Miscellaneous notes for lectures taken form old desk.

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Miscellaneous notes for lectures taken form old desk.
Series Title:
Writings and Speeches 1891-1920
Physical Description:
Unknown
Physical Location:
Box: 2
Divider: Articles, Speeches and Other Writings
Folder: Miscellaneous notes for lectures taken form old desk.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida.
Agriculture -- Florida -- Experimentation.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Brazil -- Minas Gerais.
Agriculture -- Study and teaching -- Florida.
Citrus fruit industry -- Brazil.
Leprosy -- Research -- Brazil.
Minas Gerais (Brazil) -- Rural conditions.
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Veterinaria do Estado de Minas Gerais.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Florida. Herbarium.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00000206:00078


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



Z ~Y7 /~ ,-'


-~ ~ 4. -,~~S
,,* e* I 4, 1 J


1~~3 / I iLdL e-'-"

I-Mk ~ I~ II 71/




i

S .: /- {s t a .a.^ 19-t-c
i i ,, .-. ..



o ^
*.d~! "i
r ^




j^, --rpa--^r------i- "y .------- ^" *



Ntes made by-









/'^SV 4t <, ^


-- ,I
<./ 17 I





ch ,'-, .o n -
. ~





d -/



t, ,, / /

a7dvv4 //2.d~zB



,4 -'. -.
<^ 7^ 1








"
/I / f1 1




L //
~ r~0 I-l LrdL~
VI~




Ir.-- -ri ~-..~w ~C:;



aLc~c ~ ~~ 8-R~
7,;z~,n- o~~,~~ L~n_IP-yV ave4 ~Riivee Ltcca i
UZ "

L~e-xl

.~ (- r















fT /


u~~~ ~~ -i-L ~ i_. ~


1 3~c .,


. C- i

y^*-"-^'-


/'*^




. --


Notes made by


S*-- '2,4 /


$ 6./

L- i/61z .


> 5 '* I
i

-C ^ ^C

( /fT-



1:.~.l4i




'I


Notes made by .-- -.--




-/ .." .'" x '! ,'





y A, .. c,. **** t_<_/~ -I^' /..*- '7 ,




//
/ f, ,..r -
~-i
i r











/1


i/' *" *' ...... '7
. .. :* .











/ 1 ) + \ .


/ t ,;. ... :
cui 7-.-i. ....

5*, /21- .-- i
ii1




A0

Cd)
i n- --












*j "` y '

i o,
F:
*














S r













c? -. < '*
-C- ^ J-







tf."/ / / ? .























*1 '




I- '


.JJ ____-_______ '*1_ f -




*- - -



Notes made by -


b, ,, ,,o


f ~ ~i 6 ckr





(I-~L L~L-J,


(6~y"CL








U / 7 3


(i i

*


* Ii


- "* f /

I -


I


I, -~
-s~'L



4ct L-p-~ "'


44 A


/ /


- tF


a
a

'd


i-~~ y; L, e
i,
P
I ')


- c





"r "'

7-.

( r-


Q


N
7,
K'


I /


( (.-


/
* j! : *
I











/7- ~i


VI /s


Y~I /7
/ /1 7-4d


A7. C




















I /


"22




I.


/-Ac- u~j


^ /..








, 1 1


( ,/


i;r/K


&t Fc9 p1


.i,; A ......


L





~1

- >1/
I -


(< '9


( p


6' /"
:I
;I: I







A'v ./L; 1.-


'~ I..
/


I


(il" !.


:~-li~
c ;: r ?r:i






Notes made by .- "" -A
f *-.- I



*2'. L *

-/, i /t. -- .< .- r .,
S,- d2. v ,i, '




to "" -
sal~i'1, t t c-, es^, ,
*//







tr? .
"//. 4 ,' .. ,:.
-; "



,- -^--


-5.--,r ? f,, ....
.-l ... .






Notes made by_ I


est. 'VoA<<. t .










'I
^a-t^- Yrd
4f eLw^ tr7 j

-^ ---- _^ ^*C^69T&


'p.


IZJ



Ns






Notes made by

Su-'e /--O.T ,4. r.


L(C L-a&2Emzt
' -V CL, -r r.' A ,1. ., ,



(2J&4 dt-cn L, )





L. L ~

/*C- b- '
i0 i f"- .L A
,-,,. \ .,,-, p.,.,A e








No-4











Cr lr -
RCLA LAW


'a f/ &t 0





















Q _/2C ^ CCC-^ 'VJ^ ( -rt-,C ~CL L'C~- rc~L 3u~;


~rt1 Ldr~


J






Notes made by
a


/~d& ~-~& 7

6 2Jap -<.V/ &- i


/C


A;vrE


~U r i1L:c)


I L~ C


P
SLli




__ '- ...._______.. Suil f ct.
DaNte, ._I- I Lbcality, .._ -f, .. -.

--L X.- I ,-.. --


I a t
ail
.0, / U


^(r fi't'k ^^ Y '-*; ^ ^- 'l/^.' ^. ^. I /Plt 'i'- ^
/^>, ./l" *^// ^-.f.^ ^ -^ '.'/
-^' I '/(


LA






















14 ~
31 Bf









I ~ ; .,


..... .- _;,-- _',_. __
No: y .-

i 'I ; ,__ .- .
i. ov... _/^ ^-_A ,..,.oj ^ <.<- ,

I -\ t I .- / ,
___ _1 .. .. J ,ii _A-'' '-,_5 ._.Z ,.,'
/__.? S4'-r-X-L 'ne^. z^-"








~~
i : "! .
__L__ ________ '._ > ,_1- J-^-,- .l'- !- _.iti -..<^-.^. t t-'_f
1 ._-. ,'. .-t.__-.;i *_. {.^.. f^_
I i j t 't'
- I





.. __ .--- 1 -, -I- .. .
...... .. .J ..^ -- .-f-- ... .
I ._ ....... .. .... 4 l-/.'_. _







i







i_ I ii / '



y-I \^ \ L... ...
i A '
-t --- i ; -... .











-1 I i i ,; _

f-- . .i .. ... ,


i i
I I

i



4.~i. .k~aJ
i I







r 0
c.
r
b


(n2
A
o




i j"r


Notes made by




L/ ,





1,U;I s






/I
c / .


S. J} '/c. .
/ // 4






L -AL t.-, /5 1
/ / J' 1 IA-^.L -

6'Lt~i-^1 /-^3t. /u^ ,4 Ai-w rf
Q. ^a^ It-


rL


#2


O
r,
I-
S.-
z
*^








S ...l <-, -_ C n, '/ ,
^I W~CO ,t,-( ,C- ^L>- j! Ob-'- Sub/e

D' ate., .,/- / i /,,




(-i -- e ,t ,j --




,"-?' .; 4 ) ^ r Lc <^ -^. / #^ -^^ ,.-, .l.,- /
-ZZ a._< fl I -
t~-2 V tc.~-g-wte-VL t--/ ~ ~ oZ-e{ t4~(~~- 1-t- ~A~.Y

~~ p
cwo-




DLe -r___ __ Sluject.

Da e, J --- Localit a.- _-_-


- z
i
a


4Lt, It "'t- ,4 .. ". # m^
P / wj ___^. __ ^ ^


& &rdU


SI _
k1._ Z GL rV

II ( t _P i 4 |P '


I








-'f *. ,T. t*.I-'
S-'L .Y ..-."
. -. ,(_ 1 ...

.. :/ '. .'
F A m- _,,-


S- ?,


Pg
'~


q-i L7 1C1A7. ,-


^~ .5


4 .. -i". ,7 i --



} *L. :'-;.,^,- .....
LL-/- '-' --. I.


81,





a .- Lt- -
6 i i / I --.


i L4l-. l L :6 ;':, I .


Su -;- -


t i ~I


o '
f-I .-


i^r
K







ti

I -
Sa
*'**' f -
v n r


IIF1 . I


-=i


..~


e-. f




---f


7


'L1..~~ CI~J'j'

uX~cuypgy I~ 1C4~d/

e~~r;,~~ J 6
L e~Z!~uu~

5~~~-go OLtl4'Lic~ a~p 4w,


fj



rc
r%.
c:
5-.


I


Ini


~Lr/~LCL4/ ePLLPC~L 4AC j4



itAit

'I'I A
/aA~ ^- A I
fff^<-^---M&cwc-
2. OM-<-- A~ ; A~e-*< ?% <_--


o9i


I


~ka~EZc~


w


Ft ;




(c) 4e~.&so


e. /
* 4 -
4s.).
C' .'
* *













.~ce~~- w Llr~-L

ezd. 1
~YV~(A-*





:, **^ / .'
.l -i ,




.., ,, ...I..t/c :" A7 / ,
mt








1 "-/ /t i I

/ ./JL '/


L .- ,. CL. .C-,"I^






.. ^ ...- g y- ^ '
e, i~l,~y~t2










/ J
4 >

c-c,-H (- J-C z"&&.C


ip.o


r'

;\
-^








., ,- L ---



y ;1 / _, ~t, -

-I- t L c j 4



J1 Il-ki.r- I, a. .



0 Lkt 'tttt t A0 s c.
. y> ,-' .. y K





(1 /


.,<

Sr *







,L7.
(:'


'"-L ~ ~ C, g~



4'IZ fl. a~L- ~L l.l


4




0
b 4 r/,
tff-sc,,~i,.!.'

