Eio le Joneiro.
Dec. 26, 121, arrived at Rio de Janeiro ,bout 8:30 o'clock.
Prodeded immediately to the hotell Avenida. At this placee we marie our
headquarters. It ralned practically the whole of this day. Visited
the American Consulate for registration$ fand eomrpleted the work there.
After dinner we took the bonde to the Hotel International and visited
with *,r- and ,,rs. -. W. D. Holway.
Dec. 27, 1121l. Visited the american .mbapsy before break'a't.
After breakfast visited the
Industria Pastoril.
(See next nage).




<
* ?



Industrial Fastoril.
Tues, Dec. .7, lO21- Immediately after breakfast I made my
way out to the institute which is loepted on t-ua Iachado. The institu-
tion is being orgrnised in the s.tructures that were erected for the Es-
cola Sunerior de Vaterinerit. This school was transferred to Nitcheroy
a few years agot The main building was onli. pr'-,rtially comnl-eted. T'any

of the laboratories are just on +he point of being inst.l]]:,3. Some of
them are riready well equiprecl and, functioning. In addition o tfhe
"ain building a smaller building of considerable size vwas being used
as a laboratory for meat insepca.io. Poth eheGm'caEl caind tiol/6ical
exa-minations of the nmar ,-ere beinp. mrde his work wasF 'henp eurried
on by i^r. Spitz and Dr- Pi'iti, both renchmen End r:educoted in that
country.
On reaching the Front offices, a young mrn by Ihe name of

r.e 'oacyr de ouza was detailed to accompany me through the institution-
"e began out tour at the -mmin building, going to each of the individual

laboratories and meeting the heads and assistants or these laboratories.

of pparatus" In many of the lIb-
completely, due to the lack of funds
e an iu building d seeing t thec

1e. da vilion in w1,bch the live stock
ere emronty as the animals had n-ssed
:'ibuted f-o other stations. I made
...... .... .ire stock pavilion, which gives
water 'asin is seen o-- the

central foreground. This is for supplying water to the corridors for
washing the ports outside of the stalls. In each atoll there is a con-

crete water and feed trough, separate prom all the otters. The floors




I
: !



Industria 'astoril.
uesC, Dec. 1"?, 192 1- immediately after breakfast i male my
way out to the institute, which is looted on Eua Machado. 'he institu-
tion is being orgrFnised in the structuress that were erec-ed for the cEs-
cola Superior de Vaterinaria. This school was transferred to Hitcheroy
a few years ago: The main building was only partially eormnl,-ted. "any
of the laboratories -re just on lie point of being in-otr]-llr. Some of
them are readyy well cquinnecd End; functioning. in ridition o the
'ain building a smaller buile'ing of considerable size was being used

as a laboratory for meat insepc.sio* roth chemacl Cand bio16gcal
excaminitions of the -ear -e'.re beinp -irde his work wa:s einp orrvied
on by Dr. Spitz and Dr. PtHti, both Zrenehmen end --educated in that
country.
On reaching the front offices, a young mmn by the name of
9r. 94oacyr de ouza was detailed to accompany me through the institution.
"e began out tour at the mrin building, going" to each of the individual

laboratories rjnd meeting the heads and assistants or' these laboratories.
There was generally a rreat abundance of apparatus In mrny of the lab-
oratoises this hacd not been insl,' lled completely, clue to the lack of funds
for doing so. afterr biwwing the main building ;-nd seeing c-ll the
Laboratories there we proceeded to the pavilion in v',1ch the live Ptock
was being kept. M--ort of the stalls were empty as the animals had nasped
through the quarantine and 1,:.en distributed to other stations. I made
an4 exposure on the interior of the live stock pavilion, which gives
a n idea of thie general arrangement. ,- water Thsin is seen o-.- the
central foreground. This is for supplying water to the corridors for
washing the parts outside of the stalls. In each tall there is a con-

crete water and feed trough, separate -rom all the others. The floors








. .........










