Rural Life Problems for Preachers.

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Material Information

Title:
Rural Life Problems for Preachers.
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 3
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Rural Life Problems for Preachers.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00103


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St


COMMENCEMENT NUMBER



THE KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST


Volume 37 Kansas State Agricultural College, M nhattan, Saturday, June 17, 1911 Number 36

PEACE HAS ITS HEROES. men ever-it is the strong young men THE CHURCH CAN HELP. the needs of the country people as they THE CALL OF RELIGION.
who go to the front, and are killed or exist. His church, the DuPage Pres-
DB.E.B.KRERBIEL'SCOMMENCEMENT maimed. Can a race avoid deteriora- IS S N byterian Church, is thirty miles west THE REV. C. G. CLARKE IN THE BAC-
DAY PLEA FOR DISARMAMENT. tion if it is deprived of its healthiest IMORE TH S THIS. of Chicago and six miles from the CALAUREATE SERMON EXPLAINED
blood? Biology replies in the nega-. nearest railroad. It is surrounded ITS MEANING.
Three Thousand Persons Heard the Call- tive; and the history of France during merica Farmers M It Acquire Leader- by no town or village-the church
forniai'i Arguments for Interna- and after the Napoleonic wars c a ship. Cnltlrate tns flshnes. Try to and manse stand alone on the open An Important Message for the Graduates
tional Arbitration-More firms the tenets of biology. Develop PoblleS rliandawill- prairie. It is one of the oldest t11'rom an Alumnus o Twenty-
than200 Graduates. "In the second place, the costliness Ingness to C -operate. churches in Illinois. The people are Tegean'Dgo-Theis
of wars and armaments has begun to an average country folk of Scotch,
Seventy-two per cent of the revenues militate against them. The implements So many things, apparently, are English, Irish, and German descent. To come back after twenty-three
of the United Stateg:are used to sup- of war are more expensive to-day than wrong in the rural churches, and in When Mr. McNutt went there one of years and give the-Ainal charge to a
port the army and havy and provide ever. But as long as the present sys- rural communities generally, that it the elders, a farmer, had been preach- class ten times as large as that in
armament! The weapons of 1900 are tem prevails no nation can afford to may be a long, lon time before ideal ing for three years, or until he died. which he was graduated, was the ex-
forty times as effective as those of bewithoutthe latest andthebestequip- conditions shall ex 6. As in every The last minister had resigned with perience, last Sunday, of the Rev.
1870. If the Franco-Prussian war ment. Thegreater the stridesof science other great sociology cal question, the $400 back on his salary, which amount Clement G. Clarke, '88, who preached
were fought now, more men would and invention, the greater the cost of first thing desired a better under- the church borrowed to pay the debt. the baccalaureate sermon to the class
armaments. This unhappy condition standing of the el menis involved. No one had united with the church for
is aggravated by the fact that the sys- This was, in a large measure, the re- five years. A club house had been
tem of compulsory universal service sult of the meeting n Commencement fitted up in the neighborhood for an
is being more and more generally week, held under tie comprehensive organization that called itself "The
adopted by the countries of the old title: "Rural Churc and Rural Life New Era Club," the chief object of
world, and that the peace footing of Conference." which was dancing. Many of the
the armies of all nations is steadily The filst session as held Sunday young persons of the neighborhood,
increasing. Is it then to be wondered morning in the ngregational including church members, were
at that nations are debt-ridden and are Church, where the v. NI. B. McNutt, spending evenings there. The dan-
seeking new sources of revenue; or, of Plainfield, III.,pa oroftheDuPage cing element from the surrounding
that in seeking an improvement of Presbyterian Churc spoke upon the towns had also begun to frequent the
their financial situation they should subject uppermost in he minds of those place. The only service the church
demand a means of reducing their present. Distance, ek of vision, of attempted was to open the doors Sun-
armaments, and, therefore, some peace- leadership, of self-s crifice, of public day for preaching and Sunday-school.
ful means of settling their differences? spirit, of co6peratio -all were blam- Collections were taken once a year
The expense of armaments and war able, Mr. McNutt s d, for much that for missions and ministerial relief,
gives strength to the peace move- was wrong in the co entry. and this was practically the extent of
ment." Sessions were held n Anderson Hall the benevolent work.
AS TO PEACE. Monday and Tues in which ad- MANY AR LIKE IT.
Dr E. B. Krebbiel. The peace movement, Dr. Krebbiel dresses were made the Rev. J. H.
Swsaid, does not get its strength solely White, pastor of t United Presby- The condition of this chu atr'88
be killed tan were engaged in that or even primarily from the costliness terian Church, Ma attan; the Rev. that time was not exceptional," Mr.
conflict. Fr 250 years Japan had no or dead iness of war. Its chief A. E. Holt, Congr national Church, lMcNutt said. "Other churches were, of 1911. It was to be expected that in
war, and when it did finally have one strength lies in that it is the natural and arestill, in the same light. Some such circumstances the speaker would
it whipped one of the richest and product, of the evolution of society, persons are saying the country church feel the impulses and emotions certain
most powerful nations: Russia. of history. Furthermore, the study of has outlived its usefulness, and that to arise with such influences-the
Students graduating from a great history puts it beyond all doubt that was an'd Fs true of the old type of earnest, kindlp 'yes of many old
agricultural college presumably leave the peaceful pursuits of men have, country church. Many such have friends who had known him in his
aes ,l~agiroo-'peaeef4-missis -4- M beginning been-&playing--e- -i-n u in despr a u.d Lokeiner t 50.1 mme th beg1
Edwtd Benjamin Krehbiel, of Leland ever more important, role, and that Many others exist at the same dying of th'e sturdy 210 in caps and gowns,
Stanford University, -Commencement martial interests have correspond- rate. getting ready to face the world. The
day orator for 1911, justified himself ingly decreased. In primitive society "Whatwas the matter with this coun- Auditorium was crowded long before
Sin presenting the foregoing ioforma- the natural condition was one of war try church? What is the matter with 4 o'clock, the hour for the sermon.
tion about war by declaring that these -every man's hand was against his that type of country church? My Mr. Clarke showed plainly, too,
students are the future leaders, and neighbor. diagnosis of the case is, simply, a lack, that all these influences had gripped


interest, Dr. Krehbiel's address was blotted out strife within the bound- the same reason. They lack adequate It was a message to remember. The
not wasted. The graduates. and the aries of those -units, what right have conception of the needs-they fail to boys and girls before him, he said,
3000 persons in the audience gave it we to suppose that this process will see the possibilities of country life. were looking to the future, but he
the closest possible consideration. not continue in the future? Interna- "I resolved, first of all, wlen I went found it impossible not to look back-
He spoe for about one hour. After tional law has acted as an ever-widen- to DuPage, that I would get next to ward for a time, and with a feeling of
this the glee club sang Handel's "Holy ing bridge between nations. Nations the boys and girls; that I would make tenderness, in thinking of the years
Art Thou," and in a few minutes the indeed are, theoretically, not bound President Waters. that old church a great center of at- he had studied in Manhattan, and tihe

Every division was applauded, but daily becoming more subject to it, for R ev. D. H. Fisher astor first Pres- great center. I do not believe in the in religion and he believed in college
e heartiest ovation was accorded public opinion is constantly becoming ev isr astor irt Pr churh attempting to do everything or men. The educated man, he declared, is
the irs r the ho ecn cs ore poerul and nations ore sub byterian Church, Manhattan; Profes- trying to do things that might better more and more to be the spokesman of
uhe girl t as noo n hecnomis th e o rn- je o pul onions morale opsu- sor McKeever, Professor Kammeyer, be left to other institutions. But a the future and religion the conserving
i'course. It wsere endeon the n et t p ubic oii ui opif dm- Professor Holton; Peident Sandes, great center of attractions-a hub of force. He believed he would see the
king's exercises were ended. ion, (however, is the fruit of democ- tyofph of To that i d Oes two united i4n the worlds advance-e
SD. K l semocray Wshurn Co l joys, of happy memories and associa- two unte in the wl's a e-
Dr. Krehbiel is an exceptionally rcy. Democracy is no longer na-others.
achieves by reason of facts well mar- international. Improvements in tran T I organizedan old-fashioned upon hemenaof thefuure, uponscol
was 'by the Rev. M. B. McNutt, Mon- singing school. It might have been lege men'.
shelled and figures carefully grouped portation and communication h e day night, at the intrchurch banquet anything else just as well--a class in The call of religion, to-day, the
for instant understanding. "iAmer- cast the world into a smaller mould. in Woodman Hall. His subject was, scientific farming. The singing school speaker said, is a call to educated
ica'sordSecond rtunity" would, r The average Americhi an is now more in d "Modern Methods iin the Country met one night in the week, in the men. It is a call consistent with the
ordinarily, be distinctly heavy for a touch with China than the New Eng- Church."church. There was good musical and the rational.
hot June morning and 3000 persons, lander was with the Virginian in 1789, cha tch o a gd msca i l n r n h rioa
but Dr. rehbiel presented itso at- and he probably understands him as Mr. McNutt said that perhaps the talent among the youngfolks and this Another thing in this call is righteous-
tractively that he ept his audience well as our forefthers dideach otier country church of th past was all that nipw enterprise proved to be a great ness, a passion foa righteousness.
inthe niverm th dght. h aui n versel handsr ar e idnc a. the country peole could afford. chorus choir, a male quartettea neddeo inb of
Dr. rehbiel said America's first each nation is getting into touch with as the country people could afford. chorus choir, a male quree a siset with ery ambition a
opportunity came-and wams accepted every other, of international democ- But the new era of scientific farming ladies' quartette, and orchestra, and student in college has to take home .
opp-when governityment by the waspeople was racy. There is little doubt that the and te introducti of the modern some good soloists. Besides, it i- with him. Righteouness should be
undertaken. The correctness of this peace movement has rome to stay. comforts and convdsniences into the proved the singing in the church and the ambition of every man. They
undertaen. The corretnessd by this "What is needed is a leader, apeo- country homes have brought a demand Sunday-school a hundred per cent. should know wrong from right; they
word.n hesen d wa pie which shall boldly avow its full foand made possible better things for "We began at once to observe all the should knowi.the men in public life
world. The second opportunity was the rural churches.
in the universal demand for arbitra and implicit belief in the ideal of uni- u special days-a dozen or more. This who do wrong, and they should vote
tion to abolish war. versal peace, and act accordingly. The country tourb must work out kept our musicians busy. And the them out and not into-public office.
The nations of the old world, bound its own problems from the country first thing we knew the young people "Who said there is no place for the
"'Through the sacrifice bf life," up in long-standing rivalries and in point of view. It nueds to devise ap- and many of the 'outsiders,' as they Decalogue in American politics?"
Dr. Krehbiel said, "war does not the prevalent militarism, cannot as- propriate methods and to evolve and were called, were taking part in these Mr. Clarke demanded. "Thank God
of choice destroy bad men, but good (Conduded o0 page 3.) build up a type of life that will fit into (Coacladed an page 4.) (Concluded on page 4.)


..-1
..... ..












THE KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST

Issued weekly during the college year by the
Kansas State Agricultural College. Manhat-
tan. Kansas.

PRES. H. J. WATERS ............. Editor-in-chief
PROF. C. J. DILLON............ Managing Editor
Dn. J. D. WALTERS ................Local Editor

Except for contributions from officers of the
college or members of the faculty, the articles
in THE KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST are written by
students in the department of industrial jour-
nalism, under the direction of Prof. Charles
Dillon.
The typesetting and other mechanical work
is by students in the school of printing, of
which J. D. Rickman is superintendent. Both
these departments are in Kedzie Hall.
Newspapers and other publications are in-
vited to use the contents of the paper freely
without credit.
The increasing demand for THE KANSAS IN-
DUSTRIALIST makes it necessary to Insist upon
"the payment of the regular subscription price,
50 cents a year, invariably in advance. No
commission is paid any one for subscriptions,
and no advertisements are accepted. The
paper is sent free only to the alumni, to officers
of the state, and members of the legislature.
This rule will ntbe violated.

Entered at 4le post-office, Manhattan. Kean..
as second-class matter. Act of July 16 1894.

SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 1911

WHAT WILL YOU DO WITH IT?
It is ended, now, the four years'
work. It is your fault if you have
missed. There isn't a man or woman
in the world upon whom you can
rightfully put the blame for one of
your shortcomings. If you did the
work well and faithfully you have the
education you came to college to get.
It is your big asset, the goods you
have to show, your stock in trade-
what will you do with it?
Time and again you've laughed at
the well-meaning speaker in chapel
who pointed out the duty you owed
the, state, but you don't feel like
laughing now, do you? It has sud-
denly become a mighty serious busi-
ness. You have some real concern,
now, about the future. You begin to
realize that there was truth in the
message you thought so trite. It is a
whole lot more important now than it
was the morning you nudged your
seat mate in chapel.
It seems impossible for anyone to
miss the human i- Jerest, as newspaper
*--- -.--=... -w i ,T-i- the actrities of Com-
mencement week. It seems impossible
for any man of depth and good com-
g mon sense to view the scenes unmoved.
For the first time, perhaps, you real-
ize that here are more than 200 fine
young men and women who have de-
veloped together, studying side by
side, some of them for five years, go-
ing out, to-morrow, to try their
strength, potential citizens of a great
republic in which efficiency counts for
more than at any time in history, in
which men and women who can do
things and do them right are more
than ever in demand.
They are not the finished product,
these graduates. They are just the
best possible output that a great tech-
nical training school can give the
world, an output that must be whipped
into shape after it leaves the campus,
brave and hopeful and bright of eyes,
ready to grapple with anything that
presents itself, listening eagerly for
Opportunity's knock.
A spectacle, surely, to give one a
new feeling toward his fellows, a keener
interest -in the students still to be
graduated, a kindlier sympathy for
some that may not find the road to
learning so smooth as it is for the
feet of others. Somehow you give
way to strange impulses under the in-
fluence of thei4time. You find your-
self wondering if, after all, it will not
be possible for you to guide some of
the hesitating feet that are taking the
highway to-day through an unmapped
land. It is such a big world, and
there are so very many starting out
into it every day, each with his little
ambitions and plans and hopes; a
big, big world that may prove to be
so pitiably small for some. You may
have smiled at such thoughts in other
years, but you finish the day by full
conversion to the student idea that
there isn't anything under the beauti-
ful, bending sky one half so important
right now as Commencement week and
"My Future."
Commencement means more than the
finishing of two or three hundred stu-
dents. It means new vigor for those
who are -in classes yet to be graduated.