3 L""vt C~ / w iI


* A'





~L r-pcC ~ &-{-,t

b ~-- -- ~'C


QJ~ /R~CMr-.


s /Cc~QLC
4 t~A~~o


ii ,







( I\ .--1 .; .. t
1/ .-'
iL) Q ,Ci /Va d / JL-, '


SJl -" """--......t ,




^^ W ,. (^ "- ; "s-/ c












^ 5 .... -

2-









SI,
t1--- --Ci



-
__../ :,_____. _.-
_-,_-E 4_i Jv.4._












I ;
-- "'i- _- ei I- I



--i --- ^






I ^ -^ -- --- --- -- -- -- ^







Da te. "*lVt. i4


- -- __~~~__ ____ -____- Sub ject.


--L ,-, ,

f d I ^ *--


3Er u-1' L-


=,,""~' 1


I -


I.


/4


Jig


Lovalitz.




e.











%^a^- f ^. /^^L- -.T




-{ ( r /
^L~ ^>6

-l^i c^/^i LOle rCi? CL
~^ U7 -lj I. /^-/




/)-M--^'-" /^zs '3^*7ltCY ^>-w^-*^






""- '.-"-v ---- ~

A*Lj --L 3-



/ / -^/7^ '




^e~,, ~- 4 -7J ^- -
^ ^,, --^- ,, ^^^





't^^ <-a >^ ---6
~~ ~


OCI4 cLLL ~e IZs Cr
LU-* 4 6 __C
<3-*--'eU .^,<^ ^<- ^




7~ "C" ~AJ
o~4-CC ~ eei r *;L L--

JU^L ,2L &e^ /-^
*^*x* -< -A, r-^-^-~ s<












4 J
e~C*~r~II~jLVhC -~c 12
J4-k"' oL-<-^ 4~"-Z;^ &-o--^




Gfio'-~~ct.P- -^-~tpl--tZ^^iss- 1







I'r~c ~ c/ ..
iGA: -
^ ^. -
*hc ~ 44^S aL^ t^ .i/ sZL
^i^J '^^ s-y^
*^ aec a>^s- t^^^^ K---<< s<
i^' '^<^ ^ (hs.~ (--<^ T t^




T~~j/Aai~l~ O,,;._e-~
3~c
~t~s~Sd~ ~
~L) cZftcZLul yx ~u~ 6"
~ ~bW Le---L~T~C~.
--






Notes made by


I e







-
di U^Vt^- t, ; l)ti






,,* .




,3^^ (4^ X ; ;


%^,^ ~a,<-er-.c / A
< ;

31 3L~ r LC r


I.E
'N


Cr

K





KNe


II


I


Notes made by.






Notes made by f__

,.. ,.. ,








c. Aga-c QS-
4. /aJL ~ A -Z<-u A. otv








e. uls ^ ^-^a
,t-c-







'2 ) 4 L L adt


- -









i ., C .r L j -,a '2.
. ..- -o a T





** (1 ZS
i, ` ^ R, y -












Z-9


1(I5




X (A^-V- c -' t^* '
Notes made by'-------------







I. Xall '/ 9I--














/1S2c'-, i ze s 9
._ "^1. b ; ^ ^ _
uW .y^^^t 0 1*
II (l//j~wc^-- ^ ^.^*tf
HE ,^^ &-- ^t

/,~ jf~m L a-A^ *--'S<






&^^ '^a.'o^~z /^jnl








-rt. A/ 1 av w f^, -




A Subject.

------------ Loliy -
Dte, LocalizJ,













7'-


8







made by


a- .. i I









A w-









_
.L- -- -











S__
. .... ef a..I_ _w,' _




















doI d i- I 'le i -_
_- __ ..........






















-+ I
__fL ^ 0 .. r t tt~a1i^ t ;_ '__ _






-Tb


Ia ^a2-ct






g)- -^ ^^ dc'
%^C U-//


1 .







J .4
N aZ by


IC3L^. ^^,C /brCI-^~y



^. 42---s<^^^/^^



A 4^e^z,
'F.


Sj. ^-t-L~OC-T~su-.--
3. 6;,,/tt ^
-/. ^-<-<--*<< t-,
Z,7


d r b6I
-/^ <^L <^








3i^. B/9




Q a.s. /l,4- / -q

9 ffda










.. 9 / 0 I
- -- -












Z -A u- *- t' -











S4 9 2-s M^ -










r c^ Y- E. 4kc -


















z
L~t~^.y.*^*-e^*^-t^^U~ir
f -^


~C*PTIT-*-P7-~ "n~r rrlpr rrT ~ 7 ; B1BS'




,


I*'f ^ .* A t -L ^

Utf7 'c *1' it
I .'


___ __ __ __ a c


-a L
*4 -'
to-31 ,

/rT.,(f


C
La- c ', C


V


fic
( rqll f- a c_4


A


7;


MENT .STATION


~~"


IL








* Ia/ur 4z
t^^^U^^. J-^t-^-t^


/2/-la


~O ~(CA ) ~~~/~;l


~a~cz~TI74

~ 1/K c:o~


L)


4PL~A~





ER ENT STATION







t -
I ./ b (,., c


1 1/0 -- s f > =
/9/0= Sb~~)


(










IIr


~-~M 0t1


A2 L"- k


'9;

/0'4k


/6~


/ '


__ ___




RIMENT STATION
I *R .iMEN


'. /-I

tgl, ,Uo.. ^



34,,;,
"/ ^-<^


\ ^

^* t/"-

tBL ^^^ ^

^C L^--- -I *tL


44~- -


LLL.




(

(


46J%-ed


-I-


cLwJ~~lcl~~C-. ~ 0~~~


3w~e~k,




EXPERIMENT STATION



/ -. wI














"I I.
S4 21L' r.~hl %


ppk...:




P


-./:-. U '
gcl .

T21


A1-1 1,


-1.
/Lr~ ,. IM


rr.
*- .r A. U r --


A .-... A.,


.. ,i
V.


:JI .
IaJ!. f "


., ,


-. i.s


,4~ '


9.P I'


--1


''.


-r S





l ~* ti~ -:


;: j


1


1 l


. r~~r




- Ur~-


S7 P / -P A Y

3 e A a ^ .; J






3 *- A So ,, J,9 5


S, /I C11o


3 1 /4/


4"1


.1w/i,


*,
11
3 'L

r,


~--- Y -Y---l





ERIMENT STATION











1al, ^ ^ 4


lb ^/ ',A tV-wn< ,,
^^^ v-L~b~1 ^ ci. ;




y r~u eII
^9~wpi .d-f t / c^








CI I-* ^ -t







Notes made by

/, ./ P c., t- c/

Yo .







--l ,










I-




-'* t S








*z*


410
G a _________




b"I~~.1, -jU I Z~/~


~~1


S Locality. -- d .--,
.^ Loca liy 'h ^S t l.^.fc ^ __


I


I.


Date. -- -


___ ~ ____ r_ C ~llrl


ti


ii


o- ..t







Notes m ----- -






r1









Ir, -.




.. uc I I






I'










I *r

1




FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
GAINESVILLE


Ih~' IAA~~~hr~q
aiC e ^ ^t^
i>^ ^^^ ^2^^)^^ ^OIL




FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
GAINESVILLE

^7 6 /i
'^tdJ-1-TT^^^^ ^S-^r ^H Ljit^


UI

fr-445 7ea7rc


~c/







Notes made






., -- A --.




I#
f. __ .. .j .
-C^J ,^t ', IL;

/jgJ.



E. .
Q.$






t fl~ t-- *n-l-- .


'.9 ,1 .-L .. -i -a
I..I *t '
,i.









t
S' .... :" .. .. ... itr



t.,




o ,1 ..-
II
,* l / ^ CL, 9, 4/ "




/~

I ... ,, Q < l -* I .. ,




.
-" a" *. :



I.1 -(1. .- ** /* ****- a
'"L: ; ^ ,*

C f y *, *
4' ,/*.*. .. ^ ^ ** '

.^^^.'
*- '* ** i. *;. .'








-'"4
SI.- -

r A^


I.. i


) '4


---- .I


r 4. ,-




ft
___..~LLr-r C_ t <,
nflJA.


Lo .l J __.
-- Loo bity, ?- -l -..-


.U i ii /1 C

A!h7 *9rfr r dtL
fl.rC i I AKe trs-i.4 Lt Cl .~ l 1 -~ 7 /-


:42i'a


%Mh4?~rc.A L4'i4r~ h7V~ ~1 rf


- Subject.


ch'0
AE
c
z






Notes made b : -



eke k,, ,. .
Z4,




-A
rI qt/ a









;'I
.C "-I t.. .



"q^.
~^ *^---- -- r

P.- '

i 4 r/j -
,t^.if~i*^*-fu^t. Ai.*^^ <,

^..,/-^.^ |
*^'*' ~it. f-c"- e- ^ ^ ,^ .5
^ 'fht~ ~t sW,(, c O CLj~-^ L^^'
(^'~~~~~~~~~~ 6(/ilt^<^f-/ t-^. y













ADDRESS OF



William C. Brown
President
New York Central Lines


AT ANNUAL DINNER OF


THE RAILWAY BUSINESS ASSOCIATION









HOTEL WALDORF-ASTORIA. NEW YORK CITY
WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 10, 1909





4


I











ADDRESS OF
WILLIAM C. BROWN
President
New York Central Lines
AT
Annual Dinner of the Railway Business Association
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
Wednesday Evening, November 10, 1909


MR. TOASTMASTER AND GENTLEMEN OF THE
RAILWAY BUSINESS ASSOCIATION:

Your Association, as I understand its purpose, was
organized to promote more harmonious relations between
the public and the great transportation interests of the
country; and in this work, the importance of which can
hardly be exaggerated, every citizen, no matter where
located or what his business, may well wish you a
hearty God-speed.
The question of the regulation of these great instru-
mentalities of commerce for the purpose of correcting
wrongs and abuses and preventing their recurrence has
overshadowed almost all other questions during the last
four years and promises to be an important factor during
the coming session of Congress.
There was a time when the fundamental right of
the Nation and States to regulate and control the rail-
roads was seriously discussed and questioned. Happily
for all-the railroads as well as the public-this question
is no longer open for debate.