-2-
oR the stalls are concrete, sloping backward to a putter. '"here were
found to 'Ie sanewhat hard on 1he anirnrls feet and have been covered
with removable wooden floors. The wooden floors are taken u-n aind washed.
Two segment c.f lhe wooden floor may ihe s-een employed as gates for the
first stall in the picture. In front of the same stall may be seen two

of these wooden floor segments placed upright to guard the goats that
were kept inside. After visiting the stock pavilion we visited the new
pavilion that was being constructed for the Centennial Exposition, to
house the cattle during that time. Lr. Souze explained that this na-
ler light end temporary structure. Concrete floors
4 n, and the uprights to hold the structure in nlace
Son But for the explanation, I should have judgedcl t
'- ywas intended as a permanent one.
S '. iting the stalls we made a visit to the new concrete
ring completion in construction, The silo arTneared
feet in diameter and about twenty t-o feet tall,
its diameter. The chumte wap marl of concrete' Dr.S.
the first silo built ir Prazil and therefore they
this structure. (A silo has been in use at Oanelleira
k, and has probably seen service for a /longer time.)
k, when introduced from froeign countries will here-
........... n island in the harbor at Rio, where they will be
kept under observation for the necessary length of ti-ne. Work on this
island had just begun and no structutes yet erected. -! the work was
in its initial stages end it required an additional day, I di,! not take t-
to visit it, iho 'r. Souza was anxious to have me lo so.







-2-
ot the stalls are concrete, sloping backward to a butter. hese were
found to 'c someewhat hard on the anim.-ls feet and have been covered,
with removable wooden floors. 'ho wooden floors are Ia-en up ,nc washed.
wo sce.,ents of the wooden floor may be een employed as gates for the
first stall in the picture- In front of the same stall may be seen two
of those wooden floor segm,-nts placed upright to guard the goats that
were kept inside. After visiting the stock -oavilion we visited the new
pavilion that wvas being constructed for the Centennial positioni, to
house the cattle during that tine. r. Souze explained that this na-
violion was f rather light and temporary structure. Concrete floors
were being IEid down, and the uprights to hold the structure in -lace

were of railroad iron 5ut for the explanation, I should have judge, t
that the structure was intended as a permanent one.
After visiting the stalls we made a visit to the new concrete
eilo. This was nearing-completion in construction, he silo trneared
to be about twelve feet in diameter and about twenty twvo feet tall,
rather too low for its diameter. The chute war mad of concrete- Dr.S.
said that this was the first silo built in ?razil and therefore they
wanted it to be of this structure. (A silo has been in use at Gamelleira
for at east a year, -ndi has probably seen service for a Iloneer time.)
Live stock, when introduced from ,Proeign countries will here-
after be taken to an island in the harbor at Rio, %.here they will be
kept under observation for the necessary length of tine. -ork on this
island had just begun and no s*ruetuvtrs yet erected. s the work was
in its initial stages and it required an additional day, I did not take time
to visit it, tho er. Sou-a was anxious to have me do so.












-4-
Pinheiro
Dec. 28, 1921. Had a note of introduction from Lr. Souza
to the Direntfr at Pinheiro. The institution id located on the left
,-arra do Pirahy and Sao Taulo, about
lio :e Janeiro
bout 10:?0 o'clock. horse car
eat of the institution. I went
:nd after a wait of about twenty

who ('ietai led Ygron 0Carlos 'ello


Originally the site of the institution was a fazc-nda, more
or less improved. A few years ago kha National College was located
on the fazenda. This was later moved to Titcheroy.
The institution ownt-d about 2,000 hectares of land, about
800 head of live stock all told, about 5OC head of cattle, l'0 hoad
of horses and other draft animals, 70 head of hogs, ahout:PO sheep
and some goats.
They have under cultivation about 8 hectreas of corn, 3 of rice,
5 of mandioca, 6 of cane, 1 of alfalfa, and about 3 hectares of various
experimental forage crops. The range is principally of Gurdura. This
is relied unon as the main n.-sture grass. mall arep is also ilalbted
to Capim Chloris. Some Sudan grass is also planted. This is well thot
of.
1.e grounds are superbly kent. The buildings are spacious
and well adapted to the instructional work. There are about 200 internatos,
or patronatos a]s they r-re termed. Everything is free to the students.
They work and study on alternate days. They are mostly young -en who are
in need of an education and have not the means Sor obtaining it. 7o stu-
dents are taken under sixteen yecrs of age. 'Tany of those that I saw






