<%BANNER%>

Short Course for fertilizer Salesmen. 1920

UFLAC

~i'-/ -2~5'

~4'p~. SC

--eBa, i~L~-A,/

iil : SCCLW )



J--P ~CK~;
I -9
a. :~
"'I, ~
ifL-
acca~a-cal1































i'


i/d


~PIJ~Y ~lr;lbly-iir~


~7Y~LC~-~ ~cuC LZ1
~II~L/e~;-'~~;-c~o












, ~.-.,







,1-~~c~ Le


aa-7
.. -.e f E A



( -




..-0,4-.. ,,.
(> Z^<* e.,dyA JA<
* f/3^,^ 0^)^<^
















~CZ-~-f~~3~~/BCc~









(9c. 2-~; W -;/ 4


- %.





i -/





4- tL ^tL,-1 -i/ -t2l^*^~'



gf *



"o oM E COObEYIrV.lw
lAB A O3, L .Di, fl
-- e --










;dt ue zY _74d //-
yr x HGTO 000
OFc vQFicnnnBE'rr cobACvin-' t*-*y
wmmD-3L~Yr siivtStEuiiJ~i p^ Xt-A y-,~j .&









Ii

it'6&/?' ^-^ -jvu
~;/f/-- (c-^^-^c
( ^- -^'^ ~i pti
~---; Y 7~










///

"- /#4, ~
..J 1
Av ^vn~-^^^ & ^




P'z.. -j, t. CCA^-'^-~f



II,
I//I T
/^ ^fc^ 'yk -c^



1//1 ~/6(c-ck^^,~i+-".~G-




* cc~t- (~e.j

(/J *tf~ 6-


6~9
6V


~- c.I-C ;-


/1 &2~e~c~6sUV






/Ifj2; c-dnc LkL-url

a~rzL$ i-

a:4d~
~ardt ~r- a/U 6d~


~3. Jy p-~e~ Z~B6
~~6dAL


41-


C' a-~ ~lt&/











ate-


S- .-


14< .


~~ ~s~Z;-~;-"









Agricultural Short Course

For Fertilizer Salesmen

University of Florida
College of Agriculture


March 1, 2, 3
1920

Monday, March 1
10 A. M.

ADDRESS OF WELCOME-President A. A. Murphree, University of
Florida.

INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS-Representing the Fertilizer Industry-
Mr. Lorenzo Wilson, Jacksonville, Fla.

SADDRESS-Purpose of the Salesmen School-Dean P. H. Rolfs,
College of Agriculture, University of Florida.

LECTURE-How Fertilizers Have Influenced Southern Agriculture
-Prof. J. N. Harper, Director, Soil Improvement Com-
mittee.

Afternoon-2:30 P. M.

LECTURE-How Plants,Feed-Prof. W.'L. Floyd, College of Ag-
..riculture, University of Florida.

LECTURv-Organic Matter-Its Functions in Soil Fertility-Prof.
C. A. Whiftle, Soil Improvement Committee.

ADDRESS-Salesmen-Harry N. Tolles, of the Sheldon School,
Chicago.








Tuesday, March 2


10 A. M.


ADDRESS-The Science of Salesmanship-Harry N. Tolles, of the
Sheldon School, Chicago.


LECTURE-Methods and Value of Conducting Accurate Field Ex-
pereiments-Dr. C. D. Sherbakoff, Experiment Station,
University of Florida.


LECTURE-Fertilizer Experiments With Sugar Cane and Sweet
Potatoes-Prof. J. M. Scott, Experiment Station, Uni-
versity of Florida.





Afternoon-2:30 P. M.


LECTURE-Losses of Fertilizers by Leaching-Prof. S. E. Collison,
Experiment Station, University of Florida.


LECTURE-Cultivation and Fertilization of. Irish and Sweet Po-
tatoes and Tomatoes-Prof. A. P. Spencer, Agricultural
Extension- Division, University of Florida.


LECTURE-Cultivation and Fertilization of Pineapples and Guavas
-Dean P. H. Rolfs, College of Agriculture, University
of Florida.


LEcTURE-Factors Influencing Profits on the Farm-Prof. J. E.
Turlington, Agricultural College, University of Florida.

Visit to Station Plots and Dairy Barn.








Wednesday, March 3


10 A. M.


LECTURE-Capacity of Legumes for Growing Nitrogen-Prof.
C. A. Whittle, Soil Improvement Committee.


LECTURE-The County Agents and Soil Fertility Problems-Prof.
C. K. McQuarrie, State Agent, Co-operative Demonstra-
tion Work, University of Florida.


LECTURE-Losses from Diseases Attacking Citrus-Prof. H. E.
Stevens, Experiment Station, University of Florida.


LECTURE-Losses from Insects Attacking Citrus-Dr. E. W.
Berger, State Plant Board.





Afternoon-2:30 P. M.


LECTURE-Care Necessary In Preventing the Dissemination of
Insects and Pests-Wilson Newell, State Plant Com-
missioner.


IECTURE-Fertilizer Requirements of General Field Crops-Prof.
J. N. Harper, Director, Soil Improvement Committee.

LECTURE-Principal Insects and Pests Attacking Crops and How
to Control Them-Prof. J. R. Watson, Experiment Sta-
tion, University of Florida.