The question of the limitation of the right of regula-
tion, the extent to which it should be exercised, is still
open for discussion-not in a harsh or hostile spirit, not
for the purpose of fixing by law an arbitrary point beyond
which such regulation shall not go; but in a spirit of
friendly co-operation to try and ascertain, in the interest
alike of the public and the railroads, that happy mean
which shall result in the maximum benefit to the patrons
of the railroads and the minimum embarrassment in the
way of restrictive regulation to the railroads of the
Nation.
The question has been narrowed down marvelously in
the last four years, the distance which separates the two
parties to this important question is extremely small; and
such associations as yours, Mr. Toastmaster, can do
much in bringing about a determination that will be fair
and just to all interests.
I am particularly happy to-night in having assigned
to me a subject, the far-reaching importance of which
few appreciate, and in regard to which, when its full
significance and importance is realized, there will be
little difference of opinion.
From the dawn of civilization the drift of population
has been from the East to the West; and through all the
centuries, absorbing and assimilating the millions of the
overflow of older civilizations, the West has continually
called for more.
From early in the Seventeenth Century the-nations of
the Old world d have found on this continent an impera-
ti\ely necessary vent-a safety valve. The broad prairies
of the United States have beckoned to the discontented,
the dispossessed and unfortunate of every race and clime,
and here they have found a foundation upon which to
build new hopes and aspirations.
2


_ _IT~ __~___(_








At the close of the Civil War in 1865, the states of
Iowa, Minnesota and Nebraska would have furnished a
quarter section of Government land to every veteran
mustered out of the military service of the Nation. Great
states and territories, with their wealth of primeval
forest and virgin soil, lay waiting to be peopled.
To-day all this is changed. The day of "free land
for Free-men," is past. No longer can the homestead
be had for the asking. The frontier, like the Indian, has
become a tradition-an interesting item in the Nation's
history.
Almost the last county of the last state or territory
where cultivation is possible has been settled. Temporarily
Sthe tide of emigration is setting up into western Canada,
but this limited territory will soon be filled. Occasionally
an Indian reservation is opened for settlement and tens
of thousands of eager settlers gather on the borders wait-
ing the word that sends them like a flood sweeping over
the land, realizing that our once apparently inexhaustible
public domain is gone forever.
The wave of population, beginning with the Grecian
colonies along the Mediterranean a thousand years be-
fore the birth of Christ, followed by the distribution of
the Legions of Rome over Europe, and twenty-five
centuries later crossing the Atlantic to the eastern shores
of the new world, has at last broken on the eastern
shore of the Pacific, and just beyond that ocean lies the
Orient with its teeming millions.
The advance column of this great westward-moving
procession of the centuries has encircled the globe; soon
a great human undertow must set back toward the East,
and the westward tide will settle in turbulent, dangerous
eddies and whirlpools about the great centers of popula-
tion.








A short time before the close of a life devoted to
a most profound study of history and participation in
the political affairs of his time, Lord Macaulay, the
eminent English historian, in a letter written to his
friend, Mr. H. S. Randall, a citizen of this country, under
date of May 23, 1857, said:
"As long as you have a boundless extent of fertile
unoccupied land, your laboring population will be far
more at ease than the laboring population of the old
world.
"But the time will come when New England will
be as thickly peopled as Old England.
"You will have your Manchesters and your Birm-
inghams, and in these Manchesters and Birminghams
hundreds of thousands of artisans will assuredly be
sometime out of work. Then your institutions will
be fairly brought to the test."
Two important features of this remarkable prophesy
of a half century ago have been fulfilled.
The boundless extent of fertile unoccupied land is
gone.
We have our Manchesters and our Birminghams by
the score and in times of great depression such as will
certainly come, our unemployed will be numbered not by
the hundreds of thousands but by the million.
Is it not time to "take thought of the morrow," and
to make such preparation as may be possible against the
day of stress and test predicted by Macaulay?
In this direction, I desire to briefly suggest two plans
having a common purpose and perhaps equal in impor-
tance.
First: The broadening and, in a way, the specializing
Sof our methods of education in all our schools and col-
leges. I would give no less attention to graduating
lawyers and physicians, but would give a great deal
C!








more to turning out of our public schools young men with
a -good common-school education plus a year's practical
training at some useful trade.
I would have a first-class manual training school at- /
tached to every high school and to every college and
university, where young men could be turned out good,
practical, journeyman blacksmiths, boilermakers, car-
penters, cabinet makers, plumbers, or skilled workmen at
some other useful trade.
I would increase the capacity of these schools to ac-
commodate every child in the community and then I
would make attendance compulsory,
I have discussed this question with officials of public
school boards and with the presidents of some of our
colleges, and in a majority of cases I have been met with
the suggestion that a course of this kind would be likely
to antagonize organized labor. I am glad to-night that
the doubt as to the advisability of a course of this kind
on that account can be definitely set at rest. Yesterday,
at the annual convention of the American Federation of
Labor a special committee on industrial education, ap-
pointed one year ago to make a study of this subject, sub-
mitted their report, from which the following is an
extract:
"Organized labor favors that plan of industrial
training which will give our boys and girls such
training as will help them to advance after they are
in industry. We believe that as much attention
should be given to the proper education of those
who work at our industry as is now given to those
who prepare to enter professional and managerial
careers."
I would make our agricultural colleges in fact what
they are in name by limiting admission to young men
who want to study and school themselves in scientific agri-








culture to the end that graduates of these colleges should
be first-class farmers thoroughly equipped for and vitally
interested in that most honorable profession.
I realize that a policy of this kind will cost millions
on millions of money, but no man can estimate the cost
in treasure and possibly in blood of a contrary policy.
Second: I would postpone the day of test fore-
shadowed by Lord Macaulay by doubling our rural popu-
lation, and would do this by more than doubling the
product per acre of the nation's farms.
The United States with the most fertile soil and
favorable climate in the world, but with its careless, un-
informed methods of seed selection, fertilization and culti-
vation, produces an annual average yield of less than
fourteen bushels of wheat per acre, while England pro-
duces more than thirty-two; Germany about twenty-
eight; the Netherlands more than thirty-four, and
France, approximately twenty.
Of oats, the United States produces an average an-
nual yield of twenty-three and seven-tenths bushels per
acre, England forty-two, Germany forty-six, and the
Netherlands fifty-three.
The average yield of potatoes in the United States
is eighty-five bushels per acre, while that of Germany,
Belgium and Great Britain is two hundred and fifty
bushels.
Potatoes, like wheat, corn and bread, are a food staple
of the poor man.
Germany, with an arable area no greater than some of
our largest states, produces approximately two billion
bushels of potatoes annually, while the aggregate crop of
the United States averages barely two hundred and
seventy-five million bushels per annum; and, in the year








ended June 30, 1909, we imported eight million three
hundred and eighty-four thousand bushels.
For half a century we have proudly plumed ourselves
as the granary of the world and our annual exports of
food stuffs have formed the basis for a large balance of
trade in our favor. Our exports of this character show a
steady and alarmingly rapid decline. In the past, in-
crease in population, increase in consumption, have been
met by multiplied acres. This is no longer possible, or at
least only to a very limited and constantly diminishing ex-
tent. Increased consumption in the future must be pro-
vided for not by an increase in acres but by an increase
in the yield per acre.
Each year immigration and natural increase add ap-
proximately two million hungry mouths to be fed and it
calls for an increase of approximately seventy-five million
bushels of food producing cereal per annum to supply
this demand.
In 1898 the total acreage of corn, wheat, oats, barley
and rye was 151,780,501, and we exported 598,715,000
bushels. In 1907 the acreage had increased to 185,353,-
ooo acres, or an increase of twenty-two per cent, while
our exports were only 227,422,000 bushels, or a decrease
of sixty-nine per cent.
This tremendous falling off in exports of grain and
its products .suggests the possibility that "the grain may
have been fed to stock and exported in the shape of beef
and pork, but the falling off in the exports of these
commodities for the period named is fully as startling as
in grain.
In 1900 the report of the Agricultural Department
shows 27,610,000 cattle on the Nation's farms. In 1908
there were 50,100,000, an increase of eighty-one per cent,
but our exports of beef were fourteen per cent less.