-4-
Pinheiro
Dec. 28, 1921. Had a note of introduction from Dr. Souza
to the Director at Pinheiro. The institution id located on the left
hand side of the railroad between -Pfrra do Pirahy and Sao Paulo, about
three and a half hours ride from "io le Janeciro o
Arrived ht the station about 10:"0 o'clock. horse car
runs between the station and the set of the institution. I went
immediately to the reception hall and after a wait of about twenty
or thirty minutes met the Dirsettor who detailed Agron'Carlos 0ollo
Filho to show me the institution.
Originally the site of the institution was a fazenda, more
or less improved. A few years ago the National College was located,
on the fazenda. This was later moverl to Titcheroy.
,The institution owned about 2,000 h'nectares of l-nd, about
800 head of live stock E,11 told, about cOC head of cattle, 100 head
of horses and other draft animals, 70 hea-l of hogs, s'out, PO sheep
and some goats.
They have under cultiv;tion about 8 hectreas of corn, 3 of rice,
5 of mandioca, 6 of cane, 1 of alfalfa, and about 3 hectares of various
experimental forage crops, The range is principally of Ourdura. This
is relied unon as the main nrpture grass. small are: is also planted
to Capim Chloris. Some Sudan grass is also planted. This is well thot
of.
.e grounds are superbly kont. The buildings are spacious
and well adapted to the instructional work. There are about 200 internatop,
or patronatos as they iro termed. -verything is free to the students.
They work and study on alternate days. They are mostly young ien who are
in need of rn education and have not tlke means 6or obtaining it. 7o stu-
dents are taken under sixteen yenrs of age. '.Iiy of those that I saw









irdi





LI







-5-
looked rather under developed for this age. NTearly all of those that I
saw wore fine looking boys.
The Diredtor showed me number of the dA ss rooms. The one
arranged forthe study of soil physics was especially elaborate and the
materials for demonstration well prepared. Cleanliness and orderliness
seemed to be of first consideration. In a general way, the rnnaratus
and the supplies for the differentt laboratories -ere such aEs we usu-
ally have for high schools in the United States.
The administrative offices are unusually well and tastefully
prepared. The conference hall is about 14 x 16 meters with 0 li'jo table
in the center" Four chasfs were on each side and one -t erich end.
T'nt....n ...nn 4...,-. -..- ,.;".,.. e -est and three to the north, win-

..- ... .velvet hangings for the doors and
A it hangings al the windows. "heIi ceiling
P, 'T ith ror a e in *ntin ftinF.-P.
-"* nr5 bTd rooms I visited rour- of
,, h. 'hey were very clos-ly nlnced
numerouss .-en,9 open, lc-ttinr a food
--_ ventilated.
In thedis-tribu-tion of the buildings for instructional nurnoses

-Hment or attention n~id fo convenience



I: .....s for the live stock end found

"Prepred.. It ,,OFa lonp,6 reuse of
fifty meters lonv,' very s1'acious an;
..the railrotrd. The- :Fiie away. -rom







', ** ". .- 5 -- -; *? *-** *
looked rather under developed for this ,ge. NTearly all of those that I
saw were fine looking boys.
The Diredtor showed me a number of the calss rooms. The one
arranged forithe study of soil physics was especially elaborate and the
materials for demonstration well n-re-nred. Cleanliness and orderliness
seemed to be of first consideration. In a general way, the apparatus
and the supplies for the different laboratories -'ere such as we usu-
ally heve for high schools in the united Stftes.
The administrative offices are unusually well and tastefully
prepared. The conference hall is about 14 x 16 meters with a lrqge table
in the center" Four char's were on each side and one at r'ch end.
There were four large windows to the -.es.t and tree to the north, win-
dows about 1 1/2 meters ,,'i.e. PIeavy velvet hangings for the' doors and
windows eand lace curtains over the hangings ol the win-,ows. 'e ceiling w
of this hall was ortistic,-ol.. nrencrc,2 "ith fo'' fine -r-intinc-F.
The nvatonatoq sleep in 1h,-rve ,.1 ro.mrs. I visited four of
these 1hat had rbout thirty I ,c1. cach. They were very clo,--ly ,L-iced
together. The v windows were nimfr numerous Cn,9 open, letting a flood
of sunphine- in, quarters excellently ventilated.
In the distribution of the buildings for iiiFntructional ,;rnooses
there seemed to be no special arrangement or attention nr-id to convenience
for getting from one to Tihe other.

Live Stock.
V-e visited the range of houses for the live stock ',Inn found
thpc especially sunptuouF --'nd, \well nrenored. It "aF a 1ongt range of
buildings, prob:: bly one. hundred f-nd fifty meters lone, ver'y psnacious ,n'
.11 v.,ntili'tcd f om thr, side toward the r&ilro d. The F.ide away fron



















iW7






-6-

the railroad a part of the hill had !o be cut out to locAte the builliing.
The ventilation from this side was not so good. The stalls were ar-
ranged in sections so that h'-e animals stood narallel to the length of
the building; giving a sPace -bout equally wide for nas.ing in the build-
ing. Aside from this there war good roe'1 outside o' 'he building.
Four cattle were ke-nt in each section- roncroete floors r-,d concrete
trough, heavy wooden structures for keeping the anindjs in place. 1c
stanchions were used. The amount of space useld -ror the livre rock was
... .... -- .. ed fnr exhibition pu-rposes.
Vic" rather srmcller End less spacios
Itie' -he how e- was le--ss well u'en-




i~aI
'tB. To s~ee the anima-'ls i t vas
K5. vs hownr No rice Arbian


I ds woere present in ihe Louse.

