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Soapberry Tree.

UFLAC

STHE SOAPBERRY TREE .' ;

P. H. Rolfs ..

. : The soapberry tree belongs to the family Sapindaceae being

generically knownias Sapindus and known under different specific names". i.

There are eleven species belonging to this genus occurring thruout the .

tropics nd sub-tropi s, especially in Africa. Sapindus Mukorossi (8. '

Sutils?) is' sel in China, Japan and elsewhere' place f soap. Sapindus

:Saponaria is grown to some extent in South Florida, Southern California. -

and in the West Indies. Sapindus p)arginatus,'a larger tree. occurs in '

SKansas to Texas and Ls qcutivated occasionally in South Florida. ,In

Algeria the soapherry tree is said to have .produced remunerative crops.

S The fleshy portion around.the seed contains a material, which on

mixing with water forms .a soapy like lather, hence its name. This mater-

ial may be used for cleansing, as with soap. Before the dye industry was, .

perfected to its present stage soap were rather destructive to some of

the more.delicate shades and the soapberry became a useful material for

washing the class of fabrics whose coloring would be injured by the soaps.' ...;

Seed of some of the species has also been employed for'poisoning fish.

There are other plants belonging to this family which have the

.., same property. The' sopberry distributed largely in Florida nearly '
s e p- .
fifteen years ago by E..Moulethen of Jacksonville produced fruits-

. which contain a large amount of this saponifying material...

-lants. of the soapberry tree -have bee-nr offered to the, American ...'

-trade for a long time by the Ametican nurserymen, especially those .locat e

n the Southea'te''ni'United States and in Californi.. They re now6ffe

.ed ,Or sale by the Royal Palm Nunsery -at: ne.co,. Fl.' afd-.pos ib ly by there.
-eie.s .in the .State. In,1907 ..Mr H.-.o S.,;S e : ,.ep d as gp

nd'.rang' .La-k andM- ,E. 0O. Pai ritei ea 'ad .
; eA'. K l .
;.;. ." .L ::! .; i u. ;?'..! ,










TH.O S.APB1iRRICY TrEib.


Thie Boa.pb~rry tree belong to the family :apindaooae

being generically kno'in a6 tapiiLdus and. knovn under different

speciflo nuies. Thore a.~:e eleven sp.oci, belonging to this

genus occurring throughout the tropics and sub-tropics, especi-

ally in Africa. zSapindus l~ikorossi (2. utilis') is used in

China, Japzax andd olaoeL~ re in place oof oap. Sapindus Sa)onaria

is grown to some oxternt in southh F"lorida, Southorn California

and in the et LndiiaS, 3,apinlt;.s mrlrginatus, a larger treat,

occurs in .Laisai to 'exas aldl iL, cuitivwted. occaaionally: in

Louth iloj.ia., In llgoria thoe o;apberry tree haa produced

remunerative crops.

lT'ie iflehy portion arouxid the sood -conCtains saponin, which

saponifies on mixing. with wvator, hence its n.amo1e his material may

be used for Cl.:.in.g cloth, :ii i. the caso with ordiisnary oap.-

Beforo the dye industry waO perlocted to itu present stago the

chemical soaps wore rather diestr.4ctive to oomo of the more delicate

shades and the sopbeorry boaume a uooful material for washing the

class of fabrics wn.ose coloring would be injured by the ordinary

toaps*

Titore are other plX,.ts belonging to this family which

haVe the same property. The soapberry distributed, largely in

Florida noearay fifteen years ago by E. lioule of Jacksonville

produced fruits which contain a large amount of this saponifying

material. Seed of some of the species has also been employed

for poisoning fish.

Plants of the soapberry tree have-been offered to the








.,merican trade for a long time b the .snerican nurserymen, especially

tIhose loc:.tecd in the ,ou.thcasten ni .d ,t -too d ikn California,

Thoy aro now ofwir rec. i.or salo by ho th Ioyal Prlnm In'Isery at Oneco,

2iorida and. pouiLly by other arIoriOes in th-e ,tate.




MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Soapberry Tree.
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 3
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Soapberry Tree.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00110

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Soapberry Tree.
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 3
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Soapberry Tree.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00110

Full Text

THE SOAPBERRY TREE
^# 81
P. H. Rolfs

The soapberry tree belongs to the family Sapindaceae being

generically known as Sapindus and known under different specific names.

There are eleven species belonging to this genus occurring thruout the

tropics and sub-tropics, especially in Africa. Sapindus Mukorossi (S.

utilis?) is used in China, Japan and elsewhere in place of soap. Sapindus

Saponaria is grown to some extent in South Florida, Southern California

and in the West Indies. Sapindus parginatus, a larger tree, occurs in

Kansas to Texas and Ls cultivated occasionally in South Florida. In

Algeria the soapherry tree is said to have produced remunerative crops.

The fleshy portion around the seed contains a material, which on

-mixing with water forms a soapy like lather, hence its name. This mater-

ial may be used for cleansing, as with soap. Before the dye industry was

perfected to its present stage soaps were rather destructive to some of

the more delicate shades and the soapberry became a useful material for

washing the class of fabrics whose coloring would be injured by the soaps.

Seed of some of the species has also been employed for poisoning fish.

There are other plants belonging to this family which have the

same property. The sotpberry distributed largely in Florida nearly

fifteen years ago by E. Moule then of Jacksonville produced fruits-

which contain a large amount of this saponifying material.

Plants of the soapberry tree have been offered to the American

trade for a long time by the American nurserymen, especially those locate

in the Southeastern United States and in California. They are now offered

ed for sale by the Royal Palm Nursery at Oneco, Fla. and possibly by other

nurseries in the State. In 1907 Mr H. B. Stevens reported it as growing

wild around orange Lake and Mr. E. 0. Painter said it had been grown for

years at Tallahassee. (Proc. Fla. Hort. Soc. 1907 p 136)

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION,
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA.










TH. SiAPBIERY TMiE.

lThe .ioipbrry tree belongs to the family Sapindaooae

being generically lkoiwn as Sapindus and kIown under different

specific naues. There ar- oloven .,eoleo belonging to this

genus ooourring throughout the tropics Liand sub-tropios, especi-

ally in Africa. 3apiundiu iukorossi (C, utills.') is used in

China, Japan and eluowbere in place of aoap. bapinduB Saponaria

is grown to some extent in .outh Florida, Southern California

and in the neot indxis. japindLs .riarginatus, a larger tree,

occurs in .ailSaa to .Lexas a;nd ii cultiv--ted oooaalonally in

Iouth iloida. in Algoria the so.ipberry tree haa produced

remunerative orops.

'The fleshy portion around the aoed -containu sauonin, vwhioh

.aponifies on .mixing with wator, hence its name. 'This material may

be used for ole.:iaing cloth, is i6 the caso with ordin..ary -oap.

before the dye industry was perfected to itu present stage the

chemical soaps wore rather destruotive to jomo of the more delicate

shades and the soapberry boaume a useful material for washing the

class of fabrioe vwiose coloring would be injured by the ordinary

qoape.

T',ere a'-e other pl;ats belonging to this family which

haVe the same property. The soapberry distributed largely in

Florida noarky fifteen years ago by i. Mloule of Jacksonville

produced fruits which contain a large amount of this saponifying

material, Seed of some of tho species has also been employed

for poisoning fish,

Plants of the uoapberry tree have'been offered to the


i
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- .7 -ls ll (I~


R O. ..
y/ '-


.aerloan trade for a long time b the uimerioan nurserymen, especially

those located in the ;;southo.astorn United At ..tos ,uld in California,

They are now offered for sale by the toyal Palm ilursery at Oneco,

Florida and possibly by othor nurfiories in the ,tate.


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