Trip 9: Quro Presto.

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Title:
Trip 9: Quro Presto.
Series Title:
Correspondence and Subject Files 1921-1943
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Physical Location:
Box: 6
Divider: Subject Files
Folder: Trip 9: Quro Presto.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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AA00000207:00104


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*Trio No.
0 -- P-.._ O- to ?' to .ov. 2,' l.
Pt. October P, 4:15 train for.




j/Lmhc^o '<'jyuig'wu oi aa role nd ''"ois of,-"'-' ~p''r'o n
n o b rn J-n-_io e l. on t ei io. Arrived
lad quarters ao the rcoffcolo Tiotel.
a -Ionteiro, rArs. P. I. '0.lfs, Lfie
Hotel is a rather ancient structure
e basement bnO about t ll s f a dozen
to have been built about 75 or 80
B, .oj. -'L/uing wF oia ano rn. .''Vot o0 f tm,' Uins e.ere of an-
...----....-), od excellent. Service polite
of tected of an old timse Klace.
J, Ton nteiro caella, 4o us an, we startCd
-""t visit rsto the church on the bill
-he interior of te. church. iter
i- of the church we crossed an iron
", eEck to headquirters. 'Yissing Jown
-..... lon of the School of Minas. Part
of the building h,3 been demolished but a part was still stEnding. The
e ar- s ago. i-lade two exposures on the

ed on to the new School of ?`inass.
P-pital. "Hde three different exposures
School, which is a vc:ritable forti-
le entrance, the rest is gu'-,r,ed by a
for tle original building of t ,e
r viwwing the exterior of the School
s Church with ...oor ish towers. 'One
of the pulpits of this was sculptured b1 a handless artist. The raint-
ings on the ceiling were. m&-le by tlhe sane artist.







-"'" "' Trip No. 9.

Ouro Preto, Oct. 9 to "ov. 2, 1.
Left 'Bello Horizonte on Sat. Ocoher 90", 4:15 train for
Ouro Preto, in company with Dr. "ntonio and '!iss A'.lia :onteiio. Arrived
at Ouro L-reto about 9:30 P. 1. and hacd quarters al the Toffolo jotel.
xarty consisted of Antonio and An-elia Ionteiro, ffrs. P. I. oelfs, Lfiie
and Clarissa '-olfs and, myself. Thr Hotel is a rather ancient structure
two stories high, businesF partlin the basement an'" about a icif a dozen
rooms in the second s'ory. rmnpears to ha-ve been built about 75 or 80
years ago. Evert.hinp was old and worn. '.'ost of the +binPs were of an-
cient type. Ac'mormations were groc1, ooI excellent. Service polite
and accomodating. All the could be c.'-,ccted of an old time -iplace.
.unday, October 30". Dr. '.Tonteiro called for us: an, wej started
o.xt afoot to see the town. Our firstt visit s to the church on the hill

back of the hotel. "1d a view o- 4hit interior of the, church., After
spending about ":-n hour in 'h.: vicinity of the church We crossed an iron
bridge b.ck of the church on our ',ci, ,bao to headquarters. passing down
the street we found te orinc1 of e the Schl of Minas. Part
of the building hcd been demolished but a part was still standing. 7he
School was foumi,,d forty of fifty years ago. itade two exposures on ,hc
old "building. After this we passed on to the new School of "inasi.
Ahis is located in the old State Car.ital. "-'de three different exposures

of three different views of the ntcw School, which is a veritoble forti-
fication. There is only one ossible entrance, the rest is goor',ed by &
high walled parapet. The con'ract for t''e oripirntl building/ of the
tee capital was /, -. After viewing the exterior of the School
al.d the loeotion we went to tbeAsss Church with ..oorish towers. "One
of the pulpits of this was sculptured b1 a handless artist. '"he naint-
ings on the ceiling were r-a.e by t]le srIe artist.