hil, 2rovwn w.iss, Vurbam, .,ereford,
UaracI. These were all registered stodk and kept for breeding purposes.
St......... k........ .... "-... ...... king F-peciriens, probably due to having

toeciens of Jeroarseys w ere esnecillY
Shing b.t lredita-le onimais.
A" 'ne foi L.wing breeds wer present.

and L-rre -lpc-k. All of these '-a(d
Canastra. 'he nestesos o0r -he 'uro.
ad one specimen they called Canastra
pussy fat fhing thrt would weigh about
two hundred pounds, active and very agile in spite of its excessively
corpulent appearence"
Gr[.dd- Cattle. '-e visited Ihe pasture nearby Pnd found a herd

of twenty or thirty, mostly cu'rrles. -Two of these were esrecially fine
4p


I .- -






-6-

the railroadl a pfrt of the hill h E to be cut out to locde the buil.ing.-
Thu ventilation from this Fide was not so good.'. ho, stalls were ar-
ranged in ,'*tions sI 'hat `h- animals stood riirallel to the length of

the building; giving a tnace rbout equally 1vi de for passing in the build-
ing. Aside from this here wrs tn .ood roo-e'1 outside of the building.
Four cattle were kept in coh .ecion Concrete floors nd concrete
troughd, heavy wooden sFtructures for I-:e,-ing the anirl'9is in place, Nc
stanchions were used. The ,-ount of space : urscd for the live stock was
much -no-rc'. rnm-l that Is usually emnloyed fnr exhibitionn purrnoses.
Horses. e. ese izerz kept in a rather smaller Erd less spacious
k" building tK-,t the one used or the cttle.- The hou e was l.:ss well irc'i-

tilated and darker that thr, t for ih,-- Ii -le To see the animals it -as
s!necsary to tekV- t'ef out o, ,he sb lls. I was shovT two nice Arabian
stallions.

Cattle. The following breeds -.ore present in Ihe house.
iollandaiseC,' Jersey, imCnenthi, A rv1 m vi ss rurhar, 7ereford
Iclad.i.e -uernsey, ow

Uar.clc. thesee were all registered Ptobk and kept for breeding purposes.

The ,uen-iseys were rather inferior looking -pecir,,i.ns, probably due to having
sunt out all of the good ones. The soe.i-ens of Jerseys w ere especially
inferior. The urha-.s clso were anything byt redit-,ifble animals.
Tog. Pure bred enimi'ls of the f'ol rv ing breeds wer n resent.

Duroc Jersey, Poland Chihp, T'orkshire and 3 rr-e ?lcrk. All of T these 'd
beed used for crossing o0-1 Ihe native Canastra. '"he Mestesos o0 the "uro
e. seys were especially fine. They hard. one specimen they called Canastra
but looked to Qe like th. Tattoo. A pussy fat fhing that would a'weigh about:

two hu'lrecd 1oundcs, active and very a-ile in spite of its excessively
..orpulent -. ppe, rence
I-rdd Car title. 'e visited the pasture nearby fnd found a herd

of twenty or thirty, mosti c'resTes. Two of those were especially fine









II









Pik









on the herd but with insufficint
ound of the picture s'ows a Flamengo




rk is being done in the wey of in-
expneriment-s fin, being n r-d .vith var-
IoUs KinrIs 01 a.LT n.a Woect was obtained 1from Toyas p-nve th}e best results..
1n exposure on the orangee testing grounds was made hut the picture Cailed




"f" ro o years et thI-own ws* .ol. was

.ant w.s espectirily well fitted u,
"' '- 'butter hr.d been nrde an3 i -.en some
be lity. There wasi an ice slant but
it we r. The uieufl electric source had
not been sufficient to provide pnmver for the institution* I had expected
to return to the dairy lrboralory for n more detailedl cyraminalion of -ho
apparatus '--t a rain in 'he afternoon interfered with the rlc-nd.









looking specimerns. ', '!],-- an exposure on. th,:r herd but ,,ith ins i fficant
light. OnU c' f the c o',, in Ihe foreground of the picture Fhvows a Fi@.'ncrn
mestesos. The other Limousina.