LECTURE-Sources of Fertilizer Materials and Their Availability-
F. H. Jeter, Soil Improvement Committee.












































sfr.RVI







PROGRAM
'"'"i"Illllll|| ||BII(U l """


Agricultural Short


Course


FOR


Fertilizer


Salesmen


University of Florida
College of Agriculture
Gainesville


March 1, 2, 3, 1920
















Southern Fertilizer Association




The short course for fertilizer salesmen is offered at the
suggestion of the Southern Fertilizer Association. The members
of this organization doing business in this state and nearby terri-
tory are sending all their salesmen to the school.
Local Committee in Charge-The Committee in charge of local
arrangements is as follows: Bayless W. Haynes, Chairman, Jack-
sonville; Harry Hasson, Jacksonviile, and E. E. Cannon.
General Chairman Salesmen's Schools of the Southern Fer-
tilizer Association-W. Dewey Cooke, Savannah.
The Soil Improvement Committee, which is in general charge,
is as follows:
Soil Improvement Committee-D. B; Osborne, Chairman, At-
lanta, Ga.; Harry Hodgson (Ex-Officio), Athens, Ga.; W. E. Rich-
ards, Atlanta, Ga.; A. H. Sterne, Atlanta, Ga.; L. M. Bogle,
Tupelo, Miss.; J. R. Porter, Atlanta, Ga.; D. C. Allen, Mont-
gomery, Ala.; W. DeC. Kessler, Montgomery, Ala.; W. T. Wright,
Atlanta, Ga.; T. G. Sinclair, Shreveport, La.; Ernest E. Dallis,
Secretary, Atlanta, Ga.

TECHNICAL STAFF OF THE COMMITTEE:

Director, J. N. Harper, Atlanta, Ga.; J. C. Pridmore, Shreve-
port, La., in charge of Western Office; C. A. Whittle, Editorial
Manager, Atlanta; F. H. Jeter, Agricultural Editor, Atlanta;
Loy E. Rast, Agronomist, Shreveport; C. A. McLendon, Agrono-
mist, Atlanta, Ga.








EXTRACT OF ADDRESS DELIVERED TO THE AGRICULTURAL SHORT COURSE
FOR FERTILIZER SALESMEN

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
College of Agriculture
Gainesville, Florida
March 1, 1920


OUR' INSTITUTIONS

Gentlemen of the Fertilizer Salesmen School:.- It is a great pleasure
to have you present with us on the Campus and to have you become a part
of our great institution. There are two principal objects for your
meeting here. The first is for us to get better acquainted personally,
mingle with each other and exchange views and arguments. We have much
information that will be of greater or less benefit to you. You like-
wise have much information that we need. As a matter of fact, I
'believe the people who will deliver the lectures to the audience are
likely to learn as much from the audience as the audience is to learn
from the.lecturer. It is a give and take proposition, in which both
parties give and both parties take.

There is probably no one subject in the State in which the
people are so vitally interested and at the same time one which is so
imperfectly understood as is the organization of yqur institutions of
higher learning. I make no apologies therefore, in presenting to you
.this morning an outline of the higher educational work in the State of
Florida, especially in so far as it pertains directly to the agricul-
tural work in the State.

BOARD OF CONTROL .

In 1905 the Legislature of Florida had the courage to combine
all of the institutions of higher learning, seven in number, into four,
and placed them under one Board of Control composed of five men ap-
pointed by the Governor of the state. These men serve without pay,
giving the State their services free of charge. .In many quarters out-
side of the state of Florida it was freely said that this venture would
prove unsuccessful, since no five men could be found in the state who
would be willing to meet not less than twelve times a year, abandon
their own business for the time being and give their time and best
thought, as well as their best energies to the welfare of the state.
After fifteen years it has proven beyond a doubt that five such men can
be found in the state, and that under this arrangement the institutions
of higher learning have prospered as never before. The members of this
Board of Control are: Hon. J. B. Hodges, Hon. Ed. L. Wartman, Hon. J.
B. Sutton, Hon. H. B. Minium, and Hon. W. W. Flournoy.

This Board of Control molds the general policy of all of the
institutions under their control, which consists of the University of
Florida at Gainesville, the Women's College at Tallahassee, the Insti-
tution foi the Deaf and Blind at St. Augustine, and the Negro Agricul-
tural and Mechanical College at Tallahassee.







THE UNIVERSITY


The University of Florida is located at Gainesville, having
opened its doors to students at this place in September 1906. She owns
a property of over 600 acres of land situated in one body. In 1905
this consisted of piney woods and hammock. Now we have ten brick
buildings, a 90 acre campus, and three splendid farms.

The University is composed of five colleges:

(a) Arts and Sciences
(b) Agricultural College
(c) College of Engineering
(d) Teachers College
(e) Law College

This is a most splendid arrangement, since from among our graduates
will come the future leaders of the state. These young men come to
know each other and respect each other for their attainments and have
none of the petty prejudices which arise when these different colleges
are located in different parts of the commonwealth, as occurs in many
other states.

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE

You gentlemen of the school of fertilizer salesmen are inter-
ested in this institution as a whole, but are most vitally and directly
interested in the College of Agriculture. The College of Agriculture
in Florida was established in 1884. Among its older graduates we find
;some of the leading.men, not only of the State but of the Nation. Rear
'Admiral Cone is among its early graduates. Mr. R. C. Dunn of our State
,Railway Commission is among the men who have done things in Florida.
iHon. C. E. Davis of Madison has for several terms represented his
county in the Legislature. Both are graduates of the University, and I
might add greatly to this list and find no less prominent men among her
early graduates.

Any business to be successful must have various divisions.
The Agricultural College has three principal divisions. These are
based upon the lines of activities conducted by each. It can readily
be seen without argument that if a man gives all of his time to teach-
ing students on the campus, he cannot at the same time make of himself
a thoro investigator, and likewise the thoro investigator cannot devote
his time to the complicated and higher specialized lines of investiga-
tion and at the same time travel over the state and deliver lectures to
agricultural assemblages. As a matter of fact it takes at least three
distinct types of mind to carry on these three divisions of work.
Therefore, we find the Agricultural College composed of:

(a) 'Instructional division for teaching students attending the
.University

(b) Investigational division (Experiment Station)

(c) Extension division, for teaching people not resident at the
University.








