<%BANNER%>

Relation of Agriculture College and other lines of Agricultural Work in Florida to Citrus Canker.

UFLAC





L nt m- c / *

A t1



ad //V /
i L

C^..~LC- C_ ~c- ---4~,,/


t /A/

- -/9,/L

d" tr^ ^^f" ~^



.-A
^~y|! ./*LL f ft**'t^*lS *^'" ^;/






Z
0



H'1-
zr




Z

- .









































*


. ,. ^ ,j^AU
(^^~;l p,/~ .- I ^w
(i .M 'W ^ /
Qf*^
Id 6y &'

P\ ?*


/ (L.
,1


~. eW(~


EIIL4


La.- .. J~'- J7

S/' t z


4.. d


il


~L ~c.c~C~acr


!c~t/aicLI ~ci~L~;I-


i~L~C~tM Y3






;PL.L~ ('b; ~Y (\1 96


UtLJ/LL4 (1~PYtC.LI 6L5

..?~~z c I, ,. $


z
0

H
Cl)
H
z

-4


/(?? z( &L6'/* x CL 4-e

I-.
/6 3, d"1,;- lca1 24/



7 (fu ^ti fpaf L\- ,'\. -i ,A a)



/0 e-,f- a,-/ //P
/ ?I 6~ IA 7 *M
7J y /r9


c
w
>136
ly
o-










4t t 0

9 ,
i & L.. -:









S ,, c ...,, ,. ..... .. .


O2N ,h / ,

^p~ ~/ p' CI a
71 p i d * I
H Je t G^M ,Al







(/ i74 M'- <, 7A-
/

/9/3 9t&n4^44.4




H -I* *






(/u ^)








77 6--






/O(



1/ 1W c' Jk

& /t9 'f 1 y t h i 1




,0 7




EXPERIMENT STATION




2 ,/6 / ,-
(2&XL, ,l !O f/







7 7 /d '
1/ n Z/e 4^ .


/ cc, &3.


If t
4 A/ ^/p
f (? c^/-


i/-zL~t*tL~C li~-~L-b-YL-Q


dleL~, ~-18~,










4, 6 &., /y
' (^^~~ ^

Oz. L L


{~ .7
I'


VL








;/ c' / t"-








f-2~y
0~

H
12c
Ht




z





Sa. a $




I "
,, /t^"^ 6 ^ ^^^^C& ;3 >-
(fA&-i? a..^, Ga^Lo^ '
^^'^ &<,i^-n-f *s ^ -*-,<'< /^-t^^~i-^









9 sY ', f / < *r A








0





h 7I Li-, y


3, @r6 p-~l ha,


'4-'.


1K ~
hi-


"lY
2117


/1~r 4' 0a-tvc'r
~ Ito *

I/L o


;tti-/ a d
r







Other material


Univ. Cat. 3934-35

lieport.sent to B, Knapp, Feb. 1, 1936

Y J ant Board, irc. I

i.Ctnsion Bulletin 1
%.el-








Bulletin 1 April, 1915




University of Florida

Agricultural Extension Work
P. H. Rolfs, Director

Gainesville, Florida






Contents

General Statement--------------------------------- 3
Report of State Agent --...- ..----.-----..----.-.--- 5
Tabulated Report of Demonstration Work ...---.----..-.-- -- 8
County Canning Club Agents--....------- .------------..-- 9
Duties of Canning Club Agents----------------.....-----9
List of Agents .---.----.....------------...-------.--- 9
Records of Ten Highest Girls ----- .......------ 10
Miles Traveled by County Agents -------------------.---- 10
Number of Demonstrators and Co-operators.--------... -------. 11
Hdg Cholera Treatment.----.------..........---------- 13
Number of Hogs Inoculated during 1914----------------------13
Co-operative Demonstration Work in Hog Cholera..------------.14
Silo Construction -----.15
Farmers' Institutes-....------. .----- -----------------.---15
















BOARD OF CONTROL FOR THE INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER
EDUCATION

P. K. Yonge, Chairman, Pensacola, Fla.
T. B. King, Arcadia, Fla.
E. L. Wartmann, Citra, Fla.
W. D. Finlayson, Old Town, Fla.
J. G. Kellum, Secretary
F. E. Jennings, Jacksonville, Fla.



FARMERS' CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK

STAFF

A. A. MURPHREE, President of the University
P. H. ROLFS, Director
BRADFORD KNAPP, Special Agent, Co-operative Demonstra-
tion Work, U. S. Department of Agriculture
C. K. McQUARRIE, State Agent
H. E. SAVELY, Field Agent, U. S. Department of Agriculture
A. P. SPENCER, District Agent for Central and South Florida
E. S. PACE, District Agent for North Florida
AGNES E. HARRIS, Assistant State Aaent for Girls' Canning
Clubs
BESSIE V. GLOVER, Secretary











CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK


GENERAL STATEMENT
The Board of Control for the University of Florida has enter-
ed into a co-operative agreement with the Secretary of the U.
S. Department of Agriculture, whereby the agricultural extension
work carried on in the State by the University and by the De-
partment of Agriculture is co-ordinated. Dr. Bradford Knapp,
Special Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Agent of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture, and P. H. Rolfs, Director of the Ex-
tension Work of the University, are entrusted with carrying out
the plans for this work. The University of Florida provides suit-
able office rooms and facilities at the University for headquar-
ters and for handling the clerical work. It also pays one-half the
salaries of the State and District Agents. When the State and
District Agents are traveling exclusively for Farmers' Institute
work all of the expenses are borne from the State funds. The
engagement of all workers under the co-operative arrangement
must be agreeable to both the Department and the University.
The Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Work, the Boys'
Corn Clubs, and the Girls' Canning Clubs, are under the direction
of Prof. C. K. McQuarrie, who is State Agent for carrying on this
work. The salaries of the County Agents and other local em-
ployees are met in part by funds amounting to about $25,000, ap-
propriated for this purpose by the U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture. These funds are augmented by the appropriation of $5,000
annually by the legislature of Florida. The Farmers' Institute
work is provided for by an annual legislative appropriation of
$10,000. The Smith-Lever Agricultural Extension fund of
$10,000, which became available on July 1, 1914, is used in ex-
tending this work into additional counties.
The District Agent and the Assistant State Agent work un-
der the direction and advice of the State Agent. The State Agent
and District Agents visit the County Agents as frequently as
possible; and, with the County Agents, make visits to the Farm
Demonstrators, the Boys' Corn Clubs, and the Girls' Canning
Clubs. The State Agent and the District Agents are members of
the faculty of the University. The Assistant State Agent is a
member of the faculty of the College for Women.
The State is divided into two sections. All of the Counties








Agricultural Extension Division


organized east and south of and including Duval, Bradford,
Alachua and Levy are considered as Central and South Florida.
This district is in charge of Prof. A. P. Spencer. The Counties
to the northward and westward of those named and already or-
ganized, are placed in the North Florida District, in charge of
Prof. E. S. Pace. The Assistant State Agent, Miss Harris, being
located at the College for Women, keeps in close touch with the
women's work and brings the County Agents there annually for
instructions. She visits the County Canning Club Agents as fre-
quently as possible.
The value of this co-operative arrangement cannot be easily
over-estimated. The State and District Agents being located at
'the University are constantly in close contact with the staff of the
Experiment Station and the professors of the Agricultural Col-
lege. The County Demonstration Agents during their sessions
at the University are enabled to come in contact with the most
recent and fundamental progress that has been made in agricul-
tural education.
Duties of County Agents.-These Agents are appointed for
their special fitness for the work in their particular County. The
tabular statement at the close of the State Agent's report shows
the immense amount of work accomplished by these men. The
Agents visit as many farmers as possible and give direct instruc-
tion.
A demonstrator is a farmer, fruit grower, or trucker who
sets aside a portion of his field to demonstrate the usefulness of
a particular method of procedure. Where all of the field is
handled according to the directions of the County Agent, the per-
son is known as a co-operator.
Every County that has entered the co-operative arrange-
ment has been aided at the rate of $675 annually. The amount
needed above this has been supplied either by the County as a
whole or by private or community aid. The salaries paid County
Agents vary from $800 for the lowest to $2,400 for the highest.
The Counties in which the higher salaries are paid also make
provision for traveling expenses.
The Canning Club work is carried on for only a portion of the
year. The co-operative work allows $300 annually for canning
clubs under the condition that the counties desiring this work
provide at least, an equal amount. The Canning Club Agents
visit the different agricultural communities and promote an







Bullein 1 5

interest in canning and other rural work. These County Canning
Agents receive not less than $75.00 per month for the time em-
ployed.

REPORT OF STATE AGENT

P. H. Rolfs, Director,
Division of University Extension.
SIR: In submitting my Annual Report of the Farmers' Co-
Operative Demonstration Work of the State of Florida, there are
several items to which I should especially like to draw your at-
tention. Some of the items look a little disappointing, such as
the number in the Corn Demonstration Work. This can be ex-
plained from the fact that up to the time of the corn-planting sea-
son last year only 17 Counties were engaged in the work. To off-
set this, other items appear here that are very satisfactory, par-
ticularly along the line of increased and better grades of live
stock.
There were two meetings of the County Agents held during
the year. One was from February 24 to 27, inclusive, at which
17 agents were present. That meeting was very interesting from
every standpoint. It was the first meeting held where so many
agents were present, and the matters discussed were very inter-
esting. Stenographic notes were taken of the whole proceedings,
which were published at a later date under the title of University
Record Vol. 9, No. 1, or Farmers' Institute Bulletin No. 4. The
other meeting was also held at Gainesville, on September 1 to
11, inclusive, with 29 agents present. That meeting differed from
the previous one in that all the agents were required to submit a
paper to be read at the meeting, dealing with some particular
phase of the work. These papers were very interesting and help-
ed to maintain the interest in the meeting all the way through.
They were the means of bringing out some discussions along cer-
tain lines that would otherwise have been omitted. Owing to
lack of funds we were unable to take stenographic notes.
At both meetings, Dr. C. F. Dawson, State Veterinarian of
the State Board of Health, Jacksonville, was present and held
demonstrations in hog cholera inoculation work. Dr. Dawson
made every individual agent do this work under his instruction,
and where a man showed backwardness in the work he was made
to repeat the operation until the doctor was satisfied that he was