_________________________________________________ _____________________- _________________________ ________________________________________________


It puts big ideas and ambitions into
wavering minds; it makes boys and
girls, still far from the coveted goal,
put into their work a larger measure
of energy; it gives them a clearer un-
derstanding of the purpose for which
they have been sent to college. Sure-
ly no normal American youth could
see those caps and gowns enter the
big Auditorium, admired and envied
by the hundreds that stood while they
marched to the places reserved for
them-the orchestra, college boys and
girls, too, playing as they passed-
the faculty and instructional staff pay-
ing deference with the rest of the
world-surely that scene must have
stirred into activity the best impulses
in every boy and girl in the building,
from sub-freshman to senior!
The glamor of it all can scarcely be
understood by a man or woman who
has not lived it. The responsibility
resting upon the teachers of all these
hundreds can not be weighed by an
outsider. The pride of seeing boys
and girls going out to earn their liv-
ings with what you have taught them,
some succeeding, some failing; to see
them come back, years after, and hear
the stories they tell of fame or failure
-that ought to repay a teacher for
every pain, for every hour's trying
labor; it ought to make him put a
mighty high value on himself and the
dignity of the work he has done.
The product a plant turns out fixes
its value to the people. The two
hundred or more students who left the
campus, last Thursday afternoon, to
come back only as alumni, are proofs,
the goods, the product that justifies
the people's confidence, the human
dividends paid to the investors of the
state. You can't overcapitalize a
factory that gives such rewards. You
can't overestimate its importance any
more than you can put a false value
upon Commencement week and the
march of the caps and gowns.
it is all over, now, boys and girls-
the four years' work. Wasn't it fine?
Haven't you enjoyed every hour of it,
looking backward with your added
common sense? Wouldn't you like to
live it-again? It gave-you the foun-
dation for your future. It's up to you.
You have the chance. What will-you
do with'it? _::

BY WAY OF EXPLANATION.
Without any desire to reopen what,
it was hoped, had become a closed in-
cident, it has been deemed wise to
print here an explanation of the edi-
torial in THE KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST
of May 27, entitled 'Fifty Years
Ago." In making this explanation it
is impossible to maintain the imper-
sonality which has been a consistent
part of the paper's policy. A careful
reading of the editorial referred to
should prove how idle was the asser-
tion that the writer suggested the
"Ditching" of Memorial Day. It
would prove that critics who declared
an "attack" had been made upon the
Grand Army of the Republic and its
reunions had not read the editorial.
or had deliberately misquoted it. It
would prove, finally, that a deal of
unpleasantness had resulted 'from
what was, really, only a sentimental
effusion absolutely lacking in any ap-
proach to disrespect for the organiza-
tion which it seems, unhappily, has
taken offense.
The writer, who prepared the edito-
rial in question without any consulta-
tion with anyone, would be the last
person to cast aspersion upon the
Grand Army of the Republic or Me-
morial Day. His father fought for the
Union and carried to his last day the
marks of battle. His grave was.
decorated two' weeks ago. It always
will be decorated. For more than
twenty years the editor of this paper
has recorded the annual meetings of
the surviving veterans. He has been
connected throughout his life with
interests constantly friendly to the old
soldiers. He has marched more miles
than they, perhaps, upon Memorial
Days, in getting material to tell the
world of their activities. It is absurd
and malicious to put upon the editorial
he wrote the stamp of unfriendliness
for these men. It is worse to attempt
to charge upon the college any respon-
sibility for it. But no explanation
ever overtakes the original item.


S A GOLDEN TEXT.
S Six days thou shalt work, but
Son the seventh day thou shalt
rest.
And thou shalt observe the
feast of weeks, of the firstfruits of
wheat harvest and the feast of
ingathering at;the year's end.--
Exodus 34: 21, 22.



THE ROYAL PURPLE FOR 1911.
The class-book committee, this year,
has produced an exceptionally hand-
some volume in the Royal Purple for
1911. It would be very hard to find
more painstaking young persons, or
any so eager to turn out a record of
which the students and the whole col-
lege should be proud. While it is
seldom wise to use superlatives, THE
KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST believes it
safe to say that the latest student vol-
ume will be found extraordinary in
several ways. The pictures are par-
ticularly praiseworthy, especially in
point of printing, and the text is a de-
light to read. There is hardly, one
whole page of foolishness in the vol-
ume, and no "jokes" that should
mortally offend anyone familiar with
college life. The cartoons are far
above the ordinary. Indeed, there is
not a sign of mediocrity in the book.

THE NEW CATALOGUE.
The importance of having facilities
at home has been emphasized, this
week, in the bright, attractive ap-
pearance of the new catalogue. With
the state printer's plant crowded to
the limit, it was comforting to know
the catalogue could be printed in Ked-
zie Hall and finished in time for Com-
mencement. Indped, Superintendent
Rickman's department has given num-
erous proofs of competence in the
school year just closed-as it has
done many times in the past. Mr.
McNeal will bavreo reason to regret
that he entrusted the catalogue to the
college printing plant this year. It
is a commendabJe "job," in print-
shop parlance, 'nd especially wel-
come because s a home product
and, more than on irie.

COMMENCEMENT DAY NOTES

A Few Lines About the Exercises and the
~'isirnlg Graduates.
"Two of the faithful were much dis-
cussed among bhe alumni: H. C.
Rushmore and I. D. Graham. Mr.
Rushmore lives in Kansas City, Kan.
He has attended tpirty-one Commence-
ments. Mr. Graham has been here
for thirty-four su h ceremonies.
The ball game, Thursday afternoon,
was an interesting contest. The
alumni-some of the former stars-
recorded four runs in the first inning.
But in the "Lucky Seventh" the.col-
lege team found its wind. The score
was 8 to 7 in favor of the college.
The batteries were: Alumni, Lewis
and Aicher; college, Baird, Stack,
and Billings.
Hardly a visitor left the campus
without going to see the fine exhibit
of domestic art work in Miss Becker's
department. Ith ld President Waters
and the regents for a half hour, and
it was worth a d&y's study. The ex-
hibit included street and house dress-
es, underclothing, 'fixings" such as
laundry bags, slipper holders, and, as
the English say, "all that sort of
thing." Ibe industrial display of
silk, cotton, and wool, thread, knives,
scissors, and butJons was excellent.
It was only a few minutes after the
battle, Thursday afternoon, before all
the dead and wounded were under
cover. The engagement was extremely
exciting. At one time the "people"-
small ones-got in between the oppos-
ing forces in search of empty shells
and the war had to be stopped until
the field was cleared. Captain Boice
observed all the humane essentials of
warfare in handling his men and
throughout the attack.
The Y. W. C. A. girls served the
Alumni-Faculty Ibanquet Thursday
noon.
.Colonel "Jack4 Brady isn't an
alumnus, but no ,ld student could be
more loyal to the college. He's ready
to get out and yeu now just as he did
in 1782-or was it11882-- ---


THE DAY'S BIG EVENTS.

How the Program was Arranged, and the
List of Degrees Conferred.
This is the general program as it
was arranged for Commencement Day,
Thursday, June 15, with the names of
students upon whom degrees were
conferred:
March, "Royal Purple" ......... Westphalinger
"Andante Religieuse".................. Massenet
College Orchestra
Invocation...The Rev. Drury Hill Fisher, A.M.
Overture, "Zampa" .......................Herold
College Orchestra
Annual Address. .....................
.......... "America's Second Opportunity"
Edward Benjamin Krehbiel. A.M..Ph. D.,
Associate Professor of History,
Leland Stanford University.
"Holy Art Thou".......................Handel
College Glee Club
GRADUATES BY COURSES.
AGRONOMY.
Ralph W. Edwards Walter S. Robinson
Harley M. Hunter' Lawrence Osmond
Jay Kerr Newell S. Robb
Hilmer H. Laude Matthew C. Stromire
Frank D. McClure Andrew J. Wheeler
Clyde McKee* Clarence Wheeler
Robert C. Moseley Casper A. Wood
Charles Myszka WilburZacharias*
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY.
Oscar Crouse Harvey G. Roots
AbnerE. Engle Edward H. Schroer
Edwin H.Grandfleld Harry E. Skinner
Ralph E. Hunt Edward P. G. Small
Edward Larson Richard Small
Bert J. McFadden George E. Thompson
David B. Osburn Oscar T. York
DAIRY HUSBANDRY.
William A. Barr Edgar R. Stockwell
Harry A. Fearey Edgar L. Westover
Yojisaemon Hashmlto Owen E. Williams
Carl Irwin* Charles Zoller*
HORTIcULTURE.
BenjaminB. Baird Mauricio J. Oteyza*
Donald F. Jones
VETERINARY MEDICINE.
Lebbeus B. Barber Thomas E. Henry
James W. Benner Benjamin W. Hollis
Roscoe A. Brauson Sylvanus E. Houk
Robert V. Christian Harold D. O'Brien
Joseph H. Coffman John E. Watt
Lewis A. Hammers Glenn E. Whipple
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
William A. Brunker Orville Nauman
Robert W. Ellis' CarlE.Olson
Leo R.Hain Leo Price
Ray Kiene John R. Stoker
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
David G. Blattner George P. May
Lewis L. Bouton Thomas T. Parker
Clifford H. Carr Silas M. Ransopher
George S. Croyle George T. Ratlife
Paul Guy* Charles E. Reed
Herman H. Harbecke Ross H. Reynolds
William L. Heard Dave G. Roth
William C. Hosick John Schlaefli
John E. Jenkins August W. Seng
Fred W. Krotzer Homer H. Sloan
John E. McDowell Alden Strong
SCIVeL ENGrTNEE ING.
Raymond C. Baird Benjamin 0. Johnson
Harrison Broberg Arthur L.Kahl
Walter Van Buck Fred C. Maybach
Roy D. Coleman Percival B. Potter
Urfa A. Domsch Lyle P. Price.
George R. Elliott W.jrtn D Ross
EarlL. Hageman Philip C Vilander
Charles Hennon Noel H Waiton
William B. Honska Harrison W. Wilkison
ARCHITECTURE.'
Alexander T. Bodle Roy Kilmer*
Henry W. Carr Ira T. Koogle.
FredrickD. Elliott Kirby K. Wyatt
Frederick S. Hopper :-
PRINTING.
Aaron E. Anderson Harlan D. Smith
William H. Goldsmith Clifton J. Stratton
Martin L. Laude ley W. Weaver
HOME ECONOMICS.


Effie Adams
Amy E. Banker
Ethel R. Barber :
NTr rie R. Ba.ves
Clara A. Bern
ST Case
NMary I. Coton
Winifred E Cowan
Bertha NI. Davis
Goldie; E Lagile
Fionne E Fate
Lu'ile M 'Forest*'
Mary Gabrielson
Carrie M. Gates*
Edna J. Grandfleld
Mabel R. Hammond
Carrie 0. Harris*
Mildred K. Huse
Blanche Ingersoll
Fern V. Jessup
Mabel L. Keats
Alice M. Keith
Clara M. Kliewer
Claire Lewallen
Mabel E. Lungren
DeNell G. Lyon
Minnie V. McCray
Josephine C. Miller
Winona G. Miller
GENERAL
Harrison R. Anderson
Willis E. Berg
Walter A. Buchheim
Ralph M. Caldwell
Percy G. Davis
Jane M. Dow
Martin Dupray
Lilla C. Farmer
Victor H. Florell
Frank E. Fuller
Harry A. Geauque
Ellen M. Hickok
George B. Holmes


Margaret D. Morris
Maria Morris
Flora H. Morton
Lucy Needham
Ed\the B. O'Brien
Dora NM. Otto
Hazel N. Parke
Marv R Parsons
Clara M Peters
Bertha E Pnulipi
Bernna L Piamb
Edna Push
Olga M. Raemer
Georgia A. Randel
Ola B. Raymond
Marie E. Roehrig
Elsie A. Rogler
Matah Schaeffer*
Minna M. Scott
Gladys S. Seaton
Clara L. Shofe*
Mary E. Simmons.
Clara P. Smith
Florence Snell
Mabel R. Sommer
Edna G. Soupene
Bertha L. Swartz
Zepherine E. Towne
Florence Wyland
SCIENCE.
Edward H. Kellogg
Emma Lee*
John Z. Martin
Robert A. Mitchel
Ellen F. Nelson
Laura B. Nixon
Walter Osborn
Helen T. Parsons
Orel DeA Pyles
WravR Reeres*
HIgh D. Robertson
William Wood


GRADUATE COURSES. .
The degree of Master of Science in Agriuonl-
ture was conferred upon
Robert John Barneti. B. S.. K S. A C.., '95
Joe GnEsby Lill. B. S. in Agculture. K. S.
A. C., 'V9
Benediction
March. "Masterstroke"............... Chambers
College Orchestra
*0f the class of 1910
The foregoing list does not include
short-course students to whom certif-
icates were issued.

Always wash cut glass in hot water
and polish with newspaper.


Omnipresence.
(The Baccalaureate Hymn. 1911.)
Lord of all being; throned afar,
Thy glory flames from sun and star;
Centre and soul of every sphere.
Yet to each loving heart how near!
Sun of our life. thy quickening ray
Sheds on our path the glow of day;
Star of our hope, thy softened light
Cheers the long watches of the night
Our midnight is thy smile withdrawn;
Our noontide is thy gracious dawn;
Our rainbow arch thy mercy's sign;
All. save the clouds of sin, are thine!
Lord of all life, below, above.
Whose light is truth, whose warmth is love.
Before thy ever-blazing throne
We ask no lustre of our own.
Grant us thy truth to make us free.
And kindling hearts that burn for thee.
Till all thy living altars claim
One holy light, one heavenly flame!
-0. V. Holmes.