Forage.

A considerable mount of work is being lone in the way of in-
troducing now forc,!e crops. Car;,"ul exnerinlen't. 'r,' beinp,' r1-le ",ith va-r-
wh ich
ious kinds of alfalfa o-ed wias obtFained from Texas gave the best results..
in expesure on the forape testing grounds vwas -iade but fhie picture riled
to ut useful.

L iry.
A. P. A. Souzf, who spent two years at 4the town Ag. Col. was
in cahrge of the Dairy. The dairy plant '-.ves especiflly ".ell fitted un
with machinery ;:nd appliances. So e butter hrd been mno-e and -I v' some
specimens of thi, of most cx-'llent quP.lity. There was, an ice plantt but
n.t in operation due to the lc-ok of power. The Floi electric source had
not been sufficient to provide power for the institution I had expected
to return to the dairy I-.boratory for a nore detailed e:a-m!inntion of :iu
a@-pa&rCtus Lut a rain in -he afternoon interfered with the pr-nd.

















4 oloW











,MAIGOES
Varieties, Deedoro, Dec. 29, 3-921.

The trees were located at the top of a hill, near the
headquarters. !ony of the trees had been used repeatedly from which to
take inarches. Some of the work was in progress at the time of the
visit. Apparently the foliage of the 4rees was rather Fhort and hard,
o.ot much young growth and where it occurred the leaves were being pro-
duced rather sparingly 11any of the trees bore f uit even tho only
a year or two old from inurch. Colletotrichum streaking w.as
present on practically all of the trees. One tree of Eosa had a large
crop of fruit hanging on it less severely affected than some of the
other varAieties;, It appeared to be one of the most vigorous trees in
the plantation. Apparently the tree was of a type of this variety
bearing fruit that was below the best of those seen in 1io. Other
trees of ilosa were quite small and producing small fruits. -"s a
whole the fruit on the trees seemed to be below the standard size tho
undoubtedly true to rname.
The following varieties were seen on the ground (1-) Rosa,
(2), Itamaraca, (3), Carlota, (4), Augusta, (5), Bourbon (6), spatda
-osa, (7), Familia, (8), Livia., (9), ancy, (10), Espada; (11), Cecelia
avalho.

(5), Purbonstem end shaped like that of "undersha. Distal
end raised above /he apex. gome without distinct raise of t,e distal
end. General shape of the fruits same as the Hspnada- excerting that the
Espada comes more to a distinct and sharp point at the bloom c-n-1 than
the Burbon"
ripens greenish yellow, apparently less color than the ssnada,
Young foliage rather crisp kxa texture and brownish color.







-2-

Lm Leaves range small. Lateral ribe prominent, raised more on

the lateral surface thaEn on the up-er-


'about four meters tall, five meters

I characteristics vi-ible. Fruit


furrow frequently present.


a

I
t..i '

.. ii ^ .
tt \


E ilar to Espada and %urbon. Tloom
n the case of the srada" Ventral

htxyewwxin -olor of the fruit, reddish.

prominent on both sides.


t.
C" '


/
/'


p~ -J


short, approaching the flatness of the


' 7A' -
I.


",., ;./


4


S highly coloredand showing

Sent, raised on both sides.

r to uiguoba, excepting

f shape of fruit on the

iavereFe run of the 1'hil.o

Some of the fruits very

Carlota, other fruits long,



iming lighter with age.


irched tree abort 1 met.r

t blush. Sheped like a

t t stigmatie Pres.

he feel. '-'ounf leaves wine

*S


N

.ha--. -- ~ e~..


* ;


?






-2-


Lm Leaves range small. Lateral ribe Prominent, raised more on
the lateral surface than on the upner r



10) Espada" A large tree about four meters tall, five meters
broad. Very much like Burbon in all characteristics visible. Fruit
too young to be used for cmmn prison ,


(6) Espada hosa, shaped similar to Espad a end -burbon. 3loo-n
end of the fruit usually lower than in the case of the -sroda. Ventral
furrow frequently present. NxyeXDX*xiix olor of the fruit, reddish.
IIo young leaves Iresent. Leaves small, ribe prominent on both sides.
Possibly a little more prominent above.