Stated in another :way, in 1900 we exported twenty-four
and four-tenths pounds for each head of cattle owned,
while in 1908 we exported only eleven and one-half
pounds, a, decrease of fifty-three per cent.
In 1899 the number of swine owned was something,
more than thirty-eight and one-half million. In 1908 this
had increased to morethan fifty-six million, or forty-five
per cent, but our exports of pork and its products showed
a decrease of mpre than four hundred and forty-one
million pounds.
During the same period, while the number of cows in-
creased thirty-four per cent, our exports of butter and
cheese wept down from approximately seventy-nine
million pounds to less than fifteen million, and our im-
ports went up from ten million to nearly thirty-three and
one-half million pounds, or two hundred and thirty-two
per cent.
The preliminary report of the Bureau. of .Statistics .
for the year ended June 30, 1909, shows a falling-6ff, as
compared with the previous year, in the exports of beef
and tallow of thirty-five per cent; while the decline in the
exports of pork and its products exceeds fifteen per cent.
The same report shows that exports of grain for the same
period declio.d twenty-nine per cent.
If the converging lines of production and consumption
in the United,States continue to approach each other as
they have .dir.ng the past ten years, before the middle
of the nekt -decade the last vessel loaded with the
agricultural .product of this country will have left our
shores, the great exporting grain elevators in our sea-
board cities will stand empty, and this great nation, like
those of the Old World, will be looking for a place to
buy the necessaries of life.




T~.----7---- i--------~--

I.


S


Fj


PRODUCTION
lOF
CORN, WHEAT, OATS, BARLEY & RYE IN THE
UNITED STATES
AND AMOUNT REQUIRED FOR

U DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION
FED ON AVERAGES OF FIVE YEAR PERIODS
(YEARS FOLLOWING 1908 CALCULATED ON
RATE OF INCREASE SINCE 1902)




m -




so- SI

/7-- -- /-OO / / /
32S cj- -- --4-- -- -- -- -^ -- A


m5o- --



5 -- -R J427S
35 4SO -- --- -- -- --- --r--------J^4C


-- -- --- 4
JZS L -- --- -- y -- -- --- -- *'B


3000- -- --T-V v -- -- 00SO
wo^ -- ^ ^ ^ y l- -- --" r
s o - - esoo







1868 1/873 /878 1883 /8/893 1/898 0903 90 19/3 1/9/8
/ro V 10 /7 0 0 1I T90 1/ a T /
/873 /878 /883 /888,/893 /898 /9031 T08.9/3 1-9/8 19P3


w
fc






I


The above graphic charr indicates that about the year 1914 the consump-
tion of cereals in this country will have overtaken production,- and
unless there is a large increase in production per acre, the lines
will diverge after that year more rapidly than they are now
converging.


i

;.E__








I have been greatly interested in reading an article
in the November number of Thc IForld"'s- llork. h -IMr.
James J. Hill, entitled, "What We Must Do to Be dd."
dealing with this important subject, which conclut as
follows:
"The value of our annual farm product is now
about eight billion dollars. It might easil be
doubled. When the forests are all cut down *n& the
mines are nothing but empty holes in the ground,
the farm lands of the country will remain capable of
renewing their bounty forever. But they must have
proper treatment. To provide this, as a matter of
self-interest and of national safety, is the most im-
perative present duty of our people. *
The armed fleets of an enemy approaching our
harbors would be no more alarming than the re-
lentless advance *of a day when we shall have
neither sufficient food nor the means to purchase it
tf.-r cur population. The farmers of the nation must
save it in the future, just as they built its greatness
in the past.
"The man who: assumes to be the farmer's friend
or hold his interests dear will constitute himself a
missionary of the new dispensation. It is an act of
patriotic service to the country. It is a contribution
to the welfare of all humanity. It will strengthen
the pillars of a government that must otherwise be
endangered by s-ome popular upheaval when the land
can no longer sustain the population that its bosom
bears. Here lies the true secret of our anxious
interest in agricultural methods; because, in the
long run, they mean life or death to future millions
who are no strangers or invaders, but our own
children's children, and who will pass judgment upon
us according to what we have made of the world in
which their lot is to be cast."
Can the importance of this condition be exaggerated?
Is it not time that every patriotic citizen was aroused to
ascertain the cause and find and apply the remedy? Can
there be a duty of higher or broader patriotism or more
10


r __~ _____ ~_~ ~~___
----








Comprehensive philanthropy? What is the cause, and can
a remedy be found?
The land, our kindly, patient mother earth, upon
t hib not only prosperity, but life itself, depends, is year
after7 year being robbed and impoverished.
Our average annual yield of wheat for ten years was
lessrthan fourteen bushels per acre. This is less than it
waklhirty years ago. Instead of improving we are
going backward.
I do not say this in a spirit of criticism or censure of
the farmers of the Nation.
A large majority of them started with nothing but a
quarter section of unbroken prairie, a team of horses or
yoke of cattle, a plow and harrow, and a humble cabin
to shelter his little family from the heat of summer and
storms of winter.
The success he has achieved has been the result of
years of arduous toil; the knowledge he has gained has
been in the hard school of experience.
The farmer has always been the state builder, the pio-
neer. He it is who has built up and made the Nation
what it.is, and the General Government can discharge the
obligation it owes the great agricultural interests in no
better way than in spending money freely in bettering
agricultural conditions.
One hundred years ago the average production of
SGreat Britain was about the same as our present yield.
The Nation became alarmed and a royal commission
(which is still in existence) was appointed, a campaign of
education was entered upon. and to-da\y the farms of the
United Kingdom, upon which crops have been raised
for centuries, with general climatic conditions less favor-
able than ours, produce almost two and a quarter times
the wheat per acre that we do.
11








France, with her abounding prosperity, her marvelous
wealth of agricultural resources, which have made her
the creditor nation of the world, maintains 45,0oo rural
schools with agricultural departments in the shapL of
gardens and small fields where systematic scientific ilti-
vation and conservation of the soil is taught.
Since 1873, Belgium has required every school in, the
kingdom to maintain a field not less than thirty-nintand
one-half square rods for the purpose of instructing the
pupils in this most important work.
Here is where this work of education should begin,
and instruction of this character undertaken by our rural
schools, where the farmer boys and girls attend, would be
speedily and powerfully reflected .in improved methods
on our farms.
The increased value of corn, wheat, oats and barley
in the United States, provided the average yield per acre
of the same crops in Germany had been raised, and as-
suming a production of fifty bushels of corn to the acre,
would have amounted to the stupendous total during the
year 1907 of $2,280,000,000; while the increased value of
the same cereals of the crop of 1909, computed on the
same basis, would have been three and one-quarter billion
dollars.
There is no soil or climate that is naturally superior
to that of the United States, and no nation on earth can
produce a larger crop per acre than this country if our
soil is intelligently tilled.
Ninety years ago, the farms of the state of New York
produced larger average crops than the most fertile state
in the Union produces to-day.
In 1860 she stood first as an agricultural state and she
can (if she will) again take her place at the head of the
procession of great agricultural states.








The year 1908 was not as favorable for the produc-
tion of crops in New York as the average year, but a
gentleman sitting at one of our tables here to-night, a
meniber of your organization, can show.a record in the
crop line which I can not equal on my farm in one of the
richest valleys in the southwest part of the great agri-
cultural state of Iowa.
*kisten to this: Three hundred and fifty to four hun-
dred bushels of potatoes per acre. Fifty bushels of
shelled corn. Thirty-five tons of beets. Four tons of hay
per acre. This was the result not of so-called intensive
farming-just intelligent farming, and it was not in one
of those favored fertile valleys in the central or southern
part of the state, but was away up in the extreme
northern part, at the north end of Lake Champlain, with-
in twelve miles of the Canadian line.
There is not a farm in New York state where a
similar record can not be made if the farmer can be
taught similar intelligent methods, but in the language
of the Apostle, "How shall they believe who have not
heard, and how shall they hear without a preacher."
The field is eagerly awaiting the preacher. In April
of this year the New York Central Railroad tendered to
the New York State College of Agriculture the use of a
special train consisting of a combination car, four
coaches and a dining car, for a trip through that por-
tion of' the state traversed by our lines. Twenty-one
professors and advanced students of the New York
State College of Agriculture at Cornell University and
the agricultural school at St. Lawrence University made
up the party.
Thirty-one towns were visited and lectures were given
to audiences ranging from two to six hundred earnest,
- interested farmers.








The object of the trip was to awaken interest, to
prepare the ground for the seed to be sown later. These
trips will be repeated and extended and we hope it is
but the beginning of a broad and comprehensive scheme
of education. Lectures of this kind are beneficial, but the
things that will accomplish results are object lessons-
opportunities for the farmer to see the thing done in-
stead of being told how it can be done. &
The first requisite is a thorough awakening of our
people to a realization of the startling significance, the
over-shadowing importance of this condition; then a
systematic, persevering campaign of education. The
General Government should give it first place among
the questions pressing for consideration. Money should
be provided liberally and expended honestly and in-
telligently. Every scheme for the reclamation of arid
land by the Government should be pushed to completion
and the land opened to settlement at the earliest possible
moment.
Land susceptible of cultivation, either by irrigation or
without it, that is included in forest reserves should be
excluded from such reserves and made available for
settlement under such conditions as will insure prompt.
intelligent and continuous cultivation.
Each state should take similar action. Boards of
Trade, Chambers of Commerce, and other public associa-
tions should take up the work.
The Chamber of Commerce of Rochester, New York,
is conducting an active campaign of education and is
doing most efficient work along these lines.
The railroads should co-operate with the state agri-
cultural colleges and with all institutions having depart-
ments of agriculture, in arranging for meetings of
farmers in villages and country school houses, for the


~--- -~








purpose of preaching this great gospel of better methods,
which means more profitable farming. I am going to
recommend to the owners of the roads with which I
am connected the purchase of land to be used as
experimental farms according to the most advanced
methods of seed selection, fertilization and cultivation,
at the expense of the road, but under the auspices of
thlagricultural college of the state in which the farm is
located. If this recommendation is adopted, I shall hope
to see it followed by a majority of the roads of the
country.
The United States is building two or three great
battleships almost every year, which cost, fully equipped,
perhaps an average of nine million dollars each, and
it costs close to a million a year each to man, supply and
maintain them.
What one of these fighting machines costs the Govern-
ment would establish and fully equip two splendid ex-
perimental farms of six hundred and forty acres each, in
every state in the Union, to be operated by the General
Government.
The establishment of such farms by the Government
would soon be followed by one-hundred-and-sixty-acre
farms owned and operated by the state in every county
in our great agricultural states.
Such farms, once established, would not only be self-
sustaining, but, in my opinion, would show a handsome
profit. The effect of such a system of practical educa-
tion upon the product and profit of the Nation's farms
would be almost beyond comprehension.
Every thriftless and uninformed farmer would quickly
note the difference between the result of his loose methods
and those of the experimental farm, and benefit by the
comparison.