Agricultural Extension Division


perfect in it. At the February meeting, the single or serum-
alone treatment was given; but at the September meeting the
simultaneous treatment was made the strong point.
The State Board of Health provides serum to the farmers
free of charge up to 1,000 cc. per annum, and the Demonstration
Agents are qualified to treat hogs in the County for hog cholera.
This has given the work quite an impetus in the State, and is one
of the means by which the farmers and the Agent get close to-
gether. This is verified by the number of hogs inoculated, which
was 24,409 from the first of March to the fifteenth of December.
Early in September the Bureau of Animal Industry appoint-
ed Dr. G. F. Babb as Veterinary Field Agent to conduct educa-
tional and demonstration work in the State, with regard to hog
cholera. Dr. Babb took up this work shortly after his appoint-
ment, and has been giving very efficient service everywhere that
he has been called upon to go. His work is in co-operation with
the County Agents as far as possible, but at the same time he has
been conducting quite a number of demonstrations on his own
account. I consider this one of the most important moves ever
made by the Department of Agriculture, because it helps to en-
large and strengthen that work in the State.
In July, Prof. C. L. Willoughby was appointed special field
agent in Silo Construction work. Nine weeks of Prof. Willough-
by's time were given to this work. During that time he assisted
in the building of three concrete and five wood silos; and advised
as to the erection of six others to be built later: two of iron, one
of concrete, and three of wood. He also visited, for inspection
and advice as to filling, several silos that had already been built.
The total number of silos visited in the nine weeks' work was 22.
Over and above this he discussed silo construction and silage
crops with the different farmers that he met during that time.
I am confident that Prof. Willoughby's work for that short time
is going to bear fruit in getting a large number of silos built this
year.
At the beginning of the year the number of Counties en-
gaged in the Demonstration Work was 17, and by the end of the
year this number had been increased to 31, with the accession of
4 others pending. During the year there were certain crops that
the Agents were instructed to stress. In February, the matter
of sowing lespedeza in a number of the Counties was taken up,
but owing to the dry spring and early summer the demonstrations







Bulletin 1


in this crop were failures. In the fall, the matter of getting an
increased number of farmers to sow winter cover-crops was
stressed, with very gratifying results. The sowing of oats was
increased at least 100 per cent. The sowing of legume crops was
also stressed with good results. These were confined almost en-
tirely to crimson and burr clover, and in some cases hairy vetch.
It is too early to get complete reports from these crops, but the
results seem to be very satisfactory.
The matter of clearing the land of stumps has also been
stressed by our agents, with the result that reports show that
upwards of eight thousand acres in the Demonstration Work
were stumped during the year. The liming of soils was another
very important matter to which our agents have been giving
considerable attention. Quite a number of counties omitted to
report the acreage in this work, which partly explains the low
figure in the report.
The matter of crop diversification among the farmers has
been stressed right along; and while it is difficult to get the cot-
ton farmer to pay much attention to this work, conditions this
year have been such as to make it almost compulsory for the
cotton farmer to diversify his crops. There are certain crops
which, on account of our soil and climatic conditions, can be
used for cash crops. Sweet potatoes, hay, and sugar-cane made
into high grade syrup, are three of the crops that could easily
take the place of cotton. In sections where transportation facili-
ties are good, some truck crops could be substituted to great ad-
vantage. This has been done on a small scale in some of the
Counties, and this year it is expected this work will be consider-
ably enlarged.
A number of the.farmers of the State have been buying pure
breeds of hogs. This is very gratifying, and in a few years we are
bound to get good results from this work.
Attached hereto please find a tabulated statement of work
done by the County Demonstration Agents.
Very truly yours,
C. K. McQUARRIE,
State Agent









Agricultural Extension Division


CONDENSED TABULATED REPORT OF THE FARMERS'
CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN
FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR END-
ING DECEMBER 31, 1914.

Counties having Demonstration Agents, Jan. 1, 1914...................17
Counties having Demonstration Agents, Jan. 1, 1915 ...................31
Total official visits made by agents during year .................. 17,241
Miles travelled by rail ................................... .... .....16,728
Miles travelled by team and auto .................................... 50,035

Total miles travelled by County Agents........................ 66,763

Demonstrations in Number Acres
Corn ........................ 840........................... 3,068
Cotton ...... ................ 282 ............................. 984
Oats ........ ................ 166............................. 2,186
Burr Clover .................. 40 ........................... 76
Crimson Clover ............... 49............................ 70
Other Legume Crops ......... 430.......................... 1,341
Citrus Fruits ................. 122............................. (?)


Total ...... ................ 1,929


7,725


Pastures established by Demonstrators and Co-operators ................ 74
Rotations established by Demonstrators and Co-operators ..............162
Acres stumped by Demonstrators and Co-operators .................8,183
Acres limed by Demonstrators and Co-operators ..................... 773
Demonstrators and Co-operators doing fall plowing ............... 1,745
Demonstrators and Co-operators selecting seed corn in field ..........636
Improved farm implements purchased by Demonstrators and Co-oper-
ators ................. ........................................ 2,334
Average value of implements ...................................... $15
Number of letters written by County Agents ........................ 8,325
Newspaper articles written by County Agents ..................... 493
Bulletins and circulars distributed by County Agents ................21,594
Enrollment of Boys' Corn Clubs ................................. 1,026
Number Completing Work ...................................... 272
Value of Prizes in Work .................................... $1,895
Farmers' Meetings attended by County Agents .................... 330
Total attendance at same .................................... 13,280
Purebred hogs purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ........ 631
Average value ............... ............. ................. $15
Purebred cattle purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ...... .243
Average value ............................................... $75
Purebred mares purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ...... 239
Average value .......... ................................... $175
Number of hogs inoculated by County Agents from July 1 to Dec. 15..24,409
Dipping vats built in Counties in which Agents are located ........ 23
Silos built in Counties in which Agents are located .................. 23
Farmers' organizations co-operating with County Agent .............. 43


.,2








Bulletin 1


COUNTY CANNING CLUB AGENTS
The Canning Club Agents do their principal work during
late winter, spring and early summer. For the most part these
agents are employed for 6 or 8 months. The principal work is
done among the school children in the direction of canning and
preserving vegetables and fruits. Incidentally these enthusias-
tic women do much good in the way of advice in better prepara-
tion of food and better arrangements of the home.

DUTIES OF THE CANNING CLUB AGENTS
"The County Agent and the County Superintendent of
Schools plan the work. The County Agent visits as many schools
and homes as possible in the County, explains work, and enrolls
the club members. When unable to visit the school, she writes to
the teachers and asks them to enroll club members."
"In the majority of the Counties in which the Canning Club
work is being conducted in Florida the County Superintendent is
giving material assistance in enrolling club members, planning
the work and constantly co-operating with the County Agent."
"After enrolling the club members the County Agent visits
plots; assists in measuring the plots; gives instructions, in the
planting season; teaches canning and preserving, in the canning
season; and conducts a contest at the end of the club work, for
which the club members bring exhibits, write essays, and have
their record books examined."
(The above quotations are taken from Extension Bulletin No. 2, of the
Department of Home Economics of the Florida State College for Women,
p. 10.)
LIST OF COUNTY CANNING CLUB AGENTS
Miss Lila Fraser Alachua Gainesville, Florida
Miss Lizzie Dowling Baker Taylor, Florida
Mrs. T. E. Waldrup Bradford Lake Butler, Florida
Miss Lonny Landrum Clay Green Cove Springs, Florida
Mrs. A. J. Henry Columbia Lake City, Florida
Mrs. A. L. Monroe Dade Miami, Florida
Miss Allie Stribbling De Soto Arcadia, Florida
Mrs. Nevada Reddick Holmes Bonifay, Florida
Mrs. Mollie Evers Hillsboro Plant City, Florida
Mrs. J. R. Moorehead Marion Ocala, Florida
Miss Anne B. Carson Osceola Kissimmee, Florida
Miss Verda Thompson Polk Lakeland, Florida
Miss Carrie Post Pasco Dade City, Florida
Miss Jessie Burton Putnam Crescent City, Florida









Agricultural Extension Division


Miss Mozelle Durst
Mrs. W. E. Quarterman
Miss Lucia Hudson
Miss Eloise McGriff
Miss Myrtle Warren
Miss Nellie McQuarrie


Seminole
Suwanee
St. Johns
Volusia
Walton
Citrus


Sanford, Florida
Live Oak, Florida
St. Augustine, Florida
DeLand, Florida
De Funiak Springs, Florida
Inverness, Florida


RECORD OF TEN HIGHEST GIRLS

"The following are the names and records of the girls who
made the ten highest records in the State:"


Na

Name County 0 3"
o E-' 0 .

__ &4; 0 c1 ;> P

Pettie DeShong, Hillsborough 3,517 200 $ 93.80 $33.35 $60.44
Frankie DeShong, Hillsborough 3,386 190 88.32 31.68 56.64
Mabel Logue, Volusia 2,087 800 127.09 37.75 89.34
Susie Lee Henry, Suwanee 2,693 506 87.93 27.36 60.57
Vida Parker, Marion 2,488 261 93.60 17.43 76.17
Lillie Gay, Bradford 3,263 200 68.00 15.70 52.30
Perdie Farnan, Gadsden 2,764 200 67.60 20.64 46.96
Juanita Broer, De Soto 1,775 285 92.74 22.12 70.62
Ruth Whitworth, Marion 1,991 30 72.00 8.00 64.00
Junia Rodgers, De Soto 2,222 61 64.58 8.72 55.86

(The above quotation and table are taken from Extension Bulletin No.
2, of the Department of Home Economics of the Florida State College for
Women, p. 17.)

MILES TRAVELED BY COUNTY AGENTS SEPTEMBER TO
DECEMBER, INCLUSIVE.

The amount of work done by any one Agent during the
course of a week may seem trivial; yet when we take the com-
bined work of the Agents in the State, we find that it really
amounts to a tremendous figure. Taking the single item of the
number of miles traveled by rail and by conveyance, it amounts to
40,885 miles, a distance greater than one and one-half times
around the world. Even the distance traveled by team and auto-
mobile amounts to 29,345, or more than the distance entirely
around the world.









Bulletin 1


Miles
by
County Agent Miles Team
by or
Rail Auto


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Calhoun
Clay
Columbia
De Soto
Duval
Escambia
Gadsden
Hamilton
Hernando
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Pasco
Polk
Santa Rosa
Suwanee
Taylor
Walton
Washington


Totals


*Appointed Oct. 1
tAppointed Nov. 1


11,540


Total miles traveled


NUMBER OF DEMONSTRATORS AND CO-OPERATORS IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES

The total number of farmers, demonstrators and co-oper-
ators that are being served by our County Agents amounts +o
3376. Nearly all of these are visited twice a month by the
Agents, and given instruction and such help as is practicable.


S. Burgis ...
E. W. Turner 120
B. V. Mathis 660
O. L. Mizell 72
J. E. Yon 30
W. E. Brown 331
J. B. Brown 150
Jos. Crews 626
W. L. Watson 260
S. W. Hiatt 633
M. C. Gardner 478
S. S. Smith 113
J. T. Daniel 768
R. T. Kelley 64
C. A. Fulford 68
G. W. Belser 272
*E. W. Lumpkin ...
D. C. Geiger 221
F. Robinson, (col.) 250
A. W. Turner 625
D. R. McQuarrie 942
S. J. McCully 275
C. H. Baker 260
B. E. Evans 1,058
I. E. Soar 228
A. A. Lewis 342
O. O. Simmons 743
T. Z. Atkeson 630
tT. H. Stripling 60
J. C. Smith 644
D. G. McQuagge 617


2,171
670
964
556
581
782
854
2,008
745
879
1,143
1,110
718
T03
536
736
994
763
1,144
684
1,113
1,036
1,063
1,225
734
663
927
457
200
1,509
1,677

29,345

40,895









Agricultural Extension Division


In many cases the demonstrators are visited as frequently as
three and sometimes four times a month. These County Agents,
as our corps of instructors, are teaching agriculture to an as-
semblage of at least 3376 people. The instruction is varied to
suit the needs of the individual farmer. Each one of the farmers
in turn becomes an instructor for his neighborhood, since when-
ever a farmer succeeds above the average with any crop he im-
mediately becomes a center of information for that crop.