-3-


Instructional Division

In the instructional division the men who attend the Agricul-
tural College receive their instruction in the branches common to the
other colleges with the students attending on the other colleges. For
example, English, mathematics, chemistry, bacteriology, etc. are the
same whether the prospective young man becomes a doctor, lawyer, farm-
,er, agriculturalist or what not.

The strictly agricultural subjects are taught in five differ-
ent departments, each of which has its own head. In the agronomy de-
partment is taught the subject of soils and fertilizers, crops, etc.;
in the.animal husbandry and dairy department the subjects especially
relating to animal industry are taught; the veterinary science depart-
ment takes up especially the diseases of domestic animals; the horti-
cultural department includes the teaching of fertilization of horticul-
tural crops, diseases and general studies of fruit crops of the State;
and the poultry department takes up the subject of poultry husbandry.

EXPERIMENT STATION

This division of the Agricultural College gentlemen is the
,one in which you are more directly interested, tho by no means more
vitally so than in either of the other two divisions. The object of
this division is to make original agricultural investigations and print
the results of the work. The Experiment Station was established in
1887. It was required by law to publish one annual report and four
bulletins a year. Up to the present time we have published 32 annual
reports and 155 bulletins, as well as 320 press bulletins. We are,
therefore, 24 bulletins and 320 press bulletins ahead of the require-
ments.

Last Year's Work

1 Annual Report 108 pages 4,000 copies total pages 432,000
5 Bulletins 260 pages 83,000 copies total pages 20,750,000
40 Press bulletins 80 pages 52,000 copies total pages 72,000
Total number of pages printed 21,574,000

Total pages distributed (80$) 17,260,000

Departments

There are six leading departments in the Experiment Station:

(a) Animal Industry Department
(b) Soils and Fertilizer Department
(c) Plant Physiology Department
(d) Plant Disease Department
S(e) Entomology Department
(f) Forage Crop Department





-4-


EXTENSION DIVISION

The beginning of the Extension Division had its foundation in
the Farmers' Institutes which have been conducted for more than twenty
years. In 1914 the Smith Lever bill passed Congress, establishing an
organic cooperative arrangement between the Agricultural College and
the Department of Agriculture.

The object of this Division is to give instruction and prac-
tical demonstration in agriculture and home economics to people not
resident at the College. From this portion of the law you will see
that the Extension Division has to deal directly with the subjects of
agriculture and home economics to people located in the various coun-
ties of the State. The moneys arising from the Smith Lever fund were
given directly to the Land Grant College in order that this work may be
carried out. The Agricultural College is cooperating with the Women's
College at Tallahassee in carrying out the home demonstration work, It
is cooperating with the negro college at Tallahassee to carry out dem-
onstration work among the negro farmers and negro homes in the State.
You are well acquainted with the county agent; in fact sometimes your
companies look with covetous eyes upon our county agents. The home
demonstration agents are also known to you as you come in contact with
both of these agencies in the field as well as the state agents and
district agents.

Technically speaking the different departments in our exten-
sion work are designated as projects. These different departments or
projects are as follows:

(a) County Agents located in the majority of counties in the State
and usually have their headquarters at the county seat.

(b) Home Demonstration Agents located in the majority of counties
of the State with headquarters usually at the county seat. This
work is carried on cooperatively with the Florida State College
for Women.

(c) Boys' Agricultural Clubs organized in practically all of the
counties of the State.

(d) Work with the negro youth carried on cooperatively with the
Negro Agricultural and Mechanical College.

(e) Livestock giving special attention to the development of the
beef cattle raising on the farms in Florida.

(f) Hog Cholera educational work carried on directly with the hog
raisers of the State.

(g) Poultry work carried on directly with the poultry men of the
State.

All of these different lines of work have their special State
Leader, working directly and under the instruction of the State Leader
for Extension Work.





-5-


PUBLICATIONS

The character of the publications from the Extension Division
are quite different from those prepared by the Experiment Station. We
have published 25 bulletins, 11 circulars, and 5 annual reports.

CONCLUSION

Gentlemen of the Fertilizer Salesmen we have before us the
most splendid opportunity of developing a much finer and better and
more harmonious civilization than we have ever had before. Many people
are speaking of the present situation as a reconstruction. I do not
like to call it reconstruction because nothing has been demolished. We
are, however, going thru a readjustment, sloughing off many of the old
and useless things and taking on a new form and new problems. Agricul-
ture in the State of Florida is going thru so rapid a development that
we can almost call it a revolution. Those of us who have the opportu-
nity such as comes to the Agricultural College and to the Fertilizer
Salesmen need to support these problems in an altruistic way. If we
study it in a narrow selfish way we will be lost in the readjustment.
The world has come to recognize more and more that "service not self"
is the keynote to success. We are all working as hard as we know how
to make the one great industry of Florida, agriculture, the fullest
success possible. We have all caught the Rotary spirit; we are all en-
joying it. None of us are getting as much of the world's goods as we
think the other fellow has, but there is no one in a position where he
cannot enjoy himself to the fullest extent if he only catches the
motto, "Service not Self."