Men who have no books on this important subject and
who could find no time to study them if they had, would
learn by that most apt and thorough teacher,, observation,
the value of improved methods and would adopt them.
Let the Government invest the price of one battleship
in this important work, follow the investment up intelli-
gently and perseveringly for ten years, and the value
that will have been added to each year's crops of the
Nation's farms will buy and pay for every battleship in
all the navies of the world to-day.
Adopt this policy and it will give to the great business
of agriculture a new birth of marvelous possibilities and
make the cultivation of the soil a profession rather than
a vocation. It will double the wealth of the Nation's
farms and quadruple the influence, political and financial,
of the Nation's farmers.
Ten years after such a system becomes fully effective,
the farmers will own a large share, if not a majority,
of the Nation's railroads, and this will insure in larger
measure than is possible under present conditions that
industrial peace and tranquility so vital to enduring pros-
perity.
Above and beyond all other considerations this
stimulation of interest in, and addition to the wealth of,
agriculture will return the preponderance of political
power to the rural districts, where it can be more safely
lodged than in the congested centers of population, al-
ready ominously powerful in many of our states, and
indefinitely postpone that dread test of the permanency
of our institutions predicted by Macaulay a half century
ago.




--

















































































































































, L[ .EMPl I E R1TE T.nEA 0ir


I _





- -rs


ti


TO EDITORS:

Released for publication on or after 12 November 1908. (From Herbert Nlyrick,
President Phelps Publishing Company, Springfield, Mass., 9 Nouember 1908.)


Co-operation in Technical Education

A Great National Policy of Equal Schooling and Practical Training
Advocated by President Roosevelt in His Address Prepared for the Dedication, at Springfield, Mass., Nov. 12, of the
National Institute for the Co-operation of Agriculture and Education, Labor, Capital, Home-making and Citizenship.


Self-Help and Mutual Helpfulness
Now, in striving for co-operation
between the National and State Gov-
ernments and the farmers, for the
uplifting of farm life, I am striving
for exactly this principle, the princi-
ple of combining self-help with mu-
tual helpfulness. Of course the
prime thing to be done for the farm-
er, as for everyone else, is to help
him to help himself. If he won't
help himself, if he lies down on oth-
ers and tries to make them carry
him, we can rest assured that neither
Nation, State nor neighbors can per-
manently benefit him. Nevertheless,
a helping hand is often of great ser-
vice when extended even to those
most capable of helping themselves.
The individual, the community,
the State, each must give an example
of self-help; but groups of individuals
and of States-and the largest group
of all, the Nation-may all co-operate
with advantage for their common
interests. Perhaps this is especially
true in trying to secure the conser-
vation of our forests and waters, the
protection of our streams from pol-
lution, and the like. It is for this
reason that I wish to see the Nation
not only establish forest reserves
wherever possible all thru the west-
ern states and territories, but join in
making the White Mountain region
a forest reserve, just as it proposes
to do Iitlh thie- Appalachian region

AlericultuLre Mo-t Imlortant
.\'We iave been in the past, and \we
are yet, a p.,ople- with whom agri-
culture has been the i -.in important
i*i-*iipl~f.-;,: Therr 4oav.-r Valal *P-.r. Sh tury any movement comparable tO
Ith wonderful wivstiard march of the
hard--wo-rrking Auneri-an pioneer farm-
.:ir. and .of those who came after
them,,who have ou\rspread this con-
tinent, who are now filling its re-
nmoest corners, and' thanks to \whoni
th-.re "are unint-rrupted stretches of
tarm land from sea to sea, front the
~Gulf to the % atershed of the Arctic
Ocean. The roJugh wilderne-s has
Lbeen uabdued .b1. those who in their
iens h blnd in a conmmnon stream the
ii,.-] of i o ran:. nations of the Old
Worid. Thrui that mn.:t w.ise c,-
nnmi-, FtaLutl:. tihe homestead law,
we ha e been enabl-d to d&\elop the
fairl farm. the mnst important and
the nos.t A.rmerican of all our institu-
[ion-, for our greatn-. as a people
r-sta in no small dIgree upon the
fact that instead of having her,- in
th- cio.untrr dlistrict- a populati-,n if
peasants on minute hliling-. or else
nf tenants who '.ork fo-r large. lantl-
owners. "we have e,.ery''h-r,. as the
r',p.-al An.mrican farm. a mi,-Jum-
si;.:. farm. liil-d ma.niri or in large
part i.y the si nr..-r himin eli arnd his
sons.
But not, that the more dle.sirable
.reas of roujr puh. In land hav.: b-en
settled. the homestead law do,-en not
nme.r th.. ne\ conllit;:llii- and wi, ad-
he-re best to its spirit v.h,in we try to
nmod'.f the system of land ,wnerslhipp
in such a %'a,. as to: insure cointinu-ous
progress and uplift, so that thle
American farm-r may not .:nly ,t.-
tai n atrial prosperity. bur on it
build a high tpe- of civilization Im-
portant the cit.' is. and f.,rt.inst.-
tho it is that our cities lha e grown. l
as the- liha,, dlne. it is still more im-
portant that the family farn, i'*he-i r
the home-making and th.- outdoor
ibusine,- ar ,: combl-ined into .1 unit.
should continue to grow. In every
+ great crisis; of our Go,-rn meant. and
in all the slow. steady, work between
the ,'ris's v which alone enables us to
nl.,-t them i'h-n they do arise, it
i, th.: farniin foli;. the people of
Sthel cuiintr' districts, who have shown
rt.-rnis:-lves to be the backbone of the
Na tion
Farming of the Future
Now, Wvhen I ask that the Nation
co-operate with the States and with
the farmers themselves for the steady
growth and uplift of farm life, I am