Demon- Co-oper-
County Agent strators ators Both*


S. Burgis
E. W. Turner
B. V. Mathis
O. L. Mizell
J. E. Yon
J. D. Brown
Jos. Crews
W. L. Watson
S. W. Hiatt
S. S. Smith
J. T. Daniel
R. T. Kelley
C. A. Fulford
G. W. Belser
E. W. Lumpkin
D. G. Geiger
F. Robinson (col.)
A. W. Turner
D. R. McQuarrie
S. J. McCully
C. H. Baker
B. E. Evans
I. E. Soar
A. A. Lewis
0. O. Simmons
T. Z. Atkeson
T. H. Stripling
J. C. Smith
D. G. McQuagge


196
122
82
75
115
150
89
58
167
65
76
102
74
150
198
62
131
75
182
196
98
31
78
18
116
186
80
117
168


1155 1548 3376*


Demonstrators


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Calhoun
Columbia
DeSoto
Duval
Escambia
Hamilton
Hernando
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Pasco
Polk
Santa Rosa
Suwanee
Taylor
Walton
Washington


*Some of the Agents failed to report separately the
and the Co-operators.








Bulletin 1


HOG CHOLERA TREATMENT
The State Board of Health furnished, without charge, nearly
all the serum used in the State.
The number of hogs treated By our Demonstration Agents is
very gratifying, especially since many of these Agents had not
really known what serum was when they took up this co-oper-
ative work. Assuming that this work was done correctly, and
that the hogs were treated at the time treatment was needed,
there was a saving to the State of something like 18,000 head of
hogs. This is allowing a much wider latitude for error than
would be the case under expert direction. If we should assume
that the agents were all experts in hog cholera and treated the
hogs under proper conditions, there would have been a saving to
the State of not less than 21,000 hogs. Assuming that this
treatment would not have been administered if the work had
not been taken up by the County Agents, the saving to the State
in hogs alone would have been far greater than the total cost
of the demonstration work. Even assuming that 50 per cent. of
the hogs treated would have been treated in the absence of co-
operation with the County Demonstration Agents, the amou4
saved to the State would more than equal the total cost of the
work. Placing the average value of a hog at $5.00 and assuming
that 9,000 hogs were saved by the activities of the agents, we
have to the credit of the Co-operative Demonstration work at
least $45,000. This, however, does not express the real value of
this one part of the work in the State, since hundreds of farmers
will take up the work of hog raising because they know there is
a preventive of hog cholera; and other hundreds of hog raisers
who have been able to save their hogs be means of serum will
continue in the business, whereas otherwise they would have dis-
continued it.

NUMBER OF HOGS INOCULATED DURING 1914 BY COUNTY AGENTS

County Agent Number
Alachua S. Burgis 5000
Bradford O. L. Mizell 4625
Calhoun J. E. Yon 28
Columbia J. D. Brown 338
Escambia S. W. Hiatt 367
Gadsden M. C. Gardner 1273
Hamilton S. S. Smith 32
Hernando J. T. Daniel 881









Agricultural Extension Division


Hillsborough R. T. Kelley 461
Holmes C. A. Fulford 45
Jackson G. W. Belser 3143
Jefferson E. W. Lumpkin 161
Leon F. Robinson (col.) 25
Levy W. E. Brown 2365
Liberty A. W. Turner 1198
Madison D. R. McQuarrie 1392
Marion S. J. McCully 1600
Pasco I. E. Soar 273
Polk A. A. Lewis 141
Santa Rosa O. O. Simmons 46
Suwanee T. Z. Atkeson 325
Washington D. C. McQuagge 684

Total 24409

CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN HOG
CHOLERA

There follows a statistical report of the work done by Dr.
Geo. F. Babb, Veterinarian, from September to December 31,
114, under the Extension Division of the University co-operat-
hg with the Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Department of
Agriculture.
This was work carried on in addition to the work done by
the County Demonstration Agents. Whenever feasible, Dr.
Babb gave demonstrations in the use of serum; but the work was
directed mainly toward the production of better hogs and improv-
ing the sanitary conditions.
1. Number of counties in which work was conducted from Sep-
tember 1, to December 31, 1914 .......................... 27
2. Number of addresses made ................................. 76
(a) Number illustrated by stereopticon views ............. 12
(b) Total attendance .................................... 5,252
3. Number of demonstrations of preventive treatment .......... 16
(a) Where serum alone was used ....................... 15
(b) Where simultaneous inoculation was used ............. 1
(c) Number of hogs treated ............................ 459
(d) Total attendance at demonstrations ................. 839
4. Number of visits made to farms for purpose of diagnosing hog
cholera or observing conditions and giving advice .......... 6
5. Number of farmers and hog raisers personally interviewed .... 698
6. Number of persons individually instructed and placed in a po-
sition to properly administer the serum preventive treat-
ment ........... ........................................ 16
(a) County Agents ...................................... 6
(b) Hog owners ............. ......................... 10








.Bulletin 1


CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN SILO CON.
STRUCTION

There follows a general outline of work done by C. L. Wil-
loughby, Professor of Animal Husbandry, from July 1 to Sep-
tember 1, 1914, under the Extension Division of the University
co-operating with the Dairy Division Bureau of Animal Industry,
U. S. Department of Agriculture.
1. J. B. Simonton, Micanopy, 90-ton silo (concrete).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
2. L. S. Harvard, Live Oak, 140-ton silo (concrete).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
3. H. L. Chase, East Palatka, 100-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
4. L. H. Means, Gainesville, 90-ton silo (stave).
Constructing a silo from two old ones.
5. C. L. Adams, Jasper, 110-ton silo (stave).
Constructing silo.
6. Ira C. Howell, Pensacola, R. 3, 75-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in filling.
7. John M. Park, East Palatka, 60-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in completing and filling.
S. F. W. Holmes, St. Augustine, 205-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in filling.

In addition to the above, lectures on live stock and allied
subjects were delivered. These are scheduled under the head of
Farmers' Institutes.


FARMERS' INSTITUTES
SUMMARY FOR THE 6 MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31,
1914.

Total attendance ............... ...... ............................ 13,377
Number of sessions ... ..................... ............... ......... 134
Average attendance per session .................................... 99
Number of addresses from University ............................. 275
Total number of addresses ....................................... 376

The above statistical outline of the Farmers' Institute work
during the past six months, shows a large number of addresses
and a large number of Institutes held. This has been possible
largely through co-operation with the Agricultural Extension
movement in the State. The demonstration work insures a much








16 Agricultural Extension Division

more uniform attendance by the farmers in those Counties where
the demonstration work is being carried on. It also stimulates
the Counties in which no demonstration work is being done; since
they hear, directly or indirectly, of the Farmers' Institute work
in adjoining Counties. Nearly all the Farmers' Institutes have had
to be held on circuits. This is due to the fact that the demand for
this work has increased too greatly. The table shows that the
work done in the first six months was nearly equal to that former-
ly accomplished in year.





FOi~MS OF EXTENSIOITN ORK.


A Systematic Instruction

1. The Movable School.

2,. The Demonstration Farm.

/. The Correspondence Course*

v'4. The Lecture and Reading Course.

5. The Study Club.

v. Boys' and Girls' Clubs.


B. Informal Teaching

1. The Convention and Lecture.

as The Farmers'. Institute

b. Framers Week,

o. The Conference.

d. The Occasional Lecture.

2,. The Object Lesson.

/L a. The Demonstration.

b b. The Railway "Special".

o. The Exhibito

R. The Educational ExcurSion.

3. The Publication.

a a. The Press Bulletin.

J B. The Leaflet and Periodical

c. The Monograph or Booklet*

d. The Travelling Library*

4. Advisory Work.

/ a. Correspondence.

SLr b. The Travelling Adviser or Expert.

0c, The District Field Agent.

C Ogranization.
1. The Rural Conference.
2, The Campaign.
V1o. Cooperation an. federation.






Fo:W. 0?f SxrTM' ORK,


A. ystematit Istr eatioa
to The )ovnble Sobool.
2. -Tho Damontstration "'nm.
S. The Corweeponmen Course.
T he to2x^ M r and atI 1eati curse


60 Boya' sat -rias' Clubs.

3. Infor al 2:ach ing
1l ?"l Convention wan Toetnre*
a* the s arrmora' Institute




The Gooianial Lnetare,
2* ihe Objest teaeon.
a. The Demonstratimol
b. ie 3tRailway "Special"*


MR*he A tional 'flurtion.
S. The Pabltationa
a. Thu Pres Ealletin.
L t tsfieawlst ean nerioanl
e. 7 MThe eaph or 3 .oklet.
I. TMhe ?raivii Jng tibary.
4. Avrieery ork.
a. Correspendeinee.
b. The Trwavllin AAviserw e Aport*
ao The fistriet rPielA Aen

C *. Opnaeneatloa
I. The Iutral Conte~D ano
j (gl_ s_




p




A* Syatnmati Inastrz tion
1, he IBovable Sohool*

2. The Demonstrationi ama.
5, The Ooresrnvonod e Courae.




6, Boya' san AGrir' Clubs.


3. Informal raci lng
1. The Convention ant Teeoturei

a* The farmers' Institute

b. Piramerse 'eek.

s, rhe Conferenoe.
1. The Oooaei onal Leetae.

a. The Object Leson.

a. The tDenonstration.

b, The railway "Speoial"*

The asxhibit.
Tne iwesational Yieurtion.

S. The Publication.
a, The Prese Bulletin .

The Leaflet rat Perioft al

a.* The Manograph or B oklet.,
4. The mravllin g Uibrary.

4. Advisory 'Work.

.* Corr.epoatanee.

b. The Travelling A&tUer or a.tport

*9 The isrtriet Field AOgenf

0* Ogranisation.*
1. The Rural Confsmeren
B.p~ T bq.^'Li-o:a-tr- i











State Plant Board
OF FLORIDA






CIRCULAR No. 1
Issued May 15, 1915






The Florida Plant Act of 1915








Copies of this Circular may be obtained free by ad-
dressing the Plant Commissioner, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Fla.






