(.-'Iruits shorter than 'Burbon, highly colored,and showing
goos crop. Leaves medium size, xeins prominent, raised on both sides.
ruit reddish with yelloWbacgmround, similar to -ulgoba, excepting

the red is higher colored. -uch variation of shape of fruit on the
same tree. Size a trifle smaller than t-'e averaere run of the Aipifo
bas in luidq, variable on the saoe tree. Some of the fruits very
short, approaching the flatness of the Carlota, other fruits long,
appraoching the length of the "urbon.
Young foliage deep wine color, turning lighter with age.
Peduncles bright red. Fruit polyembryonic.


(11), Cecilia Carvalho. Smsal1"inarched tree aboit 1 meter
tall. Eight fruits nearly grown, with slight blush. Shreed like a
lulgoba excepting that it ends in ia'nrominent stigrawtie pren.
Side ribs of leaves prominent to the feel. Younif leaves wine

















I Ns















4. 5?
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C
'A
N
I >


~l.

I ~




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I, V.*










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I -











A,


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J4 'QI-


IC-


1k


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-3-
colored, more brilliant thah Rosa, bit about same shade. Old leaves
medium siz'ed. z.ibs probably more prominent on the lower surface.
Peduncle yellowish. One fruit cut ones and outlin-d. need

monoembryonic, see outline sketch.

(7), Familia. New lewses brownish red, "'ibs r.rominent on
the upper side, smooth on the lower side- Fruit anpbrently s-hrne of
Mulgoba, still green will probably ripen smaller than Lulpobas-. Will

probably ripen yellow- Not short enough for 'ombay type. Fruits

slightly longer dorso-ventral diameter.

(Q ,. *'^ ~^~' 1 meter tall. Pelving nearly pro,,n

-it similar to the ilia- Peduncles


green with slightly reddish creas be-
on the un.ier F-ide, leFr so on, the



about a meter and a htlf tal.

Fruits nearly prown. generall


'S


S2


U-LVLA.LUViC1 OUULL L VUiI


turve at the stipmatic area.
p.


Lamarack type of frlit. Fruits
!End smaller than the Augusta.

e size fruit ftorn the tree

!er under more favorable cir-
color of the -f-Uit v.llow,
incle denrossed, riorsal and
or ide much exaFp-erated, ventral side








colored, nore brilliant thah Rosa% bit about same shade. Old leaves
medium sized. zibs probably more prominent on the lower surface.
Peduncle yellowish. One fruit cut onea and outlined. -eed

monoembryonic, see outline sketch*

(7), Familia. New la, ss brownish red, "ibs prominent on

the upper side, smooth on the lower side* Fruit apparently shane of
Mulgoba, still green will probably ripen smaller than iulpobas. will
probably ripen yellow- Not short enough/ for bombay type. 1ruits
slightly longer dorso-ventral diameter.

(9), Nancy. Tree about 1 meter tall. -eauing nearly grown
fruit and some bloom. Ohape of fruit similar to the iamilia. Peduncles
yellowish.
loung foliage yellowish -reen with slightly reddish areas be-
tween the veins. Veins prominent on the under side, less so on the
upper.

(V), Livia. smell tree about a meter and a half tall.
Leaves similar to Cecilia Oarvalho. Fruits nearly rown.- General

shape like Iulgoba, but witIv a distinct recurve at the stigmatic area.
"bout the same size as the Ieeilia Carvalho.

(3). C-.rlota. Belongs to the Itamarac& type of fiit. Fruits
running probably larger than the Itamarach cnd smaller ,han the Auoista.
See outline Fruits 5 x 7 x 6 cm. Average size fruit fuom the tree
but apparently the firuit would be much larger under more favorable cir-
cumstances. 3eed monoembyyonic. General color of the fruit yellow,
slightly more orange than the Pombay. / PedRuncle denrosied, .dorsal nnd
ventral shoulders about even. Dorsal side -niuch exage-rated. ventral side




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considerably smeller- 'tigmatic surface sometimes slightly depressed,
much nearer the ventral side.
Tested fruit deecriped above was below normal size. Fiber
almost entirely wanting. Pulp could be easily eaten with a teasDoon.
Color of meat slightly deeper color than lc-on- 7!lting r nd delicious,
free from fiber.
Seed coat veins running from upper end to lower end, s ome
starting away from the peduncle, some branching and some anastasmosing.
Seed monoembryonic. Two prominences on the seed coat, one on the
stigmatic area and the other on the upper part of the ventral shoulder.



1, flavor similar to +be ulcoba.