not so much asking that th ate fath the m,.;ther. and the children shall fit the ordinary scholar for the
help the people as I an that b,~hal .beter opportunities for useful work actual work of life. Therefore I be-
provide free opportunity for', e pe nd fo. a happy life than any other lieve that the National Government
ple to continue their Llp.var1 cou e occupation. Our object must be so should take an active part in secur-
thru self-help and 'aisociiatod eort. far, practicable to do away with ing better educational methods, in
The farms of Ameri.,t ate .'brth tnd disadvantag-.s which are due to accordance with some such system as
some thirty billions .of doffki,. and the i.lati-.n .o the family farm, that outlined in the bill introduced in
their annual produce amnldnts to while conser.ing its many and great the last Congress by Mr Davis.
about eight billion.. For this pres- advantages. It is not my place to speak of the
ent year, 1908, the crops as a whole We wish to keep at its highest point details of such a bill, but in a gen-
do promise the largest aggregate in the peculiarly American quality of eral way I feel that the Nation
quantity, quality, and value ever pro- individual efficiency, while at the should, by making appropriations,
duced in our history. This means same time bringing about that co- put a premium upon industrial, and
that the six millions and over of operation which indicates capacity especially agricultural, training in
farm families, more than thirty mil- in the mass. Both qualities can be the State schools; the States them-
lions of farm people, are in a good used to increase the industrial and selves being required in these schools
position already; but I wish this po- ethical proficiency of our people, for to contribute what is necessary for
sition to be made sure and better, ther.. Is much the individual can only the ordinary training, and the expen-
The farm no longer produces the do for himself, and there is much ditures for the National Government
domestic manufactures of two gener- also which must he done bv all com- to bh under the supervision of t-e
ations ago, but merely the rai. prod- bii.ld r...cau-'e th indi-dual cannt Department of Agriculture
ucts of foo.,d and clothing. for the do it. Our aim mu.t be to suppl- D
great impronvemn.nts in agriculturai mnt-nt indi'ivlualisnm on t(- li farm andn Dais Bil Faioed
prroduct.ion and ;n transp-ortaton in the home v.\ilt an a'-ociated ei- Teachers must be trained, or thrir
ha.v rendered it possible f'..r one: man fort in thos.- country matters that re- teaching \,iil n.-t ..e adequate. and
on the farm no\w [r produce food and quiret organized '\ working tog-ther. these teachers must then give \'oci-
l:clonal training to the scholars in the
,t ethig f t ..hre, to phr,:am sh rnrla ountri Homes or' Cit y onrkers ordnar:, schools The Natlon v wouldd
ifet f.ir thems al a third Tn-, ore~o\er, \e mlus~ t not forget that imrply co-operatre with te Stat.i or
ith r. im.- nti th ,..r is a newt phas,-e f the problem it, o r town, and what it thu' gi es
.lil- h ocr, ripr-.e t nt a n incre and o the countrN, which i- th.: lpro*ril-m \oul,-i h,- applied to industrial. tech-
liue-tr of prJeopctnl are inerea.-,.d i of country homes fIor city \.urkers ni.al. agricultural training
work in other fa-hio,, for tlh. buidf Cheap tran p'rtaL .. nWhtnicl h The grov.th in the conEolidit..d-
nrk up of the permanent fr health f strengthencl- s. mlch the e-d nc rural scho-ol, which has in mn.ry
a o usp anf fth .r ae iane, t '- dai-h I ci, gro 't lli. Is no\ helping to in.tance- supplanted the old-lime dis-
all ..t us.n. anrl meegr t it e dtti el e' scatt.r the population of[ larg,- ct- trict school, offers the chance to dp
wal- nd e pirg n: rising all intele- t.r hion, purposes thru the adjacent trn best possible s. rvicp b,' mnans or
_nd pir ,,,untry. As come, nearer the su.:h a -ss-tenm as that outlined atlr,.e.
Farmns Otizenbhip health:. ida *:.f a universal right- Wheret p,,sir,ie. the secondary agri-
n..ur i i. and a ,ic r assocsationr cultural schloolF should he in farm
It wO:ui-i be a .era. great wrong to be-teen empl:-, .r and emplo:;,,.e. ,, communities rather than In towvns.
allo... our ,counitr. peop-le, *.hiho hae there will be gro.%th in tihe oppror- and the training should 'he of the
prospered so much, w\lhoe welfare unit. .,r ,:.t, ., -1.1, to enjoiC, ub- most practical character and such is
ha mIeint s-o nmu.h for the Nation in urban homes. will not nly fit the sehorrar to do
.I-*' S r ifI --v ... o.- ...... i ; --. 5'>" N ,, -,, =iv, _. ;: r I:- .,,t .,: &- ...... ^.,;,, .'-,,r:... "
their ,ornmer lposit(ion.. There ; Ther-etore \w hae to deal now a n' them to enjo, in the .fullest degree
peed whateverr fo.r this happening. ,ve v:ill have to deal in the ffiture the measuress .nd opportunities uo
With wise care of our natural re., witrh'a nation of families on the land; country; lrf,. We should do t \ery-
r. o es. our forests; will grd\Y bett, a nd ,ur syilem of pulie e-ducation thing that vce can to give weli-rrnineir
each .,ear. our rivers nmor.- a\ailahl' shoul d be so broadened in its seco.pe lIader; to each country y community.
for naviigation. ..hile the iill of .u as to include not merely the tradl- The Unitcd State- De-partrmnt ,f Ag.
sari, will impr\i-e \itlh viie us, tonal cultural studies, exci-Lent anil riculture wv.uld prrescr\er an intimate
instead of det..riorating. Whil- as indlspensabl,- In their way, but also relaton to. all tnIes proposed agri-
Nation w\- are gr.vr ing wealthier and Instruction relative t, th.- farm. tne cultural high schools. as v.., ll as th-
wealthier, we should see thtt th. trades and the home. branch stations connected .. ith th-m,
ichio,:,-l and the r.-ads-in sli-rt. al' Our immenlc at.. purp..sr i- to t:Ike f.or the work that the Departinen,
.1t what ma" be call,-d the rural the first st eps in pC'roviding for th- dle is .teas.ii! becoming of mor.
realty-should be improved H..re. a ninety-rive per cent who are not novw and mnore i .-.ns-luenc- to [he farm
e.-er',where els.-. our prime objecr traln.d for a location advantag- er rs
shituld h, ,the dei.elopmr.nt- i. bo tho c rrespcnuirg th:. ts en.:ye b, the It A .1 l Praeltival Co-olperation
highest type ,ot a'..rag, citizen relati'.'eiy few \.ho ar-e irain.-i in
Therefore. wer should -p.pe.iaill..J. the pr,-.fessional and Itch'nic,.l All th; .irni lY mn-an 'that rh I Na-
vote ourstel.-t to: the things that ai, scho l-s. t.-rn ..V1,ht ti ... '-op-erate v.Ilh tl-
of interest t., the a e.rag- cit.z,-n Th', Indu-trial training trainir / ir h. Strit, to- h-elp the peorid- help thenm-
country school is therefur,- )f :., ill fit a girl t:. di. urk in th li.' lI-. It th. l, :ho l r, e-t--in I l f i i.
nore itrmiportance ithan tlhe hi'igihei ',il.:h w1ill lit a hb,' t-4 v.,-rl; In th. i, t h
college, t arol: alive .ll nobll h.,p if in a city, to v1. ork hn frrit -d ire. tlr u n -r t cl
be to the ,.it.,li:,ing ,,.ree f Inci i: ..un r.. h i -ple tlhru th- ir local auihc,- iti.:.t
t gh,- h g hl o I, g,. r,-pre.ren I-, '- h 1, im ,,[- ,_a, rd -_r ra o.,_ h,
th hi g r.-prre'n t int of all training aside frnim that rlu '-ugIeslas i n d gr.:,'i ntral ot.=ingir, .
TlIcre mu't b.: Improveenim-it In, rfa n, ricl dev-'elop. ,-hiract, r. an Ir 1 plied b" thu xpertn: ; -plnt t I.- hiip-
manigemEnt: this. i ,:n nro. binb- a gra .e reproach to us as a nation Nit p ,li th- ptie rhpl ve. ry the
Lro.i t al.oul 1.artI r., the that e ha e permniittil e r trrani~ N in .nn- atr girk c ir r i in, ll he
lInt action -.f th.- farmers thei.i t o lead the -hildren aa.a tr-lrii thnm a' girl- *- ha'l*r
seirez. So far it U puo Iaible '- arn and sho, nsta.i f t... r town in th.- cuni tri v ,ni ha.c
"sllould strive tfor a enmmon --.- nseri .. he th '* li:a ,nl f i ll e lih i .: V ..rnl:- tr,
operation in ins:itut;.on w h\i:n shall .. : :bhiain d in \ .-jl nir onlrlun.-
do what tle isolated farrin- carnn, School. 'lu-t Fit rfor Life ties.
v.,ll do b:, theminselv'.. Asa an examnpli We should try to provide: th-= man" Equality in Edcuention
,e can refer to the experiments re- nith training in their prof,-si.,n-'. Tiii v.ul. ni.-rel hI. e putting inr',
on: tly carrilI on. b'v private individ- just as tlh lew. the .1 .: :tor. in- nimn- ei-I.t: tlat ,-al iial A ii. ric nr .J.,-
urlt. and by the, nr tiJnal depart- i-t--rs. tihe IL iwL r. ar.- tr.lne. l for n'I *-* fiirint.-hin a r i.. -.i..,an11i
ni.nt of agriculture, and state tlieir profession e u l. oi 'pi..:.runit of e..l 11 .. r.i r
e pe riment stations, t:o sh l! ex- In .ther w r..'i' the schl.: I l :n i andi chasc,: .or 1.- el.. Ier,[ t,. ai ,our
tr :t.r.linary possibilitie ir Ing should. bhB aimen, prinaril, r-. t r.i,, children. lhere r tlie: i'* :ind
the- reeds of our food-ola sapiP cholur for ic.tual iie rrtit..r that/ ha.:t r iii. i,, t[ -ir ti- n in i' re
..ur animals or a uni',ersit;, S' .: i..ieral co-operAition in tech-
ThOe.er xm rd. :inal indii .,ilal. onr h.: nicil Jeducation ,.I h--lp ,n many
Otercomnic Frm uad. highest culture andi mo.t = ffi. ent :,? it ,ilI n, ain much fir couin-
In all of thi' w.- have to B pIe training p:os hibl. i- an inimportant a;- tr. lif.- f.:r tih iif' of tie family
with one fart Iwhich h h m h set fe en- farm. for th. if.- ..f tho'-. cit;.' '.or -
the strength ani tlie wL. aKness of the ; cour.ag-.i an.)i hi. d-,, .l.:-pnm--nt pr,r,- ers who ,-k land. .1 lihin:.- in the.
American farmer. indl that is. his mot.-;d: but tlii- 'h..ul. ri t Ii..r e I-.:. ou try nriar th- city in v, hl.' they
isolation. This isolation implies a at th:e axp.=n'.= .f all tle oithier In- u -rik It V\.ll n-m in mu'hli along the
lack both of Ithi pl.-asuir andr of th. di.lrldualk- \hr. cain dio. their .a nrk h..t lines of the great, police. of thr- con-
inspiration which Lciori,. fron in--- r -in the farms anl In the \wori shop : 'ervation ,f thii- rural r-es-,iurce
contrrt bet\e,:n pi-.- le nnd fr-nim r l is forr the henrit= .-.f th,.- li- our lanl Fin.rll:,. it :.il nm .an
well-devel p'-p,- orc-an;zat;on ftor sj- lullJ-i th ir .ir .lih,-,.l ,.-n holi uld rmu:hl to thr. N tiaii of th.: iti.ire
clal pleasure. f'.,r rl.-igiou life. ..,:,r b" r prim-triv -hap-.l because it i ill r. pres- nt tr : -ffo.it
education. On tii, other hand. it i I thoroly h. lii,:- h- il' r .-,r p. ..pri, to gi'e exict: ju' .r-. nid an .ilinal
to this isolati'--n mori than to n a r,.,.- iprr.-, i ti- inl,7 r lli.hi Ipati-n: opportunii v lor .io .'-ioprn :nt. ro et -h
thing else that .%\- o.e.' the strength but I ar-r. h.li-v,-e that lh.:.:, :r of the bo;'. and giris who in li.i fu-
of charac-.-r =-. t\r,pi.al ofi thh- Anm r- gr tine m:re .in ri m-.r- t.. I1enina1n ture. are to, naj.l: up the Nation
ican rarmer. w\ho li\es tIn.,.r a pecu- a forr in -,c,:nd.i r.' s hool- '..vhi -h Sincerel :,i. ur'.
liarly' indi 'ldlall-tic s.-t. rn in the -
manag. mi-nt al.-i- l or the farm and
of the farm home Th, sur,:e--efuill
managed t'amiy ,farm gi .:-l ti th.-