EXTENSI O [ID ION
C. K. McQUARRIE. S GENT
A. P. SPENCER. Vice- Ec.OR
E. W. JE'KINS. AGENT TG RN DISTRICT
S. W. HI TT. AGENT WESTERN DISTRICT
G. L. HERRINGTON. AGENT BOYS' CORN CLUBS
R. W. BLACKLOCK,
ASSISTANT BOYS CLUB AGENT
L. R. HIGHFILL.
ASSISTANT BOYS" CLUB AGENT
A. H. LOGAN. VETERINARY INSPECTOR
N. W. SANBORN.
POULTRY EXTENSION SPECIALIST
WM. H. BLACK, AGENT IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. 0. TRAXLER. FARM HELP SPECIALIST


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

P. H. ROLFS. DEAN AND DIRECTOR

GAINESVILLE




April 10, 1920


EXPERIMENT STATION
J. M. SCOTT. VICE-DIRECTOR
AND ANIMAL INDUSTRIALIST
B, F. FLOYD. PLANT PHISIOLOGIST
J. R. WATSON. ENTOMOLOGIST
H. E. STEVENS. PLANT PATHOLOGIST
S. E. COLLISION, CHEMIST
C. D. SHERAKOFF. ASSOCIATE PATHOLOGIST

COLLEGE FACULTY
W. L FLOYD
ASSISTANT DEAN AND PROF. or HORTICULTURE
C. L. WILLOUGHBY
PROF. OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. E. TURLINGTON
PROF. OF AGRONOMY
JNO. SPENCER
PROF. VETERINARY SCIENCE
S L., VINSON
AGRICULTURAL EDITOR
F. ROGERS
AsST. PROF. FARM MACHINERY


Dear Sir:


Attached hereto please find an extract from my


address delivered to the Short Course for Fertilizer Sales-


imen held at the Florida Agricultural College. A number of


people have asked for copies of this address. It makes a


clear statement of the relationship of the College to the


University, also of the Extension work and Experiment Station


to the College. I know that some part of this speech will


prove especially interesting and valuable to you.


With best wishes, I am


Very truly yours,






Dirtor
Director.







EXTENSION ISION
C. K. McQUARRIE, ST AGENT
S A. P. SPENCER, VICE-DIECTOR
E. W. JENKINS. AGENT N*THERN DISTRICT
S. W. HIATT. AGENT WESTERN DISTRICT
G. L. HERRINGTON. AGENT BOYS' CORN CLUBS
R. W. BLACKLOCK.
ASSISTANT BOYS CLUB AGENT
L. R. HIGHFILL.
ASSISTANT BOYS* CLUB AGENT
A. H. LOGAN. VETERINARY INSPECTOR
N. W. SANBORN.
POULTRY EXTENSION SPECIALIST
WM. H. BLACK. AGENT IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. O. TRAXLER. FARM HELP SPECIALIST


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

P. H. ROLFS, DEAN AND DIRECTOR

GAINESVILLE



April 10, 19B0


EXPERIMENT STATION
J. M. SCOTT. VICE-DIRECTOR
AND ANIMAL INDUSTRIALIST
B. F. FLOYD. PLANT PHYSIOLOGIST
J. R. WATSON. ENTOMOLOGIST
H. E. STEVENS. PLANT PATHOLOGIST
S. E. COLLISION. CHEMIST
C. D. SHERBAKOFF. ASSOCIATE PATHOLOGIST

COLLEGE FACULTY
W. L FLOYD
ASSISTANT DEAN AND PROF. oF HORTICULTURE
C. L. WILLOUGHBY
PROF. OP ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. E. TURLINGTON
PROF. OF AGRONOMY
JNO. SPENCER
PROP. VETERINARY SCIENCE
S. L. VINSON
AGRICULTURAL EDITOR
-F. ROGERS
ASSET. PROF. FARM MACHINERY


To Florida Senators:


Dear Senator:


Attached hereto please find an extract from my


address delivered to the Short Course for Fertilizer Sales-


men held at the Florida Agricultural College. A number of


people have asked for copies of this address. It makes a


clear statement of the relationship of the College to the


University, also of the Extension work and Experiment Station


to the College. I know that some part of this speach will


prove especially interesting and valuable to you.


With best wishes, I am


Very truly yours,







D r etor.







EXTENSION VION
C. K. McQUARRIE. STA A
A. P. SPENCER, VICE-D CT%
E. W. JENKINS. AGENT NO THE DISTRICT
S. W. HIATT. AGENT WESTERN DI RICT
G. L. HERRINGTON. AGENT BOY"S CORN CLUBS
R. W. BLACKLOCK.
ASSISTANT BOYS CLUB AGENT
L. R. HIGHFILL.
ASSISTANT BOYS* CLUB AGENT
A. H. LOGAN, VETERINARY INSPECTOR
N. W. SANBORN.
POULTRY EXTENSION SPECIALIST
WM. H. BLACK, AGENT IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. 0. TRAXLER. FARM HELP SPECIALIST


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

P. H. ROLFS. DEAN AND DIRECTOR

GAINESVILLE



April 10, 1920


EXPERIMENT STATION
J. M. SCOTT. VICE-DIRECTOR
AND ANIMAL INDUSTRIALIST
B. F. FLOYD. PLANT PHYSIOLOGIST
J. R. WATSON. ENTOMOLOGIST
H. E. STEVENS. PLANT PATHOLOGIST
S. E. COLLISION. CHEMIST
C. D. SHERBAKOFF. ASSOCIATE PATHOLOGIST

COLLEGE FACULTY
W.L FLOYD
ASSISTANT DEAN AND PROP. OF HORTICULTURE
C. L. WILLOUGHBY
PROP. OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. E. TURLINGTON
PROF, OF AGRONOMY
JNO. SPENCER
PROF. VETERINARY SCIENCE
S. L. VINSON
AGRICULTURAL EDITOR
F. ROGERS
AssT. PROF. FARM MACHINERY


To Secretary of Board of Trade:


Dear Secretary:


Inclosed please find an extract of my address delivered


at the Agricultural Short Course for Fertilizer Salesmen at the


Agricultural College. As Secretary of your body many people


assume that you know everything, either commercially or agricul-


turally. A number of people have asked me for a copy of this


address and so I know there are others who did not hear the


address who would like to have a general outline and good and


complete understanding of the large amount of agricultural work


that is being done by the Agricultural College. It is your


Agricultural College and the welfare of Florida depends upon her


agricultural developments.


Very truly yours,


Director.




MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Short Course for fertilizer Salesmen. 1920
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 3
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Short Course for fertilizer Salesmen. 1920

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00109

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Short Course for fertilizer Salesmen. 1920
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 3
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Short Course for fertilizer Salesmen. 1920

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00109

Full Text









L > : ... ....- . ..."" y
^ l~~-" ,d::Z.. y^- ......fd
:*. -. *i. /s~~ -^v. ^

/_ / '- ^^ J 'u^^- _.*
'II A /t/~Ji ^~t^
if...' .../ ^ -..... .






~, -I -


~A~s







(a) a Yw
aca





/3/
d1) <0- A-
/ /2 a .-cy / &
^^/~ A ^/ 4K^^


(M .&,, 0,6 4



C.qA






ce
-_ (--- -)
C^ Y^A,__ LI


,-~ /~ d~ ,

I.
4.zz


L9


h''


$1.44 /'tr/~' !Y.( V -
6 A ~
b. 14'L- ~





.... o a

_^# 64#(A< /


tL
'~ d'te~.~


9-/A 6
av /9 4 /
/446
-rLI -HGT
5,9LiE HST5 ]o,-j


~,,I



0170





* ~g ~t/6I ~'Q~ (~/

/ ,~lA-tZ~ f~4-
/7 ~?/~
iii' I

p1 L14~e4
'7,





e <^ 't r ^*-^ -<-A # ('Lt



I/ ^C&_--1<-^ ^frvwLWjL (Aj^ti^')

.: ,,e. D ,, -. : ,u <




I// f3 -7'
:, /^^ ^^I,.-
4< J^r^^d

///. S~ A^ 1^-




*^3 ^4i^ (@

i/i // 4^<^








~. 4 7?77~a^
I) -^. .
Sd e0..6 ... (







I^L^ C(^Uil^ (&z^^^,^
O ; 4AJ; L a
y/ {-^-t~^3^<>-^- 7
^ / ^'^^ar ^-7--'
^1 j iA4 ^


/} 7 (
OiL U^^ /rj^ ^ L














Ct K
^ -^^^^^^/^L^ 4


dLL/^ ^Tr ^ /^-c >^*^


z t/z







PROGRAM
'"""""iiillllillllllllillp "1""


Agricultural


Short


Course


FOR


Fertilizer


Salesmen


University of Florida
College of Agriculture
Gainesville


March 1, 2, 3, 1920
















Southern Fertilizer Association




The short course for fertilizer salesmen is -offered at the
suggestion of the Southern Fertilizer Association. The members
of this organization doing business in this state and nearby terri-
tory are sending all their salesmen to the school.
Local Committee in Charge-The Committee in charge of local
arrangements is as follows: Bayless W. Haynes, Chairman, Jack-
sonville; Harry Hasson, Jacksonville, and E. E. Cannon.
General Chairman Salesmen's Schools of the Southern Fer-
tilizer Association-W. Dewey Cooke, Savannah.
The Soil Improvement Committee, which is in general charge,
is as follows:
Soil Improvement Committee-D. B; Osborne, Chairman, At-
lanta, Ga.; Harry Hodgson (Ex-Officio), Athens, Ga.; W. E. Rich-
ards, Atlanta, Ga.; A. H. Sterne, Atlanta, Ga.; L. M. Bogle,
Tupelo, Miss.; J. R. Porter, Atlanta, Ga.; D. C. Allen, Mont-
gomery, Ala.; W. DeC. Kessler, Montgomery, Ala.; W. T. Wright,
Atlanta, Ga.; T. G. Sinclair, Shreveport, La.; Ernest E. Dallis,
Secretary, Atlanta, Ga.

TECHNICAL STAFF OF THE COMMITTEE:

Director, J. N. Harper, Atlanta, Ga.; J. C. Pridmore, Shreve-
port, La., in charge of Western Office; C. A. Whittle, Editorial
Manager, Atlanta; F. H. Jeter, Agricultural Editor, Atlanta;
Loy E. Rast, Agronomist, Shreveport; C. A. McLendon, Agrono-
mist, Atlanta, Ga.









Agricultural Short Course

For Fertilizer Salesmen

University of Florida
College of Agriculture


March 1, 2, 3
1920

Monday, March 1
10 A. M.

ADDRESS OF WELCOME--President A. A. Murphree, University of
Florida.

INTRODUCTORY ADDREss-Representing the Fertilizer Industry-
Mr. Lorenzo Wilson, Jacksonville, Fla.

ADDREss-Purpose of the Salesmen School-Dean P. H. Rolfs,
College of Agriculture, University of Florida.

LECTURE-How Fertilizers Have Influenced Southern Agriculture
-Prof. J. N. Harper, Director, Soil Improvement Com-
mittee.

Afternoon-2:30 P. M.

LECTURE--Iow Plants ,Feed-Prof. W..L. Floyd, College of Ag-
riculture, University of Florida.

LECTUax--Organic Matter-Its Functions in Soil Fertility-Prof.
C. A. Whittle, Soil Improvement Committee.

ADDREss-S'alesmen-Harry N. Tolles, of the Sheldon School,
Chicago.


- b








Tuesday, March 2


10 A. M.


ADDREss-The Science of Salesmanship-Harry N. Tolles, of the
Sheldon School, Chicago.


LECTURE-Methods and Value of Conducting Accurate Field Ex-
periments-Dr. C. D. Sherbakoff, Experiment Station,
University of Florida.


LECTURE-Fertilizer Experiments With Sugar Cane and Sweet
Potatoes-Prof. J. M. Scott, Experiment Station, Uni-
versity of Florida.





Afternoon-2:30 P. M.


LECTURE-Losses of Fertilizers by Leaching-Prof. S. E. Collison,
Experiment Station, University of Florida.


LECTURE-Cultivation and Fertilization of Irish and Sweet Po-
tatoes and Tomatoes-Prof. A. P. Spencer, Agricultural
Extension- Division, University of Florida.


LECTURE-Cultivation and Fertilization of Pineapples and Guavas
-Dean P. H. Rolfs, College of Agriculture, University
of Florida.