SUNFLOWERS.
What a lot of windmills might have
been operated in Kansas last week!
The onion crop of Texas, this sea-
son, is estimated to be worth $1,400,000.
This is getting rather strong, isn't it?
A man at Dodge City reports that a
swarm of his bees flew several miles
but came straight home. A bee line,
probably.
It's the song ye sing, said James
Whitcomb Riley, and the smile ye
wear, that's a-making the sun shine
everywhere.
Russia will spend 150 million dol-
lars to reorganize its fleet. It might
spend a few dollars occasionally for
schools, too.
Hutchinson must be a good town to
live in. No one died there, last
month, anyway. However, there was
only one birth.
"Indians are to be tried as farm-
ers,"said the Wichita Eagle, one day
last week. It is not believed, however,
that they will be 4ud guilty.
Mr. Dawson, attorney general, put
the lid on so firmly that the whole
state nearly dried.up, last'week. Es-
pecially at Hays and theri'abouts.
Just to be different on Mecmorial
Day the Garden City 'ltegram printed
an "upside down" number. Mr. Fax-
on has not had to apologize, either.
."Social .and Personal" item from
the. Brow- County World; "Joe Dii-
ling's 17-year-old dog is dead." Joe's
dog.probably saw two crops of locusts.
'Nothing can now prevent a "land-'
slide" in 1912. Noils, the despatches
say, are to be put upon an ad valorem
basis. We await the news as to tops
and shoddy.
A town crier is employed in Hays
when something is arranged unexpect.-'
edly. "Dance to-night," a boy yelled,
a few days ago, "everybody's invited
-dance to-night."
"These," said the reporter for the
Topeka Capital in his story fromHays
about the farmers' conference, "these
are the cold facts." If so, they were
the only cold things in Hays last week.
It happened in a quiz in industrial
journalism. 'Give a synonym for
'dashing brunette,' said the ques-,
tioner. And without hesitating for
breath a 20-year-old boy replied, sol-
emnly: "Peach."
A story out of the Presbyterian Gen-
eral Assembly, in Atlantic City, ,.
J., said ministers did not fear death.',
This probably applied only to Presby-
terians who believe they know where
they're going afterward.
Gen. Harrison Gray Otis, of the
Los Angeles Tiries; has a small can-
non on the hood of his limousine.
Still, bne little tack would put the
machine out of commission and leave
the general at the enemy's mercy.
The Missouri legislature is to be
asked in the next session to enact laws
that will give the state cleaner country
hotels. After a while the traveling
public will demand a towel every week
and fresh sheets and pillow-slips Sat-
urdays, whether they're needed or not.
One important thing about "News-
paper English" is this: It is the most
constantly employed agent of enlight-
enment in the world. It is read by
everyone. No author, however suc-
cessful and popular, addresses one
half so many persons in a year as the
live newspaper addresses in a month.
Therefore, as Dean Willard said,
what the newspapers say should be
correct.


i












ALUMNI NOTES.

Roy M. Johnson, '10, is farming at
Mankato.
Leon Davis, '09, Berkeley, Cal.,
spent the week at the college.
C. L. Zoller, '10, Kirwin, Kan., was
a Commencement visitor. Mr. Zoller
is farming.
Maude Estes, '10, is teaching do-
mestic science in the Junction City
high school.
Mae Macloud, '10, has returned
from Texas, where she has been teach-
ing domestic science.
Lucille Forest, '10, Thayer, Kan.,
will teach domestic science next year
in the Leroy high school.
Stella Ballard, '10, will teach
domestic science nesxt year in the
Washington, Kan., high school.
Louis Aicher, 'i0, director of the
Idaho experiment station, was in Man-
hattan for the graduation exercises.
Lillian Lowrance, '1U, who is teach-
ing domestic science in the Independ-
ence, Kan., high school, spent the
week in Manbattan.
Margaret Justin, '09, who has been
teaching in a mission at Clarkson.
Miss., has returned to Manhattan for
the summer vacation.
Maybeth Robinson, '10, Manhattan,
and Harry Fearey, '11, were married
the evening of Commencement day.
They will live in Idaho.
Ethel Mosley, '09, Alma. Kan., has
been teaching Domestic Science in the
Girls' Industrial School at Beloit,
Kan. She is to teach, next year, at
Hiawatha, Kan.
Elizabeth Cassel, '09, who has been
teaching domestic'ience in the Uni-
versity of New Orleans, has returned
to spend the summer vacation at her
home in Manhattan.
C. I. Weaver, '06, and Laura iLy-
manil Weaver, 'O, were here from
Chicago for Commencement. 1Mr.
Weave 'i)jn-charge of the Chicago
office ol the Westingbouse Electric
Company.
Wilma'D. Evans, '09, has had a
very pleasant year teaching domestic
science in the city schools of Houston,
Texas, and will return for another
year's work there. This work is be-
gun in the fourth grade of the Houston
schools, and Miss Evans has bad 365
pupils under her instruction.
L. B. Mickel, '10, Soldier, Kan.,
formerly telegraph editor of the
*Springfield (Ill.) Evening News, has
left that paper to work for the United
Press Association in the Chicago of-
fice. Mr. Mickel was the first stu-
dent graduated from the agricultural
college with a diploma from the print-
ing course.
W. O. Peterson, '97, was graduated
with first honors from the Kansas
City Baptist Theological Seminary
May 18. He was ordained in the Bap-
tist church at Clyde, of which he is
pastor, June 1. Dr. Stephen A. Nor-
throp, pastor of the First Bap-
tist Church of Kansas City, Kan.,
preached the ordination sermon. The
Rev. J. W. Bayles, '88, gave the
charge to the candidate.
Margaret Justin, '09, has been hav-
ing interesting and exciting exper-
iences as teacher of domestic science
and household manager in a Method-
ist missionary school near Clarkson,
Miss. The Bennett Home is situated
about eight miles from the city, and
valuable work is being done among
the children of the mountaineers of
that district. Miss Justin will return
for another year's work in the Bennett
Home.
/ ----*-----
LIKED THE SENIOR PLAY.

"At the End of the Rainbow" Filled the
Requirements Admirably.
The senior class play, "At the End of
the Rainbow," pleased a crowdedhouse
at the Auditorium Tuesday night.
There was not much plot to the three
acts, but enough good music and lively
scenes to keep the actors moving and
the crowd interested. Mrs. Mary
Simmons' characterization of the vic-
tim of the "yellow newspaper" drew
the most applause from the crowd.
John Z. Martin and Merle Sims got
away good with their solos. Edna


Pugh and Clay Lint masqueraded
pleasingly as butler and maid. A
mixed chorus between acts and the
Royal Purple March, composed for
the class book by George A. West-
phalinger, were encored.

FROM BONNIE SCOTLAND.

An Edinburgh Man Will Attend the Kan-
sas State Agricultural College.
Scotland will be represented at the
Kansas State Agricultural College
next fall by William Histop, of Edin-
burgh. He was graduated from the
University of Edinburgh this spring.
He desires to take advanced work in
crop production and animal husbandry
and chose the Kansas State Agricultur-
al College.
Agricultural schools in Scotland
teach theory only.. They do not have
laboratories and farms where students
may practice the new ideas that they
learn, as does the Kansas State Agri-
cultural College. All is book work.
Actual practice does not come until
after graduation, there.


COOKED BY THE GIRLS.

FIVE COURSES EXCELLENTLY SERVED
AT THE JUNIOR-SIENIOR BANQUET.

Instead of a "Prom" the Students Enjoyed
Themselves Eatin, After Which
the Class Croo was Care-
fully Tran erred.

The junior girls a,- a fine, cheerful
lot, aren't they? Did they sulk and
pout and refuse to do a thing when it
was decided that a '" Prom" would be
impossible this yea'? They did not.
They-cooked something good to eat;
all of which explains the reason for
the Junior-Senior banquet, Saturday
night, June 3.
It was a real banquet, too-not a
luncheon or refreshnrents-five courses
of it and every bite served in the best
possible fashion. Of course these
junior girls know ho* to cook; haven't
they been cooking] all winter and
spring in the Domestic Science Build-
ing for the hundred seniors in the
table manners course? Rather. So


the chief event came the serving of
punch in the reception-hall.
The special feature of the Junior-
Senior banquet was the handing down
of the shepherd's crook. If you've
never been in college you can't pos-
sibly value this incident at its real
worth. This, without any desire to be
facetious, is the only crook in college.
It originated in 1898. Previously to
that the graduating class had treas-
ured a nickle-plated spade as the par-
ticular object to be passed from one
class to another. No one knows his
name, but true it is that some mis-
guided student purloined the spade in
1895 and-so tradition says-flung it
into the Blue River. It was never
seen again.
After that, for no reason that any-
one will give the eager world, a crook
was bought. That was in 1898, and
every subsequent class, except that of
1900, has put its colors on the shep-
herd's staff. The class of '00 would
have hung its colors with the others
had it not been for some other bar-
barian getting in first and stealing the


Two Thousand Future CitizenA of Kansas- Count Them.


HAD A CAMPUS BREAKFAST.

The Class of '11 Was Out Early for its
Last Meeting.
More than 200 figures in caps and
gowns-theclass of 1911-met under the
trees shortly after 6:30 o'clock,
Wednesday morning, near the spot
where the May-pole stood, six weeks
ago, for a breakfast on the grass. It
was a happy crowd to which President
Waters spoke when he arrived two
hours later-happy to be free and hap-
py to be starting into the world on its
own account. Here is the program:
PROGRAM
6:45 a. m.
Breakfast... ...........................Campus
Class History...............Clif Stratton
Class Prophecy....... ....Oley Weaver
8:30 a. m.
Dedication of Arch..":..............H. Clay Lint
Re-ponse.. .......... Press. H. J. Waters
9:00 a. m.
Division of Home Economics ...............
.........................Dean Mary Van Zile
Demonstration by Departments
9:30 a. m.
Division of Agriculture...Dean Ed. H. Webster
Demonstration by Departments
9:45 a. m.
The College.................... Dean C. M. Brink
10:00 a. m.
Chapel ........................ ......Auditdrium
Overture..................... Orchestra
Alma Mater................. Everybody
Devotion............. H. Ray Anderson
Announcements.........Winnie Cowan
Solo....................John Z. Martin
Talk.........................Nell Hickok
Quartet..................... Senior Girls
Talk ................Harold D. O'Brien
March..........................Orchestra
11:00 a. m.
Division of General Science, Dean J.T. Willard
Demonstration by Departments
11:20 a. m.
Division of Mechanic Arts..................
......................Dean E. B. McCormick
Demonstration b*y Departments
11:45 a. m.
Musical Program...............Auditorium
Department of Music

Try putting pancake batter in a
.pitcher and pouring it out to bake.


when it.came down t6 providing prov-
ender for the big nmeal-310 persons
-the girls were at home in the kitchen.
Punch Gele


Paiv de veau
Pickles


Sandwiches


Salade

Ice-Cream

Cafe Noir
Care Noir


Saratoga Chips
Olives
i

Wafers

Cakes

Opera Sticks


No doubt in the world that you all
know Pair de veau when you see it,


The Crook of 1911.
and Punch gele; both were there, big
as life, and busy. Of course everyone
called it veal loaf and enjoyed it with-
out reference to the French name. And


crook. It was recovered finally and a
piece of crepe attached to it for the '00
class. Students understand why and
that, evidently, is all that is required.
The famous crook is now inthe pos-
session of the class of 1912. Only three
or four persons know where it is. It
will be hidden until June, 1912, when it
will be passed on to the class of '13.

AN ARCH FOR THE CAMPUS.
The Class of 1911 Leaves a Lasting Testi-
mony of Its Loyalty.
A handsome stone arch, the gift of
the class of 1911, is to be erected at the
south entrance to the campus at the
state agricultural college. Because
the class, 210 in number, was to leave
college Thursday it was necessary to
dedicate the arch Wednesday morning,
although it exists at present only in
the form of money, resolutions, a site,
and the state architect's plans.
The class of 1911 has three sources
from which to draw money to pay for
the arch: about $1000 profit from the
class book of the year, just issued;
the proceeds of the senior play, put
on Tuesday night, and the receipts
from the sales of the march, "Royal
Purple," composed by George A.
Westphalinger, the college band mas-
ter. The arch probably will cost
$2500. H. Clay Lint, for the class,
presented the arch to the college. It
was accepted by President Waters for
the regents. An inscription commem-
orative of the class and its generosity
will be carved in the center of the
arch.


the sophomore and freshman girls The Alumni's Business Meeting.
served without a hitch. Indeed, there The alumni met in business session
was no reason to expect a hitch; those Wednesday afternoon. About sixty
girls had had the right kind of in- persons attended. Miss Frances L.
struction; they knew how to do the Brown, '09, was reflected director.for
things that were totbe done. After three years.


HOW TO SAVE MILLIONS.

RECLAIM THE WET LANDS OF KAN-
SAS, SAYS DRAINAGE ENGINEER.

Surprising Figures from H.B. Walker, Who
Traveled 7500 Miles and Visited
93 Farms in Eight
Months.

Proper reclamation of the wet lands
of Kansas would mean from 15 to 30
million dollars annually in increased
farm products. This would be enough
money, if properly invested, to pay
for draining the entire wet land area
in two to five years.
In the last eight months, H. B.
Walker, of the state agricultural col-
lege, drainage engineer, has visited
93 farms and five drainage districts,
looking after the reclamation of the
wet lands of the state.
Drainage conditions in 30 counties
in the eastern part of the state were


studied. A
distance of
7500 miles was
trtC ve 1 el'd .
More data is
being taken by
the drainage
engineer as
rapidly as pos-
sible.
Think of 6000 square miles of land
in Kansas, the best in the state, agri-
culturally, that is not cultivated
profitably on account of excessive
moisture! These are the figures of the
drainage engineer.
Such an area would include a strip
20 miles wide, extending from the
north to the south border of the state
-an area almost as large as Con-
necticut. In some instances the rec-
lamation of these lands may be
brought about by straightening and
deepening the river channels, or by
tile drainage.
The organization of drainage dis-
tricts, or cooperative drainage, is
necessary where it is attempted to
straighten a river course or deepen,
the channel. The undertaking is too
large for a singlelaodowner taa-- -- -A
to assume the responsibility, or the
trouble. Tile drainage projects are
usually private improvements. It is
a new undertaking in Kansas,, but
where proper systems are constructed
the results have been successful.
The wet lands of the.state are good
agricultural lands-good for corn,
wheat, or alfalfa; land that will pro-
duce maximum yields. All they need
is draining. Farmers in the overflow
districts along the river valleys culti-
vate their crops in a half-hearted way
because they have no assurance that
they will harvest a crop.

PEACE HAS ITS HEROES.
(Concluded from page z.)
sume this leadership. The Asiatic
nations cannot do so, for the world
regards them as inferior. America is
the logical candidate. America has,
through its policy of keeping out of
the current of international politics,
avoided the rivalries and. hatreds
which sway the foreigner. Within its
boundaries it has representatives of
practically every people of earth-it
is already cosmopolitan in'character,
the world's 'melting pot.' In addi-
tion, having improved its first oppor-
tunity, America has proved its ability
to assume the leadership in great
causes. This is the Isecond opportu-
nity: To demand that our country
continue in the course it has entered,
and lead the world to universal
peace." ,_

The Faculty Won the Game.
The annual athletic contest between
the seniors of the college, and the fac-
ulty took place Saturday afternoon.
Professor McKeever ran against R. V.
Christian and was outclassed. The
ball game proved very exciting in
many places. Headlee and Conrad
made the battery for the faculty and
Ray Anderson pitched for the seniors.
The score at the end of the game was
7 to 4 in favor of the faculty. :Such
persons as Dean Brink, Custodian
Lewis, Professor McKeever, and
others made. the game move fast,.
Headlee slid to third. The tug of
war was won by the seniors.