(OVER)











What the Davis Bill Is


NATION TO AID PUBLIC SCHOOLS

How the Davis Bill Provides Federal Money to
States That Will Use It for Technical Edu-
cation in High Schools-A Great Plan for
More Useful Training.
By Prof 0. William Burkett
THE DAVIS BILL-H. R. 18204, Sixtieth Con-
gress, provides an appropriation for agricul-
tural and industrial education in secondary
schools; and for branch agricultural experi-
mental stations in the several states and terri-
tories; and for industrial training in normal
-schools.
SI-The Bill Itself: What It Includes
1. Appropriation to begin July 1, 1911.
2. Instruction to be given in agriculture
and home economics in agricultural high
schools of secondary grade.
S3. Instruction to be given in mechanic
arts and home economics in city schools of
secondary grade.
4. Instruction in agriculture, mechanic
arts and home economics in state and territo-
rial normal schools.
5. The federal appropriations are to be
:used for distinctive studies in agriculture,
mechanic arts and home economics in each.
Stype of school and only for these distinctive
,studies.
6. The secretary of agriculture is in-
structed to estimate to congress the allot-
ments to be made to each state and territory,
and to designate to the secretary of the treas-
ury the sum appropriated.
7. The sum for each state and territory to
be derived in this way: (a) Each.incorporated
city, town or village containing not less than
2000 inhabitants shall receive not more than
10 cents per capital of the population. (b)
The total rural, and other population not in-
cluded in said cities, towns and villages, shall
receive also not more than 10 cents per capital.
8. Branch agricultural experimental sta-
tions are to be maintained on the farms of
the agricultural secondary schools, and one-
fourth of the federal appropriation for the
agricultural secondary schools is to be used
Sfor this experiment station.
9. The apppropriation for normal schools
. is to be 1 cent per capital of population.
.. .t. L. To secuV the aprcpropration for the
branch experiment station, each state legisla-
ture must provide for the establishment and
equipment of the branch station, and must
provide, for the annual maintenance, a sum
equal to that granted by the federal govern-
ment.
-1. Experiments undertaken by these
branch experiment stations shall bear directly
upon the agricultural industry of the United


Fig 1-Showing the 132 one-room rural
Schools in Hardin county, Ia. Some are really
good schools, some are poor, some are extremely
inferior. None of them are graded schools, none
so well equipped with teachers, apparatus, build-
ing, land or garden such as the consolidated rural
school enjoys.

States with due regard to the varying needs
and conditions of the respective states.
12. The secretary of agriculture is re-
quired to see that funds are not side-tracked,
but used to best advantage for the promotion
of both instruction and experimentation.
13. Each state is required to establish
combined agricultural secondary school and
branch experimental station districts; and
there is not to be less than one district for
each fifteen counties, nor more than one for
each five counties.
14. Separate schools for colored people
may be established as each state decides, fair
division of money being made to both races.
\15. An annual report must go to the gov-
ernor of each state from each school estab-
lished under this grant.
16. The secretary of agriculture is to
keep congress posted in regard to receipts and
expenditures and on the work of the institu-
tions provided for under this bill.


II-Arguments Used Against the Bill
1. Smac k of ,paternalism, as by it the
entire educational system is apparently cen-
tralized in the federal government Not so;
the bill reaii.' decentralizes. By building up


Fig 2--Sh:i-'ing a plan for redistricting Hardin
county, Ia. f-.r con'solldati.d rural schools.
About 20 conso:lidated rural clhooils 'will replace
the 132 one-r.orn schools. The plan contemplates
districts abo.it f e miles s.u.are. and that teams
paid for by public funds shall haul the pupils to
and from schr.7is More pupils 'will be hauled
from the llag- eho,.ois than no'w. In the few
instances where practicable, trains and trolley
lines will be utilized instead of teams.

educational work through the individual
states, the states themselves are strengthened.
The public schools continue wholly under local
control, simply receiving aid for. industrial
education.
2. Why should the federal government do
what the individual states should do? So that
a uniform system of industrial or vocational
education can be had. Leave it to the states
and the work will not be done. Has it been
done yet? Haven't people demanded this edu-
cation for half a century?
3. Will not the use of federal money tend
to retard activity along educational lines in
the states? It didn't do so in the case of the
original land giants. For. every dollar of fed-
eral money, 5 rt.ate dollars have been appro-
priated.
4. Is congress not already doing too much
for the people of the' states? Precious little
for education For every dollar now appro-
priated for agriculure,. twenty dollars goes to
army and navy alone.
5. The bill is unconstitutional. It is
framed on the same lines as the Morrill act,
and no one questions that No cause to worry
about this point. It will never be raised if
the bill passes; but if anyone w ishes to test it,
the supreme court has that to decide.


Fig 3-A typical district for a consolidated
rural school at its center. It is about five miles
squar.- Cni'itains 1U0 firm homes and th.= c~:,o.d
c.,:n-.idiatdl -.|in--.-l takes Lia praise' of =ix p.',..,'.r
on.--ri .nm sch .:.':ls Y.' t tlh.: routes t, t.ll. ci- r 'd
scn.:,-,! ar :i. rrlat, Y sh,-',rt Ex. ri .-n' nro'.-s
that by t i.ii plan ea:ch child In t comal init:,
malv enio:y all tlrf- advanitaes 't .h f c rad.-d
ceh...is hp oand irdinchiding th inn grad, TIn,
t.rn.lt-ncy -'tf thesee, od scho i f l n t ri'ar-
ti'.: firm. hh., nome, the s nt.f awny frnm
tiiria Tile graduate nmae.a on it Ilp = icr;c ol-
t.ral li t h-l eoo theolP d ha e tb o aki:g,
o r iin i- r i' r I ,.. ...

6 A io,-a] sentiment is T sary itf ibese
schools are to be built up. If the local senti-
ment is present. then local means for roca-
tional training will be forthcoming. What
does the work in Georgia, Minnesota, and
some other states in4site if not this? At
present, however, thle movement for the indus-
trial and technical, education is sporadic; nor
will it go far unless some centralized force is
back of it. The people have long been asking
for educational d elp. They want better
schools; they waon.their vocation considered
in education; the'-want justice to be given
their occupation and the proper respect and
dignity accorded to the Industries of the na-
tion in the instruction of their children.

m--Why the Iill Should Pass
1. There is nofhlqg revolutionary about
this kind of education. In England, France,


Germany, Belgium and Holland the federal
government contributes toward industrial and
technical education. France, for more than a
hundred years, has had agriculture taught in
her secondary schools.
2. This country is far behind other coun-
tries in industrial education. The salvation
of this country is dependent upon either the
state or the federal government, vitalizing,
expanding, and developing technical and in-
dustrial education.
3. The country needs schools as provided
for by the Davis bill. The great crying need


Fig 4-Plan of consolidated rural school
grounds. A serviceable and pretty school building,
a capacious play ground, wild garden for study
of native plants, space for trees, a kitchen .gar-
den to be tended by pupils, the schoolmaster's
cottage and lawn, barn and sheds for the five-
acre farmstead. Four acres at rear, not shown
in cut, for experiment, demonstration, practice,
instruction, etc.

today is education for efficiency, along with
culture and academic knowledge. To supply
this need, teachers must be trained, and the
Davis bill provides the funds for so enlarging
the number and facilities of normal schools,
that the needed teachers may be promptly.
available. Indeed, they can be trained while
the work of getting ready th' high schools,
is going forward.
4. The government should aid and provide
a national s.stIem of edijuatiCon. The Davis bill
..dcVs juit thil thibg. 14 establishe.a nSwlional
'i](\ vit lh r>,ference to ,secondary ediu action
something altogether out of the question for
individual states to do. The value of the hbli
does not rest upon the amount of nioney
appropriated, nor upon the several features
of the bill. The general educational policy,
inaugurated is the marked and peculiarly
great end accomplished.
5. Nor is a new policy inaugurated. The
Morrill act of '62, the Morrill act of '90, the
Nelson act of '07, together with the experi-
ment station enactments-Hatch act of '88
and Adams act of '06-all antedate this bill,
placing the Davis bill in conformity with,
and in continuation of previous legislation.
As a result of the legislation already maade,
we have a national policy in higher educa-
tion. Now there is need of a national policy
of secondary education.
6. The bill specifies as to the nature of the
education. The principle that man should be
educated by a study of the subjects ,ron:cerned
in his occupation was established long ago.
Harvard college was founded to make clergy-
men-a vocational school from the beginning.
The colleges-law, medicine, theology, engi-
nieriig-iio- are professional and vocational
in nature. Technical high schools are con-
sistent with both the old and,the new ideas
in education.
7. Decentralization of power, and not cen-
tralization of national power, will result
through this proposed legislation. The entire
expense involved in the Davis bill is no more
than the cost of a battle ship. Is there any
comparison of the good that will be done
with the one extra battle ship, and the good
to the country if its youth be properly edu-
cated? The money invested in a battle ship
is really an instrument of centralization, for
the battle ship is in the hands of congress
and the president, but in schools it will be
scattered over the land and under local
control.
8. The Davis bill will quickly give the
country this wished-for and longed-for educa-
tion. (The few opponents of the bill in con-
gress favor the nature of the education, bdt
object to congress inaugurating it.) Dr Fel-
lows says: "It will take a century to other-
wise accomplish throughout the country what
may be thoroughly established in five years
by means of the assistance proposed in the
Davis bill."
(OVER)