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ow f-0 o111r let 1-ut fIe lis-tace to the
>' Fh.t afternoon. n 'e stoned at the
.und some nieces of flexible stone.
Km hope.
chapel Sao JOao was made of icaranda

A. Lotel. -c, the way I ,ot -n xno.ure
abin at St. An-.na. Ao one of Ua&o
(A viw of 'hl tront o-f the College


i ght I went wroun with tr..-lonteiro
,.v. Sne'ling. ,-e arrangements

ning. Started out -c-r t*he ,hool1
.,IlKQed urn f o 'he School too erther and
es, wl- was acting in the al)sence of
Ceeelia in -omnany iith 11 r'ehring,
ment his Ac' a greal, ma, ny specimens
and is well arranged and well tobulated.. The minerological collection is
especially fine. ,-'e visited the different laborstomies, Geology and Mo-in,
erolcgy. These were all located in smlIl -,voms quite wc2l da6ntedto their
purposes. The professorss studies were especially well equinred.d In the
laboratory of the i10of. of AZinerology there seemed to be a great sufficQAjncy
of instruments f,-,i, investigation.







Visited the home of one of the cousins indl feasted on jabo-
ticabas.
S After breakfast we prepared for a n'-V: up 1I1E monn'ain. Passed
thru the old village of Villa Eica. nothingg but the foun`1rtions of the
houses were left stcinrJing. At the tolo of the hill we found the chluch oT
Sco Oa&U, a little chapel. On the way we 0C-spen the Chapel of St. Ar
After enjoying Ihe nountaiin view from the top we wlke; over H'e 12ck side
of the mount' n along pasture lands. We were told by a country man that tTh
flexible stones were found in a hollow to our left, tut the distace to the
stream wais too far. o be undert-i'en that afternoon. Te stunned at the
e. reins of an old houre Cun.l there found scme nieces of flexible stone.
r Secu"eo FO, or.- c imens vhici: we b1joiht hose.
0 izqTlie'interior of the smr'll chapel jao Joo w,:s mn.clde o'" iacsrnde
'cod. i'ade our vwc\ c- to the hotel. ,- the way I-got --n rxoosure

on a large -o leint of L'atura rear a cabin at St, k-na. als o onE of Sao
Jo'ao from thr exterior and interior.' (A view of the front o' the College
of -ines. )
r Monday, October 31", last night I went mrourcnd with Dr. Tonteiro
to call on Dr. Berhing, a brother of -.s. v. Sterling. 'e -rrangements
Sto visit the School at 8: in the morning. Started out for the 2.hool
about 8;10 -nd met Dr. O. on ,he way. .,,Ilked up to the schooll tooe'her and
calL, d on the vice-irector, r. 'ones, wh wa acting in the absence of
the Director. Also met Dr. Santa Cecelia in eornn-,ny with 'r. .0-hring

we visited in the Geological DepcaIrtment This c"F a gpiit mrny snecimenl
and is well c-irranged and well tobulatced.. The minerologicsil collection is
especially fine. We visited the different laboratories, Geologyj and Min-
erolcgy. These were all located in small ro-oms quite well adated to their
purposes. The Professors studies were especially well equipped. In the
laboratory of the ;rof. of 'linerology fl'ere seeni.:d to be a great sufficJncy
of instruments f r investigation.
































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The Ftuent_ la'orator-es dit not seem to be so well fitted un with
I nited S1ates. Anr ently there is
ressor and the students than we are
rest wealth of rateic.l to voiork with.
bns are arrnle Tor an cttendr,nce of


V -i~nd Ueolog,(., eol1., Ions vre went o
K the a.e on ?the inr.titution bnd
pr librnriain vmF a Frenchmnn ani ar-
ranged the books on the French syrtra. There 'IFO scemed to "he a large
preponderance of trench works on the helvess. On the msg-r" ine tables pro-
e from the ". ,. A. I'r.n tle looks
hey wvtrc uFed nrinciTnally b-,' hte -pro-