Ccid- Color of fruit more frequently

Apparently very near relative to



,-,1 Lu.-gua- ,ery Piinar to the Ctrlota. Shape and gen-
eral dimentions same as Carlota, but unua&ly running much larger. '"he
Umbinate area likely to be raised or enlarged. Veins of the leaves nlain-

ly visible but lefs elevated than in the case of the 'Burban. Young
leaves like ItamaracW'and Carlota. Pedunclds yellowish. ? .;^ ,
QZ4 lei,
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-4-


considerably smEller. tigmatic surface sometimes slightly depressed,
much nearer the ventral side.
Tested fruit described above was below normal size. Fiber
almost entirely wanting", ulp could be easily eaten with a teaspoon.
Color of moat slightly deeper color than l-emon- Ieolting cund delicious,
free from fiber.
4 Seed coat veins running from unper end to lower end, some
starting away from the peduncle, some branching and some anastasmosing.
Seed monoembryonic. Two prominences on the seed coat, one on the
stigmatic area and the other on the upper part of the ventral shoulder.
f-f- t. 7. eC4 f L~t~aaJ aLi 'r~'c"tf-o-r"/ fA'- ''ia-ttj^ ta*'frx^w B^- ^Ai-c--Z^ c~
1 7-. Cf.-* wr f -Z

(P). Itamarach. Fruit small, flavor similar to the :'ulgoba.
Same general outline as Carlota'
Young leaves plae brown, flacid- Color of fruit more frequently
pinkish blush than in case o' Carlota. Apparently very near relative to
the Carlota. d- k..t r- ^cc x,
9Ci-r^- L at- 4Zf--- F
(4). Augusta. Very similar to the Carlota. Shape and gen-
eral dimentions same as Carlota, but unuaily running much larger. The
Umbinate area likely to be raised or enlarged. Veins of the leaves plain-
ly visible but lep-s elevated than in the case of the Burban. Young
leaves like ItamaracW'and Carlota. Pedunclds yellowish. -- /n

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-5-


-before visiting the mango plD;ntation, Canargo and myself
wnot to the vinhed6,- Found Dr. Operetta and he took us ove-,r the olace
and showed us a great many of the varieties that were being cultiva-
ted. Fifty two varieties were under trial. large number of these
were of North American varitetis. The muds were put in a year ago.
. Buds were put in during August. Many of these buds had grown to 'o
more than six feet long. A few had four and five bunches of p-ranes
almost rine.
Empire State according to Dr. Berreto was the best flavored
vareity that they had. Second to Empire State was ",rante". The ,'.p-
ire State ripens white. The flavor of one of the bunches w s esnecial-
ly delicious, very sweet and the aroma very strong. The pulp "is meaty
for that H&ass of -ra nep. Prante is a colored grane and rone of them
were fully ripe so those tasted were not sufficeintly ripe to give a
good idea of their quality. One Brante vine had eight bunches. This
was from a cutting rooted a year ago.
The best stalk according to Dr. Berreta wasa variety known
as Baretto. The second best was Concord.
The whole vinhard is located on a steep hill side- T"ere
seems to be little difference in the vigor of the grades of those on
the sides and near the bottom of the hill. Pcths are cut at convenient
plabes ih the vinhard to make it pnopsible to get to all prts conven-
iently. The stalk as a whole looked very clean and healthy. A' small
amount of diseases were present on some of the leaves, Fhowing a small
black spot.
At the dswwiixg dwelling, Dr. Berreta had planted one variety
of grapes at each post*, he posts are about one and a half meters apart.
The veranda is cohered with translucent glass. It is probably that he






-6-


expects to train there vines under the glass.
Dr. Berreto says that both the Concord and the Ferreto are
.. .i-. -....._, made on the residence Phowvs slight







orchard a messenger brought the
a was at the laboratory, ,o
ome out from the Deodoro s-tation
afoot and was going afoot over the promises. During hip visit we had
breakfast at the laboratory. This was gotten by the mon who lives in
tVe laboratory and has general care of it. It ,aO a spelndid lunch
and about equal to waht we ordinarily would call dinner. I had my
first drink of Abacate Cha. It was archer bitter, strong flavored of
bay and of light strww color. I did not mnke :ny inquiries as to how
this was prepared. Apparently it is prepared in much the same was as
tea excepting the -possibly the fresh leaves of the avocado -re used.
Soon after breakfast Dr. ,,oreira wa ],ed bpck to the De6doro station.









...... ... I. *


AL






-6-


expects to train these vines under the glass.
Dr. Berreto savys that both he Concord and the Ferreto are
Phy1oxera resistantt. The exposure made on. the reside-nce shows slight
movement, so is not of much ,V lue.