WON 16 OUT OF 19 GAMES.

AGGIES MADE GOOD SHOWING-BROKE
EVEN IN MISSOURI VALLEY.

Out-Hit and Out-Fielded Opponents-Price
Leads Batting List-Seven K men
Play Their Last Season-Pros-
pects for 1912.

The Kansas Aggies won sixteen out
of the nineteen intercollegiate games
played this season. The University
got away with two of a four-game ser-
ies played under Missouri Valley Con-
ference rules-that is, the Aggies
played under Missouri Valley rules.
To break even under the strict rules of
the big conference was doing better
than the most enthusiastic fan had
hoped. A Quaker named Trueblood,
pitching for Friends University, gets
the credit for the loss of the only
Topeka Conference game that went to
the wrong side of the column.
SEVEN MEN WITH K.
Seven K men will be graduated this
season. Harry Baird, pitcher; Judd
Stack, pitcher; Leo Price, second
base, and Whit Speer, catcher and
outfielder, have been with the team
four years. Roy Meyers has played
third for two years; Dad Croyle and
Ed. Larson won'their K's this spring.
The season opened with the Missouri
Valley team in the field. Young and
Billings were the only veterans eligi-
ble. Excellent pitching by Pollom
and Hall gave an even break with K.
U. After the games with the Univer-
sity the Aggies wandered through the
Topeka Conference teams at will until
Friends University slipped one over
in the ninth and won, 5 to 2.
The contest for batting honors is
close. McCallum, the Kansas City,
Kan., high school lad who has been
playing short, took the lead early in
the season and kept it until the last
trip, when Price recovered his batting
eye and came home four points in the
lead. His average is .338. McCal-
lum with .327 and Billings with .308
are still in the race, and with one
game to play one of these might beat

FOR NEXT YEAR.
Next year ought to see one of the
best-balanced teams in the history of
the college. Cleland, Wolcott, and
Hunt can take good care of thegardens.
Young, Vadakin, McCallum, Beeman,
and Pollom are promising infielders.
Billings ought to be the best college
catcher in the state next season; Pol-
lom and Hall both have shown indica-
tions of heaving ability.
Here are some figures gathered from
the official score-keeper's records:
Summary of Intercollegiate Games.


c-cC .2
2W n rPO cr P

:, :5
S" : :


1, S. A.C......633114316518 18 118|.261|49122890 88916
Opponents....66831 91401 4 231.21148012481991 880 3


^THE CHURCH CAN HELP.
(Concluded from page z.)
special services. They just couldn't
keep out. And, of course, the fathers
and mothers had to come to hear their
childin sing and play and speak-
and"-lewise the doting grandparents
and iceles and aunts and cousins and
sweethea rts all had to come. Next we
started what we called a gospel chorus.
Got some live new song books and
went singing around from home to
home. An athletic association already
existed. We encouraged the boys in
their field-day sports. Two or three
baseball teams were organized. We
played successfully many of the sur-
rounding towns.
"The church building was not suited
for social gatherings, so a series of
sociables was planned at the homes.
These were not the money-making kind
-they were sociables indeed. The
older persons often attended and en-
gaged in the play with the young folks.
Refreshments were served free. Young
folks and old became well acquainted.
And such fellowships! Such friend-
ships! Such companionships! And
all centering in the church.
"The 'Girls' Mission Band' was or-
ganized and met once a month. In
these little gatherings were combined


the devotional, social, educational
work and club features. After the
program the girls would sew and make
garments for the poor in the city. We
began work for the young men by or-
ganizing a class in the Sunday-school
called 'The Young Men's Bible Class.'
It has fifty members. The young men
conduct a lecture course, and have in-
troduced aLd support a bureau of pub-
licity. The boys invested in a small
printing press. With the help of the
pastor they do all the church printing
and issue a local church paper.
"You are wondering what became
of the dancing? Well, they forgot all
about it in about two years. There
has not been a dance in the New Era
hall for more than eight years. The
building stands idle and-is crumbling
to ruin. The pastor never mentioned
dancing in the pulpit or to one indi-
vidual in private. It simply was
starved out.
"Eventually, this church outgrew
the old building. It erected a new
one costing, including furnishings,
$10,000 in money and the equivalent of
another thousand in hauling, which
the farmers did gratis. ~Practically
all the money was subscribed before a
shovelful of earth was moved for the
foundation.
"The new library already has a
thousand volumes. It is purposed to


put in a line of reference books. A
number of study courses are being
planned in scientific agriculture, civil
government, sociology, nature study,
and domestic science.
"It is astonishing how few men the
Lord seems to be calling to our
country churches. I say it reverently.
How many ministers are preaching in
the country churches because they
love the work and realize its import-
ance? Too few. They practice awhile
on the farmers until they learn their
business and the Lord calls them to a
larger(?) sphere of usefulness in some
city.
"The country needs ministers of
strength and vigot in body and in
mind-who choose the rural work first
of all because of its importance and
because of the great need, and who
come determined to stay it through."

FOR FEWER CHURCHES.

The Rural Conference Urges Efforts to Stop
Denominational Waste.
Just before adjournment, Tuesday
afternoon, the rural conference
adopted resolutions calling upon those
interested in rural religious life to
organize, educate, and agitate until
society at large and the church in par-
ticular realizes the supreme import-
ance of maintaining upon American
farms a population whose standards
are in harmony with Christian Ameri-
can ideals; to understand the rural
problem and especially the forces
which are now working toward the de-
pletion of the rural population and the
disintegration of rural institutions;
to federate and cooperate until denom-
inational waste and overlapping in
the rural districts has been eliminated;
to place, as far as feasible, in every
rural community one strong minister-
ing church, adequately supported,
properly equipped, ministered to by
an able man-a church which leads in


ELIJAH WAS WELL SUNG.

THE CHORAL UNION'S SEVENTH AN-
NUAL CONCERT A HIT.

That is to Say the Audiences Gave Every
Necessary Proof of Their Approval
-Professor Valley's Fine
Organization.

Nothing could have been more ap-
propriate, under the existing condi-
tions, than "Elijah," the oratorio so
excellently sungi Wednesday night,
by the choral union of the Kansas
State Agricultural College. Evident-
ly-to judge by tle smiles-the same
idea was upperm st in many minds
when the big chorus sang:
"Look down o0l.us from heaven, O
Lord; regard the distress of Thy peo-
ple; open the heavens and send us re-
lief; help Thy serian now, 0 God!"
The entire performance was worthy
of a permanent organization and un-
usually well done tor one that changes
several times in p year. The solos,
of course, were admirable, but the en-
semble was really extraordinary in
quality.
The production was directed by Pro-
fessor Valley. Those who assisted the
choral union were Mabel Sharp Her-
dien, Chicago, soprano; Grace Brown
Slack, contralto;| J. B. Miller, Chica-
go, tenor; Miss Mell Hutto, accom-


pianist; Harry B wn, orchestra con-
ductor.
The choral union gave its seventh
annual matinee cncert at 3:30 o'clock
Wednesday. The staff was the same
except for the addition of the names
of Miss Ethel ling and Miss Ada
Maria Baum, accompanists.

community service; to call upon the
city churches which are being recruited
from the rural districts in the name of
reciprocity and self preservation to
help maintain in the country the


The Rev. M. B. McNutt.
standards they *ish for themselves,
and to co6peratq with all the allied
forces for rural betterment, especially
the agricultural colleges, the schools,
the Grange, and the Christian associa-
tions.
---~--- -
Enlarge the corl .nd clover acreage,
and thereby enlarge the wheat, barley
and flax product n of your farm.


THE CALL OF RELIGION.
(Concluded from page I.)
there are men in Kansas, to-day, who
have found a place for it. No man
should be in public life who does not
admit the authority and the righteous-
ness and the justice of the great in-
junctions: 'Thou shalt not--.' The
sermon on the mount belongs in poli-
tics to-day, and, moreover, it must be
brought up to date. 'Thou shalt not
kill' does not mean. necessarily, the
foreigner who uses a stiletto. It
means the railway man who refuses to
fix a weakened bridge so that divi-
dends may be paid on watered stock.
'Thou shalt not steal' does not refer
always to some unhappy Jean Val-
jean; it means monopolies that crush
and grind and starve. If Jesus were
to come now and preach another ser-
mon on the mount he probably would
add, 'There shall be no more rebates
and no watered stock and no more of
this and of that in modern society.'
If religion is to be vital it means we
must carry it into every department of
life.
"I will set a plumb-line in the midst
of my people, Israel," Mr. Clarke
said, was spoken of old, and Amos
was sent to test the consciences of the
people. "It seems," he declared,
"that the Lord did the same for us in


putting Roosevelt into the presidency.
When I heard Woodrow Wilson, a
few days ago, I could not resist say-
ing, 'Is this another Amos?'"
Another feature of the call of relig-
ion, the speaker said, was the call to
vicariousness, to self sacrifice. There
is no place, to-day, he declared, for
the selfish man; not in the church, or
in school, or in politics, or anywhere
else can he find rest and welcome. No
one, he said, was fit to have a diploma
who did not go out saying, "In Christ
I live."
Here is the charge given by Mr.
Clarke to the graduates, standing:
"I have voiced the 'Call of Relig-
ion,' but you will have seen that I
mean by it the same as the call to life
-life with the biggest interpretation,
under God and answerable to Him.
"Let me say three things: If the
Christian religion' is thus big in value,
worth while, and full of reality, let us,
as college men and women, stand by
the instrument with which it is to be
propagated-the Christian church.
If the church to-day is not all that we
would have it, instead of deserting it,
let us enter it to make the needed
changes. We want from college men
and women neither the supercilious-
ness of a blas6 liberalism nor the
closed mind of an unmoving conserv-
atism. We want the humble, open
mind, teachable and free, and that
spirit carried by the educated men
into the church as it is can make the
church what it ought to become.
"The door swings open: Enter the
door! Beautiful and fair as this day
in June is the Commencement day's
prospectfor you. Enter it for character
and achievement. 'Happiness enough
to get one's work flone is all the hap-
piness a brave man seeks,' said
Carlyle. Nothing less than one's ab-
solute best will enable him to get his
work done. Purpose and enthusiasm
and persistence belong to the bacca-


THE ALUMNI WAS HAPPY

MANY STORIES OF OLD TIMES TOLD
AT THE ANNUAL BANQUET.

Two Hundred or More Were Present and
Some of the Early-Day Graduates
Spoke-Leasure of '77
a star.

Even if you never had been in col-
lege you certainly would have enjoyed
the stories told at the Faculty-Alumni
banquet, Thursday noon. Looking
at the Kansas State Agricultural Col-
lege now, with its 2500 students and
an instructional staff of about 140, it
is easy to see how the old-timers were
impressed with the changes, and to un-
derstand the spirit in which they told
the tales that began: "I remember
when-."
Two hundred alumni and probably
a hundred former students and "out-
side" visitors attended the banquet.
At the head table were President
Waters and Mrs. Waters; W. E. Black-
burn, representing the board of re-
gents; Dr. Edward B. Krehbiel, Com-
mencement day speaker; A. L. Spons-
ler, M. M. Sherman, and Edwin
Taylor, regents; Dean Webster; the
Rev. Drury H. Fisher; John U. Hig-
inbotham, Chicago,- and Mrs. Scott
Higinbotham, Manhattan; Mrs. Mary
Pierce Van Zile; Miss Ella Weeks,
and Professor Dickens. Those who
spoke, briefly, were: Dr. E. B. Kreh-
biel; Marion F. Leasure, '77, La Cygne,
Kan.; P. C. Vilander, for th& class of
1911; John U. Higinbotham, '86, Chi-
cago; E. H. Freeman,. '95, Chicago;
W.E. Blackburn, and Colonel "Jack"
Brady, a student of the early '80's.
Marion F. Leasure was a student in
old Bluemont college, of which John
A. Anderson was president Mr. Leas-*
ure told in an exceedingly interest-
ing talk, how he moved with the
college from the hill, Bluemont, to the
present site of the college, when it be-
came an agricultural, college under.
the federal land grant, or Morrill,
law. The building then used was a.
barn, now, and for many years the
armory. He helped others to take
the bell from Bluemont to the armory
where, for years, it rang its usual call
to classes. Later this bell was taken
to Anderson Hall, the administration
building of the Zollege, where it still
hangs.
Mr. Leasure told of the excitement
and delight when John Anderson got
an appropriation from the legislature
of $18,000. With this money he built,
the Chemistry Building-the little
structure now the Women's Gymna-
sium-and the old Horticultural Build-
ing-now a store house-and the cen-
tral part of the machine shops. The
college then had 250 students.
The alumni was entertained in the
evening at an informal reception in
the Women's Gymnasium. By Friday
noon the last of the visitors had de-
parted.-

laureate message. Your friends, your
college, your state are looking now to
you, and their summons is the same
as the summons of religion."
----*--_
THE HONOR STUDENTS.

Oscar Crouse Was the First Senior, Eugene
Maroney First Junior.
At the close of the Commencement
exercises Thursday morning President
Waters announced the student honors
in the senior and junior classes.
Senior class-Oscar Crouse, Ralph
Morris Caldwell, William Benjamin
Honska, Frank Erwin Fuller, Donald
Forsha Jones, Miss Florence Snell,
Miss Alice Mary Keith, George Eldon
Thompson, Miss Myrtle Ruth Bayles,
Victor Homer Florell, Miss Mary Rus-
sell Parsons, and Miss Kate Maria.
Penn.
Junior class-George Eugene Maro-
ney, Miss Ruth Edgerton, Russell Ful-
ler, Thomas Arthur Case, Miss Pau-
line Kennett, Albert Yeager, Earl Har-
rison Martin, Miss Elizabeth Aberle,
Miss Mary Catherine Williams, Wil-
liam Edward Stanley, Oliver Morris'
Franklin, Edgar Allen Vaughn, Henry
Schmedler, and Warren Earl Simon-
sen. ,


The proposed Agricultural Building; one wing to ne erected this year.


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ALUMNI NOTES.