LECTURE-Factors Influencing Profits on the Farm-Prof. J. E.
Turlington, Agricultural College, University of Florida.


Visit to Station Plots and Dairy Barn.








Wednesday, March 3

10 A. M.


LECTURE-Capacity of Legumes for Growing Nitrogen-Prof.
C. A. Whittle, Soil Improvement Committee.


LECTURE-The County Agents and Soil Fertility Problems-Prof.
C. K. McQuarrie, State Agent, Co-operative Demonstra-
tion Work, University of Florida.

LECTURE-Losses from Diseases Attacking Citrus-Prof. H. E.
Stevens, Experiment Station, University of Florida.

LECTURE-Losses from Insects Attacking Citrus-Dr. E. W.
Berger, State Plant Board.





Afternoon-2:30 P. M.


LECTURE-Care Necessary In Preventing the Dissemination of
Insects and Pests-Wilson Newell, State Plant Com-
missioner.

LECTURE-Fertilizer Requirements of General Field Crops-Prof.
J. N. Harper, Director, Soil Improvement Committee.

LECTURE-Principal Insects and Pests Attacking Crops and How
to Control Them-Prof. J. R. Watson, Experiment Sta-
tion, University of Florida.

LECTURE-Sources of Fertilizer Materials and Their Availability-
F. H. Jeter, Soil Improvement Committee.




r -




kr-


~1











- ~g~PROVEAerjQjr


\SERVIQ 6



4'




w.*


EXTRACT OF ADDRESS DELIVERED TO THE AGRICULTURAL SHORT COURSE
FOR FERTILIZER SALESMEN

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
College of Agriculture
Gainesville, Florida
March 1, 1920


OUR' INSTITUTIONS 4

Gentlemen of the Fertilizer Salesmen School: It is a great pleasure
to have you present with us on the Campus and to have you become a part
of our great institution. There are two principal objects for your
meeting here. The first is for us to get better acquainted personally,
mingle with each other and exchange views and arguments. We have much
i Information that will be of greater or less benefit to you. You like-
wise have much information that we need. As a matter of fact, I
'believe the people who will deliver the lectures to the audience are
likely to learn as much from the audience as the audience is to learn
from the.lecturer. It is a give and take proposition, in which both
parties give and both parties take.

There is probably no one subject in the State in which the
people are so vitally interested and at the same time one which is so
imperfectly understood as is the organization of yqur institutions of
higher learning. I make no apologies therefore, in presenting to you
. this morning an outline of the higher educational work in the State of
Florida, especially in so far as it pertains directly to the agricul-.
tural work in the State.

BOARD OF CONTROL .

In 1905 the Legislature of Florida had the courage to combine
all of the institutions of higher learning, seven in number, into four,
and placed them under one Board of Control composed of five men ap-
pointed by the Governor of the state. These men serve without pay,
giving the State their services free of charge. In many quarters out-
side of the state of Florida it was freely said that this venture would
prove unsuccessful, since no five men could be found in the state who
would be willing to meet not less than twelve times a year, abandon
their own business for the time being and give their time and best
thought, as well as their best energies to the welfare of the state.
After fifteen years it has proven beyond a doubt that five such men can
be found in the state, and that under this arrangement the institutions
of higher learning have prospered as never before. The members of this
Board of Control are: Hon. J. B. Hodges, Hon. Ed. L. Wartman, Hon. J.
B. Sutton, Hon. H. B. Minium, and Hon. W. W. Flournoy.

This Board of Control molds the general policy of all of the
institutions under their control, which consists of the University of
Florida at Gainesville, the Women's College at Tallahassee, the Insti-
tution foP the Deaf and Blind at St. Augustine, and the Negro Agricul-
tural and Mechanical College at Tallahassee.







THE UNIVERSITY

The University of Florida is located at Gainesville, having
opened its doors to students at this place in September 1906. She owns
a property of over 600 acres of land situated in one body. In 1905
.*this consisted of piney woods and hammock. Now we have ten brick
buildings, a 90 acre campus, and three splendid farms.

The University is composed of five colleges:

(a) Arts and Sciences
(b) Agricultural College
(c) College of Engineering
(d) Teachers College
(e) Law College

This is a most splendid arrangement, since from among our graduates
will come the future leaders of the state. These young men come to
know each other and respect each other for their attainments and have
none of the petty prejudices which arise when these different colleges
are located in different parts of the commonwealth, as occurs in many
other states.

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE

You gentlemen of the school of fertilizer salesmen are inter-
ested in this institution as a whole, but are most vitally and directly
interested in the College of Agriculture. The College of Agriculture
in Florida was established in 1884. Among its older graduates we find
Some of the leading men, not only of the State but of the Nation. Rear
'Admiral Cone is among its early graduates. Mr. R. C. Dunn of our State
1Railway Commission is among the men who have done things in Florida.
|Hon. C. E. Davis of Madison has for several terms represented his
;county in the Legislature. Both are graduates of the University, and I
might add greatly to this list and find no less prominent men among her
early graduates.

Any business to be successful must have various divisions.
The Agricultural College has three principal divisions. These are
based upon the lines of activities conducted by each. It can readily
be seen without argument that if a man gives all of his time to teach-
ing students on the campus, he cannot at the same time make of himself
a thoro investigator, and likewise the thoro investigator cannot devote
his time to-the complicated and higher specialized lines of investiga-
tion and at the same time travel over the state and deliver lectures to
agricultural assemblages. As a matter of fact it takes at least three
distinct types of mind to carry on these three divisions of work.
Therefore, we find the Agricultural College composed of:

(a) 'Instructional division for teaching students attending the
*University

(b) Investigational division (Experiment Station)

(c) Extension division, for teaching people not resident at the
University.




t T


-3-



Instructional Division

In the instructional division the men who attend the Agricul-
tural College receive their instruction in the branches common to the
other colleges with the students attending on the other colleges. For
example, English, mathematics, chemistry, bacteriology, etc. are the
same whether the prospective young man becomes a doctor, lawyer, farm-
,er, agriculturalist or what not.