e -nroceeded to the ?0oolop'ical collection.
or rn institution cf this character.
as being Riven to zoological studies.
Zoological s-necimens, including the
o the erbariu-. w a,,%6 ?'Y)
On reaching the botanical section Prof. Cante Cecelia excused
himself and Dr. Lerhing continued with me. I found the herbarium stored
away in some twenty o r twenty five tin boxes holding hll, herbarium sheets
-r ".nn,l- nf size. about 11 x 18 inches. The boxes were about ten or twelve
a hasp at the side. The sneciners were
easPy 'o rall for specimens -anted. An
taker of t"e nartri rtent quicly Iound
n r At ten o'clocP. we wakee,] back to the
ehring promise0 to call .or me at 11.
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.h t.,u s -3 '
The tunts' laoratories did not Feem to be so well fi tterl un with
Appliances bF we usually have in thc united Slates. A r5aiently there is
S less intimate contact between Lhe nrofessor and the students than we are
used to at Lorne. The College hpr a great wealth of rneril-- to-rork with.
I The 'eologic and inerologic collections are ample for en attend nce of
S 500C or a 1000 sftoudnts.
After leaving` tle ",'inernlogic nd Uolo"Ic coll cIons we went to
S the library. This wyF rather siiall Fur the rape on ihe inr titution ancl
for the scone of iIs work. ,, former librrri -,n Vwf.F a Frenchmarn an. atr-
ranged the boo-s on the French syst:-ia. There also sme ead to be t, large
preponderance of 2'rench works on the shelves. On the -n5-.':Ine tables nro-
b bfly 25 to 4 C of the mrFapainrs were from the UT. S. F-ro-i thlie looks
-a,. .. L '; ." uF-ed pri ncinlly b-, hta ore-
to the magarineF I would gudge That they u. ued princinlly hero-
fessors. (L
After leaving the library we proceeded to the oolop'ical collection.
This collection wa! nnre than n-inle 'or n insti ution of this character.
Aoparentiy a great deal of attention Wir being ,-iven to zoological studies.
After a sanewcIt hasty Flance over the- Zoologioal snecimens, including the
Entomrnological Precimens -o,, Fed on fo the hcrbariu-. 0 a'}
On reaching the botanical Fection Prof. arnta Cecelia excused
himself and Dr. Berhing continued with me. I found the herbarium stored
away in pome twenty o. r twenty five tin boxes holrling the herbarium sheets
of ragulartion size, about 11 x 18 inches. hie boxes were about ten or twelve
inches ,1eec,, onrering at th1u. ton with a hsp --t the side. rnh. snecimens were
all placed in orrcrlv so That it v.F e',Py vo call for Frerimens anted. An
attendant who is rn-narently f.the cre tal-er of t' c- r.nartment nuickTlv found
all .-f the families thafit I called afor. At ten o' cloct we wal.ken, back to the
hotul. I-, parting on the street Dr. ?ehring nro'iise-, to call eor "me at 11.
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-4- Con't from page 3, see nbbve.
In the L"inerological collection there were a number of curios
iwn two specimens of clear calcite crys-
crystals Tater anr air bubbles. These
highly nrized. another curio was an
ter inside and also an sir bubble.
native matrix.
amends in the rough. These look very
ld probably be difficult to distinguish
uVouVe V uCiL oL u L U o .. ... me experience in the rmtter. I was
iadrangular in outline, having four
eights of an inch across.
vial that was about tel]P filled with
AI. he gold could be made out very readily
lilre carborumdum.
re E conside-fable number of diamonds
small diamond? in vials. In the
els of the big diamonds.
In the zoological] collection I was shown a snake skin about ?1
-_-_ -----"L Cr. -1..- a a s uccaru. Unfortunately the head
s quite imnrerfect. Another s-ecimen
*l lant ant eater. "his is an unusually
ted and quite well nrerervel.
rectly to the herbarium to study

acae are represented by a hundred
iere no duplicates in this collection.
ished me with the volumes of "artius
"Flora Rraziliencis". I studied the illustrations in this set, eomnared

a number of them with the spe&imnens in the herbarium. Apparently no sir-
ious effort has







-4- Con't from -aPae 3, see nbove.
In the -inerological collection there were a number of curios
that are quite unusual. I was shown two s-pecimens of clear calcite crys-
tals that had enclosed within the crystals water and air bubbles. these
are quite rare and naturally are hip-hly prized. Another crrio was an
oval calcite, trnslucent, with i'ater inside and also an air bubble.
`This it geode was embedded in its native matrix,

I was also shown some diamonds in the rough. These look very
much like quartz crystals. "t would probably be difficult to 'listinpuish
between them and quartz without some experience in tfhe matter. I was
shown one rough diamond that was quadranmulhr in outline, having four
faces. ach one was about three-eights of an inch across.
I was shown a four ounee vial that was about half filled with

black 'ol(. Under the hand lens the pold could be made out very readily
but the whole mpas looked very much liT-e carborumrlum.
In the collection there are a considerable number of diamonds
in situ, they also have afnumber of small diamonds in vials. In the
collection ihore are also p- ass models of the big diamonds.
In the zoological collection I was shown a snale skin about ?21
feet ''ong and about ?P incheF broad, a succaru. Tnf'orturately the head
had been cut off so the snecimen wap ouite im-nerfect. Another specimen
of considerable interest was the piant ant eater. This is an unusually
large and fine snecimen* Well mounted and quite well nreserveaT.
After breakfast I went directly to the herbarium to study
some of the specimens. The orchidacae are represented by a hundred
*- : i c \ c..-i
or so sneciiBnd, apparently there were no dupilcates in this collection.
The attendant waited on -'e anf furnished me with the volumes of 'artius
"Flora raziliencis". I studied the illustrations in this set, eomnared
a number of them with the specimens in the herbarium. Apparently no sdr-
ious effort ha










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been made toward the getting r-f a complete set of Crchidacae in Prazil.
There were, however, quite a wide representation of genera in the col-
lection. For the most part these were well preserved and in oood condi-
tion.
After spending about c hour or so on the orchids I spent rather
more than an hour on th- two volumes of "Serkatum Palmarum 'rasiliensium",
J. Parbosa Eodrigues. This is a sumptuous work of two volumes about lo
pages of text in wh t an nreas to be about 12 noint type. Here and there
are illustrations of palms from nhotographp. Vol. 1 contains RR q1
plates and vol. 2 P3 plates. All of these anpear to be from -nintinp-s.
Some what idealized, especially as to the -rigures End surroundings of the
palms. Thep e two volumes, published in 1903 credit Frazil with having
427 varieties and species of nalms. F r some reason I was not able to
find a description or illustration of Cocus Nucifera. -'robpbly this. is'
not considered as an indi-eneous sneciep. Tor did I -&rnd q description
the Foval Palm. f aa4)
Siree o'clock I left the Potanical laboratory with Prof.
narts of the institution. I gnve cnlv -rass inn at tention
022 rxci in t he Enrineerinp Department.
lical departmentt was mde up of a number of small laborato-
separated aOd disconnected. The ,s used in the dp.art-
wood, Candea, it makes a fairly p-ood illuminating gas
1 ly good for heat prodiction. It requires a rather large
l s very malodorous at the tank. he chemicall enartment
Sthe alumni nna the neonle at the irst-itution. "he equip
tory hardly justifies the opinion. It is -nrob*hbly Aue
the head professor. I did not ta'-e sufficient time to
jIrT-V-o DT -J -- tirparatus and equipment but judged rather from what was






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been made toward the getting of a complete set of Crchidacae in Brazil.
There were, however, quite a wide representation of genera in the col-
lection. For the most part these were well preserved and in oood condi-
tion.
After spending about a hour or so on the orchids I spent rather
more than an hour on the two volumes of "Seratum Palmarum 'rasiliensium",
JO Parbosa Rodrigues. 'his is a sumptuous wor1k of two volumes about lo
pages of text in wh f arnreas to be about 12 rioint type. ..ere and. there
are illustrations of palms from nhotographs. 7ol. 1 contains Hxx 91
plates and vol. 2 83 nlstes. All of these annear to be from naintin -s.

Some what idealized, especially as to the figures and surroundings of the
palms. These e two volumes, published in 1903 credit ?rozil with having
427 varieties and species of oalms. F r some reason I v'ws not able to
find a description or illustrate on of Cocus Nucifera. probably v is
not considered as an indireneous PnecieF. Tor did I fand a description
or illustration of the Foval Palm. ( c "- )
About three o'cloclh I left the ?oianical laboratory with Prof.
Vaz to visit other narts of the institution. I pave only rassinp attention
to the equipment ai in t he Ep-ineerinp, Department.
The Chemical -epartment was mde up of a number of small laborato-
ries. 'hese were separated aId disconnected. "he ,ris used in the denart-
ment is made from wood, Cindea, it mna-es a fairly pood illuminating gas
but is not especially good for heat nrohieotion. It requires a rather large
distillation and is very malodorous at the tan1'. "he chemicall 7enartment
is much praised by the alumni and the neonle at the insttution. T he equip
ment of the laboratory hardly just ies the opinion. It is -nrobhbly Iue
to the ability y of the herd professor. I did not ta'-,e uffinient time to
investigate the apparatus and equipment but ludged rather from what was






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collection and lolyked these oMer some
%.T o have a general .nowledge of nany of
Lection. It was rkher indifferently
v le been adopted for seratplion into
7' iuses were uped for nreservincn the collec-

seses for Prazilian conditions.
College and mpde my way "hack to +he


"n About 7:30 o'clock in f'he Morning
i. (Which in the "'ury vernacular,
r nd soin") 'he nartfr consisted of
l as, Chico Kenyon, "rs. I. F olfs,
--- .all. 7his was a most Pleasant and
he brook near the foot of the mountain
he top of the mountain. "ear the
obably an 7-pidendrum, deep orange,
were also found of Schizopetalum.
waP only one Piece where the nath
climbed by the mules. At the top
n g nlpce, evnecl,1ly or orchids.
oom. Up above fthe fire line and

an abundance of humus formed making
r p 1hs of this kind.
mi Pasegem nd3 "arianna can be plainly
n Fcenery was superb, in spite of the
1: o'clock after a slight drizzling
Sa"de a number or..os epposures on the


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in evidence from the student's d,'sk.
I returned to the insect collection and looked these orer some
waht in retail. Prof. Vqz seemed to have a generril knowledge of many of
the species represented int the collection. It was rather indifferently
cared for and no system seemed to have been adopted for sepatelion into
orders End families. Pasteboard cases were used for nreservin0r the collec-
tion. 'hse make good preservation cases for Brazilian conditions.
At four o'clock I le(Ft the College and 'nle my way back to the
Hotel.
TMesday, Noverber 1, 1921. About 7:30 o'clock in the morning

we started on mule back for Itacolumi. (Which in the `uny vernacular,
according to Dr. Arduino mears mother and son"). The -nrty consisted of
Dr. and Miss Monteiio, Ortho Parcellas, 'Chico Kenyon, '"rs. '. '. RFolfs,
Effir, Olarissa and myself, eight in all. "his was a most pleasant and
well arranged trip We stopped at the brook near the foot or the mountain
for breakfast and then proceeded to the top of the mountain. '"ear the
brook we f und an orchid in bloom, probably an lpidendrum, deep orange,
very showvr and pretty. Sone flowers were also found of Schizopetalum.
The entire trip was easily made, there was only one place where the nath
was at all steep, and this was easily climbed by Ihe mules. At the top
of the mountain is a splendid botanizing nlsce, ensmecially -or orchids.
Two or three species were taken in bloom. UT above the fire line and
away from whore cattle can graze and an abundance of humus formed making
an excellent bid for orchids and other platits of this kind.
From the heights of Itecolumi Pasp',gem and M:arianna can be nleinly
seen with a fi&d glass. The mountain scenery was superb, in spite of the
frequent nassing of clouds. About 2: o'clock after a slight drizzling
rain we started hack to Ouro Freto. I -'de a number os exposures on the
way back in the rain.


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.......lent bofanizin, one t e q necis auite
Hor. but in general ouite similar, be-
Very -noor in grasses and annarently
gumes These will probably make their
The soil for the most part is nitrateous.
Fs of the mullies are Quite sfeenand
illy out quite nnnraiu severely. At
Sdid nof snend any time in the gold

ty thousands of days work has been aone



I'his 'morning started out rainy
np these snells we wert out into the
fashioned houses. 7'e Tisited the

ornate of th' churches visited and
vere told that the one at Sao4 Joan
This one. 'Miuch jararpnda wood was
arch contains long chests of jacaranda
iron work on the locks. The nlaces
Yorn from usage.
saw two bells swunp n one of the
-6, U Z,,LI,,u1uweo rnn. ate of 1P45. light cracks had
Fria "hat if a person leaned their
it wa- heing rning thet it would furx


ted this day was "'opsa 2enhora do
This mapa the mos't interesting church
the chumrcb to -bich rona Amelia and

in the church were very fine, altho






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Ss a whole the region is an excellent botanizin, one t e r.reci Ps quite
different from those around E'ello Hort. but in p-eneral cuite P -miar, be-
longing to the same floral region. :ervy noor in grasses and apparently
almos+ destitute of herbaceous legumes "heFe will probably make their
appearence with the rainy Peason. The soil for the most part is nitrateous.
It washes very readily, "he banks of fthe gullies are ouite P.eenand
where kaolin has formed likely to gully out quite wxyyrfiv severely. At
intervals pocket of sand occur. .,e did not send any fime in the gold
digging or old' placer mining, Mlany thousands of days work has been done

in hunting for the precious metal.


Wednesday, Nov. 7", lI?l "his omrning started out rainy
with slight let ufisin the rain,durinp these sells we went out into the
streets of the city to see the oldfashioned houses. '.'e visited the
Yatriz church, which was the mort ornate of the churches visited and.
Sthe most ornate in "he city. We were told that the ome at Sao Joan
del Rey is even more luxurious than this one. Much jacaranda wood was
used in the construction. This church contains long chests of jacaranda
|wood, all hand made, including the iron work on the locs. 'he -nlaces
'p where the keys entered were badly worn from usaoe.
We went up the belfry and saw two bells swung n on- o f the
belfries. One of them showed that date of 1845. light crakks had
formed in one of the bells. It '"as sf1ir 4hat if a person leaned their
hadd or hair against the bell when it was beinp rminp that it would fnm
cause cracks to form.
The second church we visited rtnip day was "T'ossa ,enhora do
;' Carmo", Fee PFurton I: 371-, 1P6. ,"is ":aP the most inferestin church
that we visited, esnecially this was the church to -,hich 'ona Am-elia and
her bother belonged. The paintings in The church were very fine, altho

















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i'1-s m .i3 _. u, 4^uq equally good state of nerservation.

.,.-S..... up better then any other that we
ring was more modern than in the one
ently ola to be very interesting nnd


hests of dra-wers cut out of jacaranda
beveled and some of the narts wound-
tops were about an fich and three-quar-
,obably twenty inches broad and eighteen


g relics seen at this church was. a
stnd and some gold plating. -he
g and two and a half broai, contained
of them were sad to he portions of
were small bits, less than a cubic
sealed by mnenF of wax hearing, the of-
certain that these cirfos, eiRht or


i ..... as receiving them from ome was con-
fteen inches tall and eight inches
4 pounds .'"he whole is covered

Is had been woven. 'he 'silver showed


I "a !nd carved cruPeiix,fxra*x t

Sc f I chep fall, B anl carver from
.' :" :. eat deal of -natience and .time. mhe
rope cord around th'- waist vas delicatel, cut ont, stnlif ,g out in a nal-
ural way. As no ivory would be iof sufficeint diameter to permitt cutting
these from the -'hole l&ce, the arms were rade separate ans ear,'ullyv ioin-


'Phe fin-ers and tows were creully wored out
r, towswere- care-fully worked out-


. n _-e tn n h I M _Te _iece- way,:" rj
.'7i:


ficial imprint, of Fom-e, making itf


ed to the borly.








very old. T'he pold leaf was in unusually frood stnte of -nrserration.
The church as a -.hole was being 1'ept un better than any other that we
visited. The paintings and sculpturing was more modern thabn in the one
we visited before, but still surficiently ola to be very interesting and
instructive.
In the sacriotv we found chests of irnwers evt out of lacaranda
wood. The 'rnnt of the drawers was: eveled and some of the narts wound-
ed, cut out of the solid wood. The tons were about an fich and three-quar-
ters thich, solid. One piece was probably twenty inches broad and eighfeen
or twenty feet long.
One of the very interesting relics seen at this church was a
small case mounted on a solid silver strnd and some gold Piting .- "he
smallcase, probably three inches long and two and a half broad contained
relics of unusual imnortancd. Some of them were skid to be nortions of
t'fe crosse of various saints. '"hey were small bits, less than a cubic
centimeter in volume. The case was sealed by rme.-ns of wax 'hearing the of-
ficial imnrint, of 'ome, making it certain that these cIi-Hos, eirht or
ten in number, were authentic as far as receiving them from -one was con-
cerned. The whole stand is about fifteen inches -all and eikht inches
broad, and -robably weighs eip'gt of ten -nounds. "he whole is covered
with a cloth into which silver threads had been woven. The silver showed
considerable oxidation 'rom ape.
The "sexton" also showed us a hand carved cruefrix, Imribxxt=
r:asxxtumrtmarr the figure being ten inches tall, unria and carved from
solid ivory. This had required r great deal of nafience and time. mhe
rope cord around the waist was deliratelv cut o1t, sta,-ring olut in a nap-
ural way. As no ivory would be iof sufficeint diameter to permit cutting
these from thie .-hole nioce, the arms were rrde separate anA cear,-fully ioin-

ed to the body. '.'The frngers and tows were Careully wored out
wwere carefTully worked out..













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'We next visited the catacombs in which many of the ,relatives
of Dona Amelia n and her brother had -een interred, it l'.einp ixzSix
the day after all saints day, many candles were burning before the crypts.
A Fr eat many flowers were brought to the mD= catacombs. An interesting

thing in connection with the catacombs was that after a period of rest
in the crypts the hones are tal'en out and placed in an urn or other closed
receptacle. Before th- bones at- nlacea in these reentaceles, th'V are
carefully washed. Some of these recentacles -ere marked "In nerrietu%".
None of the dates that we saw showed ,ny preat ape. I don't remember of
seeing one earlier than IPOO.
An interestin, thin in the sacristy ,:as the old charter of the

founding of the church. Lhe origonal was in Latin, but a s'ortumiese trans-
lation was framed and nersumahly very closely similar to th original La-
tin. This charter Phowed that it hlad been cranted by Pope "ene'ict XIV.
It showed that annlieation for the charter had been nde rs early as "ar.
19, 1748, and that it had been Aranted Anr. "4, l8F,. In the -tain body
of the church at the sacred fountain there wa, a date of 1,76, nrobably the
date of the completion of the church. '-he nainting on the ceiling bore
the date of 1805. T''he naintings, on the cr- l'tng were done in .Felatine
they were remarkably freshr &nd clear. er oe naintins on the 'vail that
had been done in oil showed the nellowinp o-1: ape.
At 4:Y, the train atnrted f Purneire. ':'he mountain scenery at

first w,,,as rather hemned in owing fn the frct that the train travels along
the river bank, but i7 ralduolly arose un the mountain side until we
reached "Trez Cruzes" were the altitude showed 1336 meters, the hiq-hest
altitude reached by a railroad in rrazil. After napspinp 'res nruzes we
cam4 to t'ie station '"7arpreaves". This is the nearest noint to the ap'ri-
cultural school of the padres. This school is located at Cachoeira, about
two or three leagues from Hargreaves and is reached by pacrl animals.




p-lO
1/
-10-
Th'is school has long been established, but -'ly a few pupils attend.
Befroc reaching Burneire we cane within less thon a :ixzx
kilometer of the serra Ouro 'ranco. '"-e city of niuro Pranco could not
be seen from the railroad on account on the end of the sbar-n serra tho
the train gave us a nine view of grazing lands u-n on top of the serra
and the fine location beyond where Ouro "ranco ic- located.
'Ve reached Eello hbout 10:1F. Found 'r. ",apee anri 'r.
"onteiro waiting our arrival.









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9


..5
.-10-

Th'is school has long been established, but --ly a few pupils attend.

Befroc reaching P'urneire we s.eno within less than a itai

kilometer of the serra Ouro rsnnco. "'e city of Uuro Pranco could not

be seen from the railroad on account nn the enr of the 6sharp Perra tho

the train gave us a ine view of grazinD lands u-n on top of the serra

and the fine location beyond where Ouro rranco i located.

7e rc-ached Fello viiout 10:15. Found "'r. "p'''e qa nDr.

"onteiro waiting our arrival.
















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