<%BANNER%>
UFLAC
Package Processing Log
.logFileName { font-size:x-large; text-align:center; font-weight:bold; font-family:Arial }
.logEntry { color:black; font-family:Arial; font-size:15px; }
.errorLogEntry { color:red; font-family:Arial; font-size:15px; }
.completedLogEntry { color:blue; font-family:Arial; font-size:15px; }
Package Processing Log
4/2/2013 1:43:07 PM Error Log for AA00000207_00101 processed at: 4/2/2013 1:43:07 PM
4/2/2013 1:43:07 PM -
4/2/2013 1:43:07 PM Item title is required but not supplied!
4/2/2013 1:43:07 PM -


STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00000207/00101
Finding Guide: A Guide to the Peter Henry Rolfs Collection
 Material Information
Title: Trip 6: Pedro Leopolco.
Series Title: Correspondence and Subject Files 1921-1943
Physical Description: Mixed Material
Physical Location:
Box: 6
Divider: Subject Files
Folder: Trip 6: Pedro Leopolco.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: AA00000207:00101


This item has the following downloads:

( HTML )


Full Text
* Fazenda iodela do Cria

Trip No 6.
Pedro Leopoldo.
Left Bello Horizonte 9:50 A. M. 31" of August, 1921 for
Pedro Leopoldo, for the purpose of visiting the Zootechnic Station
under Federal control. Dr. Eomulo Joviano in charge.
Arrived at Pedro Leopoldo about 12:30 P . Was met at
the train by a young Englishman by the name of Thomas Dalton. He
has been at the Station for about three years.
The Staton was established some eight or ten years by
ago by the State government in a private contract with two Germans.
Most of the Animals acquired during their term of office have either
been soldier become useless. A considerable amount of new stock
is being acquired and a considerable amount of money is being exoend-
ed for new buildings. Mr. Dalton seemed to have general supervision
over the running of the establishment* The cattle seemed to be in
change of a Swiss by the name of William Fraike. Mr Dalton called for
me with the Ford truck and took me back to the station by the same means.
As nearly as I could learn from Mr Dalton the leading object
of the Station was to furnish males and the services of pure bred males
to the farmers of the vicinity, and also to preform various experiments
in the matter of raising forage crops for the animals. There are about
fifty hectares in vargems and about two hundred and fifty hectares -more
in mountain lands. The contour of the land is more level than around
Bello Horizonte, excepting in Bello Hor. itself. The mountains are
rather low and water very abundant. It is possible to irrigate practi-
cally all of the area by gravity.
Horses, and Jacks. There are two Arabians of Austrian
strain, see photograph. These are small animals of about four hundred








S. lso have a pure bred English Thorough-
4 ngey and appeared less vigorous than


Spanish Catalonean (?) This
w M boned but seemed to lack size of
SSta tes.
Sanimlas was to breed to mares on
.. ._ "brought in from the surrounding
e encumbancy vary few farmers took
present time there are several


out to the neighboring -aznedas
i is paid by the government, the
l- in for the animal and the care-


beef strains of cattle were found


ing specimens were three pure breds,
S rgo breed. These are said to be the
Snee and color they resemble the Hol-
-', it a pure bred Friburgo must have a
-_ Qby white on its side. The color
-._.- with milk production. The
..ra a great deal coarser than that
Sv; ~-~ ~z-. emna-l -or-n-re u-t,,o -It ed. They are coarse looking than
either of the three leading beef breeds of North America/ In milk nro-
duction they are said to be only a little inferior to the Hollandaise.
In size I would judge that they would be quite a good deal larger animals.





and fifty to five huhred kilo weight, of a sticky build, rather compact
and apparently very robust. They also have a pure bred English Thorough-
bred. This animal looked somewhat range and appeared less vigorous than
the Arabian. See photograph.
They also had a Jack of the Spanish Catalonean (?) This
animal was a fairly tall one, large boned but seemed to lack size of
body so much in demand in the United States. e
The object of keeping these animlas was to breed to mares on
the fazenca and also to breed to mares brought in from the surrounding
farms. During the first year of the encumbancy very few farmers took
advantage of the opportunity. At the present time there are several
farmers of the waiting list.
When these horses are taken out to the neighboring faznedas
a care taker goes along whose s alary is paid by the government, the
faxendeiro providing the feed and lodging for the animal and the care-
taker*
Cattle. Both the milk and beef strains of cattle were found
present.
Probably the most interesting specimens were three pure breds,
one bull and two heifers of the Friburgo breed. These are said to be the
CLL q_ ID 14-U /Ae" iXJ< HfU 1
first in Brazil.A ffIn general appesrence and color they resemble the Hol-
landaise (iolstein). It was said that a pure bred Friburgo must have a
large black spot entirely surrounded by white on its side. The color
of the skin probably has no direct ,lvA.. with milk production. The
skeletons or bones of these animals was a great deal coarser than that
of the Hollandaise or the Dutch Belted. They are courses looking than
either of the three leading beef breeds of North Americas In milk pro-
duction they are said to be only a little inferior to the Hollandaise.
In size I would judge that they would be quite a good deal larger animals.






SL$i
4jr
is lAi
:rz-n^i, l
^k\-^ ^










I.]




























Timyj

lUa-i+ l -r
4 0.



























I


















r



































a

'I














t io
1
_^^ U





:,. .^ 1 ''








































































I





















C







-3-
The three animals present had not yet fully recovered from the effects
of the importation.
Brown Swiss. Or as, they are known in literature,
Schwitz* These appear to be the favorite milk breed for a large nart
of -~nas. They were represented at the Station with some very fine
animals. 'ne old and four young bulls were present. The old or
herd bull was born and reared in Brazil. The four young ones had been
mninn ite. ThVey lso had two native born purebred cows. The herd bull
Prown Swiss cattle looked much
the lace. It is quite possible t










about two and a half years ol.
dogs. A considerable amount of work has been done in the
breeding of hogs, not in the technical line, but in the line of intro-
ducing pure breds and grades among the fazendeiros. There were three
pure bred breeds present, the Duroc, the Poland China and the Large Black.
The Durocs and the Poland Chinas came from North American while the
Large Black came from Eggland. There wer also some pure bred sows of
each of these types. One native hog o f the Canastra type was also
present. All of the hogs were being kept on stohe flagging floors.
T.e hogs seemed to prefer to lie on stone floors to a wooden covering
over the stone. During the cooler nart of the day the hogs were
turned out to exercise- 'hey were fed ofi ground corn, bran n and some
succulents.





-3-
The three animals present had not yet fully recovered from the effects
of the importation.
Brown Swiss. Or as, they are known in literature,
Schwitz" These appear to be the favorite milk breed for a large -art
of 1inas. They were represented at the Station with some very fine
animals. Une old and four young bulls were present. The old or
herd bull was born and reared in Brazil. The four young ones had been
imported. They also had two native born purebred cows. The herd bull
was Trom Pinheiros* As a whole the Prown Swiss cattle looked much
better than any others that were on the place. It is quite possible t
that this is due to having a better opportunity in selecting and breeding
this type than in the less numerous ones in Brazil. It will be quite
interesting to watch the results of this introduction. The new
Swiss animals are probably not tick immune. The Friburgo are undoubt-
edly subject to tick fever.
There were also two Hereford bulls present. These were
about two and a half years old.
4ogs. A considerable amount of work has been done in the
breeding of hogs, not in the technical line, but in the line of intro-
ducing pure breds and grades among the fazendeiros. There were three
pure bred breeds present, the Duroc, the Poland China and the Large Black.
The Durocs and the Poland Chinas came from North American while the
Large Black came from Eggland. There were also some pure bred sows of
each of these types. One native hog o f the Canastra type was also
present. All of the hogs were being kept on stohe flagging floors.
The hogs seemed to prefer to lie on stone floors to a wooden covering
over the stone. During the cooler nart of the day the hogs were
turned out to exercise. They were fed of ground corn, brany and some
succulents.









F'




-4-
The whole lot was in good condition for breeding purposes. For
breeding purposes the boars are not sent out to the fazendas.
Cow Stable. The large cow stable is nearing completion.
It is built in the shape of a quadrangle with hn interior patio.
The entrance is through a large arch with feed rooms, milk room
and sleeping quarter for care takers on the sides. The exterior
measurement of the quadrangle is about forty by fifty meters. The
original plan calls for an immense silo to be located in the carter of
the quadrangle. Running water is present at all parts, making it
present to have fresh drinking water at all times, and also to have
plenty of water for washing the stalls. When completed there will be
room for ninety six cows, four bull pens and forty or fifty calves'
The whole barn has been built in a m'st substantial and elaborate nlan.
Thoro ventilation is provided for in all arts of the barn. 'ay is
fed in manger. An abundance of straw is used for beddihg.
Horde BErn. Plans have been drawn for a horse barn and
practically all of the material is on the ground. The large front
will be placed at right angles to the main residence and will be about
sixty meters long. Entance will be had through a large arfh to the
circular barns behind. Tiis circular portion will contain the var-
ious stalls for the animals. The diameter of the circle is fifty meters.
The stalls are to be completely covered and the horses may viewed from
the front of the interior just as one wishes. The exit will be toward
the interior. Just back of the stalls is an area way four meters wide
entirely around the enclosed circle. This also os covered and will be
used as an exercise area. The entire interior of the circle will be
floored so as to be usable at any time of the year.
The anterior portion of the horse barn contains various
apartments for Iarioud uses/ saddle rooms, harness booms, sleeping





-5-
rooms for care takers atd also apartments for harness mending and
saddlery shop. The hay storage shop is also contained in this
forward part.
.Hog barn. I also saw the nlins for a hog barn which i
to be built some what farther a-ay than the horse barn* 'his is well
planned, having the nens arranged in two lateral rows with a drive
way of four meters wide between the pens, entering upon a large arch
as in the case of the horse and cow barns. The anterior portion
of the barn is to be used for storing feed and the preparation fo foods.
Apparently the stalls are to be made about four by five meters.
Forage. There was a fine small patch, about half an acre in
extent of Rhodes grass. This was said to do exceedingly well. It had
not been irrigated and was producing practically no grazing at this time.
It is quite certain that if irrigation had been precissed on it a con-
sicderhble amount of grazing would now be done.
Oats. About two acres of oats were just beginning to throw
up some seed heads* These stood, generally, aboyt knee high. Annarently
they had not been irrigated but wa the ground was quite moist as water
higher
had been run along a iswwr level- Some of the lower leaves were turn-
ing yellow. I examined them rather closely for diseases. It anneared
to be due to drying outl. No rust could be found. Occasionally a
plant of barley was found among the oats/ The sowing of oats would
at least in a measure solve the forage problem.
Flax. This was grown to produce seed to be used in feeding
animals. It was really the most promising cron that I saw at this time.
It was producing an abundance of seed and stood a little more than
knee high. It looks like flax might be made an important crop in this


section.





-6-
Truck. A fine garden of truck was being produced, con-
sistling of carrots, cabbage and lettuce. Several varieties of
hed cabbage were present, also several of the foliage type. Tomatoes
were present on the table but I saw none on te ground.
Dinning Vat. On Sept. L/ I witnessed the dipping of
live stock, cattle and horses, including mules. All of the live
stock on the range is brought up weekly and passes through the vat.
Among the horses there was bout one out of five that passes through
the vat without getting his head thoroly soaked. In the case of
cattle about one out of ten missed getting the head completely soaked
The dipping v t is the most elaborate and substantial structure
of the kind that I have ever seen. "he vat itself must be nearly
thirty meters long/ Much longer than is necessary for thoro execution
of the work. The mules were especially refractory in going through.
Usually they would come to the stepping offplace and then take the dive
after a great deal of coe'sion. This usually resulted in a complete
submergence. The animlas that went in gently more frequently went
through without covering their heads.
The side walls of the dipping vat were built up about a
meter and a half high above the top of the vat proper with a walking
ledge along the inside of the wall. The sides of the vat appeared to
be about half a meter thick The depth was sufficeint to completely
submerge the heads of even the tallest horses when a plunge was taken.
The walls were side enough apart so that the long st long '-orns would
be able to pass with out scraping their horns on either side. The dripn-
ing platform was long and narrow in t-e nlace of wide and short as is
the case in the States. It was completely covered with a tile
roofing. The pillars to hold the roof were about hald a meter square.





a.
-7-I

The 'dorrar in which the animals are herded was circular. The shoot
running up to the entrance was somewhat difficult of making. A
slight alteration here would save a lot of annoyance with refractory stock.