Roy M. Johnson, '10, is farming at
Mankato.
Leon Davis, '09, Berkeley, Cal.,
spent the week at the college.
C. L. Zoller, '10, Kirwin, Kan., was
a Commencement visitor. Mr. Zoller
is farming.
Maude Estes, '10, is teaching do-
mestic science in the Junction City
high school.
Mae Macloud, '10, has returned
from Texas, where she has been teach-
ing domestic science.
Lucille Forest, '10, Thayer, Kan.,
will teach domestic science next year
in the Leroy high school.
Stella Ballard, '10, will teach
domestic science next year in the
Washington, Kan., high school.
Louis Aicher, '0, director of the
Idaho experiment station, was in Man-
hattan for the graduation exercises.
Lillian Lowrance, '10, who is teach-
ing domestic science in the Independ-
ence, Kan., high school, spent the
week in Manhattan.
Margaret Justin, '09, who has been
teaching in a mission at Clarkson,
Miss., has returned to Manhattan for
the summer vacation.
Maybeth Robinson, '10, Manhattan,
and Harry Fearey, '11, were married
the evening of Commencement day.
They will live in Idaho.
Ethel Mosley, '09, Alma, Kan., has
been teaching Domestic Science in the
Girls' Industrial School at Beloit,
Kan. She is to teach, next year, at
Hiawatha, Kan.
Elizabeth Cassel, '09, who has been
teaching domestic iience in the Uni-
versity of New Orleans, has returned
to spend the summer vacation at her
home in Manhattan.
C. I. Weaver, '06, and Laura (Ly-
man) Weaver, '06, were here from
Chicago for Commencement. Mr.
Weaveri's,;jn chargee of the Chicago
office of the Westinghouse Electric
Company.
Wilma D. Evans, '09, has had a
very pleasant year teaching domestic
science in the city schools of Houston,
Texas, and will return for another
year's work there. This work is be-
gun in the fourth grade of the Houston
schools, and Miss Evans has had 365
pupils under her instruction.
L. B. Mickel, '10, Soldier, Kan.,
formerly telegraph editor of the
Springfield (Ill.) Evening News, has
left that paper to work for the United
Press Association in the Chicago of-
fice. Mr. Mickel was the first stu-
dent graduated from the agricultural
college with a diploma from the print-
ing course.
W. 0. Peterson, '97, was graduated
with first honors from the Kansas
City Baptist Theological Seminary
May 18. He was ordained in the Bap-
tist church at Clyde, of which he is
pastor, June 1. Dr. Stephen A. Nor-
throp, pastor of the First Bap-
tist Church of Kansas City, Kan.,
preached the ordination sermon. The
Rev. J. W. Bayles, '88, gave the
charge to the candidate.
Margaret Justin, '09, has been hav-
ing interesting and exciting exper-
iences as teacher of domestic science
and household manager in a Method-
ist missionary school near Clarkson,
Miss. The Bennett Home is situated
about eight miles from the city, and
valuable work is being done among
the children of the mountaineers of
that district. Miss Justin will return
for another year's work in the Bennett
Home.

LIKED THE SENIOR PLAY.

"At the End of the Rainbow" Filled the
Requirements Admirably.
The senior class play, "At the End of
the Rainbow," pleased a crowdedhouse
at the Auditorium Tuesday night.
There was not much plot to the three
acts, but enough good music and lively
scenes to keep the actors moving and
the crowd interested. Mrs. Mary
Simmons' characterization of the vic-
tim of the "yellow newspaper" drew
the most applause from the crowd.
John Z. Martin and Merle Sims got
away good with their solos. Edna


Pugh and Clay Lint masqueraded COOKED BY THE GIRLS. the chief event came the serving of HOW TO SAVE MILLIONS.
pleasingly as butler and maid. A punch in the reception-hall.
mixed chorus between acts and the FIVE COURSES EXCELLENTLY SERVED The special feature of the Junior- RECLA TE WET LANDS OF AN-
Royal Purple March, composed for AT THE JUNIOR-SENIORBANQUET. Senior banquet was the handing down SAS, SAYS DRAINAGE ENGINEER.
the class book by George A. West- _of the shepherd's crook. If you've SAS, SAYS DR E
phalinger, were encored. Instead of a "Prom" the Students Enjoyed never been in college you can't pos- Surprising Figures from H.B.Walker, Who
-- Themselves Eatink, After Which sibly value this incident at its real Traveled 7500 Miles and Visited
FROM BONNIE SCOTLAND. the Class Crook was Care- worth. This, without any desire to be 93 Farms in Eight
fully Transferred. facetious, is the only crook in college. Months.
An Edinburgh Man Will Attend the Kan- It originated in 1898. Previously to
sas State Agricultural College. The junior girls are a fine, cheerful that the graduating class had treas- Proper reclamation of the wet lands
Scotland will be represented at the lot, aren't they? Did they sulk and ured a nickle-plated spade as the par- of Kansas would mean from 15 to 3(
Kansas State Agricultural College pout and refuse to db a thing when it ticular object to be passed from one million dollars annually in increased
next fall by William Histop, of Edin- was decided that a 'Prom" would be class to another. No one knows his farm products. This would be enough
burgh. He was graduated from the impossible this year? They did not. name, but true it is that some mis- money, if properly invested, to pay
University of Edinburgh this spring. They cooked something good to eat; guided student purloined the spade in for draining the entire wet land area
He desires to take advanced work in all of which explains the reason for 1895 and-so tradition says-flung it in two to five years.
cropproduction and animalhusbandry the Junior-Senior banquet, Saturday into the Blue River. It was never In the last eight months. H. B
andchose the Kansas State Agricultur- night, June 3. seen again. Walker, of the state agricultural col
al College. It was a real banquet, too-not a After that, for no reason that any- lege, drainage engineer, has visited
Agricultural schools in Scotland luncheon or refreshnments-five courses one will give the eager world, a crook 93 farms and five drainage districts
teach theory only. They do not have of it and every bite served in the best was bought. That was in 1898, and looking after the reclamation of th
laboratories and farms where students possible fashion. Of course these every subsequent class, except that of wet lands of the state.
may practice the new ideas that they junior girls know how to cook; haven't 1900, has put its colors on the shep- Drainage conditions in 30 counties
learn, as does the Kansas State Agri- they been cooking' all winter and herd's staff. The class of '00 would in the eastern part of the state wer
cultural College. All is book work. spring in the Domestic Science Build- have hung its colors with the others stud ied. A
Actual practice does not come until ing for the hundred seniors in the had it not been for some other bar- distance of
after graduation, there. table manners course? Rather. So barian getting in first and stealing the 7500 miles was
I r- a v. e-IeA


Two Thousand Future Citizens of Kansas--Count Them.


HAD A CAMPUS BREAKFAST.

The Class of '11 Was Out Early for its
Last Meeting.
More than 200 figures in caps and
gowns-theclass of 1911-met under the
trees shortly after 6:30 o'clock,
Wednesday morning, near the spot
where the May-pole stood, six weeks
ago, for a breakfast on the grass. It
was a happy crowd to which President
Waters spoke when he arrived two
hours later-happy to be free and hap-
py to be starting into the world on its
own account. Here is the program:
PROGRAM
6:45 a. m.
Breakfast.. .......................Campus
Class History..............Clif Stratton
Class Prophecy ..........Oley Weaver
8:30 a. m.
Dedication of Arch................H. Clay Lint
Response.....................Pres. H. J. Waters
9:00 a. m.
Division of Home Economics ...............
..........................Dean Mary VanZile
Demonstration by Departments
9:30 a. m.
Division of Agriculture...Dean Ed. H. Webster
Demonstration by Departments
9:45 a. m.
The College................... Dean C. M. Brink
10:00 a. m.
Chapel ..............................Auditdrium
Overture..................... Orchestra
Alma Mater................. Everybody
Devotion............ H. Ray Anderson
Announcements.........Winnie Cowan
Solo......................John Z. Martin
Talk.................... .....Nell Hickok
Quartet..................... Senior Girls
Talk ................ Harold D. O'Brien
March.........................Orchestra
11:00 a. m.
Division of General Science. Dean J. T. Willard
Demonstration by Departments
11:20 a. m.
Division of Mechanic Arts.................
.......................Dean E. B. McCormick
Demonstration by Departments
11:45 a. m.
Musical Program ...................Auditorium
Department of Music

Try putting pancake batter in a
.pitcher and pouring it out to bake.


when it came down to providing prov-
ender for the big meal-310 persons
-the girls were at home in the kitchen.
Punch Gele


Paiv de veau
Pickles


Sandwiches


Salade


Saratoga Chips
Olives


Wafers


Ice-Cream Cakes


Cafe Noir


Opera Sticks


No doubt in the world that you all
know Paiv de veau when you see it,


The Crook of 1911.
and Punch gele; both were there, big
as life, and busy. Of course everyone
called it veal loaf and enjoyed it with-
out reference to the French name. And


crook. It was recovered finally and a
piece of crepe attached to it for the '00
class. Students understand why and
that, evidently, is all that is required.
The famous crook is now in the pos-
session of the class of 1912. Only three
or four persons know where it is. It
will be hidden until June, 1912, when it
will be passed on to the class of '13.

AN ARCH FOR THE CAMPUS.

The Class of 1911 Leaves a Lasting Testi-
mony of Its Loyalty.
A handsome stone arch, the gift of
the class of 1911, is to be erected at the
south entrance to the campus at the
state agricultural college. Because
the class, 210 in number, was to leave
college Thursday it was necessary to
dedicate the arch Wednesday morning,
although it exists at present only in
the form of money, resolutions, a site,
and the state architect's plans.
The class of 1911 has three sources
from which to draw money to pay for
the arch: about $1000 profit from the
class book of the year, just issued
the proceeds of the senior play, pu
on Tuesday night, and the receipts
from the sales of the march, "Roya
Purple," composed by George A
Westphalinger, the college band mas
ter. The arch probably will cos
$2500. H. Clay Lint, for the class
presented the arch to the college. I
was accepted by President Waters fo
the regents. An inscription commem
orative of the class and its generosity
will be carved in the center of thi
arch.


)
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I-
d
S,
e

s
e


tr a v eeC .
More data is
being taken by
the drainage
engineer as
rapidly as pos-
sible.
Think of 6000 square miles of land
in Kansas, the best in the state, agri-
culturally, that is not cultivated
profitably on account of excessive
moisture! These are the figures of the
drainage engineer.
Such an area would include a strip
20 miles wide, extending from the
north to the south border of the state
-an area almost as large as Con-
necticut. In some instances the rec-
lamation of these lands may be
brought about by straightening and
deepening the river channels, or by
tile drainage.
The organization of drainage dis-
tricts, or cooperative drainage, is
necessary where it is attempted to
straighten a river course or deepen
the channel. The undertaking is too
large. for a single landowner tocar.ua
to assume the responsibility, or the
trouble. Tile drainage projects are
usually private improvements. It is
a new undertaking in Kansas, but
where proper systems are constructed
the results have been successful.
The wet lands of the state are good
agricultural lands-good for corn,
wheat, or alfalfa; land that will pro-
duce maximum yields. All they need
is draining. Farmers in the overflow
districts along the river valleys culti-
vate their crops in a half-hearted way
because they have no assurance that
they will harvest a crop.


f







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9


the sophomore and freshman girls The Alumni's Business Meeting.
served without a hitch. Indeed, there The alumni met in business session
was no reason to expect a hitch; those Wednesday afternoon. About sixty
girls had had the right kind of in- persons attended. Miss Frances L.
struction; they knew how to do the Brown, '09, was reflected director for
things that were to be done. After three years.


PEACE HAS ITS HEROES.
(Concluded from page .)
sume this leadership. The Asiatic
nations cannot do so, for the world
regards them as inferior. America is
the logical candidate. America has,
through its policy of keeping out of
the current of international politics,
avoided the rivalries and .hatreds
which sway the foreigner. Within its
boundaries it has representatives of
practically every people of eafth-it
is already cosmopolitan in'character,
the world's 'melting pot.' In addi-
tion, having improved its first oppor-
tunity, America has proved its ability
to assume the leadership in great
causes. This is the second opportu-
nity: To demand that our country
continue in the course it has entered,
and lead the world to universal
peace."'' *

The Faculty Won the Game.
The annual athletic contest between
the seniors of the college and the fac-
ulty took place Saturday afternoon.
Professor McKeever ran against R. V.
Christian and was outclassed. The
ball game proved very exciting in
many places. Headlee and Conrad
made the battery for the faculty and
Ray Anderson pitched for the seniors.
The score at the end of the game was
7 to 4 in favor of the faculty. Such
persons as Dean Brink, Custodian
Lewis, Professor McKeever, and
others made the game move fast,
Headlee slid to third. The tug of
war was won by the seniors.












WON 16 OUT OF 19 GAMES.

AGGIES MADE GOOD SHOWING-BROKE
EVEN IN MISSOURI VALLEY.

Out-Hit and Out-Fielded Opponents-Price
Leads Batting List-Seven K men
Play Their Last Season-Pros-
pects for 1912.

The Kansas Aggies won sixteen out
of the nineteen intercollegiate games
played this season. The University
got away with two of a four-game ser-
ies played under Missouri Valley Con-
ference rules-that is, the Aggies
played under Missouri Valley rules.
To break even under the strict rules of
the big conference was doing better
than the most enthusiastic fan had
hoped. A Quaker named Trueblood,
pitching for Friends University, gets
the credit for the loss of the only
Topeka Conference game that went to
the wrong side of the column.
SEVEN MEN WITH K.
Seven K men will be graduated this
season, Harry Baird, pitcher; Judd
Stack, pitcher; Leo Price, second
base, and Whit Speer, catcher and
outfielder, have been with the team
four years. Roy Meyers has played
third for two years; Dad Croyle and
Ed. Larson won their K's this spring.
The season opened with the Missouri
Valley team in the field. Young and
Billings were the only veterans eligi-
ble. Excellent pitching by Pollom
and Hall gave an even break with K.
U. After the games with the Univer-
sity the Aggies wandered through the
Topeka Conference teams at will until
Friends University slipped one over
in the ninth and won, 5 to 2.
The contest for batting honors is
close. McCallum, the Kansas City,
Kan., high school lad who has been
playing short, took the lead early in
the season and kept it until the last
trip, when Price recovered his batting
eye and came home four points in the
lead. His average is .338. McCal-
lum with .327 and Billings with .308
are still in the race, and with one
game to play one of these might beat
FIOR NEXT YEAR.

Next year ought to see one of the
best-balanced teams in the history of
the college. Cleland, Wolcott, and
Hunt can take good care of the gardens.
Young, Vadakin, McCallum, Beeman,
and Pollom are promising infielders.
Billings ought to be the best college
catcher in the state next season; Pol-
lom and Hall both have shown indica-
tions of heaving ability.
Here are some figures gathered from
the official score-keeper's records:
Summary of Intercollegiate Games.

r Pr
a o



K, S. A.C .....68331148316511881 .261 4941228|901 889 16
Opponents.... 663 9111401 4 23 .211 480 248 991 880 3
'* _______________\t


THE CHURCH CAN HELP.
(Concluded from page i.)
special services. They just couldn't
keep out. And, of course, the fathers
and mothers had to come to hear their
childlgn sing and play and speak-
and'likewise the doting grandparents
anc~t les and aunts and cousins and
sweethearts all had to come. Next we
started what we called a gospel chorus.
Got some live new song books and
went singing around from home to
home. An athletic association already
existed. We encouraged the boys in
their field-day sports. Two or three
baseball teams were organized. We
played successfully many of the sur-
rounding towns.
"The church building was not suited
for social gatherings, so a series of
sociables was planned at the homes.
These were not the money-making kind
-they were sociables indeed. The
older persons often attended and en-
gaged in the play with the young folks.
Refreshments were served free. Young
folks and old became well acquainted.
And such fellowships! Such friend-
ships! Such companionships! And
all centering in the church.
; "The 'Girls' Mission Band' was or-
ganized and met once a month. In
these little gatherings were combined


the devotional, social, educational
work and club features. After the
program the girls would sew and make
garments for the poor in the city. We
began work for the young men by or-
ganizing a class in the Sunday-school
called 'The Young Men's Bible Class.'
It has fifty members. The young men
conduct a lecture course, and have in-
troduced an d support a bureau of pub-
licity. The boys invested in a small
printing press. With the help of the
pastor they do all the church printing
and issue a local church paper.
"You are wondering what became
of the dancing? Well, they forgot all
about it in about two years. There
has not been a dance in the New Era
hall for more than eight years. The
building stands idle and is crumbling
to ruin. The pastor never mentioned
dancing in the pulpit or to one indi-
vidual in private. It simply was
starved out.
"Eventually, this church outgrew
the old building. It erected a new
one costing, including furnishings,
$10,000 in money and the equivalent of
another thousand in hauling, which
the farmers did gratis. Practically
all the money was subscribed before a
shovelful of earth was moved for -the
foundation.
"The new library already has a
thousand volumes. It is purposed to


ELIJAH WAS WELL SUNG. ITHE CALL OF RELIGION.


THE *CHORAL UNION'S SEVENTH AN-
NUAL CONCERT A HIT.

That is to Say the Audiences Gave Every
Necessary Proof of Their Approval
-Professor Valley's Fine
Organization.

Nothing could have been more ap-
propriate, under the existing condi-
tions, than "Elijah," the oratorio so
excellently sung, Wednesday night,
by the choral union of the Kansas
State Agricultural College. Evident-
ly-to judge by the smiles-the same
idea was uppermost in many minds
when the big chorus sang:
"Look down oj us from heaven, O
Lord; regard the distress of Thy peo-
ple; open the heavens and send us re-
lief; help Thy servant now, O God!"
The entire performance was worthy
of a permanent organization and un-
usually well done for one that changes
several times in a year. The solos,
of course, were admirable, but the en-
semble was really extraordinary in
quality.
The production was directed by Pro-
fessor Valley. Those who assisted the
choral union were Mabel Sharp Her-
dien, Chicago, soprano; Grace Brown
Slack, contralto; ;J. B. Miller, Chica-
go, tenor; Miss Mell Hutto, accom-


(Concluded from page I.)
there are men in Kansas, to-day, who
have found a place for it. No man
should be in public life who does not
admit the authority and the righteous-
ness and the justice of the great in-
junctions: 'Thou shalt not--.' The
sermon on the mount belongs in poli-
tics to-day, and, moreover, it must be
brought up to date. 'Thou shalt not
kill' does not mean, necessarily, the
foreigner who uses a stiletto. It
means the railway man who refuses to
fix a weakened bridge so that divi-
dends may be paid on watered stock.
'Thou shalt not steal' does not refer
always to some unhappy Jean Val-
jean; it means monopolies that crush
and grind and starve. If Jesus were
to come now and preach another ser-
mon on the mount he probably would
add, 'There shall be no more rebates
and no watered stock and no more of
this and of that in modern society.'
If religion is to be vital it means we
must carry it into every department of
life. "
"I will set a plumb-line in the midst
of my people, Israel," Mr. Clarke
said, was spoken of old, and Amos
was sent to test the consciences of the
people. "It seems," he declared,
"that the Lord did the same for us in


ii


The proposed Agricultural Builidig: one wing to be erected this year.


put in a line of reference books. A
number of study courses are being
planned in scientific agriculture, civil
government, sociology, nature study,
and domestic science.
"It is astonishing how few men the
Lord seems to be calling to our
country churches. I say it reverently.
How many ministers are preaching in
the country churches because they
love the work and realize its import-
ance? Too few. They practice awhile
on the farmers until they learn their
business and the Lord calls them to a
larger (?) sphere of usefulness in some
city.
"The country needs ministers of
)strength and vigot in body and in
mind-who choose the rural work first
of all because of its importance and
because of the great need, and who
come determined to stay it through."

FOR FEWER CHURCHES.

The Rural Conference Urges Efforts to Stop
Denominational Waste.
Just before adjournment, Tuesday
afternoon, the rural conference
adopted resolutions calling upon those
interested in rural religious life to
organize, educate, and agitate until
society at large and the church in par-
ticular realizes the supreme import-
ance of maintaining upon American
farms a population whose standards
are in harmony with Christian Ameri-
can ideals; to understand the rural
problem and especially the forces
which are now working toward the de-
pletion of the rural population and the
disintegration of rural institutions;
to federate and cooperate until denom-
inational waste and overlapping in
the rural districts has been eliminated;
to place, as far as feasible, in every
rural community one strong minister-
ing church, adequately supported,
properly equipped, ministered to by
an able man-a church which leads in


panist; Harry Brbwn, orchestra con-
ductor.
The choral unin gave its seventh
annual matinee concert at 3:30 o'clock
Wednesday. The staff was the same
except for the addition of the names
of Miss Ethel Ping and Miss Ada
Maria Baum, accompanists.


community service; to call upon the
city churches which are being recruited
from the rural districts in the name of
reciprocity and self preservation to
help maintain in the country the


The Rev. M. B. McNutt.
standards they wish for themselves,
and to cooperate with all the allied
forces for rural betterment, especially
the agricultural colleges, the schools,
the Grange, and the Christian associa-
tions.

Enlarge the corn and clover acreage,
and thereby enlarge the wheat, barley
and flax production of your farm.


putting Roosevelt into the presidency.
When I heard Woodrow Wilson, a
few days ago, I could not resist say-
ing, 'Is this another Amos?'"
Another feature of the call of relig-
ion, the speaker said, was the call to
vicariousness, to self sacrifice. There
is no place, to-day, he declared, for
the selfish man; not in the church, or
in school, or in politics, or anywhere
else can he find rest and welcome. No
one, he said, was fit to have a diploma
who did not go out saying, "In Christ
I live."
Here is the charge given by Mr.
Clarke to the graduates, standing:
"I have voiced the 'Call of Relig-
ion,' but you will have seen that I
mean by it the same as the call to life
-life with the biggest interpretation,
under God and answerable to Him.
"Let me say three things: If the
Christian religion' is thus big in value,
worth while, and full of reality, let us,
as college men and women, stand by
the instrument with which it is to be
propagated-the Christian church.
If the church to-day is not all that we
would have it, instead of deserting it,
let us enter it to make the needed
changes. We want from college men
and women neither the supercilious-
ness of a blasd liberalism nor the
closed mind of an unmoving conserv-
atism. We want the humble, open
mind, teachable and free, and that
spirit carried by the educated men
into the church as it is can make the
church what it ought to become.
"The door swings open: Enter the
door! Beautiful and fair as this day
in June is the Commencement day's
prospectfor you. Enter it for character
and achievement. 'Happiness enough
to get one's work done is all the hap-
piness a brave man seeks,' said
Carlyle. Nothing less than one's ab-
solute best will enable him to get his
work done. Purpose and enthusiasm
and persistence belong to the bacca-


THE ALUMNI WAS HAPPY

MANY STORIES OF OLD TIMES TOLD
AT THE ANNUAL BANQUET.

Two Hundred or More Were Present and
Some of the Early-Day Graduates
Spoke-Leasure of '77
a Star.

Even if you never had been in col-
lege you certainly would have enjoyed
the stories told at the Faculty-Alumni
banquet, Thursday noon. Looking
at the Kansas State Agricultural Col-
lege now, with its 2500 students and
an instructional staff of about 140, it
is easy to see how the old-timers were
impressed with the changes, and to un-
derstand the spirit in which they, told
the tales that began: "I remember
when-. "
Two hundred alumni and probably
a hundred former students and "out-
side" visitors attended the banquet.
At the head table were President
Waters and Mrs. Waters; W. E. Black-
burn, representing the board of re-
gents; Dr. Edward B. Krehbiel, Com-
mencement day speaker; A. L. Spons-
ler, M. M. Sherman, and Edwin
Taylor, regents; Dean Webster; the
Rev. Drury H. Fisher; John U. Hig-
inbotham, Chicago,- and Mrs. Scott
Higinbotham, Manhattan; Mrs. Mary
Pierce Van Zile; Miss Ella Weeks,
and Professor Dickens. Those who
spoke, briefly, were: Dr. E. B. Kreh-
biel; Marion F. Leasure, '77, La Cygne,
Kan.; P. C. Vilander, for the'class of
1911; John U. Higinbotham, '86, Chi-
cago; E. H. Freeman, '95, Chicago;
W. E. Blackburn, and Colonel "Jack"
Brady, a student of the early '80's.
Marion F. Leasure was a student in
old Bluemont college, of which John
A. Anderson was president4' Mr. Leas-*
ure told in an exceedingly interest-
ing talk, how he moved with the
college from the hill, Bluemont, to the
present site of the college, when it be-
came an agricultural college under.
the federal land grant, or Morrill,
law. The building then used was a
barn, now, and for many years the
armory. He helped others to take
the bell from Bluemont to the armory
where, for years, it rang its usual call
to classes. Later this bell was taken
to Anderson Hall, the administration.
building of the college where it still
hangs.
Mr. Leasure told of the excitement
and delight when John Anderson got
an appropriation from the legislature
of $18,000. With this money he built;"
the Chemistry Building-the little
structure now the Women's Gymna-
sium-and the old Horticultural Build-
ing-now a store house-and the cen-
tral part of the machine shops. The
college then had 250 students.
The alumni was entertained in the
evening at an informal reception in
the Women's Gymnasium. By Friday
noon the last of the visitors had de-
parted.-


laureate message. Your friends, your
college, your state are looking now to
you, and their summons is the same
as the summons of religion."


THE HONOR STUDENTS.

Oscar Crouse Was the First Senior, Eugene
Maroney First Junior.
At the close of the Commencement
exercises Thursday morning President
Waters announced the student honors
in the senior and junior classes.
Senior class--Oscar Crouse, Ralph
Morris Caldwell, William Benjamin
Honska, Frank Erwin Fuller, Donald
Forsha Jones, Miss Florence Snell,
Miss Alice Mary Keith, George Eldon
Thompson, Miss Myrtle Ruth Bayles,.
Victor Homer Florell, Miss Mary Rus-
sell Parsons, and Miss Kate Maria.
Penn.
Junior class-George Eugene Maro-
ney, Miss Ruth Edgerton, Russell Ful-
ler, Thomas Arthur Case, Miss Pau-
line Kennett, Albert Yeager, Earl Har-
rison Martin, Miss Elizabeth Aberle,
Miss Mary Catherine Williams, Wil-
liam Edward Stanley, Oliver Morris
Franklin, Edgar Allen Vaughn, Henry
Schmedler, and Warren Earl Simon-
sen.












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THE KANSAS Is


COMMENCEMENT NUMBER




INDUSTRIALIST


Volume 37 Kansas State Agricultural College, Mi nhattan, Saturday, June 17, 1911 Number 36


PEACE HAS ITS HEROES.

DR.E.B. KREHBIEL'S COMMENCEMENT
DAY PLEA FOR DISARMAMENT.

Three Thousand Persons Heard the Cali-
fornian's Arguments for Interna-
tional Arbitration-More
than 200 Graduates.

Seventy-two per cent of the revenues
of the United Stateb are used to sup-
port the army and navy and provide
armament! The weapons of 1900 are
forty times as effective as those of
1870. If the Franco-Prussian war
were fought now, more men would






















Dr. E. B. Krehbiel.

be killed than were engaged in that
conflict. For 250 years Japan had no
war, and when it did finally have one
it whipped one of the richest and
most powerful nations: Russia.
Students graduating from a great
agricultural college presumably leave
-- ~e .itre apo' -peacefti- missio-Sy-but Dr.
Edward Benjamin Krehbiel, of Leland
Stanford University, Commencement
day orator for 1911, justified himself
Sin presenting the foregoing informa-
tion about war by declaring that these
students are the future leaders, and
these leaders must have a mighty part
in shaping the future of America.
If earnest attention were evidence of
interest, Dr. Krehbiel's address was
not wasted. The graduates and the
3000 persons in the audience gave it
the closest possible consideration.
He spoke for about one hour. After
this the glee club sang Handel's "Holy
Art Thou," and in a few minutes the
diplomas were being distributed.
Every division was applauded, but
the heartiest ovation was accorded
the girls from the home economics
course. It was noon when the morn-
ing's exercises were ended.
Dr. Krehbiel is an exceptionally
forceful speaker. This distinction he
achieves by reason of facts well mar-
shalled and figures carefully grouped
for instant understanding. "Amer-
ica's Second Opportunity" would,
ordinarily, be distinctly heavy for a
hot June morning and 3000 persons,
but Dr. Krehbiel presented it so at-
tractively that he kept his audience
with him throughout.
Dr. Krehbiel said America's first
opportunity came-and was accepted
-when government by the people was
undertaken. The correctness of this
judgment had been admitted by the
world. The second opportunity was
in the universal demand for arbitra-
tion to abolish war.
"Through the sacrifice of life,"
Dr. Krehbiel said, "war does not
of choice destroy bad men, but good


men ever-it is the strong young men
who go to the front, and are killed or
maimed. Can a race avoid deteriora-
tion if it is deprived of its healthiest
blood? Biology replies in the nega-
tive; and the history of France during
and after the Napoleonic wars con-
firms the tenets of biology.
"In the second place, the costliness
of wars and armaments has begun to
militate against them. The implements
of war are more expensive to-day than
ever. But as long as the present sys-
tem prevails no nation can afford to
be without the latest and the best equip-
ment. The greater the strides of science
and invention, the greater the cost of
armaments. This unhappy condition
is aggravated by the fact that the sys-
tem of compulsory universal service
is being more and more generally
adopted by the countries of the old
world, and that the peace footing of
the armies of all nations is steadily
increasing. Is it then to be wondered
at that nations are debt-ridden and are
seeking new sources of revenue ; or,
that in seeking an improvement of
their financial situation they should
demand a means of reducing their
armaments, and, therefore, some peace-
ful means of settling their differences?
The expense of armaments and war
gives strength to the peace move-
ment."
AS TO PEACE.
The peace movement, Dr. Krehbiel
said, does not get its strength solely
or even primarily from the costliness
or deadliness of war. Its chief
strength lies in that it is the natural
product of the evolution of society,
of history. Furthermore, the study of
history puts it beyond all doubt that
the peaceful pursuits of men have,
from--the beginning, been-playing an
ever more important role, and that
martial interests have correspond-
ingly decreased. In primitive society
the natural condition was one of war
-every man's hand was against his
neighbor.
"Now," he continued, "if men have
in the past steadily organized into
larger units and have, in the process,
blotted out strife within the bound-
aries of those units, what right have
we to suppose that this process will
not continue in the future? Interna-
tional law has acted as an ever-widen-
ing bridge between nations. Nations
indeed are, theoretically, not bound
to accept this law; in fact, they are
daily becoming more subject to it, for
public opinion is constantly becoming
more powerful, and nations more sub-
ject to public opinion. Public opin-
ion, however, is the fruit of democ-
racy. Democracy is no longer na-
tional; it is daily becoming more in-
ternational. Improvements in tran
portation and communication h ve
cast the world into a smaller mould.
The average American is now more in
touch with China than the New Eng-
lander was with the Virginian in 1789,
and he probably understands him as
well as our forefathers did each other.
On every hand there are evidences that-
each nation is getting into touch with
every other, of international democ-
racy. There is little doubt that the
peace movement has come to stay.
"What is needed is a leader, a peo-
ple which shall boldly avow its full
and implicit belief in the ideal of uni-
versal peace, and act accordingly.
The nations of the old world, bound
up in long-standing rivalries and in
the prevalent militarism, cannot as-
(Concluded on page 3.)


THE CHURCH CAN HELP.


BUT RURAL LIFE, IP
MORE THA

American Farmers Mi
ship, Cultivate UnsI
Develop Public SB
ingness to C


IS SAID, NEEDS
N THIS.

st Acquire Leader-
llishness. Try to
rit anda Will-
-operate.


So many things,j apparently, are
wrong in the rural churches, and in
rural communities generally, that it
may be a long, longtime before ideal
conditions shall ex st. As in every
other great sociological question, the
first thing desired i a better under-
standing of the elements involved.
This was, in a largdemeasure, the re-
sult of the meetings n Commencement
week, held under t e comprehensive
title: "Rural Chur and Rural Life
Conference."
The first session as held Sunday
morning in the congregational
Church, where the R~v. M. B. McNutt,
of Plainfield, Ill.,paor of the DuPage
Presbyterian Churce, spoke upon the
subject uppermost in he minds of those
present. Distance, lack of vision, of
leadership, of self-s crifice, of public
spirit, of cooperation-all were blam-
able, Mr. McNutt said, for much that
was wrong in the country.
Sessions were heldin Anderson Hall
Monday and Tuesday in which ad-
dresses were made I the Rev. J. H.
White, pastor of tl3 United Presby-
terian Church, Man~attan; the Rev.
A. E. Holt, Congregational Church,
.


President Waters.
Manhattan; President Waters; the
Rev. D. H. Fisher, pastor First Pres-
byterian Church, Manhattan; Profes-
sor McKeever, Professor Kammeyer,
Professor Holton; President Sanders,
of Washburn College, Topeka;'-,.
s oral others.
The principal address of the week
was by the Rev. M. B. McNutt, Mon-
day night, at the interchurch banquet
in Woodman Hall. His subject was,
"Modern Methods in the Country
Church."
Mr. McNutt said that perhaps the
country church of the past was all that
was needed in its day or was as good
as the country people could afford.
But the new era of scientific farming
and the introduction of the modern
comforts and conveniences into the
country homes have brought a demand
for and made possible better things for
the rural churches.
The country church must work out
its own problems from the country
point of view. It needs to devise ap-
propriate methods and to evolve and
build up a type of life that will fit into


the needs of the country people as they
exist. His church, the DuPage Pres-
byterian Church, is thirty miles west
of Chicago and six miles from the
nearest railroad. It is surrounded
by no town or village-the church
and manse stand alone on the open
prairie. It is one of the oldest
churches in Illinois. The people are
an average country folk of Scotch,
English, Irish, and German descent.
When Mr. McNutt went there one of
the elders, a farmer, had been preach-
ing for three years, or until he died.
The last minister had resigned with
$400 back on his salary, which amount
the church borrowed to pay the debt.
No one had united with the church for
five years. A club house had been
fitted up in the neighborhood for an
organization that called itself "The
New Era Club," the chief object of
which was dancing. Many of the
young persons of the neighborhood,
including church members, were
spending evenings there. The dan-
cing element from the surrounding
towns had also begun to frequent the
place. The only service the church
attempted was to open the doors Sun-
day for preaching and Sunday-school.
Collections were taken once a year
for missions and ministerial relief,
and this was practically the extent of
the benevolent work.
MANY ARE LIKE IT.
"The condition of this church at
that time was not exceptional," Mr.
McNutt said. "Other churches were,
and are still, in the same plight. Some
persons are saying the country church
has outlived its usefulness, and that
was and fs true of the old type of
country church. Many such have
given up in despair and disbanded.-
Many others exist at the same dying
rate.
Whatwas the matter with this coun-
try church? What is the matter with
that type of country church? My
diagnosis of the case is, simply, a lack
of vision-and the want of adaption to
the new needs. Many good preachers
are failing in the country to-day for
the same reason. They lack adequate
conception of the needs-they fail to
see the possibilities of country life.
"I resolved, first of all, when I went
to DuPage, that I would get next to
the boys and girls; that I would make
that old church a great center of at-
tractions. Notice, I did not say the
great center. I do not believe in the
church attempting to do everything or
trying to do things that might better
be left to other institutions. But a
great center of attractions-a hub of
joys, of happy memories and associa-
nins for that entire community.
First, I organized an old-fashioned
singing school. It might have been
anything else just as well-a class in
scientific farming. The singing school
met one night in the week, in the
church. There was good musical
talent among the young folks and this
nw enterprise proved to be a great
hit. Out of it grew a good, strong
chorus choir, a male quartette, a
ladies' quartette, and orchestra, and
some good soloists. Besides, it im-
proved the singing in the church and
Sunday-school a hundred per cent.
"We began at once to observe all the
special days-a dozen or more. This
kept our musicians busy. And the
first thing we knew the young people
and many of the 'outsiders,' as they
were called, were taking part in these
(Concluded on page 4.)


THE CALL OF RELIGION.

THE REV. C. G. CLARKE IN THE BAC-
CALAUREATE SERMON EXPLAINED
ITS MEANING.

An Important Message for the Graduates
of'll from an Alumnus of Twenty-
Three Years Ago-The Col-
lege Man's Duties.

To come back after twenty-three
years and give the final charge to a
class ten times as large as that in
which he was graduated, was the ex-
perience, last Sunday, of the Rev.
Clement G. Clarke, '88, who preached
the baccalaureate sermon to the class


Clement G. Clarke, '88.
of 1911. It was to be expected that in
such circumstances the speaker would
feel the impulses and emotions certain
to arise with such influences-the
earnest, kindly eyes of many old
friends who had known him in his
-youth looking- -a-him.._ver-th d ._._- ,
of the sturdy 210 in caps and gowns,
getting ready to face the world. The
Auditorium was crowded long before
4 o'clock, the hour for the sermon.
Mr. Clarke showed plainly, too,
that all these influences had gripped
him strongly so that he delivered his
message, "The Call of Religion,"
with exceptional emphasis and fervor.
It was a message to remember. The
boys and girls before him, he said,
were looking to the future, but he
found it impossible not to look back-
ward for a time, and with a feeling of
tenderness, in thinking of the years
he had studied in Manhattan, and the
friendships formed here. He believed
in religion and he believed in college
men. The educated man, he declared, is
more and more to be the spokesman of
the future and religion the conserving
force. He believed he would see the
two united in the world's advance-
ment. The stamp of religion would be
upon the men of the future, upon col-
lege men.
The call of religion, to-day, the
speaker said, is a call to educated
men. It is a call consistent with the
ideal and practical and the rational.
Another thing in this call is righteous-
ness, a passion for righteousness.
The religion of Jesus .Christ is con-
sistent with every I ambition a
student in college has to take home
with him. Righteousness should be
the ambition of every man. They
should know wrong from right; they
should know the men in public life
who do wrong, and they should vote
them out and not into public office.
"Who said there is no place for the
Decalogue in American politics?"
Mr. Clarke demanded. "Thank God
(Concluded on page 4.)


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/- iv -- A










THE KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST


Issued weekly during the college year by the
Kansas State Agricultural College. Manhat-
tan. Kansas.

PRES. H. J. WATERS............ Editor-in-chief
PROF. C. J. DILLON............ Managing Editor
DR. J. D. WALTERS..... .. .........Local Editor

Except for contributions from officers of the
college or members of the faculty, the articles
in THE KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST are written by
students in the department of industrial jour-
nalism, under the direction of Prof. Charles
Dillon.
The typesetting and other mechanical work
is by students in the school of printing, of
which J. D. Rickman is superintendent. Both
these departments are in Kedzie Hall.
Newspapers and other publications are in-
vited to use the contents of the paper freely
without credit.
The increasing demand for THE KANSAS IN-
DUSTRIALIST makes it necessary to insist upon
the payment of the regular subscription price,
50 cents a year. invariably in advance. No
commission is paid any one for subscriptions,
and no advertisements are accepted. The
paper is sent free only to the alumni, to officers
of the state, and members of the legislature.
This rule will not be violated.

Entered at the post-office. Manhattan. Kan..
as second-class matter. Act of July 16. 1894.

SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 1911

WHAT WILL YOU DO WITH IT?
It is ended, now, the four years'
work. It is your fault if you have
missed. There isn't a man or woman
in the world upon whom you can
rightfully put the blame for one of
your shortcomings. If you did the
work well and faithfully you have the
education you came to college to get.
It is your big asset, the goods you
have to show, your stock in trade-
what will you do with it?
Time and again you've laughed at
the well-meaning speaker in chapel
who pointed out the duty you owed
the state, but you don't feel like
laughing now, do you? It has sud-
denly become a mighty serious busi-
ness. You have some real concern,
now, about the future. You begin to
realize that there was truth in the
message you thought so trite. It is a
whole lot more important now than it
was the morning you nudged your
seat mate in chapel.
It seems impossible for anyone to
miss the human interest, as newspaper
------iescritn-t,-i~~the activities of Com-
mencement week. It seems impossible
for any man of depth and good com-
mon sense to view the scenes unmoved.
For the first time, perhaps, you real-
ize that here are more than 200 fine
young men and women who have de-
veloped together, studying side by
side, some of them for five years, go-
ing out, to-morrow, to try their
strength, potential citizens of a great
republic in which efficiency counts for
more than at any time in history, in
which men and women who can do
things and do them right are more
than ever in demand.
They are not the finished product,
these graduates. They are just the
best possible output that a great tech-
nical training school can give the
world, an output that must be whipped
into shape after it leaves the campus,
brave and hopeful and bright of eyes,
ready to grapple with anything that
presents itself, listening eagerly for
Opportunity's knock.
A spectacle, surely, to give one a
new feeling toward his fellows, a keener
interest in the students still to be
graduated, a kindlier sympathy for
some that may not find the road to
learning so smooth as it is for the
feet of others. Somehow you give
way to strange impulses under the in-
fluence of the-:ime. You find your-
self wondering if, after all, it will not
be possible for you to guide some of
the hesitating feet that are taking the
highway to-day through an unmapped
land. It is such a big world, and
there are so very many starting out
into it every day, each with his little
ambitions and plans and hopes; a
big, big world that may prove to be
so pitiably small for some. You may
have smiled at such thoughts in other
years, but you finish the day by full
conversion to the student idea that
there isn't anything under the beauti-
ful, bending sky one half so important
right now as Commencement week and
"My Future."
Commencement means more than the
finishing of two or three hundred stu-
dents. It means new vigor for those
who are in classes yet to be graduated.


It puts big ideas and ambitions into
wavering minds; it makes boys and
girls, still far from the coveted goal,
put into their work a larger measure
of energy; it gives them a clearer un-
derstanding of the purpose for which
they have been sent to college. Sure-
ly no normal American youth could
see those caps and gowns enter the
big Auditorium, admired and envied
by the hundreds that stood while they
marched to the places reserved for
them- the orchestra, college boys and
girls, too, playing as they passed-
the faculty and instructional staff pay-
ing deference with the rest of the
world-surely that scene must have
stirred into activity the best impulses
in every boy and girl in the building,
from sub-freshman to senior!
The glamor of it all can scarcely be
understood by a man or woman who
has not lived it. The responsibility
resting upon the teachers of all these
hundreds can not be weighed by an
outsider. The pride of seeing boys
and girls going out to earn their liv-
ings with what you have taught them,
some succeeding, some failing; to see
them come back, years after, and hear
the stories they tell of fame or failure
-that ought to repay a teacher for
every pain, for every hour's trying
labor; it ought to make him put a
mighty high value on himself and the
dignity of the work he has done.
The product a plant turns out fixes
its value to the people. The two
hundred or more students who left the
campus, last Thursday afternoon, to
come back only as alumni, are proofs,
the goods, the product that justifies
the people's confidence, the human
dividends paid to the investors of the
state. You can't overcapitalize a
factory that gives such rewards. You
can't overestimate its importance any
more than you can put a false value
upon Commencement week and the
march of the caps and gowns.
It is all over, now, boys and girls-
the four years' work. Wasn't it fine?
Haven't you enjoyed every hour of it,
looking backward with your added
common sense? Wouldn't you like to
live it again? It gave you the foun-
dation for your future. It's up to you.
You have the chance. What will you
do with it?

BY WAY OF EXPLANATION.
Without any desire to reopen what,
it was hoped, had become a closed in-
cident, it has been deemed wise to
print here an explanation of the edi-
torial in THE KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST
of May 27, entitled "Fifty Years
Ago." In making this explanation it
is impossible to maintain the imper-
sonality which has been a consistent
part of the paper's policy. A careful
reading of the editorial referred to
should prove how idle was the asser-
tion that the writer suggested the
"Ditching" of Memorial Day. It
would prove that critics who declared
an "attack" had been made upon the
Grand Army of the Republic and its
reunions had not read the editorial,
or had deliberately misquoted it. It
would prove, finally, that a deal of
unpleasantness had resulted from
what was, really, only a sentimental
effusion absolutely lacking in any ap-
proach to disrespect for the organiza-
tion which it seems, unhappily, has
taken offense.
The writer, who prepared the edito-
rial in question without any consulta-
tion with anyone, would be the last
person to cast aspersion upon the
Grand Army of the Republic or Me-
morial Day. His father fought for the
Union and carried to his last day the
marks of battle. His grave was
decorated two weeks ago. It always
will be decorated. For more than
twenty years the editor of this paper
has recorded the annual meetings of
the surviving veterans. He has been
connected throughout his life with
interests constantly friendly to the old
soldiers. He has marched more miles
than they, perhaps, upon Memorial
Days, in getting material to tell the
world of their activities. It is absurd
and malicious to put upon the editorial
he wrote the stamp of unfriendliness
for these men. It is worse to attempt
to charge upon the college any respon-
sibility for it. But no explanation
ever overtakes the original item.


n f l --""""

i A OLDEN TEXT.
S Six days thou shalt work, but
on the seventh day thou shalt
rest.
And thou shalt observe the :
feast of weeks, of the firstfruits of
wheat harvest% and the feast of
ingathering at the year's end.-
Exodus 34: 21, 22.



THE ROYAL PURPLE FOR 1911.
The class-book committee, this year,
has produced an exceptionally hand-
some volume in the Royal Purple for
1911. It would be very hard to find
more painstaking young persons, or
any so eager to turn out a record of
which the students and the whole col-
lege should be proud. While it is
seldom wise to use superlatives, THE
KANSAS INDUSTRIALIST believes it
safe to say that the latest student vol-
ume will be found extraordinary in
several ways. The pictures are par-
ticularly praiseworthy, especially in
point of printing, and the text is a de-
light to read. There is hardly one
whole page of foolishness in the vol-
ume, and no "jokes" that should
mortally offend anyone familiar with
college life. The cartoons are far
above the ordinary. Indeed, there is
not a sign of mediocrity in the book.

THE NEW CATALOGUE.
The importance of having facilities
at home has been emphasized, this
week, in the bright, attractive ap-
pearance of the new catalogue. With
the state printer's plant crowded to
the limit, it was comforting to know
the catalogue could be printed in Ked-
zie Hall and finished in time for Com-
mencement. Indeed, Superintendent
Rickman's department has given num-
erous proofs of competence in the
school year just closed-as it has
done many times in the past. Mr.
McNeal will have no reason to regret
that he entrusted the catalogue to the
college printing plant this year. It
is a commendable "job," in print-
shop parlance, and especially wel-
come because it is a home product
and, more Ihan-i., on time.-

COMMENCEMENT DAY NOTES
7--
A Few Lines About the Exercises and the
Visiting radiates.
Two of the faithful were much dis-
cussed among (he alumni: H. C.
Rushmore and I. D. Graham. Mr.
Rushmore lives in Kansas City, Kan.
He has attended thirty-one Commence-
ments. Mr. Graham has been here
for thirty-four such ceremonies.
The ball game, Thursday afternoon,
was an interesting contest. The
alumni-some of| the former stars-
recorded four runs in the first inning.
But in the "Lucky .Seventh" the.col-
lege team found its wind. The score
was 8 to 7 in favor of the college.
The batteries were: Alumni, Lewis
and Aicher; college, Baird, Stack,
and Billings.
Hardly a visitor left the campus
without going to see the fine exhibit
of domestic art work in Miss Becker's
department. Itheld President Waters
and the regents for a half hour, and
it was worth a day's study. The ex-
hibit included street and house dress-
es, underclothing,. "fixings" such as
laundry bags, slihper holders, and, as
the English say, "all that sort of
thing." The industrial display of
silk, cotton, and wool, thread, knives,
scissors, and but qns was excellent.
It was only a f.w minutes after the
battle, Thursday afternoon, before all
the dead and wounded were under
cover. The engagement was extremely
exciting. At one time the "people"-
small ones-got in between the oppos-
ing forces in search of empty shells
and the war had to be stopped until
the field was cleared. Captain Boice
observed all the humane essentials of
warfare in handling his men and
throughout the attack.
The Y. W. C. A. girls served the
Alumni-Faculty banquet Thursday
noon.
.Colonel "Jack" Brady isn't an
alumnus, but no old student could be
more loyal to the college. He's ready
to get out and yell now just as he did
in 1782-or was it 1882? --. -


THE DAY'S BIG EVENTS.

How the Program was Arranged, and the
List of Degrees Conferred.
This is the general program as it
was arranged for Commencement Day,
Thursday, June 15, with the names of
students upon whom degrees were
conferred:
March, "Royal Purple" .......... 1estphalinger
"Andante Religieuse .................Massenet
College Orchestra
Invocation...The Rev. Drury Hill Fisher, A. M.
Overture, "Zampa"......... ...............Herold
College Orchestra
Annual Address .............................
.......... "America's Second Opportunity"
Edward Benjamin Krehbiel, A.M..Ph. D.,
Associate Professor of History,
Leland Stanford University.
"Holy Art Thou"........................Handel
College Glee Club
GRADUATES BY COURSES.
AGRONOMY.
Ralph W. Edwards Walter S. Robinson
Harley M. Hunter' Lawrence Osmond
Jay Kerr Newell S. Robb
Hilmer H. Laude Matthew C. Stromire
Frank D. McClure Andrew J. Wheeler
Clyde McKee* Clarence Wheeler
Robert C. Moseley Casper A. Wood
Charles Myszka Wilbur Zacharias*
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY.
Oscar Crouse Harvey G. Roots
Abner E. Engle Edward H. Schroer
Edwin H.Grandfleld Harry E. Skinner
Ralph E. Hunt Edward P. G. Small
Edward Larson Richard Small
Bert J. McFadden George E. Thompson
David B. Osburn Oscar T. York
DAIRY HUSBANDRY.
William A. Barr Edgar R. Stockwell
Harry A. Fearey Edgar L. Westover
Yojizaemon Hashumoto Owen E. Williams
Carl Irwin* Charles Zoller*
HORTICULTURE.
Benjamin B. Baird Mauricio J. Oteyza*
Donald F. Jones
VETERINARY MEDICINE.
Lebbeus B. Barber Thomas E. Henry
James W. Benner Benjamin W. Hollis
Roscoe A. Brauson Sylvanus E. Houk
Robert V. Christian Harold D. O'Brien
Joseph H. Coffman John E. Watt
Lewis A. Hammers Glenn E. Whipple
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
William A. Brunker Orville Nauman
Robert W. Ellis Carl E. Olson
Leo R. Hain Leo Price
Ray Kiene John R. Stoker
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
David G. Blattner George P. May
Lewis L. Bouton Thomas T. Parker
Clifford H. Carr Silas M. Ransopher
George S. Croyle George T. Ratliffe
Paul Guy* Charles E. Reed
Herman H. Harbecke Ross H. Reynolds
William L. Heard Dave G. Roth
William C. Hosick John Schlaefli
John E. Jenkins August W. Seng
Fred W. Krotzer Homer H. Sloan
John E. McDowell Alden Strong
CIVIL ENGINEERING .
Raymond C. Baird Benjamin O. Johnson
Harrison Broberg Arthur L. Kahl
Walter Van Buck Fred C. Maybach
Roy D. Coleman Percival B. Potter
Urfa A. Domsch Lyle P. Price
George R. Elliott Worth D. Ross
Earl L. Hageman Philip C. Vilander
Charles Hennon Noel H. Walton
William B. Honska Harrison W. Wilkison
ARCHITECTURE.
Alexander T. Bodle Roy Kilmer*
Henry W. Carr Ira T. Koogle
Fredrick D. Elliott Kirby K. Wyatt
Frederick S. Hopper
PRINTING.
Aaron E. Anderson Harlan D. Smith
William H. Goldsmith Clifton J. Stratton
Martin L. Laude Oley W. Weaver
HOME ECONOMICS.


Effie Adams
Amy E. Banker
Ethel R. Barber
Myrtle R. Bayles
Clara A: Bergh
S I, Case
Mary I. Cotton'
Winifred E. Cowan
Bertha M. Davis
Goldie G. Eagles
Florine E. Fate
Lucile M. Forest*
Mary Gabrielson
Carrie M. Gates'
Edna J. Grandfleld
Mabel R. Hammond
Carrie O. Harris*
Mildred K. House
Blanche Ingersoll
Fern V. Jessup
Mabel L. Keats
Alice M. Keith
Clara M. Kliewer
Claire Lewallen
Mabel E. Lungren
DeNell G. Lyon
Minnie V. McCray
Josephine C. Miller
Winona G. Miller


Margaret D. Morris
Maria Morris
Flora H. Morton
Lucy Needham
Edythe B. O'Brien
Dora M. Otto
Hazel M. Parke
Mary R. Parsons
Clara M. Peters
Bertha E. Phillips
Bertha L. Plumb
Edna Pugh
Olga M. Raemer
Georgia A. Randel
Ola B. Raymond
Marie E. Roehrig
Elsie A. Rogler
Matah Schaeffer*
Minna M. Scott
Gladys S. Seaton
Clara L. Shofe"
Mary E. Simmons.
Clara P. Smith
Florence Snell
Mabel R. Sommer
Edna G. Soupene
Bertha L. Swartz
Zepherine E. Towne
Florence Wyland


GENERAL SCIENCE.


Harrison R. Anderson
Willis E. Berg
Walter A. Buchhelm
Ralph M. Caldwell
Percy G. Davis
Jane M. Dow
Martin Dupray
Lilla C. Farmer
VictOr H. Florell
Frank E. Fuller
Harry A. Geauque
Ellen M. Hickok
George B. Holmes


Edward H. Kellogg
Emma Lee*
John Z. Martin
Robert A. Mitchel
Ellen F. Nelson
Laura B. Nixon
Walter Osborn
Helen T. Parsons
Orel DeA Pyles
Wray R. Reeves*
Hugh D. Robertson
William Wood


GRADUATE COURSES.
The degree of Master of Science in Agricul-
ture was conferred upon
Robert John Barnett. B. S.. K. S. A. C., '95
Joe Grigsby Lill, B. S. in Agriculture, K. S.
A. C., '09
Benediction
March, "Masterstroke"................ chambers
College Orchestra
*Of the class of 1910
The foregoing list does not include
short-course students to whom certif-
icates were issued.

Always wash cut glass in hot water
and polish with newspaper.


Omnipresence.
(The Baccalaureate Hymn. 1911.)
Lord of all being; throned afar,
Thy glory flames from sun and star;
Centre and soul of every sphere.
Yet to each loving heart how near!
Sun of our life, thy quickening ray
Sheds on our path the glow of day;
Star of our hope, thy softened light
Cheers the long watches of the night
Our midnight is thy smile withdrawn;
Our noontide is thy gracious dawn;
Our rainbow arch thy mercy's sign;
All, save the clouds of sin, are thine!
Lord of alllife, below, above,
Whose light is truth, whose warmth is love.
Before thy ever-blazing throne
We ask no lustre of our own.
Grant us thy truth to make us free.
And kindling hearts that burn for thee,
Till all thy living altars claim
One holy light, one heavenly flame!
-0. W. lHolmes.


SUNFLOWERS.
What a lot of windmills might have
been operated in Kansas last week!
The onion crop of Texas, this sea-
son, is estimated to be worth $1,400,000.
This is getting rather strong, isn't it?
A man at Dodge City reports that a
swarm of his bees flew several miles
but came straight home. A bee line,
probably.
It's the song ye sing, said James
Whitcomb Riley, and the smile ye
wear, that's a-making the sun shine
everywhere.
Russia will spend 150 million dol-
lars to reorganize its fleet. It might
spend a few dollars occasionally for
schools, too.
Hutchinson must be a good town to
live in. No one died there, last
month, anyway. However, there was
only one birth.
"Indians are to be tried as farm-
ers,"said the Wichita Eagle, one day
last week. It is not believed, however,
that they will be tluf d guilty.
Mr. Dawson, attorney general, put
the lid on so firmly that the whole
state nearly dried up, -last week. Es-
pecially at Hays and thereabouts.
Just to be different on Memorial
Day the Garden City Telegram printed
an "upside down" number. Mr. Fax-
on has not had to apologize, either.
"Social and Personal" item from
the Brown County World: "Joe Dil-
ling's 17-year-old dog is dead." Joe's
dog probably saw two crops of locusts.
Nothing can now prevent a "land-
slide" in 1912. Noils, the despatches
say, are to be put upon an ad valorem
basis. We await the news as to tops
and shoddy.
A town crier is employed in Hays
when something is arranged unexpect-
edly. "Dance to-night," a boy yelled,
a few days ago, "everybody's invited
-dance to-night."
"These," said the reporter for the
Topeka Capital in his story from Hays
about the farmers' conference, "these
are the cold facts." If so, they were
the only cold things in Hays last week.
It happened in a quiz in industrial
journalism. "Give a synonym for
'dashing brunette,'" said the ques-
tioner. And without hesitating for
breath a 20-year-old boy replied, sol-
emnly: "Peach."
A story out of the Presbyterian Gen-
eral Assembly, in Atlantic City, N.
J., said ministers did not fear death.
This probably applied only to Presby-
terians who believe they know where
they're going afterward.

Gen. Harrison Gray Otis, of the
Los Angeles Times; has a small can-
non on the hood of his limousine.
Still, one little tack would put the
machine out of commission and leave
the general at the enemy's mercy.

The Missouri legislature is to be
asked in the next session to enact laws
that will give the state cleaner country
hotels. After a while the traveling
public will demand a towel every week
and fresh sheets and pillow-slips Sat-
urdays, whether they're needed or not.
One important thing about "News-
paper English" is this: It is the most
constantly employed agent of enlight-
enment in the world. It is read by
everyone. No author, however suc-
cessful and popular, addresses one
half so many persons in a year as the
live newspaper addresses in a month.
Therefore, as Dean Willard said,
what the newspapers say should be
correct.





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