STATE PLANT BOARD

P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola
E. L. WARTMANN, Citra
T. B. KING, Arcadia
W. D. FINLAYSON, Old Town
F. E. JENNINGS, Jacksonville-


Advisory Committee Acting as Plant Commissioner

LLOYD S. TENNY, Chairman, Orlando
W. J. KROME, Secretary, Homestead
P. H. ROLFS, Gainesville


E. W. BERGER, Entomologist, Gainesville












THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915


AN ACT to Prevent the Introduction Into and Dissemination Within
this State of Insect Pests and Diseases Injurious to Plants and Plant Pro-
ducts of this State, to Create a State Plant Board, and to Prescribe its Pow-
ers and Duties, and Making an Appropriation for the Purpose of Carrying
out the Provisions of said Act.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA:
Section 1. This Act shall be known by the short title of "The Florida
Plant Act of 1915."
Section- 2. For the purpose of this Act, the following terms shall be
construed, respectively, to mean:
Insect Pests and Diseases.-Diseases and insect pests, injurious to
plants and plant products of this State, including any of the stages of devel-
opment of such diseases and insect pests.
Plants and Plant Products.-Trees, shrubs, vines, forage, and cereal
plants, and all other plants; cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, and all other parts
of plants; and fruit, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, wood, lumber, and all
other plant products.
Places.-Vessels, cars and other vehicles, buildings, docks, nurseries,
orchards and other premises, where plants and plant products are grown,
kept or handled.
Persons.-Individuals, associations, partnerships and corporations.
Words used in this Act shall be construed to import either the plural or
the singular, as the case demands.
Section 3. There is hereby'created and established a State Plant Board,
hereinafter called the Board. The said Board shall be composed of five
members who .shall be the same persons who constitute the Board of Con-
trol created and authorized by the provisions of Chapter 5384 of the Laws of
Florida, and all of the authority by this Act granted to the Board herein
created and all the duties required of said Board shall be exercised and per-
formed by the members of the Board of Control, acting as the State Plant
Board: A majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a quorum
for all purposes. The Chairman of the Board shall be selected annually by
the members thereof. They shall be provided with a suitable office or offices
at the University of Flotida where the meetings of the Board may be held
and its records shall be kept.
Section 4. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act,
the Board may employ, prescribe the duties of, and fix the compensation of,
such inspectors and other employees as it may require and incur such ex-
penses as may be necessary, within the limits of appropriations made by
law. It shall co-operate with other departments, boards and officers of this
SState and of the United States as far as practicable.








4 THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915

Section 5. The Board shall keep itself informed as to known varieties
of insect pests and diseases, the origin, locality, nature and appearance
thereof, the manner in which they are disseminated, and approved methods
of treatment and eradication. The Board, in its rules and regulations made
pursuant to this Act, shall list the insect pests and diseases of which it shall
find that the introduction into, or the dissemination within, this State should
be prevented- in order to safe-guard the plants and plant products of this
State, together with the plants and plant products likely to become infested
or infected with such insect pests and diseases. Every such insect pest and
disease listed, and every plant and plant product infested therewith, is here-
by declared to be a public nuisance. Every person who has knowledge of
the presence of any insect pest or disease listed, as required by this section,
in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act, in or upon any!
place, shall immediately report the same to the Board or an inspector there-
of, giving such detailed information relative thereto as he may'have. Every
person who deals in or engages in the sale of plants and plant products
shall furnish to the Board or its inspectors, when requested, a statement of
the names and addresses of the persons from whom and the localities where,
he purchased or obtained such plants and plant products.

Section 6. The Board shall, from time to time, make rules and regula-
tions for carrying out the provisions and requirements of this Act, including
rules and regulations under which its inspectors and other employees shall
(a) inspect places, plants and plant products, and things and substances
used or connected therewith, (b) investigate, control, eradicate and prevent
the dissemination of insect pests and diseases, and (c) supervise or cause
the treatment, cutting and destruction of plants and plant products infested
or infected therewith. The inspectors and employees employed by the
Board shall have authority to carry out and execute the regulations and or-
ders of the said Board and shall have authority under direction of the Board
to carry out the provisions of this Act.

Section 7. Whenever such inspection discloses that any places, or plants
or plant products, or things and substances used or connected therewith,
are infested or infected with any insect pest or disease listed as a public
nuisance, as required by section five, in the rules and regulations made pur-
suant to this Act, written notice thereof shall be given the owner or other
person in possession or control of the place where found, and such owner or
other person shall proceed to control, eradicate or prevent the dissemination
of such insect pest or disease, and to remove, cut or destroy infested and
infected plants and plant products, or things and substances used or con-
nected therewith, within the time and in the manner prescribed by said no-
tice or the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. Whenever
such owner or other person cannot be found, or shall fail, neglect or refuse
to obey the requirements of said notice and the rules and regulations made
pursuant to this Act, such requirements shall be carried out by the inspect-
ors or other employees of the Board.

Section 8. It shall be unlawful for any person' to bring or cause to be
brought into this State any plant or plant product listed, as required by
section five, in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act, unless
there be plainly and legibly marked thereon or affixed thereto, or on or to








THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915


the car or other vehicle carrying, or the bundle, package, or other container
of the same, in a conspicuous place, a statement or a tag or other device
showing the names and addresses of the consignors or shippers and the
consignee or person to whom shipped, the general nature and quantity of
the contents, and the name of the locality where grown, together with a cer-
tificate of inspection of the proper official of the State, territory, district or
country from which it was brought or shipped, showing that such plant or
plant product was found or believed to be free from insect pests and dis-
eases, and any other information required by the Board.
Section 9. It shall be unlawful for any person to sell, give away, carry,
ship or deliver for carriage or. shipment, within this State, any plants or
plant products listed, as required by section five in the rules and regulations
made pursuant to this Act, unless such plants or plant products have been
officially inspected and a certificate issued by an inspector of the Board
stating that the said plants or plant products have been inspected and found
to be apparently free from insect pests and diseases, and any other facts
provided for in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. For
the issuance of such certificate, the Board may require the payment of a rea-
sonable fee to cover the expense of such inspection and certification; PRO-
VIDED, however, that if such plants or plant products were brought into
this State in compliance with the requirements of section eight, the certifi-
cate required by that section may be accepted in lieu of the inspection and
certificate required by this section in such cases as shall be provided for in
the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. If it shall be found at
any time that a certificate of inspection issued or accepted pursuant to the
provisions of'this section, is being used in connection with plants and plant
products which are infested or infected with insect pests or diseases listed
as required by section five in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this
Act, its further use may be prohibited, subject to such inspection and other
disposition of the plants and plant products involved as may be provided
for by the Board. All moneys collected by the Board under this section or
under section seven or fourteen shall be deposited in the State Treasury to
the credit of the general revenue fund receipts.
Section 10. Any person in this State, who receives from without this
State any plant or plant product as to which the requirements of section
eight have not been complied with, or who receives any plant or plant pro-
duct, sold, given away, carried, shipped, or delivered for carriage or ship-
ment within this State as to which the requirements of section nine have not
been complied with, shall immediately inform the Board or an inspector
thereof, and isolate and hold the said plant or plant product unopened or
unused, subject to such inspection and other disposition as may be pro-
vided for by the Board.
Section 11. Whenever the Board shall find that there exists outside of
this State any insect pest or disease, and that, in order to safe-guard plants
and plant products in this State, its introduction into this State should be
prevented, the Board shall give public notice thereof, specifying the plants
and plant products infested or infected or likely to become infested or in-
fected therewith, and the movement of such plants or plant products into
this State from the infested locality designated in said public notice, shall
thereafter be prohibited until the Board shall find that the danger of the in-








THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915-


production into this State pf such insect pests or diseases from such locality
has ceased to exist, of which the Board shall give public notice.

Section 12. Whenever the Board shall find there exists in this State, or
any part thereof, any insect pest or disease, and that its dissemination
should be controlled or prevented, the Board shall give public notice there-
of, specifying the plants and plant products infested or infected, or likely to
become infested or infected therewith, and the movement, planting or other
use of any such plant or plant product, or other thing or substance specified
in such notice as likely to carry and disseminate such insect pest or disease,
except under such conditions as shall be prescribed by the Board as to in-
spection, treatment and disposition, shall be prohibited within such area as
may be designated in said public notice until the Board shall find that the
danger of the dissemination of such insect pest or disease has ceased to ex-
ist, of which the Board shall give public notice.

'Section 13. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions and re-
quirements of this Act, and of the rules and regulations made, and notices
given, pursuant thereto, the Board and its inspectors and employees shall
have power to enter in or upon any place, and to open any bundle, package
or other container containing or thought to contain plants or plant products.

Section 14. Any person affected by any-rule or regulations made, or
notice given, pursuant to this Act, may have a review thereof by the Board
for the purpose of having such rule, regulation or notice modified, suspend-
ed or withdrawn. Such review shall be allowed and considered and the cost
thereof fixed, assessed, collected and paid in such manner and in accordance
with such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Board.

Section 15. Any person who shall violate any provisions or require-
ments of this Act, or of the rules and regulations made or of any notice
given pursuant thereto, or who shall forge, counterfeit, deface, destroy or
wrongfully use, any certificate provided for in this Act or in the rules and
regulations made pursuant thereto, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor
and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine of not more than
five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment -for not more than six months or
by both such fine and imprisonment at the discretion of the court having
jurisdiction. Said Plant Board shall have power and authority to enforce
its rules, ordinances and regulations in any court of competent jurisdiction
by civil, as well as criminal proceedings, and if the remedy to be pursued be
by writ of injunction, no court of this State shall have right previous to a
trial upon the merits to set aside such writ on bond. It shall be the duty
of the Attorney General and District Attorneys to represent said Plant
Board whenever called upon to do so. Said Plant Board in the discharge of
its duties and in the enforcement of the powers herein delegated, may send
for books and papers, administer oaths, hear witnesses, etc., and to that end
it is made the duty of the various sheriffs throughout the State to serve all
summons and other papers upon the request of said Plant Board.

Section 16. In construing and enforcing the provisions of this Act, the
act, omission or failure of any official, agent or other person acting for or
employed by any association, partnership or corporation within the scope of
his employment or office shall, in every case, also be deemed the act, omis-










THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915


sion or failure of such association, partnership or corporation as well as that
of the person.
Section 17. That the Board or any of its inspectors or employees shall
be a proper party in any court of equity to effectively carry out any of the
provisions of this Act when an injunction would be a proper remedy.
Section 18. This Act shall not be so construed or enforced as to con-
flict in any way with any-Act of Congress regulating the movement of plants
or plant products in inter-state or foreign commerce.
Section 19. If any section or part of a section of this Act shall for any
cause be held unconstitutional, such fact shall not affect the remainder of
this Adt.
Section 20. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act,
the sum of thirty-five thousand dollars per annum or as much thereof as may
be necessary is hereby appropriated out of any funds in the treasury not
otherwise appropriated, which said sum shall be placed to the credit of the
Board in the hands of the State Treasurer to be expended by the Board in
the manner as provided in Section 34 of Chapter 5384 of the Laws of Florida,
and the further sum of One Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Dollars is
hereby appropriated out of the General Revenues to be set apart as a speci-
fic fund to be known as the Plant Act special fund, which shall be expended
by the Board, first, for the purpose of eradicating, preventing and controll-
ing citrus canker, and thereafter so much thereof as may be necessary, may
be applied by the Board to carrying out the general purposes of this Act, but
of the funds appropriated by this Act, no more than the sum of $125,000 shall
be expended for the eradication of citrus canker.
Section 21. All Acts and parts of Acts inconsistent with the provisions
of this Act are hereby repealed; all that Chapter 6156 Laws of Florida, 1911,.
known as the State Nursery Inspection Law is hereby repealed.
Section 22. This Act shall take effect upon its passage and approval by
the Governor, or upon its becoming a law without his approval.
Approved by the Governor April 30, 1915.


RINALDI PRINTING CO., TAMPA.




MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Relation of Agriculture College and other lines of Agricultural Work in Florida to Citrus Canker.
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 3
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Relation of Agriculture College and other lines of Agricultural Work in Florida to Citrus Canker.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00098

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Relation of Agriculture College and other lines of Agricultural Work in Florida to Citrus Canker.
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 3
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Relation of Agriculture College and other lines of Agricultural Work in Florida to Citrus Canker.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00098

Full Text










/ /
H- Cc' 4.4ci9'4;
z





/
1 ..
I// _/t9 y/

W --.- ..


x i, /



4^ CI ^''' t L
,'* 6 " - ~ ^ ,
^~~~~~~~~ '^{^ 6 '<- f^ ****
ct^ c't'l 't :<'***






0~

H
to


(I i(LC ~ CUA


ewi




I~~~g A At:,:C6

~Lrd (;' i


Q~rw~ (i~O1


3L1~166' 2 L


.1P-~-q I C

f~i~.~L~ 3/

~IWAU~UI


Ci., I. +a

f'* "r:

w
'- e
4^ -
i






II


.. I- .- -
/c*7i .. :f: ,- *.






S / / /.
s 4 4. ,, -a I-



f f 6C ..y ..*s ,-, ,' .
/*





| / d /










S u y ^ 6

.Zi (- r l, .j r, , O




6 4U(i. n &

03
|-i



/*2- .'-.. i.-. .




4 ./ :,.- y 3 ,




? j i t / "





) [.., ... .



Z e

S. /A

4


[~ o |~ ^-
,/ A L' *-Ci




5-u;


Ji (@.^rs ACUw-t
0


70


i"P




I,


Pm L t


et4e'O


--

gl
*c <


" 42&Q


Wl4


7L p




EXPERIMENT STATION

*: . . ,


3 a e, &/e,
3i;zt 1,9 400~


(Zu^ **-, ?), /c-y-
L //
'A/ /4//1


S/ ,-. ,#,/
4^c/ //'





/i0 ~- //' -7- h '
F L t ( < C -..,*

SJ 7, / '



//
/6 eu A



/%4t^ < t & & > e s ^,~4r -yc< t(

/ *T/--tt. Au 2


0






'IZ





n' Li


d c '"Iv .X
rA-7.'


/~t -~


I:


. '{lH., c I


It,


_*


1






4
/ .-.
< C.


/ *





.
1-,
7
d'

it *
-* *l--U--*.:

/^.^~p


-i


b~2&. I


/ f










(ii






z
vj *


/w ~ *(v f
/t^ -**- /L
/ . (


. .-
v
>~ \









/ 3 K.-. , Y"- '



,, *, / ., -



A e_./<. .., <.. ., o,
(f J -
/oC~/ &t'tI~,

/i


I:..










I




Ed-

z
0






/& Jb-l./Jr 4
'IO


~"r 1:


' ,- s


L~d~L~ ()2r~1~ 'hl:j Ct-.r (.


1>V- ~C~~~/


/1 4' -O s4


z/yO-n
% 'o
Ia ~


6~ ~


A .'l-.l


\


I


~~/Y

"71






Other material

Univ. Cat. 393 -i 5
iMeport sent to B. Knapp, Feb. 3, 3916

Plan] t Board Circ. I ,
*ttnsi on Bulletin I .:-

U'


A





EXPERIMENT STATION













I







Bulletin 1 April, 1915




University of Florida

Agricultural Extension Work
P. H. Rolfs, Director

Gainesville, Florida






Contents

General Statement------------ ------------------...... 3
Report of State Agent...........---------..-------------- 5
Tabulated Report of Demonstration Work .---------_-.. ...-__ 8
County Canning Club Agents---------------------.........----- 9
Duties of Canning Club Agents ---.-------------.---- 9
List of Agents--....-..- .... -- ....--.... ....- ..-- -. .. 9
Records of Ten Highest Girls.--..- .....-..................10
Miles Traveled by County Agents....------....--..-............ 10
Number of Demonstrators and Co-operators--------............. 11
Hog Cholera Treatment .--_.------.------------.......---. __ 13
Number of Hogs Inoculated during 1914-----------.... ...---..13
Co-operative Demonstration Work in Hog Cholera--...-------.---14
Silo Construction -------15
Farmers' Institutes .-----.----------....----.... _-------- ---15
















BOARD OF CONTROL FOR THE INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER
EDUCATION

P. K. Yonge, Chairman, Pensacola, Fla.
T. B. King, Arcadia, Fla.
E. L. Wartmann, Citra, Fla.
W. D. Finlayson, Old Town, Fla.
J. G. Kellum, Secretary
F. E. Jennings, Jacksonville, Fla.



FARMERS' CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK

STAFF

A. A. MURPHREE, President of the University
P. H. ROLFS, Director
BRADFORD KNAPP, Special Agent, Co-operative Demonstra-
tion Work, U. S. Department of Agriculture
C. K. McQUARRIE, State Agent
H. E. SAVELY, Field Agent, U. S. Department of Agriculture
A. P. SPENCER, District Agent for Central and South Florida
E. S. PACE, District Agent for North Florida
AGNES E. HARRIS, Assistant State Agent for Girls' Canning
Clubs
BESSIE V. GLOVER, Secretary











.. ..:* **' ,












CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK
GENERAL STATEMENT
The Board of Control for the University of Florida has enter-
ed into a co-operative agreement with the Secretary of the U.
S. Department of Agriculture, whereby the agricultural extension
work carried on in the State by the University and by the De-
partment of Agriculture is co-ordinated. Dr. Bradford Knapp,
Special Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Agent of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture, and P. H. Rolfs, Director of the Ex-
tension Work of the University, are entrusted with carrying out
the plans for this work. The University of Florida provides suit-
able office rooms and facilities at the University for headquar-
ters and for handling the clerical work. It also pays one-half the
salaries of the State and District Agents. When the State and
District Agents are traveling exclusively for Farmers' Institute
work all of the expenses are borne from the State funds. The
engagement of all workers under the co-operative arrangement
must be agreeable to both the Department and the University.
The Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Work, the Boys'
Corn Clubs, and the Girls' Canning Clubs, are under the direction
of Prof. C. K. McQuarrie, who is State Agent for carrying on this
work. The salaries of the County Agents and other local em-
ployees are met in part by funds amounting to about $25,000, ap-
propriated for this purpose by the U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture. These funds are augmented by the appropriation of $5,000
annually by the legislature of Florida. The Farmers' Institute
work is provided for by an annual legislative appropriation of
$10,000. The Smith-Lever Agricultural Extension fund of
$10,000, which became available on July 1, 1914, is used in ex-
tending this work into additional counties.
The District Agent and the Assistant State Agent work un-
der the direction and advice of the State Agent. The State Agent
and District Agents visit the County Agents as frequently as
possible; and, with the County Agents, make visits to the Farm
Demonstrators, the Boys' Corn Clubs, and the Girls' Canning
Clubs. The State Agent and the District Agents are members of
the faculty of the University. The Assistant State Agent is a
member of the faculty of the College for Women.
The State is divided into two sections. All of the Counties








4 Agricultural Extension Division

organized east and south of and including Duval, Bradford,
Alachua and Levy are considered as Central and South Florida.
This district is in charge of Prof. A. P. Spencer. The Counties
to the northward and westward of those named and already or-
ganized, are placed in the North Florida District, in charge of
Prof. E. S. Pace. The Assistant State Agent, Miss Harris, being
located at the College for Women, keeps in close touch with the
women's work and brings the County Agents there annually for
instructions. She visits the County Canning Club Agents as fre-
quently as possible.
The value of this co-operative arrangement cannot be easily
over-estimated. The State and District Agents being located at
the University are constantly in close contact with the staff of the
Experiment Station and the professors of the Agricultural Col-
lege. The County Demonstration Agents during their sessions
at the University are enabled to come in contact with the most
recent and fundamental progress that has been made in agricul-
tural education.
Duties of County Agents.-These Agents are appointed for
their special fitness for the work in their particular County. The
tabular statement at the close of the State Agent's report shows
the immense amount of work accomplished by these men. The
Agents visit as many farmers as possible and give direct instruc-
tion.
A demonstrator is a farmer, fruit grower, or trucker who
sets aside a portion of his field to demonstrate the usefulness of
a particular method of procedure. Where all of the field is
handled according to the directions of the County Agent, the per-
son is known as a co-operator.
Every County that has entered the co-operative arrange-
ment has been aided at the rate of $675 annually. The amount
needed above this has been supplied either by the County as a
whole or by private or community aid. The salaries paid County
Agents vary from $800 for the lowest to $2,400 for the highest.
The Counties in which the higher salaries are paid also make
provision for traveling expenses.
The Canning Club work is carried on for only a portion of the
year. The co-operative work allows $300 annually for canning
clubs under the condition that the counties desiring this work
provide at least an equal amount. The Canning Club Agents
visit the different agricultural communities and promote an







f
Bulletin 1 5

interest in canning and other rural work. These County Canning
Agents receive not less than $75.00 per month for the time em-
ployed.

REPORT OF STATE AGENT

P. H. Rolfs, Director,
Division of University Extension.
SIR: In submitting my Annual Report of the Farmers' Co-
Operative Demonstration Work of the State of Florida, there are
several items to which I should especially like to draw your at-
tention. Some of the items look a little disappointing, such as
the number in the Corn Demonstration Work. This can be ex-
plained from the fact that up to the time of the corn-planting sea-
son last year only 17 Counties were engaged in the work. To off-
set this, other items appear here that are very satisfactory, par-
ticularly along the line of increased and better grades of live
stock.
There were two meetings of the County Agents held during
the year. One was from February 24 to 27, inclusive, at which
17 agents were present. That meeting was very interesting from
every standpoint. It was the first meeting held where so many
agents were present, and the matters discussed were very inter-
esting. Stenographic notes were taken of the whole proceedings,
which were published at a later date under the title of University
Record Vol. 9, No. 1, or Farmers' Institute Bulletin No. 4. The
other meeting was also held at Gainesville, on September 1 to
11, inclusive, with 29 agents present. That meeting differed from
the previous one in that all the agents were required to submit a
paper to be read at the meeting, dealing with some particular
phase of the work. These papers were very interesting and help-
ed to maintain the interest in the meeting all the way through.
They were the means of bringing out some discussions along c'er-
tain lines that would otherwise have been omitted. Owing to
lack of funds we were unable to take stenographic notes.
At both meetings, Dr. C. F. Dawson, State Veterinarian of
the State Board of Health, Jacksonville, was present and held
demonstrations in hog cholera inoculation work. Dr. Dawson
made every individual agent do this work under his instruction,
and where a man showed backwardness in the work he was made
to repeat the operation until the doctor was satisfied that he was








6 Agricultural Extension Division

perfect in it. At the February meeting, the single or serum-
alone treatment was given; but at the September meeting the
simultaneous treatment was made the strong point.
The State Board of Health provides serum to the farmers
free of charge up to 1,000 cc. per annum, and the Demonstration
Agents are qualified to treat hogs in the County for hog cholera.
This has given the work quite an impetus in the State, and is one
of the means by which the farmers and the Agent get close to-
gether. This is verified by the number of hogs inoculated, which
was 24,409 from the first of March to the fifteenth of December.
Early in September the Bureau of Animal Industry appoint-
ed Dr. G. F. Babb as Veterinary Field Agent to conduct educa-
tional and demonstration work in the State, with regard to hog
cholera. Dr. Babb took up this work shortly after his appoint-
ment, and has been giving very efficient service everywhere that
he has been called upon to go. His work is in co-operation with
the County Agents as far as possible, but at the same time he has
been conducting quite a number of demonstrations on his own
account. I consider this one of the most important moves ever
made by the Department of Agriculture, because it helps to en-
large and strengthen that work in the State.
In July, Prof. C. L. Willoughby was appointed special field
agent in Silo Construction work. Nine weeks of Prof. Willough-
by's time were given to this work. During that time he assisted
in the building of three concrete and five wood silos; and advised
as to the erection of six others to be built later: two of iron, one
of concrete, and three of wood. He also visited, for inspection
and advice as to filling, several silos that had already been built.
The total number of silos visited in the nine weeks' work was 22.
Over and above this he discussed silo construction and silage
crops with the different farmers that he met during that time.
I am confident that Prof. Willoughby's work for that short time
is going to bear fruit in getting a large number of silos built this
year.
At the beginning of the year the number of Counties en-
gaged in the Demonstration Work was 17, and by the end of the
year this number had been increased to 31, with the accession of
4 others pending. During the year there were certain crops that
the Agents were instructed to stress. In February, the matter
of sowing lespedeza in a number of the Counties was taken up,
but owing to the dry spring and early summer the demonstrations







Bulletin 1


in this crop were failures. In the fall, the matter of getting an
increased number of farmers to sow winter cover-crops was
stressed, with very gratifying results. The sowing of oats was
increased at least 100 per cent. The sowing of legume crops was
also stressed with good results. These were confined almost en-
tirely to crimson and burr clover, and in some cases hairy vetch.
It is too early to get complete reports from these crops, but the
results seem to be very satisfactory.
The matter of clearing the land of stumps has also been
stressed by our agents, with the result that reports show that
upwards of eight thousand acres in the Demonstration Work
were stumped during the year. The liming of soils was another
very important matter to which our agents have been giving
considerable attention. Quite a number of counties omitted to
report the acreage in this work, which partly explains the low
figure in the report.
The matter of crop diversification among the farmers has
been stressed right along; and while it is difficult to get the cot-
ton farmer to pay much attention to this work, conditions this
year have been such as to make it almost compulsory for the
cotton farmer to diversify his crops. There are certain crops
which, on account of our soil and climatic conditions, can be
used for cash crops. Sweet potatoes, hay, and sugar-cane made
into high grade syrup, are three of the crops that could easily
take the place of cotton. In sections where transportation facili-
ties are good, some truck crops could be substituted to great ad-
vantage. This has been done on a small scale in some of the
Counties, and this year it is expected this work will be consider-
ably enlarged.
A number of the farmers of the State have been buying pure
breeds of hogs. This is very gratifying, and in a few years we are
bound to get good results from this work.
Attached hereto please find a tabulated statement of work
done by the County Demonstration Agents.
Very truly yours,
C. K. McQUARRIE,
State Agent









8 Agricultural Extension Division


CONDENSED TABULATED REPORT OF THE FARMERS'
CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN
FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR END-
ING DECEMBER 31, 1914.

Counties having Demonstration Agents, Jan. 1, 1914...................17
Counties having Demonstration Agents, Jan. 1, 1915 ...................31
Total official visits made by agents during year...................17,241
Miles travelled by rail...................................... ....16,728
Miles travelled by team and auto.................................. 50,035

Total miles travelled by County Agents.......................66,763
Demonstrations in Number Acres
Corn ........................ 840 ............................. 3,068
Cotton ...... ................ 282 .............................984
Oats ........................ 166............................ 2,186-
Burr Clover .................. 40 ............................ 76
Crimson Clover ............... 49............................. 70
Other Legume Crops ......... 430...........................1,341
Citrus Fruits ................. 122............................. (?)

Total ...... ................ 1,929 7,725

Pastures established by Demonstrators and Co-operators ................74
Rotations established by Demonstrators and Co-operators ..............162
Acres stumped by Demonstrators and Co-operators ..................8,183
Acres limed by Demonstrators and Co-operators ..................... 773
Demonstrators and Co-operators doing fall plowing ............... 1,745
Demonstrators and Co-operators selecting seed corn in field ..........636
Improved farm implements purchased by Demonstrators and Co-oper-
ators ................. .................. ...................... 2,334
Average value of implements .......................................$15
Number of letters written by County Agents ...................... 8,325
Newspaper articles written by County Agents ..................... 493
Bulletins and circulars distributed by County Agents ................21,594
Enrollment of Boys' Corn Clubs ................................. 1,026
Number Completing W ork ...................................... 272
Value of Prizes in Work .................................... $1,895
Farmers' Meetings attended by County Agents .................... 330
Total attendance at same ..................................... 13,280
Purebred hogs purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ........ 631
Average value ............................ ................ $15
Purebred cattle purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ...... ,243
Average value ................................................. $75
Purebred mares purchased by Demonstrators and Co-operators ...... 239
Average value ............................................ $175
Number of hogs inoculated by County Agents from July 1 to Dec. 15.. 24,409
Dipping vats built in Counties in which Agents are located ........ 23
Silos built in Counties in which Agents are located .................. 23
Farmers' organizations co-operating with County Agent .............. 43








Bulletin 1 9

COUNTY CANNING CLUB AGENTS
The Canning Club Agents do their principal work during
late winter, spring and early summer. For the most part these
agents are employed for 6 or 8 months. The principal work is
done among the school children in the direction of canning and
preserving vegetables and fruits. Incidentally these enthusias-
tic women do much good in the way of advice in better prepara-
tion of food and better arrangements of the home.

DUTIES OF THE CANNING CLUB AGENTS
"The County Agent and the County Superintendent of
Schools plan the work. The County Agent visits as many schools
and homes as possible in the County, explains work, and enrolls
the club members. When unable to visit the school, she writes to
the teachers and asks them to enroll club members."
"In the majority of the Counties in which the Canning Club
work is being conducted in Florida the County Superintendent is
giving material assistance in enrolling club members, planning
the work and constantly co-operating with the County Agent."
"After enrolling the club members the County Agent visits
plots; assists in measuring the plots; gives instructions, in the
planting season; teaches canning and preserving, in the canning
season; and conducts a contest at the end of the club work, for
which the club members bring exhibits, write essays, and have
their record books examined."
(The above quotations are taken from Extension Bulletin No. 2, of the
Department of Home Economics of the Florida State College for Women,
p. 10.)
LIST OF COUNTY CANNING CLUB AGENTS
Miss Lila Fraser Alachua Gainesville, Florida
Miss Lizzie Dowling Baker Taylor, Florida
Mrs. T. E. Waldrup Bradford Lake Butler, Florida
Miss Lonny Landrum Clay Green Cove Springs, Florida
Mrs. A. J. Henry Columbia Lake City, Florida
Mrs. A. L. Monroe Dade Miami, Florida
Miss Allie Stribbling De Soto Arcadia, Florida
Mrs. Nevada Reddick Holmes Bonifay, Florida
Mrs. Mollie Evers Hillsboro Plant City, Florida
Mrs. J. R. Moorehead Marion Ocala, Florida
Miss Anne B. Carson Osceola Kissimmee, Florida
Miss Verda Thompson Polk Lakeland, Florida
Miss Carrie Post Pasco Dade City, Florida
Miss Jessie Burton Putnam Crescent City, Florida









Agricultural Extension Division


Miss Mozelle Durst
Mrs. W. E. Quarterman
Miss Lucia Hudson
Miss Eloise McGriff
Miss Myrtie Warren
Miss Nellie McQuarrie


Seminole
Suwanee
St. Johns
Volusia
Walton
Citrus


Sanford, Florida
Live Oak, Florida
St. Augustine, Florida
DeLand, Florida
De Funiak Springs, Florida
Inverness, Florida


RECORD OF TEN HIGHEST GIRLS

"The following are the names and records of the girls who
made the ten highest records in the State:"




Name County 0 n

o E- o 0 4
0 C o



Pettie DeShong, Hillsborough 3,517 200 $ 93.80 $33.35 $60.44
Frankie DeShong, Hillsborough 3,386 190 88.32 31.68 56.64
Mabel Logue, Volusia 2,087 800 127.09 37.75 89.34
Susie Lee Henry, Suwanee 2,693 506 87.93 27.36 60.57
Vida Parker, Marion 2,488 261 93.60 17.43 76.17
Lillie Gay, Bradford 3,263 200 68.00 15.70 52.30
Perdie Farnan, Gadsden 2,764 200 67.60 20.64 46.96
Juanita Broer, De Soto 1,775 285 92.74 22.12 70.62
Ruth Whitworth, Marion 1,991 30 72.00 8.00 64.00
Junia Rodgers, De Soto 2,222 61 64.58 8.72 55.86

(The above quotation and table are taken from Extension Bulletin No.
2, of the Department of Home Economics of the Florida State College for
Women, p. 17.)

MILES TRAVELED BY COUNTY AGENTS SEPTEMBER TO
DECEMBER, INCLUSIVE.

The amount of work done by any one Agent during the
course of a week may seem trivial; yet when we take the com-
bined work of the Agents in the State, we find that it really
amounts to a tremendous figure. Taking the single item of the
number of miles traveled by rail and by conveyance, it amounts to
40,885 miles, a distance greater than one and one-half times
around the world. Even the distance traveled by team and auto-
mobile amounts to 29,345, or more than the distance entirely
around the world.









Bulletin 1


Miles
by
County Agent Miles Team
by or
Rail Auto


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Calhoun
Clay
Columbia
De Soto
Duval
Escambia
Gadsden
Hamilton
Hernando
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Pasco
Polk
Santa Rosa
Suwanee
Taylor
Walton
Washington


Totals


*Appointed Oct. 1
tAppointed Nov. 1


11,540


Total miles traveled


NUMBER OF DEMONSTRATORS AND CO-OPERATORS IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES

The total number of farmers, demonstrators and co-oper-
ators that are being served by our County Agents amounts to
3376. Nearly all of these are visited twice a month by the
Agents, and given instruction and such help as is practicable.


S. Burgis ...
E. W. Turner 120
B. V. Mathis 660
O. L. Mizell 72
J. E. Yon 30
W. E. Brown 331
J. B. Brown 150
Jos. Crews 626
W. L. Watson 260
S. W. Hiatt 633
M. C. Gardner 478
S. S. Smith 113
J. T. Daniel 768
R. T. Kelley 64
C. A. Fulford 68
G. W. Belser 272
*E. W. Lumpkin .
D. C. Geiger 221
F. Robinson, (col.) 250
A. W. Turner 625
D. R. McQuarrie 942
S. J. McCully 275
C. H. Baker 260
B. E. Evans 1,058
I. E. Soar 228
A. A. Lewis 342
O. O. Simmons 743
T. Z. Atkeson 630
tT. H. Stripling 60
J. C. Smith 644
D. G. McQuagge 617


2,171
670
964
556
581
782
854
2,008
745
879
1,143
1,110
718
703
536
736
994
763
1,144
684
1,113
1,036
1,063
1,225
734
663
927
457
200
1,509
1,677

29,345

40,895









Agricultural Extension Division


In many cases the demonstrators are visited as frequently as
three and sometimes four times a month. These County Agents,
as our corps of instructors, are teaching agriculture to an as-
semblage of at least 3376 people. The instruction is varied to
suit the needs of the individual farmer. Each one of the farmers
in turn becomes an instructor for his neighborhood, since when-
ever a farmer succeeds above the average with any crop he im-
mediately becomes a center of information for that crop.

Demon- Co-oper-
County Agent strators ators Both*


S. Burgis
E. W. Turner
B. V. Mathis
O. L. Mizell
J. E. Yon
J. D. Brown
Jos. Crews
W. L. Watson
S. W. Hiatt
S. S. Smith
J. T. Daniel
R. T. Kelley
C. A. Fulford
G. W. Belser
E. W. Lumpkin
D. G. Geiger
F. Robinson (col.)
A. W. Turner
D. R. McQuarrie
S. J. McCully
C. H. Baker
B. E. Evans
I. E. Soar
A. A. Lewis
0. O. Simmons
T. Z. Atkeson
T. H. Stripling
J. C. Smith
D. G. McQuagge


196
122
82
75
115
150
89
58
167
65
76
102
74
150
198
62
131
75
182
196
98
31
78
18
116
186
80
117
168


1155 1548 3376*


*Some of the Agents failed to report separately the
and the Co-operators.


Demonstrators


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Calhoun
Columbia
DeSoto
Duval
Escambia
Hamilton
Hernando
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Pasco
Polk
Santa Rosa
Suwanee
Taylor
Walton
Washington








Bulletin 1


HOG CHOLERA TREATMENT
The State Board of Health furnished, without charge, nearly
all the serum used in the State.
The number of hogs treated 1y our Demonstration Agents is
very gratifying, especially since many of these Agents had not
really known what serum was when they took up this co-oper-
ative work. Assuming that this work was done correctly, and
that the hogs were treated at the time treatment was needed,
there was a saving to the State of something like 18,000 head of
hogs. This is allowing a much wider latitude for error than
would be the case under expert direction. If we should assume
that the agents were all experts in hog cholera and treated the
hogs under proper conditions, there would have been a saving to
the State of not less than 21,000 hogs. Assuming that this
treatment would not have been administered if the work had
not been taken up by the County Agents, the saving to the State
in hogs alone would have been far greater than the total cost
of the demonstration work. Even assuming that 50 per cent. of
the hogs treated would have been treated in the absence of co-
operation with the County Demonstration Agents, the amount
saved to the State would more than equal the total cost.of the
work. Placing the average value of a hog at $5.00 and assuming
that 9,000 hogs were saved by the activities of the agents, we
have to the credit of the Co-operative Demonstration work at
least $45,000. This, however, does not express the real value of
this one part of the work in the State, since hundreds of farmers
will take up the work of hog raising because they know there is
a preventive of hog cholera; and other hundreds of hog raisers
who have been able to save their hogs be means of serum will
continue in the business, whereas otherwise they would have dis-
continued it.

NUMBER OF HOGS INOCULATED DURING 1914 BY COUNTY AGENTS

County Agent Number
Alachua S. Burgis 5000
Bradford O. L. Mizell 4625
Calhoun J. E. Yon 28
Columbia J. D. Brown 338
Escambia S. W. Hiatt 367
Gadsden M. C. Gardner 1273
Hamilton S. S. Smith 32
Hernando J. T. Daniel 881









14 Agricultural Extension Division

Hillsborough R. T. Kelley 461
Holmes C. A. Fulford 45
Jackson G. W. Belser 3143
Jefferson E. W. Lumpkin 161
Leon F. Robinson (col.) 25
Levy W. E. Brown 2365
Liberty A. W. Turner 1198
Madison D. R. McQuarrie 1392
Marion S. J. McCully 1600
Pasco I. E. Soar 273
Polk A. A. Lewis 141
Santa Rosa O. O. Simmons 46
Suwanee T. Z. Atkeson 325
Washington D. C. McQuagge 684

Total 24409

CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN HOG
CHOLERA

There follows a statistical report of the work done by Dr.
Geo. F. Babb, Veterinarian, from September to December 31,
1914, under the Extension Division of the University co-operat-
Ig with the Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Department of
Agriculture.
This was work carried on in addition to the work done by
the County Demonstration Agents. Whenever feasible, Dr.
Babb gave demonstrations in the use of serum; but the work was
directed mainly toward the production of better hogs and improv-
ing the sanitary conditions.
1. Number of counties in which work was conducted from Sep-
tember 1, to December 31, 1914 ......................... 27
2. Number of addresses made ................................ 76
(a) Number illustrated by stereopticon views ............. 12
(b) Total attendance .................................... 5,252
3. Number of demonstrations of preventive treatment .......... 16
(a) Where serum alone was used ....................... 15
(b) Where simultaneous inoculation was used ............. 1
(c) Number of hogs treated ............................ 459
(d) Total attendance at demonstrations ................ 839
4. Number of visits made to farms for purpose of diagnosing hog
cholera or observing conditions and giving advice .......... 6
5. Number of farmers and hog raisers personally interviewed .... 698
6. Number of persons individually instructed and placed in a po-
sition to properly administer the serum preventive treat-
ment ........... ........................................ 16
(a) County Agents ..................................... 6
(b) Hog owners .............. ......................... 10








.Bulletin 1


CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN SILO CON-
STRUCTION

There follows a general outline of work done by C. L. Wil-
loughby, Professor of Animal Husbandry, from July 1 to Sep-
tember 1, 1914, under the Extension Division of the University
co-operating with the Dairy Division Bureau of Animal Industry,
U. S. Department of Agriculture.
1. J. B. Simonton, Micanopy, 90-ton silo (concrete).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
2. L. S. Harvard, Live Oak, 140-ton silo (concrete).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
3. H. L. Chase, East Palatka, 100-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in constructing and filling.
4. L. H. Means, Gainesville, 90-ton silo (stave).
Constructing a silo from two old ones.
5. C. L. Adams, Jasper, 110-ton silo (stave).
Constructing silo.
6. Ira C. Howell, Pensacola, R. 3, 75-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in filling.
7. JohnM. Park, East Palatka, 60-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in completing and filling.
S. F. W. Holmes, St. Augustine, 205-ton silo (stave).
Assistance in filling.

In addition to the above, lectures on live stock and allied
subjects were delivered. These are scheduled under the head of
Farmers' Institutes.


FARMERS' INSTITUTES
SUMMARY FOR THE 6 MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31,
1914.

Total attendance ................ .. ...... .......................... 13,377
Number of sessions ....................................... .... 134
Average attendance per session .................................... 99
Number of addresses from University ........................... 275
Total number of addresses ...................................... 376

The above statistical outline of the Farmers' Institute work
during the past six months, shows a large number of addresses
and a large number of Institutes held. This has been possible
largely through co-operation with the Agricultural Extension
movement in the State. The demonstration work insures a much







16 Agricultural Extension Division

more uniform attendance by the farmers in those Counties where
the demonstration work is being carried on. It also stimulates
the Counties in which no demonstration work is being done; since
they hear, directly or indirectly, of the Farmers' Institute work
in adjoining Counties. Nearly all the Farmers' Institutes have had
to be held on circuits. This is due to the fact that the demand for
this work has increased too greatly. The table shows that the
work done in the first six months was nearly equal to that former-
ly accomplished in year.








,.






30-1:: OF rT-`ITHOIT ;ORK.


A. S -,tematic Instruction *

1. The ITovable School.

K-2. The Demonstration "7im.

j3. The Correspondence Course.

P"4. The Lecture and Reading Course.

5. The Study Club.

J4. Boys' and Girls' Clubs.


Bo Informal ..E.

1. The Convention and Lecture.

a. The Farmers'. Institute

b. Framers "eek,

c. 'he Conference.

d. The Occasional Lecture.

2.. The Object Lesson,

^i a. The Demonstration.

/- b. The Railway "Special".

p c, The Exhibit.

?. The educationalal ;.:xc-rion.

3. The Publication.

G^ a. The Press Bulletin.

Bo The Leaflet and Periodical

c, The ::onograph or Booklet.

d. The Trav:lling Library.

4. Advisory -.ork.

Sa. Correspondence,

S~ b. The Travelling Adviser or Expert.

plc The District Field Agent.

C, Ogranization.
1. The I-ral Conference.
2. The Campaign.
1^- Coo 7'*'1j~- ion. na.d rTnreration.









stI
t ,,te ;ttc itr' c .n


5. t ". '. 0 *'".. J'I-n
1. 4-' ,-ihl;? 'o. "ol.






b ..-a rativa
4. o 'r t'at a l .: ci .: '" e?.-3





1 '-o ***cc*1 J. .c ,1i0





1,, 'D" a jv- nation 0" i. "0oo1. ro.






a. oTho )os tra c C.

C. '"ox C'a.onrdona.o

e. oo ".'t-bit.

IB. .'Qe '~., :t toal 's o~v ron.

3, .. -? .. Tioaotion.

a. -a ^re'OBS e .u.lotin.

8. o e tet;j2ltt .and "'oriodc10al

6. u>a Tonogragh or o-et.

d. Th e Yn AtPib ibrirs.

4. vriuoE;+r ork.

Coarosposndenoa.

.. -y^o "'rIAn 1.1 .- visor or ci>ort.

C. 'o et' et 1.Al c7-t.


1. a Th .ral n ii5nv'o;,.
. The Casapaign.










3. Cort-oe ur





.4 The. 2eaur n '. ".'bla. i'.urs.n
1 0 To ''1-rrl:, 'ohool.

2. The *;o ,,kLtrat.ibii m.,3




5. .e A,:7d Culb,.

6. 6 , oMiQ j trls' ,l!,bs.



1. 7"- Coavontlon :n- .oot.r'.

b. .o r'lao' I';titito




d. Tho uocasiioal actro.

2. To Ob.i act. Lee; O.

a. The teionstrati n.

b. The railway "SrpooMl"n.

I. t'-o k'hs.ibiti


3. W"*e "tblictlon.

a. e Tees .:illo tirk.

3. The ',os.flet sin 'ariodaioa

The 'a oraph or e-tlet.


4. -.dvi.ior;,r ork.



b ." "'ruv I dvior or rio3t.

c. 'Ot lr't lolA .- oett.

C. ".**''rcini^ i.ion -
1, 7To d aral ;Jonferornero.
2. -.-" Calmpaign.
ions~-~_ ~ P PerC~~ipr




EXPERIMENT STATION











State Plant Board


OF FLORIDA






CIRCULAR No. 1
Issued May 15, 1915






The Florida Plant Act of 1915








Copies of this Circular may be obtained free by ad-
dressing the Plant Commissioner, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Fla..






















STATE PLANT BOARD

P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola
E. L. WARTMANN, Citra
T. B. KING, Arcadia
W. D. FINLAYSON, Old Town
F. E. JENNINGS, Jacksonville


Advisory Committee Acting as Plant Commissioner

LLOYD S. TENNY, Chairman, Orlando
W. J. KROME, Secretary, Homestead
P. H. ROLFS, Gainesville


E. W. BERGER, Entomologist, Gainesville












THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915



AN ACT to Prevent the Introduction Into and Dissemination Within
this State of Insect Pests and Diseases Injurious to Plants and Plant Pro-
ducts of this State, to Create a State Plant Board, and to Prescribe its Pow-
ers and Duties, and Making an Appropriation for the Purpose of Carrying
out the Provisions of said Act.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA:
Section 1. This Act shall be known by the short title of "The Florida
Plant Act of 1915."
Section- 2. For the purpose of this Act, the following terms shall be
construed, respectively, to mean:
Insect Pests and Diseases.-Diseases and insect pests, injurious to
plants and plant products of this State, including any of the stages of devel-
opment of such diseases and insect pests.
Plants and Plant Products.-Trees, shrubs, vines, forage, and cereal
plants, and all other plants; cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, and all other parts
of plants; and fruit, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, wood, lumber, and all
other plant products.
Places.-Vessels, cars and other vehicles, buildings, docks, nurseries,
orchards and other premises, where plants and plant products are grown,
kept or handled.
Persons.-Individuals, associations, partnerships and corporations.
Words used in this Act shall be construed to import either the plural or
the singular, as the case demands.
Section 3. There is hereby'created and established a State Plant Board,
hereinafter called the Board. The said Board shall be composed of five
members who shall be the same persons who constitute the Board of Con-
trol created and authorized by the provisions of Chapter 5384 of the Laws of
Florida, and all of the authority by this Act granted to the Board herein
created and all the duties required of said Board shall be exercised and per-
formed by the members of the Board of Control, acting as the State Plant
Board: A majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a quorum
for all purposes. The Chairman of the Board shall be selected annually by
the members thereof. They shall be provided with a suitable office or offices
at the University of Flor-ida where the meetings of the Board may be held
and its records shall be kept.
Section 4. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act,
the Board may employ, prescribe the duties of, and fix the compensation of,
such inspectors and other employees as it may require and incur such ex-
penses as may be necessary, within the limits of appropriations made by
(law. It shall co-operate with other departments, boards and officers of this
State and of the United States as far as practicable.








THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915


,Section 5. The Board shall keep itself informed as to known varieties
of insect pests and diseases, the origin, locality, nature and appearance
thereof, the manner in which they are disseminated, and approved methods
of treatment and eradication. The Board, in its rules and regulations made
pursuant to this Act, shall list the insect pests and diseases of which it shall
find that the introduction into, or the dissemination within, this State should
be prevented- in order to safe-guard the plants and plant products of this
State, together with the plants and plant products likely to become infested
or infected with such insect pests and diseases. Every such insect pest and
disease listed, and every plant and plant product infested therewith, is here-
by declared to be a public nuisance. Every person who has knowledge of
the presence of any insect pest or disease listed, as required by this section,
in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act, in or upon any!
place, shall immediately report the same to the Board or an inspector there-
of, giving such detailed information relative thereto as he may'have. Every
person who deals in or engages in the sale of plants and plant products
shall furnish to the Board or its inspectors, when requested, a statement of.
the names and addresses of the persons from whom and the localities where
he purchased or obtained such plants and plant products.

Section 6. The Board shall, from time to time, make rules and regula-
tions for carrying out the provisions and requirements of this Act, including
rules and regulations under which its inspectors and other employees shall
(a) inspect places, plants and plant products, and things and substances
used or connected therewith, (b) investigate, control, eradicate and prevent
the dissemination of insect pests and diseases, and (c) supervise or cause
the treatment, cutting and destruction of plants and plant products infested
or infected therewith. The inspectors and employees employed by the
Board shall have authority to carry out and execute the regulations and or-
ders of the said Board and shall have authority under direction of the Board
to carry out the provisions of this Act.

Section 7. Whenever such inspection discloses that any places, or plants
or plant products, or things and substances used or connected therewith,
are infested or infected with any insect pest or disease listed as a public
nuisance, as required by section five, in the rules and regulations made pur-
suant to this Act, written notice thereof shall be given the owner or other
person in possession or control of the place where found, and such owner or
other person shall proceed to control, eradicate or prevent the dissemination
of such insect pest or disease, and to remove, cut or destroy infested and
infected plants and plant products, or things and substances used or con-
nected therewith, within the time and in the manner prescribed by said no-
tice or the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. Whenever
such owner or other person cannot be found, or shall fail, neglect or refuse
to obey the requirements of said notice and the rules and regulations made
pursuant to this Act, such requirements shall be carried out by the inspect-
ors or other employees of the Board.

Section 8. It shall be unlawful for any person to bring or cause to be
brought into this State any plant or plant product listed, as required by
section five, in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act, unless
there be plainly and legibly marked thereon or affixed thereto, or on or to








THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915- 5

the car or other vehicle carrying, or the bundle, package, or other container
of the same, in a conspicuous place, a statement or a tag or other device
showing the names and addresses of the consignors or shippers and the
consignee or person to whom shipped, the general nature and quantity of
the contents, and the name of the locality where grown, together with a cer-
tificate of inspection of the proper official of the State, territory, district or
country from which it was brought or shipped, showing that such plant or
plant product was found or believed to be free from insect pests and dis-
eases, and any other information required by the Board.
Section 9. It shall be unlawful for any person to sell, give away, carry,
ship or deliver for carriage or. shipment, within this State, any plants or
plant products listed, as required by section five in the rules and regulations
made pursuant to this Act, unless such plants or plant products have been
officially inspected and a certificate issued by an inspector of the Board
stating that the said plants or lant products have been inspected and found
to be apparently free from insect pests and diseases, and any other facts
provided for in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. For
the issuance of such certificate, the Board may require the payment of a rea-
sonable fee to cover the expense of such inspection and certification; PRO-
VIDED, however, that if such plants or plant products were brought into
this State in compliance with the requirements of section eight, the certifi-
cate required by that section may be accepted in lieu of the inspection and
certificate required by this section in such cases as shall be provided for in
the rules and regulations made pursuant to this Act. If it shall be found at
any time that a certificate of inspection issued or accepted pursuant to the
provisions of'this section, is being used in connection with plants and plant
products which are infested or infected with insect pests or diseases listed
as required by section five in the rules and regulations made pursuant to this
Act, its further use may be prohibited, subject to such inspection and other
disposition of the plants and plant products involved as may be provided
for by the Board. All moneys collected by the Board under this section or
under section seven or fourteen shall be deposited in the State Treasury to
the credit of the general revenue fund receipts.
Section 10. Any person in this State, who receives from without this
State any plant or plant product as to which the requirements of section
eight have not been complied with, or who receives any plant or plant pro-
duct, sold, given away, carried, shipped, or delivered for carriage or ship-
ment within this State as to which the requirements of section nine have not
been complied with, shall immediately inform the Board or an inspector
thereof, and isolate and hold the said plant or plant product unopened or
unused, subject to such inspection and other disposition as may be pro-
vided for by the Board.
Section 11. Whenever the Board shall find that there exists outside of
this State any insect pest or disease, and that, in order to safe-guard plants
and plant products in this State, its introduction into this State should be
prevented, the Board shall give public notice thereof, specifying the plants
and plant products infested or infected or likely to become infested or in-
fected therewith, and the movement of such plants or plant products into
this State from the infested locality designated in said public notice, shall
thereafter be prohibited until the Board shall find that the danger of the in-








THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT of 1915


production into this State of such insect pests or diseases from such locality
has ceased to exist, of which the Board shall give public notice.

Section 12. Whenever the Board shall find there exists in this State, or
any part thereof, any insect pest or disease, and that its dissemination
should be controlled or prevented, the Board shall give public notice there-
of, specifying the plants and plant products infested or infected, or likely to
become infested or infected therewith, and the movement, planting or other
use of any such plant or plant product, or other thing or substance specified
in such notice as likely to carry and disseminate such insect pest or disease,
except under such conditions as shall be prescribed by the Board as to in-
spection, treatment and disposition, shall be prohibited within such area as
may be designated in said public notice until the Board shall find that the
danger of the dissemination of such insect pest or disease has ceased to ex-
ist, of which the Board shall give public notice.

Section 13. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions and re-
quirements of this Act, and of the rules and regulations made, and notices
given, pursuant thereto, the Board and its inspectors and employees shall
have power to enter in or upon any place, and to open any bundle, package
or other container containing or thought to contain plants or plant products.

Section 14. Any person affected by any rule or regulations made, or
notice given, pursuant to this Act, may have a review thereof by the Board
for the purpose of having such rule, regulation or notice modified, suspend-
ed or withdrawn. Such review shall be allowed and considered and the cost
thereof fixed, assessed, collected and paid in such manner and in accordance
with such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Board.

Section 15. Any person who shall violate any provisions or require-
ments of this Act, or of the rules and regulations made or of any notice
given pursuant thereto, or who shall forge, counterfeit, deface, destroy or
wrongfully use,- any certificate provided for in this Act or in the rules and
regulations made pursuant thereto, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor
and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine of not more than
five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than six months or
by both such fine and imprisonment at the discretion of the court having
jurisdiction. Said Plant Board shall have power and authority to enforce
its rules, ordinances and regulations in any court of competent jurisdiction
by civil, as well as criminal proceedings, and if the ren.ly to be pursued be
by writ of injunction, no court of this State shall have right previous to a
trial upon the merits to set aside such writ on bond. It shall be the duty
of the Attorney General and District Attorneys to represent said Plant
Board whenever called upon to do so. Said Plant Board in the discharge of
its duties and in the enforcement of the powers herein delegated, may send
for books and papers, administer oaths, hear witnesses, etc., and to that end
it is made the duty of the various sheriffs throughout the State to serve all
summons and other papers upon the request of said Plant Board.

Section 16. In construing and enforcing the provisions of this Act, the
act, omission or failure of any official, agent or other person acting for or
employed by any association, partnership or corporation within the scope of
his employment or office shall, in every case, also be deemed the act, omis-










THE FLORIDA PLANT ACT OF 1915


sion or failure of such association, partnership or corporation as well as that
of the person.
Section 17. That the Board or any of its inspectors or employees shall
be a proper party in any court of equity to effectively carry out any of the
provisions of this Act'when an injunction would be a proper remedy.
Section 18. This Act shall not be so construed or enforced as to con-
flict in any way with any-Act of Congress regulating the movement of plants
or plant products in inter-state or foreign commerce.
Section 19. If any section or part of a section of this Act shall for any
cause be held unconstitutional, such fact shall not affect the remainder of
this Adt.
Section 20. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act,
the sum of thirty-five thousand dollars per annum or as much thereof as may
be necessary is hereby appropriated out of any funds in the treasury not
otherwise appropriated, which said sum shall be placed to the credit of the
Board in the hands of the State Treasurer to be expended by the Board in
S the manner as provided in Section 34 of Chapter 5384 of the Laws of Florida,
and the further sum of One Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Dollars is
hereby appropriated out of the General Revenues to be set apart as a speci-
fic fund to be known as the Plant Act special fund, which shall be expended
by the Board, first, for the purpose of eradicating, preventing and controll-
ing citrus canker, and thereafter so much thereof as may be necessary, may
be applied by the Board to carrying out the general purposes of this Act, but
of thle funds appropriated by this Act, no more than the sum of $125,000 shall
be expended for the eradication of citrus canker.
Section 21. All Acts and parts of Acts inconsistent with the provisions
of this Act are hereby repealed; all that Chapter 6156 Laws of Florida, 1911,.
known as the State Nursery Inspection Law is hereby repealed.
Section 22. This Act shall take effect upon its passage and approval by
the Governor, or upon its becoming a law without his approval.
Approved by the Governor April 30, 1915.


RINALDI PRINTING CO., TAMPA.


























4