Full Text







What the Davis Bill Is


NATION TO AID PUBLIC SCHOOLS

How the Davis Bill Provides Federal Money to
States That Will Use It for Technical Edu-
cation in High Schools-A Great Plan for'
More Useful Training.
By Prof C. William Burkett
THE DAVIS BILL-H. R. 18204, Sixtieth Con-
gress, provides an appropriation for agricul-
tural and industrial education in secondary
schools; and for branch agricultural experi-
mental stations in the several states and terri-
tories; and for industrial training in normal
Schools.
I-The Bill Itself: What It Includes
1. Appropriation to begin July 1, 1911.
2. Instruction to be given in agriculture
and home economics in agricultural high
schools of secondary grade.
3. Instruction to be given in mechanic
arts and home economics in city schools of
secondary grade.
4. Instruction in agriculture, mechanic
arts and home economics in state and territo-
rial normal schools.
5. The federal appropriations are to be
used for distinctive studies in agriculture,
mechanic arts and home economics in each
type of school and only for these distinctive
studies.
6. The secretary of agriculture is in-
structed to estimate to congress the allot-
ments to be made to each state and territory,
and to designate to the secretary of the treas-
ury the sum appropriated.
S 7. The sum for each state and territory to
be derived in this way: (a) Each.incorporated
city, town or village containing not less than
S 2000 inhabitants shall receive not more than
10 cents per capital of the population. (b)
The total rural, and other population not in-
cluded in said cities, towns and villages, shall
receive also not more than 10 cents per capital.
8. Branch agricultural experimental sta-
tions are to be maintained on the farms of
the agricultural secondary schools, and one-
fourth of the federal appropriation for the
agricultural secondary schools is to be used
for this experiment station.
9. The appropriation for normal schools
Sis-to be 1 cent per capital of population.
S4... ... To secure the appropriation for -he
branch experiment station, each state legisla-
ture must provide for the establishment and
equipment of the branch station, and must
provide, for the annual maintenance, a sum
equal to that granted by the federal govern-
ment.
11. Experiments undertaken by these
branch experiment stations shall bear directly
upon the agricultural industry of the United


' Fig 1-Showing the 132 one-room rural
schools in Hardin county, Ia. Some are really
good schools, some are poor, some are extremely
inferior. None of them are graded schools, none
so well equipped with teachers, apparatus, build-
ing, land or garden such as the consolidated rural
school enjoys.

States with due regard to the varying needs
and conditions of the respective states.
12. The secretary of agriculture is re-
quired to see that funds are not side-tracked,
but used to best advantage for the promotion
of both instruction and experimentation.
13. Each state is required to establish
combined agricultural secondary school and
branch experimental station districts; and
there is not to be less than one district for
each fifteen counties, nor more than one for
each five counties.
14. Separate schools for colored people
may be established as each state decides, fair
division of money being made to both races.
\15. An annual report must go to the gov-
ernor of each state from each school estab-
lished under this grant.
16. The secretary of agriculture is to
keep congress posted in regard to receipts and
expenditures and on the work of the institu-
tions provided for under this bill.


II-Arguments Used Against the Bill
1. Smacks of paternalism, as by it the
entire educational 'system is apparently cen-
tralized in the federal government. Not so;
the bill really decentralizes. By building up


Fig 2-Showing a plan for redistricting Hardin
county, la, for consolidated rural schools.
About 20 consolidated rural schools will replace
the 132 one-room schools./ The plan contemplates
districts about five miles square, and that teams
paid for by public funds shall haul the pupils to
and from schools. More pupils will be hauled
from the village schools than now. In the few
instances where practicable, trains and trolley
lines will be utilized instead of teams.

educational work through the individual
states, the states themselves are strengthened.
The public schools continue wholly under local
control, simply receiving aid for industrial
education.
2. Why should the federal government do
what the individual states should do? So that
a uniform system of industrial or vocational
education can be had. Leave it to the states
and the work will not be done. Has it been
done yet? Haven't people demanded this edu-
cation for half a century?
3. Will not the use of federal money tend
to retard activity along educational lines in
the states? It didn't do so in the case of the
original land giants. For every dollar of fed-
eral money, 25 state dollars have been appro-
priated. '11 r "
4. Is congress not already doing too much
for the people of the' states? Precious little
for education. For every dollar now appro-
priated for agriculture, twenty dollars goes to
army and navy alone.
5. The bill is unconstitutional. It is
framed on the same lines as the Morrill act,
and no one questions that. No cause to worry
about this point. It will never be raised if
the bill passes; but if anyone wishes to test it,
the supreme court has that to decide.


Fig 3-A typical district for a consolidated
rural school at its center. It is about five miles
square, contains 100 farm homes, and the good
consolidated school takes the place of six poor
one-room schools. Yet the routes to the good
school are all relatively short. Ex erience proves
that by this plan each child in aa 1l community
may enjoy all t4fe advantages of.,t best graded
schools up to and including th grade. The
tendency of these good scho ri 1 be toward
the farm, the home, the sa ,I n away from
them. The graduate mae on the agricul-
tural high school, thencj del ) to college
or university.

6. A local sentiment is a sary if these
schools are to be built up. If the local senti-
ment is present, then local means for voca-
tional training will be forthcoming. What
does the work in Georgia, Minnesota, and
some other states iiadeate if not this? At
present, however, t)e movement for the indus-
trial and technical,/education is sporadic; nor
will it go far unless some centralized force is
back of it. The people have long been asking
for educational help. They want better
schools; they wanttheir vocation considered
in education; the- want justice to be given
their occupation and the proper respect and
dignity accorded to the industries of the na-
tion in the instruction of their children.

III-Why the Bill Should Pass
1. There is nothing revolutionary about
this kind of education. In England, France,


Germany, Belgium and Holland the federal
government contributes toward industrial and
technical education. France, for more than a
hundred years, has had agriculture taught in
her secondary schools.
2. This country is far behind other coun-
tries in industrial education. The salvation
of this country is dependent upon either the
state or the federal government, vitalizing,
expanding, and developing technical and in-
dustrial education.
3. The country needs schools as provided
for by the Davis bill. The great crying need


Fig 4-Plan of consolidated rural school
grounds. A serviceable and pretty school building.
a capacious play ground, wild garden for study
of native plants, space for trees, a kitchen .gar-
den to be tended by pupils, the schoolmaster's
cottage and lawn, barn and sheds for the five-
acre farmstead. Four acres at rear, not shown
in cut, for experiment, demonstration, practice,
instruction, etc.

today is education for efficiency, along with
culture and academic knowledge. To supply
this need, teachers must be trained, and the
Davis bill provides the funds for so enlarging
the number and facilities of normal schools,
that the needed teachers may be promptly
available. Indeed, they can be trained while
the work of getting ready the high schools
is going forward.
4. The government should aid and provide
a national system of education. The Davis bill
ados just this thiog. IS established a .national
policy with reference to secondary education,
something altogether out of the question for
individual states to do. The value of the bill
does not rest upon the amount of money
appropriated, nor upon the several features
of the bill. The general educational policy
inaugurated is the marked and peculiarly
great end accomplished.
5. Nor is a new policy inaugurated. The
Morrill act of '62, the Morrill act of '90, the
Nelson act of '07, together with the experi-
ment station enactments-Hatch act of '88
and Adams act of '06-all antedate this bill,
placing the Davis bill in conformity with,
and in continuation of previous legislation.
As a result of the legislation already made,
we have a national policy in higher educa-
tion. Now there is need of a national policy
of secondary education.
6. The bill specifies as to the nature of the
education. The principle that man should be
educated by a study of the subjects concerned
in his occupation was established long ago.
Harvard college was founded to make clergy-
men-a vocational school from the beginning.
The colleges-law, medicine, theology, engi-
neering-now are professional and vocational
in nature. Technical high schools are con-
sistent with both the old and the new ideas
in education.
7. Decentralization of power, and not cen-
tralization of national power, will result
through this proposed legislation. The entire
expense involved in the Davis bill is no more
than the cost of a battle ship. Is there any
comparison of the good that will be done
with the one extra battle ship, and the good
to the country if its youth be properly edu-
cated? The money invested in a battle ship
is really an instrument of centralization, for
the battle ship is in the hands of congress
and the president, but in schools it will be
scattered over the land and under local
control.
8. The Davis bill will quickly give the
country this wished-for and longed-for educa-
tion. (The few opponents of the bill in con-
gress favor the nature of the education, but
object to congress inaugurating it.) Dr Fel-
lows says: "It will take a century to other-
wise accomplish throughout the country what
may be thoroughly established in five years
by means of the assistance proposed in the
Davis bill."


(OVER)


--r ...




xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E8AJR0051_WHPWT3 INGEST_TIME 2012-09-13T18:02:53Z PACKAGE AA00000206_00078
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES