Trip 7: Deodora, Rio.

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Title:
Trip 7: Deodora, Rio.
Series Title:
Correspondence and Subject Files 1921-1943
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Physical Location:
Box: 6
Divider: Subject Files
Folder: Trip 7: Deodora, Rio.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

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University of Florida
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AA00000207:00102


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I T rip nm1ber 7.

To Dcoloro.
This trip includes two visits to'Deodoro, one to the Botanic
Garden, one to the National Luseum and Hational FP,,rk: and one to the
citrus grove to the east ?,nrid northward of Nitcheroy.
$ V Left Lello Ilorionte on 4:20 Central train for-ei0. Found
there were no sleeper berths left in the general coach so had to take
a berth in one of the comnantments. This wav- very much more comfort-
able than the sipeper berth, being decidedly longer and having other
conveniences that are not to be had in the general berths.
<-'l- Arrived. ini Hio 'at 8:2 0 and went directly to fbthe Avenida Totel,
with the drummer froi othe ;otel.. ,
'R. ... Went to 110 Rio Branco Avenue to call on H. F. -obe-rtson.
was not in but a mn who .lid not tell me his name told me thia t Ir. -o-
bertson would be in in the course of fifteen minutes. This man had
been in the western part of the United Sotes, spoke panish well but
had not learned Portuguese. He had rnar1te 'lots of money in "exico in the
oil fields and in nin inp- but lost it all in the insurrection, 7'as one
of the i- -,ericans who rounded up the other Americans and got the wonen
and children out of thlo country. Later, when the Ainsurrectos came to
Tampico, rounded uo what men were left and helped to get 6hem out of
the country. ;'as himself among the last of the A-,ericans to leave.
iLobertson c.Lr.IC in about 10:20. had about a half hour's
talk with him. He is a young man, probably not yet 4orty, from '"inne-
sota. Said he sent me five copies of"'razilian u.-iness" and later
sent five copies more. le is probably mistaken -bout the latter, as
only one copy was received. Pro rises to scrdr another set ojf fcur of
five when copies crci back. Told T h'e had received my ncmeev order

fo-r ten mil',eis, which i found at D. HI. on my eurn.









Deodoro.
Wardei my way out on the suburban train to Deodoro. Inquired
at the statinn and was directed toward the Pomeira. his is located
about halg a kilometer away from the rail way station, on, the right
side of the highway. On the lefI side and opposite the Porneira is the
Videira. This is a very extensive planting on a large hill side. About
a kilometer beyond are the headquarters and grounds of the Institute
Biologico de Defesa Agricola. This is located on new grounds an] Is
just being developed. A nice new building of t-ic bungalow type is
being constructed for Plant Patha'logical work. The name ofr the Institute
is given over the gateway. I had ma&e 'r:cja.Lries for C0-r,.,rvo at thw
?or',rra ")d a young an gave me general directions where to 'ind him.,
,,hen I arrived at the new laboratory which is just being constructed,
I .i inquiries for "sr. Ca, o md a man said to me "This is probably
Prof. holfs" and introduced himself. It happens that he is the Chief
of the institute and was very obliging an' affable in showing me the
institution. The vargem below the Iaboratory is being drained and
leveled to Take Leds and plantings for the Institute. Sr. Arsene
Puttemans regretted very much that he had to s-nend so much time getting
ready for his work rather .tl..n in doi ng the Plant Pathological work
proper, Mi. P4tt-emns is a Belgian and has had ten or -0o e years
experience at 1iracicaba. He showed me a considerable number of ve-
getables that had already been planted in the vargem near the entranceto
to the grounds. Considerable attention is being paid. i to the develop-
ment of' the existent varieties. Thi work is being carried on on n small
scale, altogether +oo small to be of great service in this direction.
Among the diseases noted was Alternaria Brassicae on cabbage, Oidium

was also present on a considercble number of plants include ing Cruci'f-
erae.







-3-
Dr. Puttcniins said he had not been able to get the perfect
form of the t Oidium. Root knot v.as also present in considerable qunati-
ty. It is probably the same s-necies as the one that we encountered so

frequently in Florida.
Dr. Putteman showed me a lurge number of drawings of different
species of fungus that he had made. Some were inked in, ot-e-'r were
still in pencil. He had among them many new srccies, especially one
that was tery severe on peanuts. It looks "very much like one of the
diseases on peanuts that I had seen very frequently in Fla. 'ust before
going back to Rio we visited the tobacco field which was badly affected
with some disease that Dr. Futteman did not recognize. Te had been
unable to demonstrate any causative agent in connection with it. iHe
sugEsted that it might be rog eye". As I hvce never seen this disease
i n the field I could not give him any defi-ite information on it.
,r. Puttem7&ns has a go-cart ard ',lle to take him t'-o the railway station.
It usually takes about four hours a day for him to make the round, trip

from his laboratory to his home in q'o.
On the train going back oto Eio a yo-ung man Cbcut thirty years
'L -n -1 1 "
old sat In the seat with me. le had one brown eye and one blue eye, and
curly black hair. The blue eye v.&.a-: some waht zabn 'ci .q in that it -.vas
directed upwardly and o't when the brown eye, that sccmo- to be the one
that functioned, ,, turned directly ahead. Ls he rolled both eye balls,
neither of the mT ere artificial. Ordirarily he woulG pass without being
much noticed, Ii must hlve rame, a r-lher strong imrpressioan *, e as
.i r ,.5 of seeing a three eyed aan duri ng the nirht.
About .ix seven o'clock ta I got a olorL "rcm C-i>anGo. He had

received my telegram about five that af ernoon. `e asked no to wait at
the Hot:l for him and, came in about eight o'clock ,e visited until







-.4- '
nearly twelve o'clock rn,. mne arrangements to go out to a citrus grove
beyond Nitcherot with a view of packing a crste of railing oranges
to be shipped to the New York miari.-t. Ca'-,argo gave me an invitation
to go with him and Dr. PRttemens.

Citrus Grove Beyono .itcheroy.
Spt. 1G, l l" Camargo arrived about six forty five in
an automobile and we went directly to the ferry. ,e then took a
bonde for about ten or twelve' kiloetLers. andti then 'slked orne or two kilo-
meters further to the citrus grove. This is located on a czend a of
about four hundred acres in extent. The former, whose name I did not
learn has about three or four thousand trees, located on to hill sides
the vargerm or valley prt of it being used for other purposes. The trees
are planted about twelve or fourteen feet apart each way. -he-y are rather
small and .scraggly looking. The Four orange stalk being used. 'here
appc'aeI to be three leading varieties, Selectas, China and !atals.
We attempted to get a crate of Selectas. The difficulty surrounding
the trial shipments are many and various. Camargo had to have the parts
for the crate all sawed out, including the solid heads. "e was unable
to find proper lx brade for fastening the sides so used larger nails
than are usually employed. We orosceede to the vrcahrd and brought in
three large basketfuls of what were supposed t. be tl-e best Selectas
that could be found. After getting them to the headquarters we proceedo-
ed to select out the best, and rot less than a dozen passable fruits.
We returned to the orchard to get another supply but after working for
about a half hour we concluded that it would be impossible to get an crate
of Selectas that would pass on the Tew "ork market.
The Selectas is a variety that produces a rather 7ar-e fruit,


about 136's.


They are doep red, very rough slkin, thick skin and contain






'.-5-

lots of rag, are very sweet but short on aroma. It would probably
not take well on ihe American market.
The Chinas is a much smaller orange, ve-ry smooth skinned,
thin rind, containing lots of acid bit not high in aroma. -he frtit
is somewhat oblong, remifid'ing one somewhat of the shape of the nardiff,
bui having a far smoother skin.
The N ital orange is small, somewhat similar to the Chinas, and
is probably- at times confused with it I wva0 unable to tell with cer-
tainty when I had a Chinasa or when I had a 7-atal.
After being disappointed in securinli the fruit for-a trial

box we gave ourselVes over to the investigation of what might be found
in the cit ps grove. We found occasional snecimens of a white fly
called Aleurothrixus Horridus Hempel. 7his was being 1-.ert well in
chock by a red Aschursonia. We found some -ine soecimens of this

fungus. e also found the white hea,.er! fungus on some of the purple
scale. Both of those fungii look different than they do in Yla.
Cama rgo says that theta white headed fungus shows frequently 'our, five,
and sometimes six spores attaches instead of tireei as i usuna ly the
case in. F'la Diaspis was frequently seen but is kept in checi: by
some natural enemy. The Thele-oothora like fungus which is so common
in Florida was also frequently seen on the branches' It does not seen
to cause an atrophying of the branches as it does in la. A Seriplas-
tes was also found.
One case of Die-back showing multiple buds was Also found.
Other symptoms of dieback were not ;i/esent. Mellinose was present on

nearly all of the Selectas, but was not usually present on the Chinasas.
Some specimens of y.*xxg 1irrsonium like fungus '.vas found.
Stem end rot wafs the most vnr-valent Fr-ci an exceedingly destructive
disease. The farmer ascribed the difficulty to dry weather', In ,iany cases







-6- *... : .
there was more fruit lying on the ground affected with stem end rot than
there-, as left hanging on he trees. Every tree of Selectas had changing
on it mummied fruit 'king an ideal culture for the stem end rot. Of the
origi-icnil collection of fruit tken f
discarded on account of affectation
infections were very small. e'l i
fruit picked. Greasy melinose and
Frenching of a typical '1
tWe p passed into n adjoinri
the westward. -his grove had rec- ....-
younger and was not so badly affect ... -
of the scales and diseases noted in the o th.'-:Ir orchard we-e also noted here.
We return' to the headquarters, had some sandwiches and rested
up a little then proceeded around the -iioie place.
aw a Pitanga tree six or eight meters tall grov-ing in,-, the free
and in the form of a tree. 2n-,-iboo Doles lying beside the tree' sm'..;-,,ed the'
method employed for "ic'king the fruit. Some distance "awsy '..s, a jabotica-
bat ree-, the smaller limbs of which were completely covered with sqall
Nectria like rotu ies. On cutting these oen oone of them were
lound to contain eggs of some kind of insect. An im.nense Seriplastes
was also found on the jaboticaba. ... "--., ,;oducinr.
dead spots on the jaboticaba werP 4 "
COn some of the cotton rla-

a rust fungus belonging to ithe genB
me by Dr. iuttem-ns. I se-cured a
Holvay, Tuesday night.
"e saw soiri- rope Euronea .
were many interesting things a out. '
sell. .







-6-
there was more fruit lying on the ground affected with stem end rot than
there as left hanging on he trees. very tree of Selectas had hanging

on it mummied fruit -'r4king an ideal culture for the stem end rot. Of the
origiiical collection of fruit tken to head quarters over 75 ,, had to be
discarded on account of affectation with stem end rot. :.iny o' the
infections were very small. Mellinose occurred on practically every
fruit picked. Greasy melinose and black spot were also fou-nd.
Wrenching of a typical Fla type was seen a number of tiWes.
We passed into (n adjoining citrus grove located on a slope to
the westward. 'Lhis grove had received better cultural attention, was
younger and was not so badly affected with diseases, but proctically all
of the scales and diseaseF noted in the oth' r orchard were. also noted her.
ie returned to the headquarters, had som- s-ndvic:b'.- and rested
up a little then proceeded around the liome place.
Saw a Pitanga tree six or eight ,ieteri-p tall groveing in the free
and in the form of a tree. Bamboo noles lying beside the tree showed the'

method employed for -nic""ig the fruit. Some distance av'y-, as a jabotica-
ba t ree., the smaller limbs of which were completely covered with small
i^ectria like protuberances. On cutting ,these -on o-(-ie of them were
found to contain eg' of so..e- kind of insect. it itmme-nse Serinlastes
was also found on the jaboticaba. Small patches of -Igae producing
dead spots on ',,h jaboticaba wer I.s found. a
Zjd 00 K Sugena Uombreyi, Skeels4.
rs On some of the cotton rlant' apparently growing as volunteers,
a rust fungus belonging to the genius Kuhniola sp- was pointed out to
re by 1r. PuttemE'ns. I secured a few eseoimens and gave tlese to Jr.
Hol'.o,; TuesdIy nfght.
le saw some ripe European grapes hanging on an arbor. There

were many interesting things a out the old place' which th',- .,nan wants to
sell.




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Ljaw a- ti-e oGrum i NiB
Th-,is :id- a very beautiful appeaCri
Vwhen in full bloom. !'7e olf I Cm
the young leaves looked freps and
Got back to the hotel i
out from the day's exercise. .Had
the Pomeria at Deodoro.

S : .F. :; :" doro". ; ")
Sept. i '. hc C
Seo"1oro. -Before getting 'ouit to D
soxne way st'atibn.. ,e, went' immedia
grounds there. A considerabr C0-cO
of budding and grafting mangoes a.
seen to be receiving any attention. ,.B
hle top working of the ,ii
inarchi-g. Some of the specim-iens of IIns worc1 wO re V1.- ...... r........
like the inarched stuff that we ned to get from Ind ia.
At headquarters we sac a monpno Iree one arnd 5 haf years Y Id
from the date of inarching full of
as Carlot e. The branches and thB
dark green, reminding one somev,,hcit
ratlicr flat grower of a s-oeading *
We next visited the citr1
prepared foi shipment. The nurses
the roots balled and wranped in dr
eight inches in di.:i-j-eter and of aboul 'iie .,- ., ..... .
very small for the amount of top. Got an exposure on ihe i.nelc of tree?-.
Along side of this bunch of trees were some already crate for shi-oment.