The strictly agricultural subjects are taught in five differ-
ent departments, each of which has its own head. In the agronomy de-
partment is taught the subject of soils and fertilizers, crops, etc.;
in the.animal husbandry and dairy department the subjects especially
relating to animal industry are taught; the veterinary science depart-
ment takes up especially the diseases of domestic animals; the horti-
cultural department includes the teaching of fertilization of horticul-
tural crops, diseases and general studies of fruit crops of the State;
and the poultry department takes up the subject of poultry husbandry.

EXPERIMENT STATION

This division of the Agricultural College gentlemen is the
lone in which you are more directly interested, tho by no means more
vitally so than in either of the other two divisions. The object of
this division is to make original agricultural investigations and print
the results of the work. The Experiment Station was established in
1887. It was required by law to publish one annual report and four
bulletins a year. Up to the present time we have published 32 annual
reports and 155 bulletins, as well as 320 press bulletins. We are,
therefore, 24 bulletins and 320 press bulletins ahead of the require-
ments.

Last Year's Work

1 Annual Report 108 pages 4,000 copies total pages 432,000
5 Bulletins 260 pages 83,000 copies total pages 20,750,000
40 Press bulletins 80 pages 52,000 copies total pages 72,000
Total number of pages printed 21,574,000

Total pages distributed (80Z) 17,260,000

Departments

There are six leading departments in the Experiment Station:

(a) Animal Industry Department
(b) Soils and Fertilizer Department
(c) Plant Physiology Department
(d) Plant Disease Department
(e) Entomology Department
(f) Forage Crop Department





-4-



EXTENSION DIVISION

The beginning of the Extension Division had its foundation in
the Farmers' Institutes which have been conducted for more than twenty
years. In 1914 the Smith Lever bill passed Congress, establishing an
organic cooperative arrangement between the Agricultural College and
the Department of Agriculture.

The object of this Division is to give instruction and prac-
tical demonstration in agriculture and home economics to people not
resident at the College. From this portion of the law you will see
that the Extension Division has to deal directly with the subjects of
agriculture and home economics to people located in the various coun-
ties of the State. The moneys arising from the Smith Lever fund were
given directly to the Land Grant College in order that this work may be
carried out. The Agricultural College is cooperating with the Women's
College at Tallahassee in carrying out the home demonstration work. It
is cooperating with the negro college at Tallahassee to carry out dem-
onstration work among the negro farmers and negro homes in the State.
You are well acquainted with the county agent; in fact sometimes your
companies look with covetous eyes upon our county agents. The home
demonstration agents are also known to you as you come in contact with
both of these agencies in the field as well as the state agents and
district agents.

Technically speaking the different departments in our exten-
sion work are designated as projects. These different departments or
projects are as follows:

(a) County Agents located in the majority of counties in the State
and usually have their headquarters at the county seat.

(b) Home Demonstration Agents located in the majority of counties
of the State with headquarters usually at the county seat. This
work is carried on cooperatively with the Florida State College
for Women.

(c) Boys' Agricultural Clubs organized in practically all of the
counties of the State.

(d) Work with the negro youth carried on cooperatively with the
Negro Agricultural and Mechanical College.

(e) Livestock giving special attention to the development of the
beef cattle raising on the farms in Florida.

(f) Hog Cholera educational work carried on directly with the hog
raisers of the State.

(g) Poultry work carried on directly with the poultry men of the
State.

All of these different lines of work have their special State
Leader, working directly and under the instruction of the State Leader
for Extension Work.









PUBLICATIONS

The character of the publications from the Extension Division
are quite different from those prepared by the Experiment Station. We
have published 25 bulletins, 11 circulars, and 5 annual reports.

CONCLUSION

Gentlemen of the Fertilizer Salesmen we have before us the
most splendid opportunity of developing a much finer and better and
more harmonious civilization than we have ever had before. Many people
are speaking of the present situation as a reconstruction. I do not
like to call it reconstruction because nothing has been demolished. We
are, however, going thru a readjustment, sloughing off many of the old
and useless things and taking on a new form and new problems. Agricul-
ture in the State of Florida is going thru so rapid a development that
we can almost call it a revolution. Those of us who have the opportu-
nity such as comes to the Agricultural College and to the Fertilizer
Salesmen need to support these problems in an altruistic way. If we
study it in a narrow selfish way we will be lost in the readjustment.
The world has come to recognize more and more that "service not self"
is the keynote to success. We are all working as hard as we know how
to make the one great industry of Florida, agriculture, the fullest
success possible. We have all caught the Rotary spirit; we are all en-
joying it. None of us are getting as much of the world's goods as we
think the other fellow has, but there is no one in a position where he
cannot enjoy himself to the fullest extent if he only catches the
motto, "Service not Self."


eis






EXTENSI ION
C. K. McQUARRIE. S ENT
A. P. SPENCER, VicE- 1icfOR
E. W. JE I'K1NS. AGENT CIaNEN DISTRICT
S. W. HITrT. AGENT WESTERN DISTRICT
G. L. HE SIIG TON. AGENT BOYS' CORN C LUBS
R, W. BLACKLOCK.
ASSISTANT BOYS CLUB AGENT
L. R. HIGHFILL.
ASSISTANT BOYS. CLUB AGENT
A. H. LOGAN. VETERINARY INSPECTOR
N. W. SANBORN.
POULTRY EXTENSION SPECIALIST
WM. H. BLACK, AGENT IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. 0. TRAXLER. FARM HELP SPECIALIST


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

P. H. ROLFS, DEAN AND DIRECTOR

GAINESVILLE .




April 10, 1920


EXPERIMENT STATION
J. M. SCOTT, VICE-DIRECTOR
S AND ANIMAL INDUSTRIALIST
B. F. FLOYD. PLANT PHYSIOLOGIST
R. WATSON. ENTOMOLOGIST
E. STEVENS. PLANT PATHOLOGIST
S. E. COLLISION. CHEMIST
C. D. SHERBAKOFF. ASSOCIATE PATHOLOGIST

COLLEGE FACULTY
W. L FLOYD
ASSISTANT DEAN AND PROF. Of HORTICULTURE
C. L. WILLOUGHBY
PROP. OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. E. TURLINGTON
PROF. OF AGRONOMY
JNO. SPENCER
PROF. VETERINARY. SCIENCE
S. L, VINSON
AGRICULTURAL EDITOR
F. ROGERS
ASST.E.Ro.Er- FARM MACHINERY


Dear Sir:


Attached. hereto please find an extract from my


address delivered to the Short Course for Fertilizer Sales-
jS


ffmen held at the Florida Agricultural College. A number of


people have asked for copies of this address. It makes a


clear statement of the relationship of the. College to the


University, also of the Extension work and Experiment Station


to-the College. I know that some part of this speech will


prove especially interesting and valuable to you. .


With beat wishes, I am -

Very truly yoveus,



le E- ,* 47



(.///-4w






EXTENDS IO I 1SION
C. K. McGUARRIE. Sr AGENT i
* A. P. SPENCER. VICE-DI ecTOR
E. W. JENKINS. AGENT N THERN DISTRICT
S. W. HIATT, AGENT WESTERN DISTRICT
G. L. HEIRINGTON. AGENT BOYS' CORN CLUBS
R. W. BLACKLOCK.
ASSISTANT BOYS CLUB AGENT
L. R. HIGHFILL.
ASSISTANT BOYS- CLUB AGENT
'.' A. H. LOGAN. VETERINARY INSPECTOR
N. W. SANBORN.
POULTRY EXTENSION SPECIALIST
WM. H. BLACK. AGENT IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. 0. TRAXLER, FARM HELP SPECIALIST


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

P. H. ROLFS, DEAN AND DIRECTOR

GAINESVILLE



April 1I 1920


EXPERIMENT STATION
J. M. SCOTT. VICE-DIRECTOR
AND ANIMAL INDUSTRIALIST
B. F. FLOYD. PLANT PHYSIOLOGIST
J. R. WATSON. ENTOMOLOGIST
H. E. STEVENS. PLANT PATHOLOGIST
S. E. COLLISION. CHEMIST
C. D. SHERBAKOFF. ASSOCIATE PATHOLOGIST

COLLEGE FACULTY
W. L FLOYD
ASSISTANT DEAN AND PROF. OF HORTICULTURE
C. L. WILLOUGHBY
PROF. OP ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. E. TURLINGTON
r PROF. OF AGRONOMY
JNO. SPENCER
PROF. VETERINARY SCIENCE
S. L. VINSON
AGRICULTURAL EDITOR
-..-.-F. ROGERS
ASST. PROF. FARM MACHINERY


To Florida Senators:


Dear Senatori


Attached hereto please find an extract from my


address delivered to the Short Course for Fertilizer Salesa-


men held at the Florida Agricultural College. A number of


people have asked for copies of this address. It makes a


clear statement of the relationship of the College to the


University,, also of the Extension work and Experiment Station


to the College. I know that some part of this speech will


prove especially interesting and valuable to you, a


With best wishes, I am


Very truly yours,







D oetor.






EXTENSION IVION
C. K. McQUARRIE. STAA T
A. P. SPENCER, Vic.-D c'TCr
E. W. JENKINS. AGENT No TH""EDISTRICT
S. W. HIATT. AGENT WESTERN DI rRICT
G. L. HERRINGTON. AGENT BOYS' CORN CLUBS
R. W. BLACKLOCK,
ASSISTANT BOYS CLUB AGENT
L. R. HIGHFILL.
ASSISTANT BOYS' CLUB AGENT
A. H. LOGAN. VETERINARY INSPECTOR
N. W. SANBORN.
POULTRY EXTENSION SPECIALIST
WM. H. BLACK. AGENT IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. O. TRAXLER. FARM HELP SPECIALIST


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

P. H. ROLFS, DEAN AND DIRECTOR

GAINESVILLE



April 10, 1920


EXPERIMENT STATION
J. M. SCOTT. VICE-DIRECTOR
AND ANIMAL INDUSTRIALIST
B. F. FLOYD. PLANT PHYSIOLOGIST
J. R. WATSON, ENTOMOLOGIST
H. E. STEVENS. PLANT PATHOLOGIST
S. E. COLLISION. CHEMIST
C. D. SHERBAKOFF, ASSOCIATE PATHOLOGIST

COLLEGE FACULTY
W. L FLOYD
ASSISTANT DEAN AND PROF. Or HORTICULTURE
C. L. WILLOUGHBY
PROF. OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
J. E. TURLINGTON
PROF. OF AGRONOMY
JNO. SPENCER
PROF. VETERINARY SCIENCE
S. L. VINSON
AGRICULTURAL EDITOR
F. ROGERS
ASST. PROF. FARM MACHINERY


To Secretary of Board of Trade:


Dear Secretary:


Inclosed please find an extract of my address delivered


at the Agricultural Short Course for Fertilizer Salesmen at the


Agricultural College. As Secretary of your body many people


assume that you know everything, either commercially or agricul-


turally. A number of people have asked me for a copy of this


address and so I know there are others who did not hear the


address who would like to have a general outline and good and


complete understanding of the large amount of agricultural work


that is being done by the Agricultural College. It is your


Agricultural College and the welfare of Florida depends upon her


agricultural developments,


YtryF truly yours,








Director.