While visiting the nango orchard a messenger brought the
information that Dr. Carlos Moreira was at the laboratory, so Mr.
Camargo and I went over. He had come out from the Deodoro station
afoot and was going afoot over the premises. During his visit we had
breakfast at the laboratory. This was gotten by the man who lives in
t'e laboratory and has general rare of it. It --as a spelndid lunch
and about equal to waht we ordinarily would call dinner. I had my
first drink of Abacate Cha. It was archer bitter, strong flavored of
bay and of light strwv color. I did not mke -ny inquiries as to how
this was prepared. Apparently it is prenared in much the same was as
tea exceplinp the -possibly the fresh leaves of the avocado are used.
Soon after breakfast Dr. Y'.oreira wal(,ed bpci to the :ebdoro station.









II











a


-f t. ar- -






OQ"IVALDTO (.FTTZ


Dec. 30, 1921.
In cornm-any with Dr. Cost& Lima we went out to the Oswaldo
Cruz Institute. ,.e got there a little after nine, but Dr. Chagas had
not yet arrived, so we took up our visit to the different deparjt'nents.
The laboratory occupied by Dr. "swaldo Cruz is kept in the original
state, many of the books and other literature as well as arianncos
have been left in *he state in which O.wavldo Cruz left te em.
One of the first men that we -net there w-str. Adolpho Lutz,
who speaks and writes in serral nngpuage,. At the time of our visit
he was rifiking a study of the batrc'dhians of Brazil. He shiower us lraw-
ings of TProtozoans affecting the human species which in rart of their
life cycle riass through snails. In this connection he had mnde a rather
complete study of the snail fauna of Prizil. It is probably in some
similar connection as this that he is naking a collection of the' ?-itra-
chians and doing systematic work on these.
Dr. Bowman C. Crowell, a rmacnadian who sent tome time in the
Phillipine Islands has charge of the work in the Autopsy laboratory.
In this laboratory are enmplete rrcords of all autopsies held, numbering
in all several thousand.
Dr. L-auro Trravesso has charge of the Helmitholopy and works in
a laboratory very much congested with specimens and materials. 7e has
great quantities of ,ar-,iitic vermes. Only th.oe that affect animals are
studied. This is intelf is ouite a task for one man to undertake.
Librarian, Appuerus "ynpolitus Overmeer is of German Iescent.
The library is three stacks high. The book shelve-s C--re of s'-eel withh
steel doors that lock between the pasc a-e wanys. Thi. cc'-ipletely shuts
off one cornmpc-tmi.nt or on,, set of shelves from another. It is said to

be the most complete scientific library in southh Americ, TA-' magazine







room, which seems to be used also as a reading room, is separate prom
the book s lacks and from'-,the librarians office. Magazines as they are
received are put in rlnace on the lrpe table. After remaining here .for
a short time they are placed in drawers, each -aaF.zine hbvinP it own
drawer. After a sufficient number of them accumulate, they are filed
and bound, and placed in the book stacks.
Joaquim Tinto de Silva viaF in charge of the photogranhic
laboratory. Eyery negative that is male in the laboratory is printed
and the print fastened in a photographic k"z album. In this was the
man in charge can keep track of the negatives andl see at a gp'lance
what ones pro available. This laboratory is very elaborate and complete.
Even to the extent of having a machine for taking motion picture films.
After visiting the various laboratories wnd work shops we wont
back to r. Chagas office nn-in met hin. ie pissed the time of day with
him C-:nd then retired fro the office. -n addition to the usual
laboratories that one would exooct fo find with the sci-ntific institution
we we.re shown the printer, which does all of its own work excepting the
ma'r-ing of plaites, 8exptiag including the final binding of the volumes.
ae also -found a mechanical dc-partemnt which construct various materials
of wood and irofn. There is also s depari'eCa of0 glass blowing, in this
department several artisans were at work making 's-necial for! o tub -s'
for distributing serum and ta'-ing c- re of serum. "he boxes for sending
out the serum c, rademe in the infii institution. Of a necessity
which entailed more handwork than usually occurs in c-trblishments
especially designed for making boxes and other materials of that kind.
At breakfast ti:n-e d. Co,-t Lima took vs to breakFast whore we

were met by '. ,utz anrid one or t.'o ot' ers.
An adjunct to the institution is a acquerium which has not yet





p.-
been completed.
The laboratory for the study of the medicinal rla-in of
t'razil has just been comroleted, but xS:yBt>: the apparatus had not yet
been bignxnx installed or work begun- Thip is C very interesting
adjunct to the '1nstituto Oswc,-l,,i Criuz.


Li'








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