-7-
Saw a tree of Grumiitj 'ugenia Do-cibeyi, in full bloom.
This iade a very beautiful appearance, something like a cerry tree
when in full bloom. Vhe olf leaves had all practically fallen and
the young leaves looked fresh^ and green.
(Got back to the hotel in time for dinner. 'sas thoroly tired

out from the day's exercise. jade an ap-,ointment wivh Camargo to visit
the Pomeria at Deodoro.

Deodoro. v+
":. Sept. 1 -.Tool th-e7 car- imrciatl"ely after breakfast for.

Deod.oro. ') e fore getting oUvt to D eodoro: Camargo" 'oine'd- the :jtra na a romM
some- way station. C- v,, went imm-ediately to thT Foi'.ra -and '.c qife,' the
grounds there. A considerable r-nounl of yvork is being -o i'' n th: wD:
of budding anrd grafting mangoes and citrus fruits'. Othev fruifa, do not
seen to be receiving any attention. :
SThe top working of the ,i--ngoes en.pears to be done entirely by
inarchirg. Some of the specimens of ']iF vork ware rather crude. Looked
like the inarched stuff that we sued to get from India.
At headquarters we sae a mongo tree one and a h&'f years old

from the date of inarching full offruit. It was of the variety known
@ vI.
as Carlotfe The branches and the' e recemes are pinkish and the leaves
dark green, reminding one somev.liat of the -.i1goba group. The tree is a

rather flat grower of a f-reading habit.("u-<4- '
Wie next visited the citrus ";nr.ery staik that was buled and
prepared foi shipment. The nursery trees stood over five feet tall,,
the roots balled and wrr,'iped in dried grass. 7he balls were six or,
eight inches in diameter and of about ithe same depth. The ball seems
very small for the eniount of7 top. Got an exposure on the `"1un&im of tree'.
Along side of this bunch of trees were some already crate for shipvlent.











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About 9:30 1 started out for a visit to the U. S. Caiaate. Found
Ai. Bo-.ton there ',eo informed ne that the pl).sa.sador was at Petrooolis
5md would not be back for several days. 'he A1'nadassor was recuperating
from a slight indisposition owing, to an infection in the foot. Had a
brief chat with M-. Penton and then returned to the Hotel in time for
an eaG.y breakfast.
In the year od the Ambapsy an oleander bAle was growing. This
was badly affected with iAserlic nium rPustulans. on the leaves and
things. IThe u-tner s oid.cFOf the lei ves is 'affected with what appears
to e'e some Licaniunm, Thej up-er suptface with what' was. formerly known
as sspidiotus F i;c. Taking it' SS-a' 1'olce the Lush ins about -as -7badly
scle ifetedas'coul', wet L* found. "






-6 -
All of them were in full leaf and exz m i i( m
ag-,inst infestation in transit. A sms
do Cachorro, eats the young leaves 9 i
is about half the size of a honey bei
The mango trees that were ,,
had bcen grown in tin cans, about te .
was rather roughly done and noy mueh -
the stock of either the sock or the '
,Te next visited the citrus orchard. this ar-nmi -o' a"
variety orohard of all sorts of novelties and good things, The trees are
planted about four or five meters es' ie n _^ _t-h-i{-,:_n_-_r ,
stil&ok there was a wi Iow lea-ved len
quite sweet. All of the fruit was F
and citrus scab. A--peared to tbe 1 'H
ore long and slender, many of tem e
es are thin and willowy but stand ei
I'

ing as a novelty. The fruits arej
lemon type,'. xposu>. mi the tree
Another novelty i' the orchard was h.e imperial orange'. his
was badly affected with Chlorosis, ^-!--'^ h ^tin Qlofo leaves crumb-
ling up. :any c the leaves lied no I
fruit that had set had only a few g
the stunting effect of Chlorosis vel
as the I rwcrial because of the vwII
@i ^^mSISWWBS^Si~^^S
A -iost interesting tree w I
had one branch probably two feet lo 4
markings of chlorosis. All sorts
present. For the most part the cholorysis was uniiarerai ..- a,
exposure on the limb but did not get focus right.







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A.ll of them were in full leaf and exposed so there Was no protection
against infestation in Iransit A small bee, locally known as Abelha
de Cachorro, eats the young leaves and the young shoots. 'h6s bee
is about half the size of a honey bee.
The mango trees that were in arched and ready for distribution
had b-eecn grown in tin cans, about ten inches in diameter. The work
was rather roughly done and noy mueh attention had Leen paid to -rotecting
the stock of either the sock or the scion.
Tie next visited the citrus orchard. 'his appears to be a
variety orchard of all sorts of novelties and good things. "he trees are
planted about four or fivoe meters each way. One of the interesting things
struck there was a willowv leaved lemon. The fui't is ovoid, sub"c-i,
quite sweet. All of the fruit was badly marked with rust mite, mellinose
and citrus scab. appeared to tbe the caitrui's scabt of Fla. The leaves
are long and slender, many of tern eight ot more inches long- The branch-
es are thin and willowy but stand erect. Had no 6 -marnt value exceot-
ing as a novelty. The fruits are quite seedy and the seed annear of a
lemon type/. .xposuro on, the tree failed to materialize into a good film.
Another novelty i' the orchard was 'hae imperial orange. This
was badly affected with Chloiosis, even to the extent of the leaves crumb-
ling up. I"Sny o the leaves hLd no choloryphyl at all. The -ew small
fruit that had set had only a few green stripes on them. The tree showed
the stunting effect of Chlorosis very markedly. The variety is known
as the Imperial because of the vywllow and P reen color.
A lost interesting tree was found about sixty feet away. This
had one branch probably two feet long with all its leaves with various
markings of chlorosis. All sorts of p.ptterns of green and yellow were
present. For the most part the cholorysis was unilateral. ^lade anA
exposure orn the limb but did not get focus right.




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All the rest of the tree appeared entirely normal.There were about a
hundred leaves on the branch. The branhhlets also showed more or less
chlorosss in strips. Secured a specimen of the leaves. "fade an exposure
but failed to get the range.
Dias4is scale were present in varying numbers but were kent in
check by disease and nredacious insects. Aleurothrixus lorridus
Hempel was also present but was being kent in check by its natural enemies.
A very interesting shaddock tree was visited. "he young bloom
and young branches were covered with hair, a very curious thing in citrus.
't is one of the pink fleshed varieties". The most curious thing about

this shaddock is the extreme variation in he leaves. On one single small
branch I found six excessive variations. I found one leaf fifteen om
long -,nd seven :m broad, nesuring five vm across the apron- The apron
-was only four m long. The blade proper was ten om and the petiole
about one Am. another leaf fourteen cm long had no articulation for
an apron, being a continuous tissue from the apron to the 1blade, other-
wise the lead was practically normal. Ano'hei leaf seventeen cm long
was oval in outline, te blade thirteen 1r3 long with the apex refuse.
This leaf has no aprons. The petiole is approximately four cm long.
Another leaf 14 cm long and seven cm broad was apparently normal in
all of its proportions. Another leaf nine cm long is broadly obcorcate.
It contains no aprons. Another leaf 11 cm long had a blade eight
cm" lonF and seven broad, being almost circular in outline, excepting
the sharp notch at; the distall end._ imO / z)
A considerable number of scale insects were found affecting.:
a fungus that Dr. Puttemans considers a new genius.
Got some good specimens of lime affected with as scab. Camargo
thinks the scab the same as the Florida scab.
Found four very curious specimens of flies affected by a fungus







10.

apparently i^re +i'iB it looks like it might be an s~ria. 7ach one
_ _. f:,-iifaLh'.:t __-,. ,rs fruiting body protruding rrom the
..iwo protruding r rom the 7enlce where
Sound on the flies.

have met me at the w notelat 11L
t.e12 and then went to freakfsat.
rardens. J4-e a couple of exposures
:lIm Ivenues, in th e -ar,.,ens ax
-0y palm, @"ctius Vinifera.

The location of t... was such that'i could not get a phot grapbh" of, them
7 -'___7',- the park saw two young fellows

fraromu, ra Yhrr dlisec(reo.Ttely. 7hey
,;ect of a Teuton" I spoke to them
,greatly fleased to hear an ,.nlish
wh-o anneared to be the older is in
-of the Federal 'Express. le was born
f ack O0 I,-le- Stanley. Said hqe
son during the war. ad been arrested

as a erian sw* They claimed lhis name ,:w,,s fictitious. Said it was
nvince them that he was an tvIerican
Er nc put in jeil" Fe has no business
6 [,ess as Rua Alfandega 48 and
for me Th"e other boy was John
foi- me-

3--U1 general. His address was
homesick to get back to the I. S.
ty.
o ta"nic Girrden was growing a large

tree labeled icheej, It looks ICIT much i.n general @s'rect like a mango.







10.
apparently urnei,*- it looks like it might be a.n isiria. ach one
of the- four flies had what a -ip-ars a fruiting body protruding rom the
posterior portion of the abdomen and Iwo protruding -rom the p-olace where
the wings are located. No wTings were found on the flies.

Sept. CO. Camargo was to have met me at the hotell at 11
o'clock for breakfsat. iaited till 12 and then went to breakfast.
After "breakfast went to the Botanic Gardens. .4,."e a couple of exposures
in the, a -den on a couple of Eoyal Palm Avenues. in th e Gardens as
saw fine specimens of the $ilix burity -Eam. artius Yinifera.
The location of these v,-as such that I could not get a photograph of ttemr
with out E wider angle lens..hen in the park saw two young fellows
about nineteen years of age roT-ir g around rafhur disconsoQlately. 'hey
were blue ecyed and, had the general aspect of a Teuton' I spoke to them
in ,',qlish and they seemed to be very greatly pleased to hear an englishh
voice. The smkier of the boys, who appeared to be the older is in
the foreign Comm ercial Department of the Feieral Express. He was born
in the U. S. and carried t1ie name of 'ack O'@a_-ley Stanley. Said he
was three days in the Brazilian -prison during the war. Iad. been arrested
as a German spy. They claimed his n-ae was fictitious. Said it was
three days before the Consul could convince them that he was an A- ierican
citizen. No wonders he -vas arrested End put in jail. He has no business
having such a name. lie gives hs address s as Fua Alfandega 48 and
offered to do anything that he could for me- `he other boy was John
Loss Faurschon, a sFcn of the Danish c sul general. His address was
io Theophilo Ottoni 3. Stanley was homesick to get back to the TT. S.
and is going on a farm near Kansas city.
.hlar the e _trance of thc Botanic Grrden was growing a large
4-'eu. labeled ichee. 1 looks very much in general aspect like a mango.











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'row of SaBti Sapucaia. These bear the lerge seefd podi tnat - don brought in n time ago. here are seves not borne f F uit.

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caia. 'A' ne s eie-ns1 of tfhetcorollAs that had fallen "ro'r theo
tree. It belongs to th nius Lethis, of the family Myrtacae ie




fllowers oare different from *those ou' ,:nv iyriacaca that I dii ;e ever seen.
t ispro-ly hCon tsnh ia aInkca a.
-rJ pof t ea yon ain theses tribi bes ars e sket tlite shearing.l

donthat thout in-ner toli me was -arfim. are s feared to bCe a ofyrtaeous
Got





plant or so. nearly related form. It 'olakes s a nice appeallence inrhe
a sheared hedge but hardly attractiv6nus Le in the form the familydner yrtad chosen.
-f-lower:rs a re dif f e'rn t. from tho''e' O of ny*,'.1, rlacaea that ic ,,e ever seen.
l~f s # b ly -C'ton thn}ia &ami.ca:$a. ....' -
evonn ,the, t r'., in bTheds -:cjp P,.-esket 'ieshearing
tha te 6e ,,'eet tolei., me. waF L,.Irfim. ii a-opeared to be a M4yrtaceous
plant or soaqe nearly related form. It makes a nice a-p-eneence in
a sheared hedge but hardly attractive in the form the pkrzdner had chosen.

In the front yard of the museumeu m roses, Baby irilTler and Louis
Philippi were used. The first was doing quite well, the latter not so
well. The Alternanthera showed up well where used 'or bedOl ng -ournoses.
Cycas !evoluta and the sword fern were used for ornamentation. Pli.ribago
Capensis was used in the back ground. Scabiosa was used in the beds.
Some of the varigated St. Aug. grass was apparently holding :ts own
against the ordinary green type. Colcus were used in large quantities.
,!Ede an exposure of the Sa-nucaia and on Bipaalis. 'he latter
is not likely to come out well.
The National museum is an extensive two story structure
built arounii a court. Bird fauna sce;s to be umnsually well represented.







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r'h, branches are low with -preading limbs. I was very much surprised

to find this ber. Apparxntly the tree has not borne fruit.

ational- Museumo4
.... 19P -'sday 21.,1921, .Immediately after getting coffee I
took er pa fnluSr
took C` a 'ar. on :1ua 6 sembla and found -the National iuseurm and Prk
without difficulty.* The en tanee to the Park ani .the ,,ipproachi to
L,'L Nati orll si4U.m 1q 'fime, -th Ai-oihs r`ei of itse main drive is a
row of Saphi's Zapucaia. TChese bear lie large seed pod that Hr, had-
don brouAht in some tirrime ago. 'h'ere are sevt-jral s-pecies of'- .] .
"Got
"a pucaia. A ome spei'"enrIs oftfhd' codroll'Cs that iad, fallen 'from .the
tree. It elorgF 'to th genius Lecythis "of the faraily .yrtacae Nio
Flowers -are different from tho',' of'nc ,,vrlacaea that I blve ever seen.

It. is probably C0ontanhia Saucia.
S'" *: Just beyond in:the tri.',m'-'t beds was cnsket like shearing

that the gardener told me v'a,- -cirfimi. i appeared to be a Mvrtaceous
plant or some nearly relatEd form. It makes a nice appeaeence in
a sheared hedge but hardly attractive in the form the gvvdner had chosen.
In the front yard of the -'uLseum roses, :aby laribler and Louis
Philippi were used. The first v.oa doing quite well, the latter not so
well. The bAlternanthera showed un well where used -or bed(' ng f,'i)"oses.
Cycas Bevoluta and the sword fern were used for or-nmaentation. lmbago
Capensis was used in the back around. Scabiosa was used in the beds.
Some of the varigated St. Aug. grass was apparently holding `ts own
against the ordinary green type. Coleus were used. in large quantities.
.,,de an exposure of the Sapucaia and on oipsalis. 'he latter
is not likely to come out well.
The nationall .'.useum is an extensive two story structure
built around a court. Dird faua[j seems to be uhnusually well represented.







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After dinner I took the Carioca bonde which has its station just
across fiom the Avenida. This took, 'i out to the Inlernational "otel.
Got up to the I'riteration&l before Dr. B.!i. 1D.. IHoLviy *had- finished
his' dinner. *rrs. Holway joined us in the course of ten -or fifteen
minutes -and we spent two' or three 'hours very -oleasantly., "heLv move about
f-romn oneplace to another as convenience and -the trio justifies. They
-expect to visit B.,., inthe- coi;. *of bf-two or ,,'{J,: weeks. r;;hey find
botnizing very profit :nb le around Fio. The International Totel is
well located as they cani begin bo.tanizing tlh moment they s tep off the
naved street. -Dr. Ho-ay finals it -very 1i fficult to get the original
publications of the s-necies1 -enyv of the South American sF-oeci&s having
been published in rather evanescent j-6urnals, and unscientific naners.
'ie has found something of value Ti- every n]ace that he hs vrited.







-12-
The number of species s.'--rn to bhe qi.ite bewildering. There ,pp.-ri'
to be aboit eighty or ninrty s pecies of "irg birds he ninerolo-
gical collection a-.o seemed to be very extensive. 'he department of
quitee ihe 9P~rmeto
hnology ad some quite interesting thing. The collection o insects
on exhibit was not so extcrnsive or in as good shapeo aC: I lad cyooctod
to find it. The large Bracilian moth was here na1eOd Thysani'. Agripina.
ilie collection of fruits and vegetables was difficult to examine, owing
to the lack of light. .,o-t of them were, however, discolored by thlt
prcsving" .fuid. There wore five cabinets containing one Iundred

and fif.Lty or two hundred species of orchids preserved in fluids. A
considerable number of botany specimens were also placed in shoi cases
for exhibition.
AIong other interesting things were found the stages of the
large Iarvae that I .Ic:ed up a number of times on the streets. of Bello
Hor. This was labeled Brassolis is astyra, God. ',hen I goft home
soem of these had pupated showing that my suspicions v;,ere correct.
.I spent the whole day a' the Iuseum and was thotolv tired
out when the guards came around to notify us of quitting time
-.. Ca-Cmro came to the enot and found me at the train readv
to embark. Ve had about twenty min. before the train started. He told
me he had made two trips to the Hotel to find, ne there but fti led to
find me-" was each time in the Hotel when he called. 1vidi-ntly the
hotel people do not bother the-iselves much about their guestsi.







Mango, Deodoro, 19-4-21 (Adrlendia'1)


At Pomeift the work seem( (
The mango is top worked by inarchie
10 in. tin cans with branches of t h
stub of the scion is left and at t]
Good, clean workmanship is not the f-
the final results are good.
Fig. 9, Carlotfe, which I
plant was in vigorous state. of groan
bloom was still being produced. Dloom blight was present in considerable
abundance. Some of the young fruit were badly spotted already. They
had not etvreached the size where they bend the peduncles.
Fig. 10 shows a tree of b-e 72vns It n _
//
due to the -mnanner of' inarching.
or red and the flowers show a redd&"
meters tall and has enough fruit s
Fig. 11 shows a tree of
and peduncles as well as yellowish
in arch but no name was discovered
of a shortish or Ponibay type, rath,
growth may be rore or less accidental. Although less than 1 1/` meters
tall it was carrying about fifty small fruits and still had some bloom.
The leaves are longer and broader -- --, -

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Mango, Deodoro, 19--21 (Addenda'l)

At Pomei-ra the work seemed to be confined to citrus and mango.
The mango is top worked by inarching, see page 7. The seedlings are in
10 in. tin cans with branches of the mother tree on them often a long
stub of the scion is left and at times a long stub left on the stock.
Good, clean workmanship is not the rule. Even with this clumsy work
the final results are good.
Fig. 9, Carlotfe, which had been used considerbalv for mother
.V
plant was in vigorous state. of growth and setting fruit liberally. Some
bloom was still being produced. Bloom blight was present in considerable
abundance. Some of the young fruit were badly spotted already. They
had not Yetrreached the size where they bend the peduncles.
Fig. 10 shows a tree of the Losa type. Its lopsided shape was
Sdue to the manner of inarching. The flowering recemes are pinkish'.
or red and the flowers show a reddish cast. The'tree is about-2 1/2
meters tall and has enough fruit set to make a crate (40 kgs).
Fig. 11 shows a tree of a different type, yellowish bloom
and peduncles as well as yellowish midribs and perioles. It is an
in arch but no name was discovered with the tree. The young fruits are
of a shortish or Bombay type, rather thick laterally. Its low squatty
growth may be ?ore or less accidental. Although less than 1 1/2 meters
tall it was carrying about fifty small fruits and still had some bloom.
The leaves are longer and broader than the I'osa ard Carlotte types.















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Ci tru Niursery, 'Deodo

At Porneire. The citrus nu.
though in many wlys crude. Tht soi0
were about 25 m. long and about half,
sinken paths between. A small streal
prepared by hand hoes. The rows mad
trees set about 12 inches apart intL ..... .
applying the water in this way The seedlings set out are from II
to 18 inches tall and about 1/4 in cali-erat foot.- _See 1fi' .-
Adjacent to the new nursery
ba.bly` 2 o r 3 yecrs, of- ny. of ti
13) in the patch bud method. :'They a
about 30 inches,(See Fig. 13). In th
scattering trees left.from an old nur
main picture. The trees shown in Pi1
this nursery.
Fig. 14 shows a general vie\v u' ,n uoier nursery and
general citrus plantings? It seer" to be a general mixture of odds
and ends. Probably left overs from older nurseries. There were
Eangpur lime, citron, lemon, oranges.. etc. c--nd the fines-_tbnf.aniz-.
ing and entomological grr7unds. Fo-nn o ...n
entirely new to me. Scab, melanbse 1
scale insects, so1t- Aleurothixas horl





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Citrus Nursery, nDeodoro, 19, IX, 21. (Addenda 2)

'At Pomeire. The citrus nursery work was very in'erestingp
though in many ways crude. The soil was well prepared. The beds S
were about 2? m. long and about half as broad with more or less
sunken paths between. A small stream of water was run down the rills
prepared by hand hoes. The rows made about 14 inches apart and the
trees set about 12 inches apart in the row. ,he land is ideal for
applying the water in this way" The seedling-s set out are from 10
to 18 inches tall and about 1/4 in caliper at foot. ee fig. l?.
Adjacent to thl new nursery was an older nursery of oro-

bably 2 or 3 years of age.p ilany of the trees were budded, (see 71g.
13) in the patch bud method. lThey are budded high 6n the stock
about 30 inches, (See scattering trees left-from an old nursery, same aFe as those in the
main picture. The trees shown in Figs. 4 and 5 are probably from
this nursery.
Fig. 14 shows a general view of an older nursery and
general citrus plantings? It seerics to be a general mixture of odds
and ends. Probably left overs from older nurseries. There were
Rangpur lime, citron, lemon, oranges, etc, and the finest botaniz-
ing and entomological grounds. Found four flies killed by a fungus
entirely new to me. Scab, melan6sen rust mites, etc, and especially
scale insects, some Aleurothixas horridus.




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